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Trivia / Revenge of the Sith

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  • Acting for Two:
    • As in the previous two films, Ki-Adi Mundi and Nute Gunray are both played by Silas Carson.
    • Temuera Morrison provides the voices for all the clone troopers.
    • Ewan McGregor asked to portray one of the Red Guards flanking Palpatine aside from Obi-Wan, but it is unknown if they granted this wish.
    • The infant Luke and Leia were both played by Aidan Barton.
  • Approval of God: George Lucas approved of every change Matt Stover made in his novel.
  • Billing Displacement:
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    • Despite prominent billing as part of the cast, Christopher Lee is only in the movie for three minutes.
    • Oliver Ford Davies received billing during the Co-Starring section for reprising his role as Sio Bibble, despite only making a non-speaking background cameo during the ending of the film, which is cropped out in the fullscreen version.
    • Ahmed Best is also in the same Co-Starring section despite Jar Jar not having much more screen time and only one brief line.
  • Content Leak: The film was leaked online mere hours before its launch.
  • Corpsing: Ewan McGregor seems to have a hard time holding back a chuckle when he comments on Anakin "killing younglings".
  • Creator's Favorite Episode: Natalie Portman considers this movie her favorite of the three Star Wars movies she was in.
  • Deleted Role:
    • Liam Neeson has said that he recorded a cameo as Qui-Gon Jinn, which was to feature in a scene with Yoda, further explaining the concept of a Jedi communicating from beyond the grave. In the script, the dialogue (in which Qui-Gon is heard, not seen) appeared in the scene, in which Yoda is meditating on the secret asteroid base, just before Bail Organa informs him of Obi-wan's return with Padmé. The scene does not appear in the deleted scenes section of the DVD, but an unfinished version was included in the Blu-ray release box set. Neeson later returned again when this idea was used in The Clone Wars.
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    • Genevieve Oreilly was cast as a young Mon Mothma serving as a senator beside Padme, along with a number of new characters, and they held a couple of meetings to establish official opposition to Palpatines' executive power called the Delegation of 2000. The scenes remained canon but was removed for serving no purpose other than baiting fans with the origins of the Rebellion. O'Reilly was not forgotten, though, and would officially reprise the role in a more substantial form in Rogue One and Andor.
  • Deleted Scene: See here.
  • Descended Creator:
    • Director/writer George Lucas portrays Baron Papanoida.
    • Matthew Wood, a supervising sound editor at Lucasfilm subsidiary Skywalker Sound (where he previously worked on all three installments of the Star Wars prequel trilogy) performs the voice of General Grievous.
  • Dyeing for Your Art: Hayden Christensen gained twenty-four pounds for this movie. He did so by eating six meals a day.
  • Enforced Method Acting:
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    • According to Ross Beadman, who played the Jedi youngling, Hayden Christensen shouted "Boo!" on the set in order to add to his fear. This resulted in his backward stumble.
    • George Lucas intentionally put extra weight into the Darth Vader helmet so that when Hayden Christensen first walks around in the Vader suit, he almost stumbles, since Anakin/Vader's not used to the Vader suit yet. He is also too short to fit in the classic costume (David Prowse was 5 inches taller than Christensen) so they had to build a new one that bumps him up to the appropriate height. He actually saw mostly though the mouth grill rather than the eyes.
  • Kids' Meal Toy: This film had both different toys and watches from Burger King for the theatrical and home video releases. In some parts of Europe, certain toys from the theatrical promotion were offered, while New Zealand offered a different set with only the wind-up Yoda coming from the USA theatrical promotion. The Quick promotion in Belgium had two toys, including a different version of the aforementioned wind-up Yoda toy. Also as a result of the "Sponge-nappings" that occurred during their The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie promotion in 2004, inflatable Darth Vaders attached to the roofs of select restaurants were guarded by Stormtroopers. In a similar vein to the McDonald's Happy Meal promotion for Batman Returns, this promotion was boycotted by parents due to the film's PG-13 rating.
  • Looping Lines: Hayden Christensen and Ewan McGregor had to record grunts for when they were fighting. That's right. Grunts. Christensen came up with an interesting method for doing his- he did push-ups in the recording booth!
