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Give Me a Sword
When the going gets tough, both The Horde and The Alliance would rather fight side by side with the enemies they know.

A horse! A horse! My kingdom for a horse!
Richard III Act V, scene iv

An unarmed character faces a fight. Another character must give him a sword or other weapon, or something such as a horse needed to enable him to fight.

Wrecked Weapon may lead to this, or having a sword jam in the wound so the character can't pull it free.

It's often a tribute to the fighting skill of the unarmed man or Fire Forged Friendship of the one who gives it — especially if he does not use the Stock Phrase but the other characters do so anyway, or someone else says "Give him your sword." Location may also be significant — throwing a sword to a man who is toe-to-toe with the monster is only prudent (and avoids Throwing Your Sword Always Works). Of course, failure to do that get the inverse effect, which may shade into The Dog Bites Back, if a Mook refuses to give the Big Bad something without which he is powerless and helpless.

Unlike It Was a Gift, this is temporary, especially for the Cool Sword and other weapons not easily replaced. Expect the character to return the weapon after the fight, with thanks. If he is then told to keep the weapon, it transformed into It Was a Gift as well; it is a particularly strong tribute, particularly with the Cool Sword or other unusual weapons.

Will certainly occur if needed for Combat by Champion. May occur for Duel to the Death, though other character may defuse that one.

Examples

    open/close all folders 

     Anime and Manga  
  • Mazinger Z: In Mazinger-Z vs Great General of Darkness -the movie retold the last chapter of Mazinger Z in a severely improved way, closing off the original series and kicking off the sequel, Great Mazinger-, Kouji has been defeated by the Mykene War Beasts, his Humongous Mecha is utterly trashed, it barely functions, and its weapons are useless. Then Tetsuya shows up piloting Great Mazinger, and as he begins to deliver a sound beating, he throws one of his swords at Mazinger-Z saying "You can use this" (and conveniently and intentionally impaling a Warbeast). Kouji catches the sword, and even though his Humongous Mecha is barely capable to move, he still manage to destroy one of the Mykene War Beasts, and he impales the Mykene commander was leading the squad. The sword was returned to Great Mazinger afterwards, along a heartfelt "Thank you".
  • In The Familiar of Zero, Saito's first combat experience is a duel with a student mage (and noble) who forges him a sword on the spot. After beating Saito to a pulp.
  • This happens at least once in Naruto. In the Land of Waves arc, Zabuza asks for a kunai from Naruto, which he catches in his teeth and uses to behead the villain.
  • In the One Piece Arlong park arc, Zoro is two swords short of his usual three, and therefore unable to fight effectively. The gaping hole in his chest doesn't help either, but the POINT is, that when faced with Hachi's six sword style, he says screw it, and asks for his old friends Johnny and Yosaku's swords. They throw them without hesitation, then freak out when Zoro doesn't seem to be looking at the SPINNING SWORDS OF DOOM heading toward him. But that's only cause he's being extra badass, and catches the sword without looking, and swings immediately into an attack that dodges all six swords and slashes the octo-man's chest.
  • In Berserk, Guts's sword is broken while fighting General Vascogne. Zodd appears and throws his own giant sword into the middle of the duel, which Guts then picks up and uses to win the fight.
  • Inverted in Corsair, when Shirokko challenges Canale to a duel, something which Canale has refused many times before. This time his lover Ayace throws his own sword at him and tells him he has to fight.
  • Played for laughs in Bobobo-bo Bo-bobo. Bobobo's allies want to hand him some weapons to aid him in the fight with the Arc Villain. The battle is taking place in mid-air, so they use a cannon to launch spears, swords, and other sharp weapons up to him. Not surprisingly, Bobobo catches none of them and is instead pierced by most of them. The next weapon they launch is a two-story house. That hits him too.
  • In the anime adaptation of Tales of the Abyss, Luke throws Asch his sword after having defeated him in a duel and retrieved the Sword of Lorelei from him so Asch can pull a You Shall Not Pass against the Big Bad's mooks while Luke escapes. The same scene in the original video game did not include that detail, which in the end it doesn't matter — both the original and adaptation sees Asch die in the process.

