Retcon / Video Games

  • Diablo: In Diablo II, the hero of the first game is established as the one who became the Dark Wanderer. Diablo III establishes the Dark Wanderer's name is Aidan, and both Deckard Cain and the people of Tristram knew his identity instead of being known as a nameless wanderer. Aidan is King Leoric's eldest son and Albrecht's brother, despite Albrecht previously being the king's only son. Diablo II establishes Diablo as one of the three Prime Evils, while Diablo III establishes Diablo as one of the seven Great Evils from the seven heads of Tathamet, now known as the Prime Evil.
  • In Saints Row 2 onward. The game (and its successors) lets you be a female, unlike in the first, where the Boss can only be male. The devs have stated that, canonically, if the Boss is female in the last three games, then she was female in the first one too.
  • The Batman: Arkham Series originally had several character backstories and designs that have been overwritten by the time of Batman: Arkham Knight, by both the original developers and WB Games Montreal. A notable Rocksteady example is Hush, who is said to have been defeated in Asylum, yet Batman meets him for the first time in City. Most people who aren't against there rewrites often note that Asylum wasn't originally going to have a sequel, so most of the backstories were lifted straight from comics.
  • Kingdom Hearts:
    • The first Kingdom Hearts I defines the Heartless as "those without hearts": when a person succumbed to the darkness in their heart, the darkness consumed it entirely, leaving them with no heart, thus, a Heartless. However, starting in Final Mix, the explanation is reversed: the Heartless is the heart, and the empty shell of the body becomes a Nobody. Additional information introduced in subsequent games only serves to make the whole thing even more confusing.
    • The adventure Sora and friends had at Disney Castle in Kingdom Hearts II. Donald and Goofy wonder what Heartless are doing in the castle. Queen Minnie escorts Sora to a hidden chamber below the throne and talks about the Cornerstone of Light. Maleficent sort of appears to them. Due to her meddling with the past, she can barely be in the castle until Pete destroys it. Sora and friends go through a magic doorway to the world of Timeless River and prevent Present Pete from breaking it with the help of Past Pete. So now Maleficent and her forces can't enter the castle in the Present, right? WRONG!!! By Kingdom Hearts Re:coded and Kingdom Hearts Dream Drop Distance, this was COMPLETELY forgotten. We see her and Pete holding the queen hostage, threatening to harm her unless they give her Jiminy Cricket's Journal.
    • In the original game, Ansem, the leader of Hollow Bastion, was said to be a once-benevolent king who became obsessed with the study of darkness and was eventually consumed by it. In the second game, however, we discover that the person everyone thought was Ansem was actually his apprentice, Xehanort, who had deposed Ansem and stolen his name, and that the real Ansem remained a good guy (for the most part). Kingdom Hearts Dream Drop Distance makes it even MORE screwey! The first Xehanort we ever saw, "Ansem", went back in time and made his past self evil to start with, and the entire nature of Xehanort's past plans have changed as to be more interconnected, with his big plan involving creating thirteen versions of himself, through both time travel and infusing his heart into other peoples' hearts.
    • In the first game, Riku states that Kairi coming to Destiny Islands is the reason he knows there are other worlds. However, we find out in Kingdom Hearts: Birth by Sleep that Terra meets Riku, who seems to know he's not from around there. This was apparently before Kairi ended up on the island, but Riku still appears to know that there are other worlds.
  • Halo:
    • From the first game we are given: "You are the Master Chief, born for battle, bred for war, you are the last of Spartan-II project. Your brethren have died". The novel Halo: First Strike then reveals that a number of other Spartan-IIs survived. In fact, there was another Spartan alongside you on the Pillar of Autumn, though she was stuck in a cryopod due to her injuries. Even then, she was supposed to be dead, but First Strike changed that to clinically dead, and had her resuscitated through complex surgery. However, the games never referenced any of this until 343 Industries took over the franchise from Bungie.
    • 2010's Halo: Reach retconned several details of the titular planet's fall as depicted in 2001's Halo: The Fall of Reach. In the original novel, the Pillar of Autumn was about to leave the system when the Covenant initiate their attack on August 30, 2552. The ship then spends the entire battle duking it out with the Covies, which ends with the latter successfully wiping out almost all of Reach's defenders in less than a day. After the Autumn is forced to flee the system, Cortana uses data from a Forerunner crystal to plot a course to Halo. The first game's plot follows. Halo Reach, meanwhile, has the battle for Reach lasting much longer, with the Covenant raiding the planet as early as July 24, and forces from their main fleet arriving as early as August 14. The Pillar of Autumn even manages to find time to land on the planet on August 30, just before it evacuates the system, in order to retrieve a fragment of Cortana from Noble Team. Cortana then plots a course to Halo based not just on the Forerunner crystal, but with data gathered from Reach's own Forerunner artifact. Cue massive Fan Dumb/Fan Wank that has continued to persist despite 343i making multiple subsequent efforts to reconcile the timeline discrepancies.
    • The earlier Halo novels stated that the Elites, Hunters, and Brutes were not encountered by humanity until the last year of the Human-Covenant war. This was contradicted by so many other sources that the 2010/2011 reprints of said novels retconned away any mention of them being newly encountered species.
  • Resident Evil:
    • Albert Wesker in the original Resident Evil was a stock horror film character, the obligatory traitor who gets killed at the end. Realizing that the series was in need of a main villain, they brought back Wesker from the dead in Resident Evil – Code: Veronica and released a fictional documentary called Wesker's Report which explained that Wesker was behind the events of Resident Evil 2 and Resident Evil 3: Nemesis as well.
    • In the original PlayStation version of Resident Evil, the severed hand founded by Joseph Frost at the beginning of the game was originally established to be that of Edward Dewey's, Bravo Team's originally unseen pilot. When both, the remake and Zero came out, Edward Dewey was established to had died earlier during the events of Zero and the corpse found by Joseph now belongs to Kevin Dooley, a helicopter pilot who accompanied Bravo Team on their mission.
    • Originally, the team wielded generic Beretta handguns in the PlayStation version of the first game. Resident Evil 3: Nemesis then introduced the Samurai Edge, a customized Beretta that was planned to be adopted as the standard-issue sidearm by S.T.A.R.S. before they disbanded. In the GameCube version, the S.T.A.R.S. members now use the Samurai Edge.
    • Resident Evil 2 has Annette Birkin, a paranoid wife of the now mutated monster, William Birkin. She is continuing her husband's legacy of the G-Virus research and is angry at Claire for "killing" her husband. However, Resident Evil: The Darkside Chronicles rewrites Annette's character to be more sympathetic and is willing to stop her husband after he mutates.
