YMMV / Teen Titans Go!


  • Accidental Aesop: As one thread in Scans Daily pointed, some viewed "The Return of Slade" as commentary on misguided attempts to reintroduce famous products from the past with a darker tone in order to draw modern fans. However, the reverse can also be true, as a Lighter and Softer approach isn't always the best solution either, as this show continually proves.
  • Accidental Innuendo:
    • In "Artful Dodgers":
    Starfire: Perhaps this is the year you will let Raven and I participate in the dodging of balls!
    • Starfire gives us these two gems in "Halloween":
    Starfire: My quoltrap has never quivered so violently!
    Starfire: I hope my quoltrap never stops quivering!
    • From "Meatball Party":
    Cyborg: SHE'S GONNA EAT IT! SHE'S GONNA EAT IT!!!
    Beast Boy: Mmm-hmm! She's gonna eat it!
    Robin: EAT IT! SHE'S GONNA EAT IT!!!
    Starfire: Mmm-hmm! She's gonna eat it!
    • And again when Robin puts a time limit on the other Titans' use of the bathroom in "Serious Business":
    Robin: Remember, five minutes! I WILL BE WATCHING.
    • "Riding the Dragon":
    The Titans: We're gonna ride that dragon!!! That dragon!!!
  • Alas, Poor Scrappy: Despite Robin having a huge amount of hate, there are many who feel his punishment at times is a bit excessive and feel sorry for him, especially as the show seems to take particular glee in portraying him as a pathetic Loser Protagonist. Some fans also do not like how the other Titans seem all too willing to replace Robin as leader, whether with another leader, or one of their own numbers committing mutiny.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Is Silkie really as oblivious as he seems? Or was his perfect stealth take-down of what seems to be an entire criminal cartel the result of a keen strategic mind motivated by the love of a woman?
    • Is Beast Boy really a stupid, selfish jerk, or is he just a boy that needs education to tap into his potential?
    • What about Robin? Does he really want to be a good hero, looking for what's best in the city? Or a murderous psychopath who only beats villains for fame and glory? Also, is he over-controlling of his team because he's tired of being Batman's sidekick and he's afraid that someone on his team will take over (because they have powers)?
    • Raven. Do "Dreams" and "Campfire Stories" indicate she really wants to kill her friends? Or is she a tortured soul Surrounded by Idiots? Trigon implied that Raven actually used to be evil, but she later grew out of it.
    • Starfire. Why does she participate in mean-spirited activities that her friends do? Is it because she doesn't know any better? Or she's tired of her friends picking on her because she's nice?
    • Cyborg. Who was meant to be only guardian of Tower, and the only young adult member of group. Consider how he acts more like a teenager when he's around his friend Beast Boy, while also considering his origins about him being unwanted as he's a cyborg who's vengeful towards his father who was an engineer specialized in mechanics. All these factors leave him as a borderline psychopathic Man-teenager who uses entertainment as an excuse to explain his somewhat childish or teen personality and block his traumatic memories out his database.
    • The Titans in general. Are they really heroes? Or are they just really power-hungry jerks who use the cover of being heroes as an excuse to get away with bullying villains who aren't even doing anything?
  • Anvilicious: "Vegetables" has moral about eating a balanced diet. Eating nothing but meat or vegetables is unhealthy.
  • Audience-Alienating Premise:
    • The show is a spin-off of the original that is meant to cater to a different audience. While it has garnered a large fanbase and consistently pulls in high ratings, it has also alienated some fans of the original show who were expecting a more true revival of the series rather than a purely Black Comedy sitcom as well as fans who feel this show is a Replacement Scrappy for Young Justice. It doesn't help that some of the episodes seemingly take shots at fans of both the original series and those of Young Justice.