    Film 
  • In Gladiator, Maximus disarms Commodus in the arena, and Commodus immediately starts demanding one of the surrounding Praetorian Guards to give him a sword. If he hadn't recently and publicly dishonored his own royal guards, they might have given him one. In contrast, Juba had previously thrown Maximus a sword when he didn't ask for one.
  • The Golden Voyage of Sinbad. Occurs twice at the beginning of the fight with the statue of the Hindu goddess Kali. First Sinbad throws Prince Koura a sword so Sinbad can duel him, then Koura throws the sword to Kali. After Kali snatches it out of the air she "grows" another sword in each of her other five hands.
  • In Baz Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet, a Setting Update that uses the original dialogue, Capulet's "Fetch me my longsword!" moment involves a Longsword-brand shotgun.
  • The Four Musketeers, during the duel in the flaming side-building of the convent from which the heroes are attempting to rescue Constance. Porthos just yells "Sword! Sword!", but Aramis does comply.
  • In Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls Ace gets a spear thrown into his leg while fighting a tribal native. He shouts for his sidekick to throw him a spear, which he does... stabbing him in the other leg.
  • Mister Arrow (Sam the Eagle) rushes to provide Captain Smollett (Kermit the Frog) with a sword in Muppet Treasure Island.
  • Done with shields in the duel scene in The 13th Warrior. Each combatant is given three shields to use. When a shield is broken, fighting stops so that the combatant can retrieve his next one. It's a foregone conclusion that once you're out of shields, you're doomed, but it turns out that the older, smaller Viking didn't even need a shield to win at any time.
  • In The Vikings, Ragnar is thrown into a pit of wolves. If he doesn't die with a sword in his hand, he won't go to Valhalla. Eric defies the villain by throwing him one, and has his hand cut off as punishment.
  • Happens repeatedly in one battle in Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest. Elizabeth, Pintel, and Regetti have, between them, two swords and the eponymous chest and they're being chased by Davy Jones's men. In the running melee, they keep tossing each other the swords and taking turns running with the chest.
  • In Lethal Weapon, during Riggs' fight with Mr. Joshua, Mr. Joshua grabs a metal pole and begins swinging at Riggs. Murtaugh then tosses Riggs a nightstick so that he has a fighting chance again.
  • Subverted in Wyatt Earp. A prisoner, faced with a lynch mob, screams at his jailer to give him a gun so he could defend himself. The jailer, Wyatt Earp, tells him that if he doesn't shut up he will give him over. Then he walks out and talks the mob down.
  • In the original Clash of the Titans, one of Perseus' friends tosses him his sword so he can fight off a giant scorpion.
  • In Night at the Museum: Battle for the Smithsonian, Octavius throws Jedediah his sword, with the traditional (though more literal than usual) "You have my sword". Then calls out "Sword!" and is tossed one of his underlings' swords.
  • In The Thief of Bagdad, Ahmad says "Give me a sword!" in Basra so that he can fight Grand Vizier Jaffar who has usurped him, but not only does nobody give him a sword, he's blinded by a magic spell and his friend Abu the Thief is turned into a dog.
  • Two examples from John Wayne films:
    • In Rio Bravo, there is an exciting moment when the bad guys have John T. Chance (Wayne) where they want him in front of a saloon, but then suddenly Feathers (Angie Dickinson) throws a plant pot through the window and simultaneously Colorado (Ricky Nelson) throws a rifle to him.
    • In The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance Tom Doniphon (Wayne) silently signals to Pompey (Woody Strode) to throw him the rifle as they watch the showdown between Liberty Valance and Ransom Stoddard.
  • Star Wars
    • In Return of the Jedi, Luke, Han, and Chewbacca are sentenced to a long and painful death by being forced to jump into a Sarlacc's pit. Luke signals to R2, who is on a gliding barge several hundred yards away, to get his lightsaber ready. Luke then steps off the plank, grabs it, uses it to launch himself in the air while R2 shoots his lightsaber to to him, catches the lightsaber, does a front flip, and begins to kick ass.
    • In Attack of the Clones Obi-Wan's lightsaber has been taken away and Anakin's has been destroyed. When a number of Jedi arrive at the Geonosian arena to stop their execution, two Jedi throw them a pair of spare lightsabers. Anakin's borrowed saber is eventually destroyed (again) but we can assume Obi-Wan gives his back.
  • In In Bruges, Ken, in a tower, arms his friend Ray, at street level, with a pistol by throwing himself out the window. Of course, after impact the pistol is a pile of rubbish. Ken's near-last words: "Okay I think you're gonna die now."
  • In ¡Three Amigos!, Ned Nederlander is forced to demonstrate his movie-star gunfighting for real by dueling a German pilot. One of the banditos gives him a (very heavy) gun to do it with - and despite the added weight, Ned wins.
  • In The Quick and the Dead, Cort has to call desperately for a bullet after his first shot fails to kill Spotted Horse. (He was only allowed one bullet per duel so he wouldn't be tempted to try to shoot his way out.) The only one willing to help is a blind kid who has to find the right caliber by feel from a boxful of ammo before tossing it to him.
  • Planet Terror: "Give him the gun. Give him all the guns."
  • Spoofed in a deleted scene in Mr. and Mrs. Smith where Jane Smith says she's run out of ammo in the middle of the department store shootout. John Smith throws her a weapon...which bounces off her back, causing Jane to roll her eyes in exasperation.
  • In the climactic duel of For a Few Dollars More, Indio has shot the long-barreled revolver out of Colonel Mortimer's hand, and wants an unfair duel: Indio clearing leather versus Mortimer bending over to get his weapon off the ground. Manco intervenes, providing Mortimer with a fast-draw revolver, belt, and holster for a much fairer fight.