    • Lisa Trevor was added to the rewritten canon of Resident Evil 1. A child savagely experimented on but instead of dying from the viruses, she absorbed them becoming almost invincible. Eventually turning into a mindless hulking monster that stalks the Arkay Mansion.
    • Resident Evil 3: Nemesis has a file named "Business Fax" that introduces a virus called the "NE-T type", which is a translation mistake. Such virus didn't exist up until years later with the release of Resident Evil: The Umbrella Chronicles, in which they have decided to make it official with the "NE-α type parasite".
  • The dialogue between Callie and Marie in the North American version of Splatoon occasionally gets changed with updates. For example Marie once liked marshmallows but ever since the third Splatfest (hot dogs vs marshmallows) she's been telling Callie she's into hot dogs instead.
  • StarCraft:
    • StarCraft Brood War: In the original game, the Terrans are portrayed as a near-offshoot of humanity long isolated from Earth, with a separate historical and technological development. The swift arrival of a United Earth Directorate with similar technology and language in the Expansion Pack manages to contradict the spirit of this several times over. The first U E D mission is partially about stealing Terran technology, a mention is made of the configuration of the U E D flagship being unlike any Terran ship yet encountered (despite looking identical), and the manual tries to Handwave it away with references to bugs built into Terran equipment (and the U E D is the in-game explanation for several new units and technologies) but even a rather lenient interpretation of events has trouble making it all fit together.
    • StarCraft II had a pretty big one involving the Zerg Overmind. In the original game, the instruction manual states that the Overmind was created with an imperative to absorb creatures into the Swarm and thereby improve the Zerg. This is what caused it to rebel and overrun the Xel'Naga. SC 2 states that another force interfered with the creation of the Overmind, enslaving it to that imperative. It also says that the creation of Infested Kerrigan and the death of the Overmind was all part of a Thanatos Gambit to free the Zerg from this control. Kerrigan wouldn't have his imperative. So after creating her, he then went to the most powerful species in the sector, set up camp on the homeworld, and gave them both a reason and the opportunity to kill him. This also conveniently explains why in SC1, the Overmind decided to leave the all-important Kerrigan behind when he went to Auir.
    • Before Starcraft II even began, you had the retcon of Blizzard deciding to make the Brood War Praetor, Artanis, the Player Character from the Protoss campaign of the original Starcraft. It doesn't seem to have affected much, but it does make a lot of Brood War's dialogue with anything containing Artanis odd. Most characters, especially Aldaris, treats Artanis like the new guy that knows nothing, even though he's now supposed to be the war-experienced Executor from the original game's Episode 3.
    • Kerrigan now has split-personalities in Starcraft II instead of being the lone queen-$&%@#-of-the-universe from the original games. It's clear Blizzard wanted to return Kerrigan to the good side, and wanted the whole Raynor x Kerrigan romance to happen, but to do it, they would have had to have Kerrigan accomplish something extremely redeeming for her. Only Blizzard didn't decide to go that route. They copped out and made it so that her BAD side was what caused all the destruction while the GOOD side is inside the Queen of Blades somewhere struggling to get out. Not once in either of the original Starcraft games is there ever a hint of Kerrigan possibly having split personalities. This plotline was only added in Starcraft II to get Kerrigan back on the good side in the least amount of believable work as possible.
    • Tassadar isn't completely dead anymore. He's now an all-knowing ghost that hangs out around the rotting carcass of the Overmind.
    • Though that actually turns out to be a surviving xel'naga using his form.
    • Zeratul is bewildered and questions who could've created such an abomination when he omes across a living Hybrid...this comes many years AFTER meeting Duran in Dark Origins and learning of the his Hybrid experiments.
  • Rivaling the Klingons are the orcs from Blizzard's Warcraft franchise. In the first two games the orcs were simply Always Chaotic Evil, but in the third game they were now led by Thrall, a young Shaman, who wants to return his people back to the way they were before the Burning Legion came to Draenor. It turns out that, instead of being bloodthirsty idiots for 100 years as originally stated, they were a peaceful race of warriors who had been corrupted by the Burning Legion only about 5 years before they came to Azeroth. This meant that several orcs remember the time before the corruption. To help with the retcon Blizzard has made a book explaining the corruption and has planned two new books that will show what really happened during the Tides of Darkness and Beyond the Dark Portal video games.
    • To Blizzard's credit, though, they have admitted that gameplay and balance FAR supersede continuity in the context of how important they are, and that if they can't make a game element fit within the confines of the established lore, they WILL alter it to suit their needs. Adding in a dash of Unreliable Narrator (given that all of the tie-in-books and game-based-lore are, in some form, intended to have been documented by those present for those given events) also helps explain inconsistencies, using a Watsonian explanation for certain elements.
    • Blizzard stated in 2013 that the Warcraft movie is intended to tell the "true" events of the early games, indicating yet another retcon.
    • Even when one allows for fanon, it's often argued that the draenei are an even bigger retcon than the orcs. In the first two games, they were presumed to be an extinct race. But some survivors (ugly raptor-footed mooks) appeared in the third game. Then, when the Alliance needed a new race in World of Warcraft, the draenei were picked...and their appearance was changed to make them look like smaller, bluer eredar (big demons who had been heavily involved in the corruption of a titan and were the main villains of the third game). The explanation was that the eredar from the third game are actually the man'ari eredar, a corrupted form of the original Eredar, who were actually the draenei. No one's quite sure what corrupted the titan in the first place (dreadlords were definitely involved, but it seems unlikely that it was them alone), but he was the one who corrupted the eredar, rather than the other way around. The draenei in the third game were revealed to have been mutated by demonic magic. In other words, the draenei the players play are the original unmutated draenei, who are in fact the original uncorrupted eredar. Does your head hurt yet?
    • Let's not forget their Horde counterpart, the Blood Elves. Supposedly they all followed Kael'Thas into the Outlands, but in World of Warcraft, there are a lot of them left in Azeroth, and not only that, they also managed to rebuild half of their capital city in a mere four years. And seeing as there are two banks and auction houses in it, business is obviously going great.
      • That one was actually covered in expanded universe material to an extent; the rpg books that came out shortly after WC3 explained, in a fairly minor retcon, that while most of the elves in Quel'Thalas and Silvermoon were slain, the city itself was largely left in tact. The main problem was that it was still invested not only with zombies, but with the ghosts of the citizens slain there. The RPG also mentions some blood elves coming back to Azeroth prior to TBC, though not as many as depicted in WoW.