    • Most fans who were keen to the idea of a superhero comedy, especially with DC characters, likewise were turned off by the mean-spirited nature of the show, the unlikeability of the characters in general, and the constant airings of the series shutting out other shows such as Adventure Time and Regular Show. Pointing out that there have been DC shows that have done comedy right like Batman: The Brave and the Bold and even fellow DC Nations mini-series such as Super Best Friends Forever. Even the shorts that inspired this, New Teen Titans, was received more favorably as it at least kept the tone of the '03 series.
    • There are viewers who are unhappy at the fact that the show gets reaired so often to the detriment of other shows like Adventure Time. The latest victim, for example, was Transformers: Robots in Disguise which was given a terrible time slot (5.30am Central Time).note  This has been taken by the show's hatedom as a deliberate and spiteful display of favoritism.
  • Author's Saving Throw: A few episodes have been better-received than others:
    • "Mouth Hole" appears to be a response to complaints about both Robin's Badass Decay and the former Ship Sinking of Robin/Starfire.
    • "Real Boy Adventures" appears to be a response to complaints about Cyborg's Badass Decay, and the controversy "Tower Power" stirred up where he enjoyed his loss of humanity.
    • Finally having Mammoth, See-More, and Billy Numerous speak in "The Hive Five", after two seasons of remaining silent.
    • "Squash and Stretch" spends most of its time discussing the use of violence in cartoons and where it is considered acceptable, which may very well have been done to appease complaints about some episodes having the Titans solve their problems or deal with people they don't like by using violence (though the said complaints are rendered ridiculous by the fact that the original series, by necessity of being an action-oriented show, still saw the Titans' problems being solved via punching at least 85% of the time). There is even a scene where the Titans beat up Robin and conclude that real-life violence isn't funny.
    • "Boys vs. Girls" was largely criticized for having the Titans being sexist without consequences to their behavior. As a possible response to this, the ending of "Operation: Dude Rescue" shows Robin being sexist but gets the appropriate outcome for his attitude.
    • Episodes like "The Return of Slade", "The Fourth Wall", and "Let's Get Serious" all take the time to acknowledge the criticisms lobbied against it by fans of the original show, but always end up placing blame back on said audience for "not getting the joke" or "taking things too seriously". "TTG v. PPG", The Powerpuff Girls (2016) crossover, on the other hand, goes out of its way to not only acknowledge the flaws of the show, but stays firm in the fact that yes, the Titans are all incompetent Jerkasses, and that's the comedy of the show, but delivers it in a way that isn't so insulting to detractors.
    • The Night Begins To Shine 4-parter was a TV Movie based on one of the only things some people liked about the show, and that was the Imagine Spot in the episode "40%, 40%, 20%" which was done in a different style from the rest of the show that looked close to the original Teen Titans cartoon. Unlike most of these examples, this one actually worked, with the final part of said movie being the top scripted show on cable the day it aired.
  • Awesome Music:
  • Awesome Art: "40% 40% 20%" was praised for its amazing artstyle, receiving the highest ratings of any episode so far. Even detractors of the show complimented the art of the episode.
  • Badass Decay: Comes with the below. Most if not all the characters are, for comic book fans anyway, criminally incompetent:
    • Robin gets hit with this the hardest. In the original series, he was able to formulate a strategy to take down all of his teammates. Here? He was shown to be the weakest member of the team since he has no powers. Though this is mostly a case of Depending on the Writer as some episodes show that he is just as competent as he was in the original series.
    • Believe it or not, Batman. The show's dialogue does try to make him out to be the intimidating badass that everybody knows and loves, but when he's actually seen, he's reduced to being nothing more than an unconcerned bystander who chuckles like Squidward.
    • Cyborg. "Ghost Boy" features a normal mountain lion mauling him to death. In the original series, and indeed several Go! episodes that aren't "Ghost Boy", he could withstand and rather handily beat up some of Beast Boy's stronger animal forms (e.g. in a fairly large, carnivorous dinosaur form, the BB clone Trigon created wasn't able to even scratch Cyborg's armor).