    Literature 
  • In The King Must Die, when Theseus is fighting a duel, his spear breaks, and his men throw their spears about him so he can pick one from the ground. His foe did not get such treatment when his weapon broke.
  • In Piers Anthony's Centaur Aisle, the king demands a sword to fight his Evil Uncle; this is shot down because on one hand, the sword is magical giving him an unfair advantage, and on the other hand, if the magic is not used, the king is wounded and so his uncle has an unfair advantage.
  • In James Swallow's Warhammer 40,000 Blood Angels novel Deus Sanguinius, when Mephiston let Rafen act as the Blood Angels' champion, he ordered a sergeant to give Rafen his sword. Later, he orders that Rafen be given a jump pack so he can pursue his foe.
    • In Red Fury, when Rafen has his back to the Tomb of Sanguinius, and has pierced one heart of the Blood Fiend trying to desecrate it, Mephiston throws him his Cool Sword so that Rafen can get its other heart.
  • Happens with Cohen the Barbarian and Twoflower the tourist at the end of Terry Pratchett's Interesting Times. Twoflower has no chance to win against the Big Bad of the story either way of course, but Cohen gives him a sword anyway as a sign that he takes his wish to fight him seriously.
  • In Dan Abnett's Warhammer 40,000 Gaunt's Ghosts novel Blood Pact, Wes Maggs asks this, repeatedly. Unfortunately, while delirious he had attacked the prisoner they were protecting and Gaunt's not sure he can trust him. He ends up taking a gun from a downed foe, and Gaunt does not object.
  • In Dune, when Paul challenges Feyd Harkonnen, the emperor offers his own sword to the latter, who readily accepts.
  • In Andre Norton's The Prince Commands, Michael loses his horse in battle and asks for another; an officer immediately orders for a horse for His Highness.
  • The Lies of Locke Lamora: After Locke convinces the Spider to let him go so he can fight the Grey King, the Spider's lieutenant hands him a sword and says, "Get it wet. With my compliments."
  • An interesting variant occurs in the Nibelungenlied. Hagen von Tronje, a heroic/villainous knight trapped in a building with his fellow nobles and warriors, faces the hero Rüdiger von Bechlarn, whom he has previously sworn friendship to (they are forced to fight by a code of honor and oaths). Hagen requests a shield, as his is broken, and Rüdiger offers his.
    • This enables Rüdiger to fulfill his duties as Etzel's vassal (his liege has ordered him to attack Hagen and co.) without completely breaking his oath of friendship to the Nibelungs — he is giving one of them material aid. And so it is significant that Hagen asks Rüdiger for a shield rather than just picking up one of the dozens lying on the ground.
  • In Mort, Death's servant Albert goes back to the Unseen University, and starts acting like a Bad Boss. When Death comes to take him back he hisses to the cowardly Rincewind for his staff, but Rincewind doesn't give it. The other wizards praise him afterwards, until Rincewind admits he couldn't find the staff. The Librarian makes it clear he took it, with an 'ook'.
  • In A Song of Ice and Fire Jaime recalls how Ser Arthur Dayne hacked the Smiling Knight's sword to pieces with his own Thunderbolt Iron blade. Ever chivalrous, Dayne paused and allowed the bandit to retrieve another sword, then killed him.
  • In Night Club from Jiří Kulhánek, one of characters kick sword in middle of fight towards an unarmed companion. His comment goes along the line of, "It's a wonder I don't have it sticked in belly."
  • Near the end of Megan Whalen Turner's The Thief, when Gen parts ways with the magus' party, being pursued on its way back to Sounis by Attolian soldiers, the magus is hurt by Gen's distrust and shouts at him. Gen (the only one not armed and who hid from the last fight up a tree) sighs and tells him, "Leave me a sword, and I'll do my best to slow them down." He regrets it right away, and the magus doesn't take him seriously, since everyone knows he's a Street Urchin. Sophos leaves him his, though, since it's no use to him really. Gen lies in wait on top of a large rock and comes very close to wrecking a whole cavalry unit on his own and getting away with it. We learn later that Gen takes the sword by the blunt part the top of the blade because he swore an oath never to hold a sword by the hilt again unless his life was in danger.
  • In Orson Scott Card's Shadow Giants. At the climax of the novel, Achilles orders Suriyawong to shoot Bean, but Suriyawong merely slides his knife over to Achilles, echoing an earlier scene in the novel when they first met.
  • This is how Annabeth from Percy Jackson and the Olympians got her knife. When Luke and Thalia came across her while going to Camp Halfblood, they let her join in and Luke gave Annabeth a knife to fight off monsters along the way.
  • In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Voldemort takes Lucius Malfoy's wand to fight Harry Potter because Voldemort's own wand is useless against him.
  • In Conan the Magnificent by Robert Jordan, Conan winds up facing the firedrake first. Eldran throws his sword to Conan. Bonus points that Eldran's sword is a magic blade specifically forged to take down the beast. Eldran was on a quest to do exactly that.
  • In The Stormlight Archive, Kaladin and Shallan are trapped in a crevice by a chasmfiend. When Kaladin volunteers to attack and distract it, Shallan summons her Shardblade and offers it to him.
  • At the end of The Aeneid, Turnus takes his charioteer's sword, rather than his father's, by mistake; this means that when he strikes Aeneas' sturdy armour, his sword shatters and, disarmed, he runs around beseeching the Rutulians to provide him with another sword.