      • Though the RPG also introduced even more retcons into the Blood Elves' backstory, by having them be a minority of the high elves rather than all of them, having drained demons before meeting Illidan, having night elves attack them on sight and having them be nomadic.
      • This is all rendered moot by the RPG books being declared completely non-canon.
    • Also see Not Quite Dead and Staying Alive for mind-boggling character revivals in the game universe. Blizzard heavily retcons everything to make new quests (the Black and Blue Dragons were originally stated to have only the aspects left), and make some playable units (see blood elves and draenei). The fans have just learned to accept it.
    • A rather nasty example comes from the plotline regarding Arthas in Wrath of the Lich King. A plot twist occurs in the Icecrown Citadel instances stating that killing Arthas would only enrage the undead and make them more destructive because it's actually only Arthas' will that are holding them back. However, this seemingly contradicts earlier quest chains which establish that Arthas has no humanity left due to ripping out his own heart and having it manifest as Matthias Lehner. It also causes even more problems when you consider the fact that there's no real reason given why the undead would become more mindless and destructive given that we've already re-killed most of them and we have seen how the Forsaken have free will and aren't mindless at all. They might be bitter and angry, but not mindlessly destructive. It all seems like a thinly veiled excuse to give a reason why the undead and the Lich King are still around after Arthas dies.
      • Word of God said that it is not that if there's no Lich King in charge of the Scourge, Yogg-Saron would take over, power them up with Lovecraftian eldritch powers or whatever, and have them kill everything as was implied. Rather, for unknown reasons, Arthas and Ner'zhul held the Scourge back.
    • Worgen: Barely sentient ravening extradimensional hellhounds, or just druidic devotees of the wolf god who lost control?
    • A main one, and one everyone seems to forget is that Deathwing, the Big Bad in Cataclysm was killed in the canon campaign of Beyond the Dark Portal in Warcraft 2. Handwaved by Blizzard that he faked his death by crashing into the ocean.
    • Gul'dan's original story stated he was a member of the Shadowmoon Clan and apprentice to Ner'zhul who made a bargain with the Legion from his desire for power. The Harbingers mini-series retcons this to Gul'dan being the crippled exile of a nameless clan he later destroyed who, denied the blessing of the elements, made a bargain with the Legion.
    • Blizzard later announced the massive Chronicle projects which will provide a clear and bullet-proof canon... by retconing everything.
  • Ultima:
  • .hack:
    • ".hack//Link", ".hack//Quantum", and "The Thanatos Report" (an OVA included in the bluray for the .Hack movie "beyond the world") make it so that Everything that has happened in the franchise was not the result of big business abusing technologies that have advanced past the point of their understanding as the world reached the technological event horizon and true A.I. began to develop, but a Deeply-entrenched conspiracy from the 1980's concerning an Ecological terrorist organizations' efforts to digitize the entirety of humanity so as to keep the world from being destroyed in a thousand years due to human abuse and destruction of the ecosystem...which they cite as being caused by technological advancement.
    • Forgetting entirely that the Ecosystem is not the planet, their plan would end up killing everyone as with everyone in virtual reality there'd be no-one to maintain the servers everyone's trapped in (and the franchise had long-established that if the servers go down, everyone trapped within them DIES), doing this would prevent any technological advancement which would mediate such ecological destruction (or planetary colonization efforts), and Several other significant past plot points; the least of which being the nature of How Aura—who this plan all hinged upon to work—was created to be a testament of the love her programmer held for a woman he never got to be with...that those entry's retcon as being one of the inner-circle. And the belief of 'we'll destroy the world with technological progress' has been debunked since the 80's, and said damage has actually steeply declined in that time.
  • The Elder Scrolls
    • The Imperial Province (Cyrodiil) was always described as being covered in a thick jungle (ref: Pocket Guide to the Empire and numerous in-game books and NPC accounts). In The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion, the first game to take place there, the jungle has turned into generic fantasy forests and meadows. The explanation for this: A god made the land colder for some soldiers who were too hot and the jungle vanished.
    • The first two games, as well as the spinoff Battlespire, mention that there is no race native from the Imperial Province, that the province is a cosmopolitan mish-mash of all the other races. The Imperial line is supposed to be Nords. Then comes Morrowind, introducing the Imperial race, and retconning them as a descendant of the original Nede/Atmoran Caucasian race, from which the modern Nords, Bretons (via mix with elves) and Imperials are all descended. The retcon does maintain that the Emperor's family has more Nord blood then most Imperials.
    • The Elder Scrolls Online has drawn the ire of lore-minded fans due to its developers' in-universe explanation for depicting Cyrodiil as forests and meadows again. As TESO is set a good 800 years before the main series begins, the explanation used in Oblivion wouldn't work, so they explained away the tropical rainforests by calling said depiction a "transcription error."
  • Fallout
    • In Fallout 3, the bulky Plasma Rifle from Fallout 2 is replaced with a lighter and more traditionally rifle-shaped model. The Fallout 2 rifle returns in Fallout: New Vegas as "Plasma Caster", along with a justification in-universe.
    • Then Fallout 4 came with more truly lore-breaking changes, with mixed reaction.
      • Many designs of various objects are updated with a more "retro" and colorful look, such as the Holotapes being partially made out of plastic, and Nuka cola bottles shaped like rockets. The latter is described in-universe as an actual update on the bottle design, although the lack of Nuka Cola bottle with older design in-game make this a bit jarring.
      • The Vertibird VTOL is described as being developed and produced by the Enclave after the war. The Vertibird at least exist as a prototype pre-war. But in Fallout 4 Vertibird appears to have been in service during pre-war, you can even see them in the pre-war segment.
      • In Fallout 2 Jet is shown to be invented by Myron in New Reno out of Brahmin (a post-war mutant animal) dung, with it appearance on the East Coast even acknowledges about it's origin from New Reno. But Jet appears to have existed in pre-war America for sometime, with several mentions of its being used by your pre-war neighbors.
      • In all previous Fallout games, the power armors are described to have been powered by a miniature nuclear reactor that allows it to perpetually operates for a very long time. In Fallout 4 they're powered by miniature fusion cells that canonly last for about 30 minutes per cell, and this is not a case of Gameplay and Story Segregation.