    • In the episode "In and Out", Mammoth, of all people, suffers this. Previous episodes established him as The Juggernaut, but this episode turns him into a weeping Butt-Monkey who gets beaten up by Robin.
  • Base-Breaking Character: Pretty much all of the Titans have mixed reception due to the show's Broken Base status, although some characters' popularity have suffered more than others:
    • Beast Boy has been received differently across the fanbase. Some loved how his role as Plucky Comic Relief has been expanded, and see him being even more hilarious and his more worf-y and unfunny characterization aspects were toned down. While others don't take well how much of a jerk he has become, and that he doesn't even care he got the entire team killed with his pranks in "Ghost Boy". There's also mixed view about his design; some people find it cuter, while for others it adds to their annoyance over the character. Also, some feel that his Butt-Monkey status, and particularly the repeated jokes about his intelligence in episodes like "Brain Food" and "Head Fruit", is a bit excessive.
    • While most agree Raven is most in-character with her original series counterpart, being an Only Sane Woman among a bunch of idiots, there are still complaints over several changes to her character. Raven's portrayal as a fan of a certain pony-centered cartoon and its toys really rubs a large portion of the fandom the wrong way, being deemed OOC and irritating. Raven's increased tendency to snark and show little emotion heavily divides the fandom over those who find it funny and those who find it tiresome. Opinions are also split over her increased violent behavior and beating others up when annoyed, as well as her heavy overuse of her powers. Then there's Raven increasingly displaying positive emotion and joining in the other Titans' silliness, whereas fans remember that she could never do this back in the day since emotion, good or bad, would cause her powers to spiral further out of control the more she felt them, so she had to keep it cool.
      • On a similar note, her Alter Ego, Lady Legasus. Depending on who you ask, she's either one of the best things the show has done with Raven, or one of the biggest "what the hell" moments in the show's historynote . Her very existence stems from the absence of Raven's cloak, which in this show is the only reason Raven's so cranky. Then there's her oversexualized portrayal, which definitely got some fans drooling with desire and others frothing with rage.
    • Starfire has become this as well. While some adore her for being the nicest and most innocent out of the Titans, there are those who despise her due to her gullibility being more evident in this incarnation, which causes her to act irritating and obnoxious like the rest of the Titans (sans Raven, but even she has her rare moments) at times. Also, her Amusing Alien speech of randomly adding "the" in front of words is taken Up to Eleven, and can be quite annoying to some.
    • Terra was already a Base-Breaking Character in the original series, but is an even bigger case now. Many have not taken to her villainization well, while others are just happy with any appearance she gets and feel sorry for how she's depicted in this series.
    • Batman has very divided opinions, some love his random cameos and find them to be hilarious, others hate his Badass Decay and how the show has turned him into a pathetic joke character.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment:
  • Bile Fascination: Many will say that the show is bad. Some watch it to see just how bad it is.
  • Broken Base:
    • Mostly concerning fans of the original series. Some genuinely love the current series and consider it a decent and funny follow-up in its own right; others, however, feel it completely misses the point of the original and has taken too many liberties with the characterizations, animation, and overall tone.
    • The episode "The Fourth Wall" is either considered an Author's Saving Throw in acknowledging that the show has many detractors and isn't considered as good as the original Teen Titans animated series or is seen as yet another shallow Take That, Critics! because of the Titans ultimately showing defiance against Control Freak's threat to reboot them again with their usual Jerkass tendencies and Toilet Humor.
    • While the episode "The Cape" has garnered a lot of hatred and accusations of being yet another jab at the detractors for being a Gag Dub of the original series' first episode, there are some who find the episode legitimately funny.
  • Comedy Ghetto: The focus on comedy has turned off plenty of fans from the original series and the comics.
  • Critical Backlash: The show is widely hated by some, particularly fans of the original series. But it does have defenders, some claiming that while the show has its share of flaws, it's not as bad as people say.