  • Missing Trailer Scene: A strange example in which the footage is missing from a movie other than the one being advertised. The Revenge of the Sith teaser trailer has a Framing Device with the events of the prequels getting narrated by footage of Obi-Wan from A New Hope. The trailer uses a close-up shot of Obi-Wan when he says, "For over a thousand generations, the Jedi Knights were the guardians of peace and justice in the Old Republic." In the actual film, this line was spoken in a wide shot. To make the trailer, they actually had to go into the Lucasfilm archives to find that unused clip of Alec Guinness delivering the line in close-up.
  • Name's the Same: The planet Utapau is most likely named for U-Tapao Royal Thai Navy Airfield, which was used as a base by the US Air Force during The Vietnam War.
  • No Stunt Double: Ewan McGregor and Hayden Christensen did their duel themselves. They trained for two months in fencing and fitness in preparation and as a result, the speed in which they engage the duel is the speed in which it was filmed, and was not digitally accelerated.
  • The Original Darrin: An interesting case with Mas Amedda. In The Phantom Menace, which was filmed in England, he was played by Jerome Blake. For Attack of the Clones, which was filmed in Australia, he was played by David Bowers. While Bowers reprised the role for the principal photography in Australia, Blake reprised the role during additional photography in England. Only Bowers was credited for the role, but Blake received a mention in the Special Thanks section.
  • The Other Darrin:
    • Several of the minor characters changed actors from Attack of the Clones. Saesee Tiin went from Jesse Jensen, plus archival footage of Khan Bonfils from The Phantom Menace, to Kenji Oates, Kit Fisto went from Daniel Zizmor and Jesse Jensen's brother Zachariah to Hayden Christensen's stunt double Ben Cooke, Luminara Unduli went from Mary Oyaya to Fay David, Stass Allie went from Lily Nyamwasa to Nina Fallon, Rune Haako went from Alan Ruscoe to Sandy Thompson, and Ask Aak and Passel Argente, who were both played by Steven Boyle, were instead played by Paul Spence and Marty Wetherill, respectively.
    • In the Japanese dub, Takashi Inagaki voices Palpatine due to his previous actor Katsuhiko Kobayashi dying of hepatocellular carcinoma on May 6, 2005.
    • In the previous two installments, the European Spanish dub had given Palpatine two different voice actors, Jordi Dauder for his civilian persona and Joan Massotkleiner for his Sidious visage. In this film, Dauder took over both roles.
  • Preview Piggybacking: The final trailer of Fantastic Four (2005) was attached to many United States screenings since both films are distributed by Fox.
  • Real Life Writes the Hairstyle:
    • Obi-Wan Kenobi's hairstyle was deliberately cut shorter than it was in Attack of the Clones due to Ewan McGregor's dislike of his "Jedi Mullet", and in order to make him closely resemble Alec Guinness's portrayal of the character in A New Hope. The last scene of the film was actually shot during AOTC, resulting in Ewan McGregor having to put his hood up to disguise the fact that he still had his mullet.
    • Anakin was initially given a ponytail for his look in this film but Hayden Christensen was not a fan, saying he felt it was too pretty. They took the existing wig and undid the ponytail, ruffling it out to give a slightly more rugged look, though McGregor teased him for now having his own "Jedi Mullet." George was fine with it, feeling helping to make the actors more comfortable is ideal. Others commented that it made him resemble Luke a little bit more.
  • Real-Life Relative:
    • All of George Lucas's adopted children appear in minor roles in this film, in addition to Lucas himself. As Anakin enters the opera house, Lucas is talking to Katie, who is playing his character's daughter as well and Amanda plays a red-haired Senator who walks by. As some troopers are trying to dismiss Senator Organa during the attack on the Jedi Temple, they're attacked by Jett Lucas (whose character name is Zett Jukassa).
    • Aidan Barton, who plays the infant Luke and Leia, is the son of editor Roger Barton.
    • Producer Rick McCallum's daughter Mousy plays Bene, one of the Padawans killed by Anakin.
  • Refitted for Sequel:
    • The original title for Episode VI was Revenge of the Jedi, but Lucas changed that feeling that vengeance wasn't quite the Jedi way. The Sith, however...
    • The track "Love Pledge and the Arena" from the Attack of the Clones soundtrack was originally meant for that film's arena sequence, but was mostly cut in favor of recycled music from The Phantom Menace. However, key portions of the track were instead utilized for Sith, during the invasion of the Jedi Temple and the battles of Kashyyyk and Utapau.