    • How power armor appears throughout the series. In Fallout 1 and 2 they're depicted as bulky walking tank that towers over an average person. In Fallout 3 and New Vegas the appears as no more bulkier than an average non-powered metal armor. Fallout 4 returns with the one-man tank look.
  • Final Fantasy I: The tradition of adding a character named "Cid" in each Final Fantasy game began with Final Fantasy II. However, when the original game was remade for the GBA (followed by subsequent remakes), someone named Cid was inserted into its canon as the ancient creator of your party's airship. He is never seen and was only minorly mentioned by one of the townspeople of Lufenia. Surprisingly enough, he became a major character in Dissidia: Final Fantasy as Cid of the Lufaine.
  • Final Fantasy VII has the "Compilation" cheerfully retconning quite a good deal of the original game's backstory, to the consternation of many fans and the relief of others. For a sample of the changes, take a deeeeeep breath: Crisis Core retcons bit-part Zack into a lovable hero, Aerith was likely in love with him before Cloud (in the original game, when Cloud asked if Zack and Aerith were "serious", Aerith replied, "No... but I liked him for a while") and received all much of her trademarks from him, Genesis orchestrated the Nibelheim incident (though it seems to have gotten far more out of hand than he intended), and Zack died fighting what looks like the entire Shinra army before passing on his memories to Cloud (a heroic passing-of-the-torch instead of an epic Mind Screw). Before Crisis forever cements the Turks as wisecracking antiheroes instead of villains, portrayed similarly in CC and AC, but on a larger scale with many members here, as well as adds a different incarnation of AVALANCHE that existed before Barrett founded his group, making them behind many events that occurred prior to the original game; Advent Children itself changes the personalities of many characters, but especially Cloud (considerably more mopey) and Vincent (considerably less mopey); and Dirge of Cerberus retconned considerable amounts of Vincent's backstory, making HIM more mopey, and added an entire army of subterranean Super Soldiers to the canon where there were none before).
    • Cloud being considerably more mopey in Advent Children is explained in a blink-and-you'll-miss-it-moment: The Geostigma that infects people doesn't just hurt them, it also fills them with doubt and angst and other bad emotions. Naturally, Cloud is able to resist it long enough to maintain his Badass-edness, but it isn't until his stigma is cured that he actually stops being mopey and truly becomes his Badass Super Soldier self.
    • Interestingly, some of the retcon in the compilation has already been hit by the Reset Button, as aspects of the Nibelheim Incident changed in the anime short Last Order were retconned in Crisis Core to be more similar to the original game's events.
  • Sonic the Hedgehog. The retcons are confusing at best.
    • Shadow's dead, no he's not, he's alive, except he's a robot (revealed in the same game where's he found to be alive), except he's not a robot, he's a clone, except he's not, he's really the original Shadow. A retcon so bad it took two games to sort it out. To officially summarize, Shadow was nearly killed in his heroic sacrifice, but Eggman recovered his body, only to be surprised that he was alive! However, Shadow was amnesiac. Eggman, figuring that there's no reason not to use this, promptly made some clones/robots, and then began screwing with Shadow's head, apparently for the sole purpose of being an asshole.
    • Then there's the entire re-imagining that everything post-Sonic Adventure has brought, with some characters gaining a year, some characters becoming four years older and one losing ten years. One only has to look at the Archie Comics version of Sonic to see how much of an effect this has had on the early stories.
    • Sonic Generations had an interesting one concerning Sonic himself. In the original Sonic the Hedgehog game, he was listed as 10 years old. When Sonic the Hedgehog 2 came out, he was upped to 16 years old, where he stands to this day. When the decision was made to put in Modern Sonic and Classic Sonic, it was decided that Classic Sonic was the ten-year-old one from Sonic the Hedgehog. And since he was with Classic Tails, Classic Eggman and Classic Metal Sonic, it retroactively made Sonic the Hedgehog, Sonic the Hedgehog CD, Sonic the Hedgehog 2 and Sonic 3 & Knuckles all adventures with the heroes as kids.
    • Sonic Adventure retconned the Master Emerald's location. Instead of the underground Hidden Palace Zone, it now rests in a much smaller, outdoor temple.
    • The Sonic Comics just went through a rather painful retcon due to the Ken Penders lawsuit resulting in Archie Comics putting a lot of characters on hold and sending a bunch more to another dimension.
  • Team Fortress 2 has had a few retcons since the developers have tried to add more back story to an otherwise plotless game as well as shift the tone from lighthearted mid-20th-century pulp to full-on wacky comedy.
    • The back story of the Demoman originally told of him killing his biological parents while trying to blow Nessie out of the water, then growing up in a foster home afterward. However, when a comic from the WAR! update in December 2009 depicted the Demoman talking to his real mother (who, in turn, talked about his real father), Valve retconned this by saying that he had only killed his adoptive parents, and his biological parents later heard of his great skills at explosives and took him out of the foster home for proper training. The Demoman's eye story later got changed yet again, this time his eye was possessed by MONOCULUS! in the Bombinomicon (Halloween 2011) comic. It isn't known if it's the same Demoman, or if the RED and BLU ones have different back stories with the same result.
    • RED and BLU were originally described as "two holding companies that secretly control every government on earth." Since then, it has been revealed that they're actually the end product of a petty squabble between two rich but dimwitted brothers who inherited half of their father's useless real estate each and are in the process of squandering their liquid assets fighting to gain control over the rest of it, with the delusion that it will help them corner the market on gravel. All the businesses they supposedly own were merely fronts for more fighting, and nobody has ever been fooled by them.
  • Mega Man Powered Up retconned two robot masters, Time Man and Oil Man, into the original batch of robots created by Dr. Light, in order to bring the total amount of first-generation bosses to 8, much like the other games in the series.
  • In Mega Man X6, Capcom retconned Zero's death in X5, shoehorning him into the plot (if you found and defeated a Nightmare Zero).
  • Street Fighter:
    • The series had its fair share of retcons, but some of them are not actual legitimate changes to the story so much as they are actually the result of inconsistent translations between the Japanese and English versions of the game (such as the revelation in Super SF II that Cammy was M. Bison's lover in the past, which never actually occurred in the Japanese ending). One legitimate retcon concerns the many ways Guile's combat buddy Charlie has been killed off throughout Alpha series (stabbed in the back in the first Alpha, gunned down in Alpha 2, and died in an explosion in Guile's ending in Alpha 3). The early anime trailers for the console version of Street Fighter IV implied that Charlie may not be dead after all, but Guile's prologue and ending in Super Street Fighter IV seems to suggest that Charlie is dead again.