  • Critical Research Failure:
    • In "Missing", Robin states the richest person he knew was Scrooge McDuck, when the richest person he knows should be Bruce Wayne, his adoptive father. Granted, Scrooge gives Bruce a pretty good run for his money, and Robin presumably has a pretty good reason not to admit that he knows Bruce Wayne.
    • The superheroes and villains from Bizarro World (or Htrae) have names that are a combination of their respected Earth counterpart and Bizarro (Batman becomes Batzarro, Wonder Woman becomes Bizarra, etc.) The episode that touches this concept, "Robin Backwards", just reverses the names (Robin becomes Nibor, Cyborg becomes Grobyc, etc.).
    • "Kicking a Ball and Pretending to Be Hurt" has Robin stating that no one in the United States plays soccer. While obviously a "Take That!" joke, it's a pretty shallow and dated one (though Animation Lead Time had more to do with this).
    • The superheroes from Young Justice in "Let's Get Serious" also count here. The team's designs featured are from Season 1, where there were definitely a lot more lighter moments, and Season 2 is the one that got really dark. In addition to that, Aqualad is probably the closest they got to an accurate portrayal (makes sense, considering his voice actor is right there); even though it could be possible, Miss Martian never stretched her arms the way she did, usually using her body-shifting powers for disguises and the like. Superboy gets it the worst of all, here: not only does he wink like a pretty boy even though he's clearly the angstiest of the Season 1 team, but he also flies despite being only half-Kryptonian, with not one of Lex Luthor's shields in sight.
    • For a time, CN would use the show as the face of its anti-bullying campaign, because they're both superheroes as well as Adored by the Network. This is despite the fact that the Titans are downright misanthropic and mean spirited in their show, often using "justice" as an excuse to use excessive force or get what they want without care for the consequences. Surprisingly, the network actually pulled the Titans from the campaign, likely because the network did indeed see that the Titans themselves were bullies. And then brought them back for a short time in 2017.
  • Critic-Proof: Regardless of whatever the size of the Hatedom may be, the show consistently pulls in high ratings (up until season four, when ratings began to drop drastically). The main difference between the two groups is that the hatedom is made up almost entirely of the Periphery Demographic, while most of the fanbase is made up of the intended target audience of kids 8 to 14. As a result of this, it is much easier to see the show be treated with scorn online, including on this very site.
  • Crosses the Line Twice: The second half of "Ghost Boy". Beast Boy takes his pranking too far. It eventually causes everybody to die, including Beast Boy himself, though he doesn't care.
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: While the show is meant to be a Black Comedy Sadist Show with the Titans being Unsympathetic Comedy Protagonists, as mentioned many times above and below, one of the common complaints is that all the Titans have become completely selfish assholes towards one another, and it got to the point where even the villains call them out on their actions. With everyone being cruel towards to their teammates, it's often the real villains who are more often liked by some viewers.
  • Designated Hero:
    • Though one could consider them Jerkass Woobies, The Titans themselves in countless episodes are only called "heroes" because they fight the "real" villains, and are otherwise devoid of any heroic intentions. Instances such as "Breakfast Cheese" and "Caged Tiger" depict them as Sociopathic Heroes who beat up villains for the fun of it, and use stopping crime as just an excuse for their acts of violence. "TTG v PPG" outright confirms this, establishing the Titans as "superheroes who do not care about stopping villains." Justified as the show usually exploits this for Black Comedy. This is even lampshaded in the episode "Serious Business" when Robin says that the Titans spend 3% of their time actually fighting crime. This is especially prominent with the male Titans, who are even more selfish, childish, and jerkish than the girls, constantly labelling them as harmless babies (when they would actually mop the floor with the Titans). The Titans also tend to pull a Starscream on Robin, though unlike the Decepticon, they tend to be more successful in usurping Robin's position.