    • Count Dooku was initially imagined as an advanced droid lieutenant (among other options) before Christopher Lee signed up. This concept was recycled for General Grievous.
  • Role Reprise: James Earl Jones returned to voice Darth Vader 22 years after Return of the Jedi, as did many of his famous foreign dubbing voices, such as Georges Aminel in the French version. Peter Mayhew likewise returns as Chewbacca for the first time since Return of the Jedi.
  • Scully Box: Hayden Christensen insisted that he be the one in the Darth Vader suit. But because he is a bit shorter than David Prowse, the suit had to be built in a way that it rose off Christensen's torso and shoulders to match Prowse's intimidating height. This meant Christensen was actually looking out of the helmet's mouth grille rather than its eyes.
  • Separated-at-Birth Casting: Tarkin appears in passing towards the end largely because they found an actor (Wayne Pygram) with an astonishing resemblance to a younger Peter Cushing and couldn't bear to not cast him!
  • Spared by the Cut: In prior cuts, Shaak Ti was killed in the beginning by General Grievous. This scene was cut, and Ti's death was changed to her being killed by Vader in the Temple Massacre. However, that second scene was also cut, removing Shaak Ti's death from the film continuity entirely. Ti then returned in The Force Unleashed, where she was fought and killed by Starkiller. This remained her canonical death until Star Wars was acquired by Disney, putting nearly all the Expanded Universe material into the non-canonical Legends continuity. Shaak Ti's canonical death was then established to be during Order 66 just like in the second deleted scene.
  • Spoiled by the Merchandise: LEGO Star Wars was released a few weeks before Revenge of the Sith and contains a playable version of the entire movie (albeit modified by Rule of Funny, Compressed Adaptation, and Speaking Simlish).
  • Two Voices, One Character: While Matthew Wood provided General Grievous' voice, some of Grievous' coughing was done by George Lucas himself, who had bronchitis at the time.
  • Uncredited Role:
  • What Could Have Been:
    • Star Wars III: Fall of the Republic, by John L. Flynn, was a script that a fan offered to sell to Lucas in 1983. Nowadays it's mainly a curiosity, although some believe it might have inspired Lucas to some degree.
    • Ahmed Best has stated that Lucas, explicitly after deciding that Jar Jar Binks was "just a politician", planned to include a scene where Palpatine mockingly thanked him for granting him the emergency powers in the first place before crowning himself emperor. Best himself wanted Jar Jar to die in the film so that he'd be given a dramatic send-off, but Lucas vetoed it.
    • In the original script, Dooku begged for his life after Anakin defeated him. Christopher Lee felt this would have been an Out-of-Character Moment for him, and Lucas agreed, rewriting the scene.
    • There are a good amount of scenes that were not included in the final film, or even finished. These included two death scenes filmed for Shaak Ti (in the first, captured alongside Palpatine and executed by Grievous; in the second, killed by Anakin in the Temple massacre) which were both discarded,note  Anakin and Obi-Wan treading through the sewers on Grievous' flagship, Wat Tambor's death by Darth Vader in Mustafar,note  an entire subplot of Padmé holding meetings with Mon Mothma, Bail Organa, and other senators to plan the birth of the Rebel Alliance, and a 30-second scene of Yoda arriving on Dagobah.
    • Anakin had concept art involving having a mohawk and tattoos. George Lucas rejected that because he felt it was "Too Much". Hayden was originally going to have long hair in a ponytail, but felt uncomfortable because it made him look "Too Pretty".
    • The creation of Grievous' character was entirely left by Lucas to the art deparment, which conceived a handful of versions of him. One of their ideas was making him a Chiss-like Creepy Child who moved around on a floating chair, but Lucas shot it down for being hard to take seriously. Another was a floating, tentacled alien head, but this was rejected as well for being just plain weird. Yet another was a droid design that was repurposed as Grievous' electrical staff-wielding IG-100 MagnaGuards. The character was finally designed as a cyborg alien warlord, which Lucas eventually gave the green light to.
    • Speaking of Grievous, Gary Oldman was apparently intended to voice him, but Lucas' departure from the Director's Guild of America many years earlier prevented Oldman from taking part without legal action. It was also rumored that John Rhys-Davies was considered.