    • When SF II originally debuted, Ryu had become famous after defeating Sagat. Capcom changed it years later, by making Sagat the actual winner of the match, who was offering to help Ryu back to his feet when the latter succumbed to the Satsui no Hadonote  and cheapshot him with a surprise Gou Shoryu. This created another retcon in itself. Originally, Sagat was consumed by hatred for Ryu and wanted vengeance, as seen in Ryu's ending for SF: Alpha. Whereas the newer version makes it so Sagat never hated him, and was only trying to set the record straight about who really won the match.
    • The biggest retcon, however, is saved for Gouken, the original master who trained Ryu and Ken. While Gouken's origins, identity, and even existence remained ambiguous for much of the franchise's early years, slowly the character began to emerge and was portrayed as the long-dead (and inherently mystical and mysterious) master killed by his brother, Akuma. Then suddenly in Street Fighter IV, the character's back story was blatantly Retconned to add in the convenient fact that Gouken was never killed, just rendered in a coma and everyone (Ryu, Ken, Akuma, etc.) thought he'd been dead all this time. Admittedly, Gouken was included in the game almost solely as a nod toward the infamous Sheng Long "secret" but nonexistent character in the Street Fighter series, as well as rumors throughout several games that Gouken was somehow playable. Still, this massive Retcon removed most all of Gouken's mysterious, mystical nature and turned him into a standard, more generic fighter.
    • Bison was officially considered dead following Super Street Fighter II: Turbo and remained that way until Street Fighter IV. Now he apparently has multiple bodies stored somewhere in case his soul needs to inhabit a new one. Never mind that he was supposed to have been killed by Akuma's Shun Goku Satsu, which sends the victim's soul to hell where it is attacked by demons.note 
    • Since 1999, it's been accepted that Charlie's death happened in Street Fighter Alpha 3, where he committed a Heroic Sacrifice to ensure Bison blew up with the Psycho Drive. Guile's oath to his friend is implied to be that he will finish the mission Charlie failed to when Bison reemerges during the second World Warrior tournament. This then gets retconned in IV, where Guile doesn't believe Charlie actually died (which also gets supported by Abel's backstory) and he's on a mission to find him. Turns out this is true by Street Fighter V, as Charlie (now just going by "Nash") reemerges albeit worse for wear. However this too comes with its own retcon as it ignores the events of Alpha 3, as his backstory says that canon fate was shown in Alpha 2, wherein he is betrayed by a chopper pilot, shot in the back, and plummets down a waterfall.
  • Myst series: First, Myst IV: Revelation changed the entire concept of trap books by turning them into prison ages instead and having Sirrus and Achenar return. It also re-introduced Yeesha, who later on in Uru and even End of Ages bent so many of the rules of Writing Ages that she practically threw both canon and fanon out the window. At least Uru acknowledged that what Yeesha could do was out of the ordinary ("I could write things they never thought possible"). Myst IV on the other hand seemed to act as if the prison books had always been that way which just doesn't make sense. In fact, Uru (and later Myst V) attempted to explain away all the "inconsistencies" of the first four games in a rather interesting way — they are, by Uru canon, JUST VIDEO GAMES. Yeah, it makes sense, but still seems like a slap in the face to some fans of the first (and arguably best) games.
  • Metroid:
    • Metroid: Zero Mission, the remake of the first Metroid, contains a great many retcons to the original story, most along the lines of what happens to Samus after she defeats Mother Brain. However, things such as Kraid and Ridley getting massive growth spurts (to match their portrayals in later games) are clearly Re Write territory.
    • In Metroid Prime, there was a Chozo barrier around the Impact Crater, which stopped the Space Pirates from getting inside, where Metroid Prime (the creature) was. However, in the first US version of the game, Pirate logs indicate that they captured and studies the creature before it escaped. This was very quickly retconned when they realised it was impossible - in the normal English version and the Player's Choice versions of the games, the Pirate logs only say that they know there is a creature there, but they don't know what it is. But even in the non-US versions, the scan data of Metroid Prime says it has mechanical weapons, which (in the US version) it assimilated when the Space Pirates were experimenting on it. Either way, it's still a Plot Hole.
    • Metroid: Other M has some scenes that people have cited as being rather continuity breaking;
      • The biggest one seems to be the infamous PTSD scene where Ridley appears in front of Samus, which makes the heroine scared stiff while we briefly see her as a little girl just as scared of him before he begins carrying her to her would be death. The scene is actually lifting a plot point from a then non-canon manga which mentioned that Samus' parents were killed by Ridley. Because this plot point was not introduced until the manga, and because the manga was not released until after the release of Zero Mission, we're left to wonder why Ridley's presence never did this to Samus to begin with, and why after numerous encounters with him, is she still scared of him.
      • The mechanic of Samus not using any of her weapons or skills until Adam approves of it annoyed many players, especially when she doesn't activate her Varia Suit in an area of the Bottle Ship that has an extreme temperature risk. Although it was only a way for Nintendo to explain off her not being able to access the power (and for Nintendo to prevent people from sequence breaking the game, something that they have been trying to curtail since they saw how extreme people got with Super Metroid), it was odd that Samus was only now deciding to obey someone. This and many other issues with the story were actually brought up in the next game of the chronological order, Metroid Fusion: The AI actually brings up Samus' willingness to follow Adam's orders to the letter, even if it means certain death for her, as if the AI was puzzled at how obedient she was to him.
      • Then there's the whole thing with Adam apparently being "the only father figure [Samus] had ever known," seemingly retconning Samus' entire Happily Adopted relationship with the aliens who raised her.
  • In Summoner, Laharah is an evil goddess, and her followers, the Nuvasarim, feed on agony. This is thoroughly - and convincingly - retconned in the sequel, in which Laharah is the protagonist. except that neither Laharah, nor Urath, nor any other gods exist. They are all merely parts of Aosi. What's that you say? Vadagar's giant three-headed corpse? We didn't walk through any giant three-headed corpse!
  • Dark Reign has an ingenious version of this: the first twelve missions are recreations of famous battles between the Freedom Guard and the Imperium. You choose which site to fight for, but the historical results of the battle will not necessarily match your victory. The final mission involves going back in time and retconning history itself by saving Togra and defeating both sides. Thus, the retcon is part of the plot.
  • In Backyard Skateboarding, the playable characters have allegedly never heard of several neighborhood kids. This would fit in continuity for Andy MacDonald, but not for the Backyard Kids because they played in the same league as them for a few years! In MANY different sports! (It may be that Skateboarding is supposed to be from Andy MacDonald's perspective, with the others as just playable.)