     Live Action TV  
  • In the Babylon 5 episode "Infection", Sinclair orders a Security troop to toss him a rifle when he arrives on the scene of a confrontation with the Monster of the Week.
  • In Firefly, Malcolm Reynolds accidentally challenges a nobleman to a duel and has to be provided with a sword… and a crash course in using it.
    Use of a sw- what?
  • Kaizoku Sentai Gokaiger lend each other weapons all the time, but episode 4 takes this up to a whole other level. When Ahim finally comes to understand Joe's desire to take out the Monster of the Week by himself, she shows it by lending him her cutlass so he can use the two sword style he's been practicing. When this turns out to be insufficient, the other three rangers throw him their swords as well.
  • In an episode of Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers Jason and Tommy are tasked with recovering some ancient weapons which are being guarded by Titanus the carried zord. Jason lends Tommy his sword in order to draw Titanus' fire while Jason makes a break for the weapons. In return Tommy lends Jason his armour.
  • Highlander: The Series: In "The Messenger" Richie has been listening to an immortal impersonating Methos, who's telling other immortals to live in peace and put their swords down. He's left his sword behind, and gone to talk to the guy, only to find he's been killed already by the bad guy of the week, Culbraith. Duncan ends up throwing Richie his sword so he can fight Culbraith.
  • Nikita throws a gun to Owen in "Dark Matter", when he runs out of bullets.
  • Angel. Friendly Neighborhood Vampire Angel is confronted by a more powerful vampire, so Cordelia throws Angel a wooden stake. The other vampire catches it. Oops!