    • The film would have solved the mystery of Sifo-Dyas, but Lucas changed his mind when he realized the subplot had become irrelevant by this point of the story, was kind of implicit already, and would have inflated even more the film's plot. He instead tasked James Luceno with revealing it in the lead-in novel Labyrinth of Evil.
    • Count Dooku was originally going to survive until the midpoint of the film, with his death being the final push Anakin needed to join the Dark Side rather than Mace Windu's. His death was instead moved to the opening sequence, which had changed from its original conception (seven battles on seven different planets showcasing the fury of the Clone Wars, rather than Palpatine being kidnapped by Dooku and Grievous).
    • The Chancellor's Rodian aide from Attack of the Clones and two senate guards were to make cameos with Palpatine before the Jedi Masters arrived. These were cut before filming.
    • The actual kidnapping of Palpatine was present in the early drafts of the film, but it was cut and passed over to be depicted in Labyrinth of Evil and Star Wars: Clone Wars. The opening battle was originally over 45 minutes in length even after they cut out that part, including the aforementioned first Shaak Ti death scene. Part of the extra footage ended up in the video game of the film.
    • Palpatine was going to have much more dialogue while witnessing Anakin and Dooku's duel. He would have shouted to Anakin that Dooku revealed to him he paid the Tuskens to murder Shmi Skywalker.
    • As Lucas was fond of the Dark Horse Star Wars: Republic comic books, he tried to get the character of Quinlan Vos in the film as he had done with Aayla Secura in the previous installment. He wrote a scene with him in Kashyyyk during Order 66, but it ended up cut from the script and never went beyond that. Still, Vos and his mission in Boz Pity are mentioned by Obi-Wan in the film's final cut.
    • If Shaak Ti's death by Grievous had made it in, Tsui Choi from the Dark Horse comics would've been shown taking her place on the Jedi Council. The idea was dropped after the scene was cut, but unlike Vos, Choi still has a blink-and-you'll-miss-it cameo on Kashyyyk, riding a flying can-cell beast.
    • Padmé originally had a much larger role talking with other senators about opposing Palpatine's increasing accumulation of power, the "delegation of 2,000". Officially this remains canon, and was the early beginnings of the Rebel Alliance as many of the same senators became Rebel leaders like Mon Mothma and Bail Organa, but was cut because it was a subplot that couldn't go anywhere and it was just a few more political meetings. Genevieve O'Reilly as Mon Mothma ended up a Deleted Role in this film, but was brought back to play the character in Rogue One.
    • Lucas considered having Han Solo appear as a young boy raised by Chewbacca, but decided against it due to the improbability of it and the plot hole that would be created by young Han knowing of and interacting with the Jedi, yet not believing in the Force as an adult (which is already kind of incoherent, given how known the Jedi were at that time nonetheless, though not as blatant). Concept art for this can be found in the Art of Revenge of the Sith book and is reproduced here.
    • The original script, as reflected in the book The Making of Star Wars Revenge of the Sith, revealed that Palpatine used the power of the Force to will the midi-chlorians to start the cell divisions that created Anakin, as part of an evil scheme to breed the perfect Sith. The conversation between them at the theater ended with Palpatine saying "You might say I'm your father." Palpatine's role at this was replaced in the Legends canon by Darth Plagueis', but the idea of him being Anakin's "creator" would be still teased by Disney in the comic book series Darth Vader: Dark Lord of the Sith 13 years later (albeit executives clarified it was all a vision by Vader).
    • There exists concept art of a teenage Boba Fett killing Mace Windu during Order 66. Windu's killer was changed to Palpatine, as Lucas felt Boba was far too young to believably pose a challenge to such a powerful Jedi Master. This plot idea was used for the Legends young reader series Boba Fett as well as the season two finale of The Clone Wars, though Windu obviously avoided the kill.
    • Two of the Jedi Masters who accompany Mace Windu and died during the unsuccessful arrest of Palpatine were originally meant to be killed during Order 66. Specifically, Saesee Tiin was supposed to accompany Ki-Adi-Mundi at Mygeeto and be killed alongside him, while Kit Fisto was to die along with two Jedi that were ultimately cut from the film on Saleucami (where Stass Allie was ultimately killed in the finished picture).