  • The Metal Gear series tends to have each new installment retcon at least one more-or-less significant plot detail from the previous game, to a degree where it is also as big a stable of the series as the cardboard box.
    • Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater made a few changes to Big Boss' initially established back-story from previous games. Originally, Big Boss was stated to be born around the 1920's, meaning that he was in his 50's when Solid Snake was born during the 1970's and over 70 when Solid Snake (supposedly) killed him in Metal Gear 2, which was set in 1999. However, he's only 29 in Metal Gear Solid 3, which is set in 1964, meaning that he was de-aged by roughly ten years. Likewise, Big Boss' bio in the Metal Gear 2 manual stated Big Boss lost his eye during the 1980's, a few decades later from the events of Metal Gear Solid 3 (where Big Boss loses said eye during an interrogation session).
    • A line of dialogue in Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker places Big Boss's age at 39 years old in 1974, which is jarring when you consider that Les Enfants Terribles occurred only two years earlier according to Liquid's dialogue in Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty:
      Liquid: The price of physical prodigy... Few more years and you’ll be another dead clone of the old man. Our raw materials are vintage, brother. Big Boss was in his late fifties when they created his copies.
    • The eponymous walking nuclear tank itself has had its history changed as well. The TX-55 Metal Gear from the first MSX game in the series was originally the first of its kind, until RAXA and the ICBMG (both from MPO) , as well as Metal Gear Zeke from Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker, revealed that there were at least three models before it (technically four, if one counts the eponymous weapon in Peace Walker as a Metal Gear).
    • Gray Fox's back-story was also heavily retconned in MPO. In MG2, Gray Fox reveals during his death scene that he was a half-white war orphan from Vietnam who was adopted by Big Boss after the war was over (which would have been after 1975) and later served Renamo (the Mozambican National Resistance) during the Mozambican Civil War. In MPO, we find out he was a German-speaking child soldier from Mozambique who fought for the Frelimo (who were the enemies of the real life Renamo) in 1966 (four years before MPO and nine years before the Vietnam War ended). The Metal Gear Solid 4 Database doesn't even mention Gray Fox's time in Vietnam, nor his time serving Renamo.
    • The identities of the Patriots have been changed multiple times since the first mention of the organization. In MGS2 they were suggested to be both an Illuminati-like secret council composed mainly of twelve members known as the Wisemen's Committee. The timeline in the ending of MGS3 stated that the Patriots were actually the US branch of the Philosophers, which was the real Illuminati-like organization. But then MGS4 established that was really a cover for their true origins (MPO having previously revealed that the US Philosophers were murdered by Ocelot under orders from Zero) as a different group founded by Big Boss and his team from MGS3 as a sort of continuation of the Philosophers, which Big Boss left over a dispute with Zero, and which Zero passed on to a group of AIs; and that furthermore, Donald Anderson from MGS1 was really Sigint, and Dr. Clark (who revived Gray Fox as a cyborg) was Para-Medic, and that their "accidental" deaths (Anderson's from being tortured by Ocelot, Clark's from Fox's rampage) had been orchestrated by Eva and Ocelot from the get-go as part of their plan to destroy the Patriots and rescue Big Boss. And the really weird thing is, after playing all the games all of the above will make perfect sense.
    • Peace Walker retcons both, Snake Eater and Portable Ops, by revealing that the DCI was not the true mastermind behind The Boss' death, who was actually following orders from Hot Coldman, the true culprit.
    • A lot of the plotpoints from Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake were retconned as early as Metal Gear Solid. For instance, Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake heavily implies in both its intro and the instruction manual that the entire world was actually disarming its nukes and the only intact nukes were procured by Zanzibar Land by raiding nuclear outposts. However, Metal Gear Solid retcons this by exposing that more than 20,000 nukes still exist in the world either by 1998 or 2003, despite their goal being to get rid of them by 2001 or 2007, as well as the fact that they were creating nukes, and that START II, which was stated to have not only been ratified, but also implemented long before the events of Metal Gear 2, was mentioned to have not even been ratified yet by the time of Metal Gear Solid. There's also the infamous implication of Big Boss stating that he is Snake's father in Zanzibar Land.
    • Venom Snake's existence is one big retcon. It is revealed in Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain that Venom Snake is the "big boss" that Solid Snake kills in Metal Gear and the Big Boss in Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake is the real Big Boss. It makes since when you think about it and yet there was still outcry from fans about this one.
    • You might even consider Zero as a retcon. It was implied that Zero become bitter towards Big Boss for leaving the Patriots and he eventually went crazy but Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain reveals the exact opposite. Zero was not only not bitter, but he desperately wanted Big Boss back and seemed regretful for driving Big Boss away. One of his last moments before becoming brain dead was visiting Big Boss while he's in his coma and expressing his regrets. Also while he did go overboard with the whole control thing he was certainly not crazy.
  • In Silent Hill, the exact nature of Silent Hill changes dramatically between games, comics and the film. Silent Hill 1, Origins and the film imply, or outright show that the fog-world and otherworld are caused by Alessa, in retribution for the crimes committed against her. This changes in Silent Hill 2, and is featured in some the comics, which suggests that the town was always a dark place, and that Alessa just caused the evil it to break through into our world. It switches again in Silent Hill 3 and Homecoming, both feature the fog world being caused by the Order, and that they are able to control it to some degree. Other comics say it was caused by the impregnation of a woman by Whately, who does not appear or is mentioned in any of the games. Finally, Silent Hill Downpour suggests that the town itself is sentient.
  • The first few .hack// games avoided this by being a direct sequel to the anime .hack//SIGN; on the other hand, Roots contradict various aspects of the G.U. games (both were released about the same time, but when Roots reenacted some of G.U.'s scenes, the first game was already available for months). The most jarring ones:
    • Shino's death scene (in this case, the retcon was caused by the games). While the scene is essentially the same in both versions, some minor details were changed to contribute to the drama of Alkaid's death scene in the games. Shino got lines when in the anime she didn't say anything, among other changes (such as Haseo not calling her on her phone). Shino's outfit coloring also suffered, as in some of the game's flashbacks it would be black (that is, post-Ovan-disappearance) when, according to the plot, it should be white.
  • Champions Online seems to be lampooning the trope: "Retcon" was their custom term for a respec, until some players got confused by it!
