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Black Index

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An index of tropes about black people. For the color, see Tropes in Black.


  • African Terrorists: Sub-Saharan African terrorists, often carrying out guerrilla operations and maybe working for someone else.
  • Afro Asskicker: A lot of hair would realistically be a hamper in battle, but not for this character!
  • Afrofuturism: Melding Speculative Fiction and the black experience.
  • Ambiguously Brown: When characters have brown skin, but it's very unclear where they're from.
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  • Angry Black Man: A (unfortunately stereotyped) black man who is always angry at The Man.
  • Bald, Black Leader Guy: The man in charge is bald and black.
  • Black and Nerdy: A black character is also very smart to a nerdy degree.
  • Black Best Friend: A black character whose main purpose is to revolve around the non-black main character and/or only add diversity to a work.
  • Black Boss Lady: The boss of an operation is both black and a woman, and is more often than not very, very good at her job.
  • Black Dude Dies First: When the token minority of the cast (usually a black man, though not always) is the first to go.
  • Blackface: A non-black person putting on something to darken their skin tone and appear black, maybe with big white/red lips to boot.
  • Black Gal on White Guy Drama: A black woman and a white man are together and have to suffer criticism for it.
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  • Black Is Bigger in Bed: Black men having larger penises than other races, usually for comedy.
  • Black Like Me: Character disguises themselves or is transformed into a non-white race to experience what life is like for people of said race. note 
  • Black Vikings: A minority character is in a work, but it doesn't make sense in the historical setting.
  • Blaxploitation: A genre of film with a hero whose main attributes is the fact that they're black (almost always behaving stereotypically), badass, and fighting against the bad guys pretty violently.
  • Blaxploitation Parody: A technical Blaxploitation film (see above), but it acknowledges the problems with the genre and avoids them in favor of the good.
  • Blind Black Guy: A black man who is also blind and may or may not serve as some kind of wise mentor role.
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  • But Not Too Black: A character is black, but their skin tone is very pale, with the unfortunate implication that this makes them "easier to swallow."
  • Electric Black Guy: A black character with the superpower to control electricity.
  • The Diva: She's strong, dark, beautiful, a go-getter, mature, and demands respect.
  • Funny Afro: A character has an afro simply because it's funny.
  • Ghetto Name: A true but often overexaggerated name for a black character in a poor area. See the page for examples.
  • Magical Negro: A black character who is both wise and mystic, only existing to give wisdom to other non-black characters.
  • Malcolm Xerox: Someone who is willing to go to violent extremes for the sake of an oppressed group.
  • Mammy: A black woman note  who is generally obese, uneducated but wise, middle-aged, serving as a maid and/or babysitter for a white family.
  • N-Word Privileges: Slurs and insults to a group are only acceptable when used by people in said group.
  • Pretty Fly for a White Guy: A white character humorously acts in a stereotypically "black" manner.
  • Race Film: Films released in the 1910-1950 era with an all-black cast but generally did not discuss racism in favor of other subjects.
  • Salt and Pepper: A duo of one black person and one white person with personalities that are hilariously polar.
  • Sassy Black Woman: A black woman known for being very sassy, very loudly.
  • Scary Black Man: The scary, intimidating, large, strong, and quiet guy is also black.
  • Soul Brotha: A black character who is amazingly cool, always calm and in general "groovy."
  • Starbucks Skin Scale: Skin colors are compared to coffee (i.e. "cream", "mocha", "caramel", etc.)
  • Uncle Tomfoolery: A stereotypical black guy with the sole purpose of comic relief.
  • Where Da White Women At?: A black man and a white woman are romantically together. Usually, the couple experiences criticism.
  • The Whitest Black Guy: A character who belongs to a group—usually a race or culture, though not always—does not feel that they are "X enough" for said group.
  • You Know I'm Black, Right?: Character A insults a group in front of Character B, who coldly informs them that they are part of said group.

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