    • The first version of the duel in Palpatine's office was completely different. Anakin was originally supposed to be present and just watch during the entire duel, with Palpatine even having stolen Anakin's lightsaber in order to fight, and the point of the scene would have been Anakin debating on which side he was going to choose. However, they figured that Anakin simply watching the fight could be interpreted as that he had already made his choice, so it all had to be entirely reshot, adding the moment where Anakin and Padmé "watch" each other across Coruscant to make him arrive later. Also, as mentioned by a Lucasfilm executive, the original cut made it fairly clear Palpatine was playing up being helpless to get Anakin to side with him, while the reshot version left it ambiguous whether he was playing up, really beaten or mostly beaten yet playing it up anyway.
    • Furthermore, the fight between Windu and Palpatine was supposed to be an all-over-the-place masterpiece, but due to Lucas wanting Ian McDiarmid to do as many of his own stunts as possible (odd, considering his predilection for digital effects, and the fight later on in the movie between Palpatine and Yoda) it was reduced to, largely, Windu forcing Palpatine down the hallway and then a skirmish in the office's center before Anakin showed up.
    • Originally, when Yoda and Obi-Wan rush to the Jedi Temple following Order 66, they were to be confronted by clone troopers disguised as Jedi. A promotional image of such a trooper can be found as a bonus feature on the DVD release, whilst they appear as playable characters in LEGO Star Wars.
    • Nute Gunray's demise was somewhat different in the original screenplay. In a desperate attempt to kill Vader, Gunray would've summoned a group of droidekas to open fire on him as he was killing the other Separatist leaders. When the smoke cleared, Vader was presumably killed... only for him to appear from the roof and destroy the droidekas before beheading Gunray. This explains why, in the finished film, Gunray flinched in shock when Vader went to him; he had thought the droids had killed him.
    • A scene of Wat Tambor getting stabbed in the stomach by Vader at Mustafar was filmed, but cut for being too violent (though the final film had Tambor visibly hiding in the conference room). Two stills from the scene were used in promotional material, and one of the stills were drawn for the comic book adaptation.
    • A glimpse at the original backstory as seen in the novelization of Return of the Jedi (as well as strongly implied by Leia's lines in said film) shows us that her mother, who is now known to be Padmé, was originally meant to survive Anakin's turn to the Dark Side.
    • The scene on Mustafar where Padmé and Anakin meet was supposed to be different. Anakin would've been wielding what seems like his red lightsaber from the OT, Padmé would have already given birth before going to Mustafar and would've been wearing different clothes, and most of all, Padmé would've pulled a dagger on Anakin after embracing him, having come to the conclusion that Anakin was dead and that Vader needed to die, only to find herself unable to kill the man she loved. It was this act, rather than simply seeing Obi-Wan, that would convince Anakin that Padmé had "betrayed" him and prompt him force-choke her. Concept art depicting this version of the scene can be seen here.
      • There was also a version in which Anakin was already wearing the Darth Vader armour, and it would be believed that Darth Vader had "betrayed and murdered" Anakin Skywalker, just like Obi-Wan said in A New Hope. It's probably because of the hasty retcon in Jedi that this was changed, although this was another reason why Padmé was trying to kill Vader, believing he was responsible for her husband's death, while Vader himself was simply blinded by the Dark Side and his own rage and didn't know who he was fighting
    • The Return of the Jedi novelization also said Anakin fell into a pool of lava. In the movie, he doesn't actually touch the lava, but the fumes are hot enough to set his clothes on fire. This may have been changed to make Anakin's survival a bit more plausible.
    • The white dress and cape worn by Bail Organa's aide, Sheltay Retrac, was originally designed for Padmé; it was instead assigned to Sheltay because Padmé's outfits needed to be more voluminous to hide her pregnancy.
    • One idea raised for Padmé was that she would become temporarily Force-sensitive while pregnant, and even surpass Anakin in power for a time due to carrying twins that equal him in strength.
  • Word of Saint Paul: Samuel L. Jackson has stated that Mace Windu beat Palpatine, while the novelization implies that Sidious threw the fight to manipulate Anakin (something that is also backed by a Lucasfilm executive). The film, which the novelization differs a fair lot from at several points, leaves it ambiguous.

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