    Mythology & Religion 
  • In some versions of the Arthurian legend, the reason Arthur pulls the sword out of the Stone is that Kay had forgotten his and had sent him to fetch one. (The Disney version has young Arthur, who just became Kai's squire, forgetting to bring it along.)
    • In the battle scenes of Thomas Mallory's Mort d'Arthur, it is common for one knight to see another unhorsed, and go strike down another knight so as to bring his horse to the unhorsed one.
  • Older Than Feudalism: There is Hephaestus forging a whole new arsenal for Achilles in The Iliad.
  • And Unferth arming Beowulf with his sword Hrunting before he descends into the lake.
  • Subverted in Norse Mythology. The god Frey possessed a sword capable of fighting on its own and cutting through anything. He gave it to his friend Skirnir however, and when the Apocalypse known as Ragnarok came, Frey lacked a weapon. The fire demon Surtur quickly cut him down.
  • Averted and possibly subverted in The Bible - when David volunteers to fight Goliath, King Saul offers to lend him his own sword and armour. David tries the gear on, concludes that being weighed down like that would just make him a sitting duck for Goliath's sword, and leaves to fight Goliath with just his sling and staff.

    Professional Wrestling 

    Theater 
  • Several Shakespeare plays qualify.
    And another, from the same:
    Tybalt: This, by his voice, should be a Montague,
    Fetch me my rapier, boy. ...
    • Henry IV Part 1: at the battle of Shrewsbury, Prince Hal asks Falstaff to give him his sword, Falstaff refuses and instead throws him a bottle of wine. Hal doesn't take it well.