      • Deconstructed in the episode "A Farce", where Brother Blood and the Brain take the Titans to court for their careless destruction of Jump City. They are all found guilty at the end of the episode.
    • Special mention goes to Robin who displays several villain tendencies such as evil scheming, violent psychotic fits, and being prone to laughing evilly. He even acts as the episode's antagonist more frequently than actual villains do.
    • There are also times when Beast Boy and Cyborg fit this description well, and are portrayed as excessively selfish, lazy, childish, and willing to sink to any low in order to get what they want.
    • Aqualad is depicted as one as well. Instead of being Friend to All Living Things, he treats his sea creatures like slaves.
  • Designated Villain: Any episode where one or more Titans are treated as the sane ones will inevitably have them in the wrong, and it's the ones acting stupid and childish that are the episode's "good guys", with the Titan that's "in the wrong" eventually accepting and even joining in on their teammates' behavior. Robin and Raven in particular end up in this position a lot, though in Robin's case, there are an equal amount of episodes where he's legitimately being an asshole and the Titans disapproving him is reasonable.
    • The HIVE are this in several episodes where the Titans beat them up for seemingly no reason. "Breakfast Cheese" has the Titans beat them up for essentially standing around doing nothing. Particularly evident in "The HIVE Five" where each of them are just minding their own non-villainous business before one of the Titans will show up to ruin their time.
    • Brother Blood for the episode "Waffles". Beast Boy and Cyborg are particularly insufferable this episode due to playing a game of only saying the word "waffles". Brother Blood actually serves as the Straight Man and keeps calling the two of them out on their stupidity, yet he loses anyway after being unable to take the stupid behavior any longer and bails.
    • Dr. Light. In "Caged Tiger" after waiting on the boy Titans, he hangs out with the girl Titans and they actually manage to convince him to pull a Heel–Face Turn. Only for the boys to show up last minute and brutally beat him up anyway.
    • Rose Wilson. It's not hard to side with her Only Sane Man attitude when put alongside the sillier Titans. Plus she lays a Take That, Scrappy! moment on all of them sans Raven.
  • Die for Our Ship:
    • Terra for Beast Boy/Raven (big time).
    • As well as the alternative, Raven for Beast Boy/Terra.
    • Aqualad for pretty much any ship involving Raven or Terra including: Beast Boy/Raven, Beast Boy/Terra, and Robin/Raven.
    • There's also Batgirl for Robin/Starfire.
  • Ear Worm: It's become quickly apparent that the Titans (mostly Beast Boy, Cyborg, and Robin) love to sing. Almost all of their songs will naturally become this:
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Jinx is easily the most popular of the H.I.V.E. Five, due to being the only one who regularly speaks (unlike most of her teammates), having the most focus, and being portrayed as sympathetic from time-to-time. Her hanging out with Starfire and Raven, as well as her relationship with Cyborg also contribute to her popularity.
    • Raven's emoticlones. Especially Passion/Purple, for the BB/Raven fans, as well as Pink.
    • Lady Legasus has been getting plenty of fan art as well.
    • Birdarang is well-liked for his square-ish demeanor and goofy voice.
    • Mother Mae-Eye is actually received better in this series, compared to her original self where she appeared in an episode that was questionably written on drugs. Here she's not some pie-dwelling witch who induces hallucinations, but is instead a Sweeny Todd expy who bakes pies with people in them. She's also actually capable of combat and actively antagonizes the Titans rather than pretending to be their mother for unexplained reasons in the old show.
    • Blackfire had fanart before her debut.
    • Mad Mod. For being one of the few classic Teen Titans rogues to be true to his original series self. Also, unlike many of the other villains he does not undergo Badass Decay and is actually a successful villain, where he manages to drain the youth from all the Titans sans Raven.
    • Control Freak is this in spades. He's true to his original self, but what really makes him interesting is he provides an In-Universe explanation of the Teen Titans continuity being rebooted, explaining in the "Fourth Wall" that he reset reality and created the GO! continuity.