  • Some (minor and easily Handwaved details) from the first Jak and Daxter game don't exactly mesh with revelations made in the later games.
  • Ace Attorney:
    • It was rumoured amongst characters in the original first game that Edgeworth was so hellbent on always getting a guilty verdict that he sometimes faked evidence. However, according to case added in the DS remake, Edgeworth never faked any evidence, and it was all a nasty rumour. Some fans did not take kindly to this, claiming it rendered a good portion of Edgeworth's Character Development in the first game moot.
    • In case 2 of Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney, Maya very clearly states that she lives independently and doesn't have any family. Then, in case 2 of Justice for All, we see that she lives together with Morgan and Pearl, her aunt and cousin, in Fey manor. That said, in that same case Maya said that she tends to exaggerate a little, so this might be the explanation of this plothole.
    • Spark Brushel says in Apollo Justice: Ace Attorney that Apollo's father died while performing on stage. Two games later, in Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney – Spirit of Justice, Apollo (and the player) learns that his father actually was killed in an arson in a foreign country. This retcon served the purpose of allowing Apollo to prove the killer's guilt in "Turnabout Revolution" because his father saw the killer's hand, which allowed to identify her.
  • Pokémon:
    • In Pokémon Red and Blue and Yellow, as well as FireRed and LeafGreen, Giovanni vowed to make amends for his actions, feeling he betrayed his followers and renouncing Team Rocket for good. However, an event in HeartGold and SoulSilver reveals that Giovanni had in fact planned for Team Rocket to be revived, that he wasn't truly remorseful for betraying them, and the only reason he left was to get stronger.
    • In Gold and Silver, Steel- and Dark-types were stated to be new types. This was omitted in the remakes, owing to the fact that the previous games, even Fire Red and Leaf Green, also had Steel- and Dark-types.
    • Players should treat FireRed/LeafGreen and HeartGold/SoulSilver as the "true" versions of RBY and Gold/Silver, respectively.
    • Also, Steel was retroactively added to Magnemite and Magneton, which were pure Electric-types in the first generation, completely changing their type matchups. Similarly, Pokémon X and Y added the Fairy type, which was also retconned onto a number of older Pokémon, with a few (specifically, the Clefairy, Togepi, and Snubbull families) actually losing their former Normal types entirely.
    • Rotom's alternate forms also had type retcons. In Platinum, all of its forms shared the original's Electric/Ghost typing, but learned moves of other types relating to the appliance it was possessing. Starting in Black and White, the Ghost type for the alternate forms was replaced with the same type of the move that form learns.
    • Both times new types were added, other types gained and lost weaknesses unrelated to the new types as well, such as Steel losing its resistances to Dark and Ghost in the sixth gen when Fairy was introduced.
    • Some of the breeding mechanics amounted to retcons as well. Several species that once only bred more of their own kind were explained to not have been able to produce their pre-evolutions earlier due to not having the proper held incense. The families of Wobbuffet, Mr. Mime, Azumarill, Chingling, Snorlax, Mantine, Sudowoodo, Roserade, and Blissey are all part of this. They'll produce the middle or highest member of their line, depending on the species, when bred without the proper incense, and the baby member of the line only when bred while holding said incense.
    • Keldeo knowing its signature move Secret Sword causes it to automatically change into its Resolute Form until the move is forgotten. However, as this form was only introduced in B2W2, it can know Secret Sword in the original BW while remaining in its Ordinary Form.
    • They also retconned in some evolution methods; while most evolutions of older Pokémon use either a game mechanic or an item that wasn't available in previous games, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl gave Lickitung the ability to evolve if it's leveled up with Rollout in its moveset, and Yanma and Piloswine gained similar evolutions with AncientPower. However, Lickitung could learn the move via TM in the second generation or tutor in the third, and you can breed AncientPower onto a Piloswine in any generation.
    • The Delta Episode of the Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire remake has the new character Zinnia reveal the Many Worlds Interpretation to be a real part of the Pokémon universe, serving as an in-game explanation for all of the previously unexplained retcons that have occurred in the game series.
  • Herman Toothrot is a loony eccentric in the first two Monkey Island games. In subsequent games he is inexplicably identified as the grandfather of Guybrush's love interest Elaine Marley. This contradicts a large chunk of the established story, and much shoehorning has to be made.
  • The Legacy of Kain series pulls an interesting in-game example: at the end of Soul Reaver 2, when Kain changes the timeline by pulling the Reaver out of Raziel, the timeline itself retcons Blood Omen 2 and parts of Defiance into existence to prevent time from being destroyed.
  • Guile, a character that the player can recruit in Chrono Cross, was actually meant to be Magus from the previous game. The developers said that they eliminated his backstory because of time constraints and because they didn't want any of the "secondary" characters to have more importance than the others, but evidence still exists that the two were originally meant to be the same person (they both hover instead of walking, have long white hair, and use Shadow magic; Guile's Japanese name, Alfador, is the same name that the child Magus gave to his cat in Chrono Trigger). Surprisingly, in the Updated Re-release of Chrono Trigger for the Nintendo DS, they retconned the whole story by having Magus lose all of his memories in a canonical ending, thus strongly implying that Guile is an amnesiac Magus.
    • The same thing can be said about Dalton. In Chrono Trigger he was a joke villain, but in one of the bonus dungeons of the DS version you can fight him and discover that he's planning to raise a huge army in Porre and destroy Guardia (Crono, Marle and Lucca's hometown). Of course, Chrono Cross tells us that Guardia has indeed fallen against Porre's army.
  • Left 4 Dead went through this a few times. During the development of the game, each campaign was supposed to continue in sequence in the storyline, but play testers complained that they felt it was too much of a downer to see the survivors get rescued and wind up having it fail, starting the next campaign. Valve then made it where each campaign is a separate story. Fans then started to complain that the campaigns felt too out of place, so Valve made the Crash Course campaign that tied in between No Mercy and Death Toll. Possibly due to Fan Wank, Valve made the sequel have the campaigns be all connected in sequence and it was met with positive reaction. In response to this, The Sacrifice comic goes to state that the survivors from the first game have, in fact, gone through several rescues in each campaign one by one (No Mercy, Death Toll, Dead Air, and then Blood Harvest).
  • Mortal Kombat
    • Raiden's story in the first Mortal Kombat was much more self-serving, as he had been invited by Shang Tsung to compete and does so in order to prove mortals are puny when matched with a god. His ending from that game has him overthrow the tournament and turn it into a showcase of the gods (that eventually destroy the world). Later games throw this characterization out the window and instead portray him as a concerned protector who feels he must participate in order to avert disaster (as this happens after the first movie also changed the entire story of the first game).