     Video Games  
  • In Halo 2:
    Master Chief: I need a weapon.
    Sergeant Johnson: Right this way.
  • World of Warcraft: Arthas has Tirion just where he wants him; unfortunately for Arthas, Darion Mograine (who just had a Heel-Face Turn) throws Tirion the corrupted Ashbringer, which he instantly purifies and fights Arthas off with.
    • The image comes fromthe Mists of Pandaria trailer, where a human gives an orc his spare weapon so they can both fight Chen Stormstout (who had just interrupted their own duel).
  • Happens whenever a character with no weapons is recruited mid-chapter in Fire Emblem. It's normally stated to be "spare weaponry"; examples include the generic soldiers giving Lucius a tome of magic/vulnerary, and in the fan-made hack Tactics Universe, in Chapter 7; Siegfried gives out weapons/vulneraries to the prisoners he rescues... even if your weapons are likely to be breaking. With no "spare weapons" being given out. Um.
  • Kirby
    • Played straight in the series when you fight Meta Knight, he will throw you a sword and will not attack until you draw it from the ground. Subverted in Revenge of Meta Knight though, as he will attack after a set period of time. He waits a decent amount of time, considering that the battle takes place on a falling airship. If he waited forever, it'd be suicide.
    • Also happens in Kirby and The Amazing Mirror: after killing Dark Meta Knight, a portal appears and sucks in all four Kirbys. The moment this happens, Meta Knight chucks his sword into the portal, giving you a rather potent weapon to use against the final boss.
    • You can also tell that the Meta Knight you fight in the Radish Ruins is not the real one because he doesn't throw you a sword.
    • In Kirby Super Star Ultra, at the end of Revenge of the King, King Dedede throws Kirby a hammer.
  • In The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, Ganon knocks the Master Sword out of Link's hand during the final battle, and Zelda uses magic to hold Ganon back so that Link can retrieve it. Can be a potential subversion if you did the trader's quest and obtained the Biggoron Sword. Ganon knocks the Master Sword out of Link's hand, but there's nothing stopping him from whipping that out right after. You can also use the Megaton Hammer during this part. However, while the Hammer/Biggoron's Sword will do damage to the boss, only the Master Sword can kill him, leading to a great many to whack on Ganon for a ridiculously long time with the Biggoron's sword, wondering why the hell he wouldn't die, only to fall over dead directly after looking at the Master Sword.
  • Happens in Quest for Glory II: Trial By Fire for Fighter class heroes. Though the Hero can destroy the Earth Elemental via other means (if you can use magic or buy flaming powder), if he aims for Paladin, he can ask Rakeesh for his flaming Cool Sword for the fight (since he can't fight it himself, being injured ; and since a mundane sword won't hurt the thing), and then have A Taste of Power of what it is to wield a Paladin sword. Rendered even more awesome in the game ending, if the Hero actually accumulates enough honorable deeds for Rakeesh to stand witness for the Hero, and bestow him the title of Paladin along with the Cool Sword, combining it with It Was a Gift.
  • Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare features this trope in the last mission. As your entire team lay injured on a wrecked bridge, the Big Bad executing team members as he walks among them, Capt. Price slides his pistol over to you, enabling you to exact vengeance upon your hapless opponent.
    • This is given a continuity nod in Modern Warfare 2, when Capt. Soap MacTavish returns said pistol to Capt. Price five years later.
      Capt. MacTavish: This belongs to you, sir.
    • And again in Modern Warfare 3 when Price lays the same pistol on Soap's chest after he dies.
  • In either Alpha or Original Generation continuities of Super Robot Wars, Sanger Zonvolt flat-out requests the Humongous Mecha-sized Type-3 Colossal Blade be given to him when his Mid-Season Upgrade Super Robot Dygenguard's primary weapons malfunctions.
  • Partially, at the final boss of Kingdom Hearts II. Riku, disabled, passes his keyblade to Sora so that he can deliver a Dual Wielding finishing barrage. And in 358/2 Days, Xion tosses Riku a Keyblade, too. Particularly impressive, as she's technically dead at the time.
  • In Blaze Union, Garlot and Leon reconcile after an intense stint of volatile rivalry when post-battle, Leon demands a horse so that he can rescue his little sister Elena from the clutches of his unsavory former partner Pandra. It marks the beginning of Leon finally being able to acknowledge Garlot and accept that there's Always Someone Better, and Leon joins the party shortly after this incident.
  • In Devil May Cry 4 it's "let me keep this sword;" becoming It Was a Gift at the end. But then there is a family resemblance...
  • In The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind, there is a quest where you visit the shrines of Vivec's virtues. One requires you to reenact a moment when Vivec displayed his courtesy by giving a silver longsword to a Daedra Lord. The other actor in this is a dremora who views the entire thing as demeaning and tedious. He has a chest full of the swords next to him, showing that he has to do this often. He doesn't mind if you take one from the chest and give it to him instead of one brought from the outside.
  • The final mission of the original Homeworld has a particularly epic example: when your fleet is being overwhelmed by the fleet of The Empire, the Rebellion not only pulls a Big Damn Heroes with a sizeable battlegroup, but give you control of half their force.
  • In the PS4 trailer of Warframe one of aforementioned Warframes is about to be killed by the Grineer, but more frames show up and crash the party, partway through the fight, Frost tosses the original one, Excalibur a longsword, who then proceeds to use it to dice up some Grineer.
  • Resident Evil for GameCube, Jill snatches away Barry's gun as she suspects him to be a spy. Then Lisa Trevor comes along, and Barry demands his gun back. Doing so allows him to stall Lisa's approach until you solve a puzzle to defeat her. Otherwise, Barry wil be automatically killed.
  • In Leather Goddesses Of Phobos, the hero fights sword to sword with a villain, disarms him, and has the option to give him his sword back. If he does, the genre-savvy villain realizes he's up against a Hero, and commits suicide.

    Webcomics 

     Western Animation  
  • In the Darkwing Duck episode "Quack of Ages" Darkwing has gone back in time and appears as a knight. In the midst of combat he calls out, "Men, a sword!" — and is promptly buried under a mound of blades, from under which comes a feeble, "Men, a tourniquet."
  • In ReBoot Andraia throws her trident to Matrix when Megabyte doesn't fight fair.
  • In Justice League Unlimited, Batman subverts this trope with Lex Luthor of all people.
    (Batman winds up back to back with Luthor while they are fighting Darkseid's Para-Demons)
    Luthor: Problem?
    Batman: I'm out.
    Luthor: Here, take my extra. (Hands gun over shoulder)
    Batman: Not my style.
    Luthor: Suit yourself — I'm planning to live through this.
  • In The Secret of NIMH, Justin has to fight Jenner, and calls for a sword. He is thrown one by Sullivan, who Jenner then mortally wounds.


Give Me a SignStock PhrasesGive My Regards in the Next World
Girl with Psycho WeaponWeapons and Wielding TropesGood Weapon, Evil Weapon
Gender-Bender FriendshipFriendship TropesGreater Need Than Mine
Flesh GolemImageSource/Video GamesGrim Up North

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