    • Kaldur gained a lot of fans due to calling out the Titans with his "The Reason You Suck" Speech in "Let's Get Serious."
    • Rose Wilson is one of the most popular characters, due to being in one of the few serious, action-filled episodes, having great interactions with fan favorite Raven, and for being a total badass in her appearance and fighting style. Also, the way she disses the Titans can be taken as a Take That, Scrappy! moment. It helps that she's the closest thing we'll see to Slade due to the infamous "The Return of Slade". Her popularity led her to getting brought back in "Operation Dude Rescue".
  • Evil Is Sexy:
    • In "Starfire the Terrible", Starfire when she turns into a villain. Well, she tries to, at least.
    • Jinx is this as well. Cyborg definitely thinks this.
    • Blackfire. Just listen to her voice.
    • Terra as well.
    • Kitten.
    • Rose Wilson. Her eyepatch and Peek-a-Bangs alone won her so many fans.
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop: One of the main criticisms against the series. Many of the morals the show appears to proclaim come off as unfortunate:
    • The various episodes that deal with intelligence such as "Books", "Knowledge", and "Head Fruit" all come off as anti-intellectual with their implication that knowledge or stimulating your brain in any way is bad and possibly fatal for your health. "Knowledge" also carries the implication that intelligence makes you an insufferable, judgemental, overly-critical ass who no one wants to be friends with.
    • In the episode "Sandwich Thief" Robin teaches the lesson that you should never let things go. No matter what you do, who you do it to, or how ridiculous your theories get, you should never stop and keep going because eventually you will be proven correct.
    • The episodes that deal with laziness such as "Lazy Sunday", "The Best Robin", or "Leg Day" carry the moral that it's okay to be lazy and exercise is bad and that it's okay to trick your friends into doing things for you. Lampshaded by the Couch Spirit in "Lazy Sunday".
    Couch Spirit: Just you listen to the Couch. Some folks may try to take away your laziness, but don't you let them. Never be too lazy to stand up and fight for your right... to be lazy.
    • The various sports episodes like "Artful Dodgers", "Multiple Trick Pony", and "Kicking a Ball and Pretending to Be Hurt", all send the message that there's nothing wrong with cheating or being a Sore Loser, and it can solve all problems.
    • The various episodes that deal with money such as "Two Bumblebees and a Wasp", "Black Friday", and "Pyramid Scheme", all send a message that there's nothing wrong with being greedy and that money should be acquired by any means. The episode "Pyramid Scheme" in particular encourages committing Ponzi Schemes, which are very illegal crimes that carry serious legal consequences.
    • The infamous "Staring at the Future" has the moral that you should avoid responsibility at all costs, even if you have to ruin the lives of others in the process.
    • The start of "Nature" has Beast Boy being sophisticated and civilized for once, where his behavior immediately gets frowned upon by the others and he's encouraged to be more animalistic. Nearing the end of the episode, Beast Boy gets Mother Nature to grant civilization to the animals, where she heeds his instructions of disposing of all the trees, which carries the implication of deforestation being a positive thing.
    • The episode "Hot Garbage" carries the moral that it's okay to be filthy and you should never throw away garbage. Also, as mentioned below, it carries the Unfortunate Implications that it's okay to embrace hoarding, a serious psychological problem for many today.
    • "Boys vs. Girls" has been riddled with criticism about sexism and gender inequality. Initially the boys, especially Robin, behave very sexistly towards the girls labeling themselves inferior in every way. However, after a contest, where the girls dominate at everything with no explanation, Cyborg and Beast Boy decide to join the girls themselves. The episode pretty much ends by stating upfront that girls are better than boys. The depiction of "cooties" being a real thing is also in poor taste.
    • "Man Person" was especially scorned for encouraging kids to inflict self-injury, by presenting body parts as being expendable, and making prosthetic limbs look cool and easy to attain.