    • Likewise, Scorpion was described in the first game as donning a yellow version of the Lin Kuei uniform in undeath as a Take That!, essentially calling Sub-Zero a coward. Mortal Kombat Mythologies: Sub-Zero shows the still-living Hanzo Hasashi (Scorpion's former identity) wearing the same costume, which is now depicted as the uniform of the Shirai-Ryu clan, rivals to the Lin-Kuei.
    • Kabal from Mortal Kombat 3 was given the same treatment. The third game presented him as a reformed gangster seeking revenge for the deaths of his comrades and his ending states that he devotes himself to fighting injustice. Fast-forward to Mortal Kombat: Deception, and not only has Kabal returned to his criminal lifestyle, but he's one of the antagonists in the game.
  • The sixth route of Duel Savior Destiny hastily claims at the end that Mia is Not Blood Related to Taiga as a saving throw to prevent 'real' incest. The final route, however, establishes firmly that they do have blood ties.
  • The Koopalings from Super Mario Bros. 3 were originally introduced as Bowser's children. However, after this game this was not mentioned again, and the Koopalings got called Bowser's "minions" in later games, but the "Bowser's children" wasn't disproved either, leading fans to still believe they were his kids. It was not until a 2012 interview that Miyamoto officially said that "in the current story, the Koopalings are not Bowser's children."
  • In Mass Effect:
    • Saren's hatred for humans was said to be the result of his brother Desolus getting killed during the First Contact War. This was contradicted by the later comic miniseries Evolution, in which it's revealed that Saren himself killed Desolus, because his brother was a General Ripper who intended to turn the entire turian population into monsters in order to re-fight the war. It's worth noting that the comic book miniseries was written by Mac Walters, whereas the original game was written by Drew Karpyshyn, though Mac Walters was also a part of the writing team.
  • In The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past there was mention of Seven Wise Men who sealed Ganon in the Sacred Realm. After the release of the prequel game The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, the Game Boy Advance Polished Port of ALttP retcons them as just "The Seven Sages" due to five of them being female.
  • For the first time in the series, Animal Crossing: New Leaf introduced two new villager personality types, Smug (for males) and Uchi (for females). While most of the villagers with these personality types were created for New Leaf, some villagers from previous games got changed, like Charlise (Peppy → Uchi) and Kidd (Lazy → Smug). A small few island villagers from the first game also had their personalities changed when they were introduced as regular villagers in later games, such as Rowan (Cranky → Jock).
  • Unreal: maybe because in an arena shooter, story is pretty much optional; Malcolm becomes Grand Champion by beating Xan during the 2341 competition during the events of Unreal Tournament. Immediately retconned to 2293 in Unreal Championship and Unreal Tournament 2003, which take place a century later, after the Earth and humanity were conquered by an alien empire. In UT2004, events are completely rewritten as Unreal Championship enters full canon discontinuity and UT2003 becomes a normal tournament taking place in 2302, where Gorge beat Malcolm. Unreal Tournament 2004 happens in 2303. The winner is unknown but supposedly either Malcolm, Xan, the Skaarj leader or the player. In Unreal Championship 2, in 2315, Lauren and Brock are Necris after being killed by Gorge just after Malcolm's defeat, so in the off-season between 2302 and 2303. However, they competed as humans in 2303. In Unreal Tournament III, which happens between UT2004 and UC2 despite taking place in the 2340s, Lauren appears as a human despite being necrified for years and is listed as a former champion, even though at that point, she is supposedly either dead or didn't reach the finals of the 2303 tournament. A whole bloody mess of a timeline.
  • Both Aliens: Colonial Marines and Alien: Isolation did this for the first two films of the Alien franchise.
    • Colonial Marines claims that chestbursters create a parasitic pseudo-womb inside their hosts whilst they gestate, ensuring that if they are surgically removed before birth, it will kill the host.
    • Colonial Marines reveals Hicks survived instead of dying of in Alienł and that the engineer Michael Ripley meets in that film is actually CEO Michael Weyland.
    • Isolation confirms the previously Director's Cut fact that xenomorphs can reproduce asexually by mutating humans into xenomorph eggs.
    • Isolation explains that the colony on LV-426 never found the alien vessel because scavengers got there decades ago and switched off the signal so nobody else would ever find it, planning on keeping the riches for finding it to themselves.
  • Handsome Jack being a puppeteer and behind the events of the first game were admitted by Anthony Burch to be a retcon and apparently was not intended for the series, however Handsome Jack turned out to be such a fantastic and well-made villain that Mr. Burch notes the retcon is something "fans are surprisingly forgiving of"
  • The New-U stations of Borderlands 2 were eventually retconned into simply being a gameplay mechanic rather than an in-universe device after the fact that Handsome Jack would allow his greatest enemies to be resurrected as many times as possible was too much of a plot hole to ignore, with writer Anthony Burch regretting writing dialog for the stations simply by how it made things even more glaring.
  • In the Soul Calibur games, it is revealed that Sophitia Alexandria died at some point during the Time Skip between IV and V. Expanded universe material further elaborates that she removed the Soul Edge shard which was embedded near her heart in the canon ending of the very first game, which freed her daughter Pyrrha from the evil sword's influences but cost her own life. As of Lost Swords, however, this character is back and fully playable, and her website profile states that she's just "missing" instead of strictly deceased.
  • In Twilight Heroes, the heroes can retcon to kick off New Game+ after your actions destroy an entire neighborhood.
  • The Paradise Lost DLC for Postal 2 retcons the events of Postal III as being All Just a Dream the Postal Dude was having during a coma.
  • The first Assassin's Creed game was released in 2007 but is set in 2012. Several e-mails can be read which tell of things such as Hollywood having closed and most of Africa's population having died out. But in Assassin's Creed III, the series caught up with 2012, and every subsequent game has been set in its year of release, so those e-mails have been retconned to have been propaganda to Abstergo Employees by the hacker group Erudito.
  • Cheekily parodied (while played straight in its own way) in South Park: The Fractured but Whole. The game allows you to choose The New Kid's gender despite only being able to play as a boy in the previous game. If you choose to play as a girl, Cartman will explain that The New Kid was somehow secretly a girl all along but nobody noticed, not even her own parents or even the US government agents monitoring her friend-making prowess. Then again, given the average IQ of the adults in South Park, it's not that implausible.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Retcon/VideoGames