    • While "Smile Bones" technically gave the "correct lesson" at the very end: "chew your food", the immensely disturbing lengths it goes to in order to reach that point, pretty much render the lesson pointless. The episode features Beast Boy and Cyborg being even bigger assholes than usual, and starving their friends to the point where they become malnourished. The episode then shows further signs of writers engaging in substance abuse when Beast Boy and Cyborg's bellies swell up to tremendous proportions, before sprouting arms and legs and taking on lives of their own. The bellies then engage in cannibalism and consume vast portions of the city, and after defeating the bellies they shrink down to normal size, with all the excess mass (from the buildings the bellies ate) disappearing into nowhere. The end result is they've pretty much scared kids into not eating food at all.
    • The episode "Oil Drums" states that you should watch plenty of TV to keep your brain healthy or your mind will rot and you'll turn into a zombie obsessed with outdoor activities. Also doubles as a Critical Research Failure as it has been theorized that too much TV affects your mind.
    • The episode "Beast Man" has the moral that you should avoid being a hardworking, responsible adult or "The Man" will find you and force you to get a job.
    • "Accept the Next Proposition You Hear", has the moral that it's okay to be a follower and that you should let someone else make your decisions for you.
    • "BBBDAY" outright states that nobody cares about birthdays, and that everyone should simply pretend to enjoy them.
    • "The True Meaning of Christmas", initially has Santa stating the true meaning of Christmas was about family and friends, before the Titans blow up his factory, forcibly making him change the message that Christmas was only about presents and nothing more.
    • "Think About Your Future" shows that it's okay to be lazy and reckless no matter of how much it affects your future, and nobody should be responsible.
    • The beginning of "Serious Business" shows that you should laugh at someone who is desperate to go to the bathroom and make them wet themselves instead of helping them.
    • "Shrimps And Prime Rib" teaches that if someone's better at your job than you, you're no longer needed and can just do whatever you want.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Robin/Raven, mostly from those who watched the original series and liked their close relationship there. Though it's also popular among Beast Boy/Terra shippers who want Raven out of the picture by pairing her with someone else.
    • Starfire/Beast Boy due to usually acting much more like their original selves when they're around each other. "Starliar" is what solidified it for some fans due their genuinely cute interactions. "Uncle Jokes" also tends to get a lot of love from the BB/Star shippers, while "The Date" also teased this.
  • Fandom Berserk Button:
    • The show itself is one to fans of the original series and fans of Cartoon Network's other shows. Just mentioning Teen Titans Go! or daring to say that it is in any way better than the original show or Cartoon Network's other shows will have you attacked by fans. As far as many fans of the original series are concerned, this show doesn't exist.
    • The hatred has increased tenfold with ads calling the series "your new favorite show" and the Thursday night block being renamed "New Titans Thursdays" (though fortunately, it was changed back to just "New Thursdays" after a couple weeks, and the tagline didn't last long, either).
    • Any new episode full of Family-Unfriendly Aesop has a tendency to set the internet ablaze.
    • Any episode where they take footage from the original series and dub over/poorly edit them are very much guaranteed to set the internet on fire. The ratio of likes/dislikes on these clips from "The Cape" (a Gag Dub of "Divide and Conquer", the very first episode of the original series) are a strong indicator of how much this is a no-no for many haters of the series who are fans of the original.
    • Likewise, when an episode comes out that takes jabs at criticisms and treats them with a strawman fallacy, expect that particular episode to be treated with scorn by everyone, including fans of the show.
    • Basically, if you're a fan of the series, you're guaranteed to become an internet pariah.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • Teen Titans Go!'s Adored by the Network status resulted in a massive rivalry between the Go! fandom and the rest of the DC Nation fans. The demise of DC Nation caused the rivalry to stretch to nearly every other show on CN, thanks to said status. Many fans of the other shows believe that it doesn't deserve all the airtime that it gets.note  Adventure Time, Regular Show, and Steven Universe fans note in particular resent its popularity and excessive airtime. It's gotten so serious that it potentially rivals Call of Duty and even Twilight as having the largest hatedom on the internet!
      • It goes even further, as many fans blame the series for getting Regular Show cancelled by depriving it of reruns to keep ratings up, and with Adventure Time set to end in 2018, many fear Steven Universe or any show that is either not named Teen Titans GO!, or is deemed too inappropriate for kids by the network's increasingly-conservative censors will also be axed, and that Infinity Train will be rejected by the network. The latest victim of the network's favoritism is Clarence.
    • Speaking of DC, Teen Titans GO! is often regarded as the rotten tomato among all of DC's other media adaptations, with the fandoms of other DC works shunning TTG or refusing to acknowledge it as part of the DC community.
    • As of "Truth, Justice, and What?" fans of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2012) have started clashing with fans of the show due to the content of the episode, which features the Titans beating a representation of the Turtles up.
    • With the Total Drama fandom, as Cartoon Network has started a trend of halting the airing of new episodes of Teen Titans Go! to marathon the new season of Total Drama. Likewise the TD fandom in general is annoyed by the excessive airing of TTG like any other show's fandoms.
    • The episode "Two Parter" did nothing for the volatile "Marvel vs. DC" rivalry, by insulting Marvel's poster boy, Spider-Man, effectively pouring a can of gasoline on the fire.
    • Sonic Boom fans joined the rivalry due to that series getting moved for more Teen Titans Go! reruns.
    • A minor rivalry from Infinity Train fans, due to Cartoon Network airing the pilot at 6am just to air a marathon of Teen Titans Go! episodesnote  through the rest of the day, thus possibly lessening the chances of the show getting greenlit.
    • Fans of shows on Disney-owned networks that got cancelled, such as The Muppets and Girl Meets World, hate the show for killing the chances the shows may have had for more seasons, as they both aired opposite times when Cartoon Network would run Teen Titans Go!.
  • Fanon:
    • A rather large portion of the fanbase has decided that this series is just a bunch of weird dreams from original series Beast Boy. Those who have this as their head canon have admitted that they have more fun watching the show than other people probably do.
    • There's also a theory that this series is an alternate reality created by Larry, and exists in the same continuity as the original series. note 
  • Foe Yay:
    • This bit between Terra and Raven:
    Raven: What's an attractive, (sniffs Terra) decent-smelling girl like you doing with Beast Boy?
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: Many fans who have read the comics or have seen the original series knows that Cyborg's greatest fear is losing his humanity. In "Tower Power", his mind is a part of Titans Tower.
  • Growing the Beard:
    • "Colors of Raven" for some.
    • "Cool School" is one of the most liked episodes, with the inclusion of Rose Wilson.
    • "40% 40% 20%" is an extremely loved episode, and one of the few that did not rack up criticism from the haters, mainly due to a massive Animation Bump and loving send-up to 80s action movies.
  • Ham and Cheese: All the voice actors. It's pretty obvious the cast is just having a ball reprising their old roles.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Several years ago, a fan wrote a Teen Titans fanfic about the gang watching Enchanted and comparing themselves to the characters from the film. Starfire, of course, is compared to ditzy Princess Classic Giselle. Fast forward to the episode "Laundry Day", in which Starfire makes a beautiful dress out of scratch, something Giselle did in the movie.
    • In "BBBDay!", the Titans avoid using the Birthday Song because they can't afford the right to use it. While the song was believed to be under copyright at the time the episode was written, by the time it aired, a judge had ruled that the copyright was never valid in the first place.
    • Starfire befriending monsters rather than slaying them in "Video Game References" became hilarious with the release of Undertale, which emphasizes The Power of Friendship and eschews the typical combat-themed adventure.
    • "Pyramid Scheme" aired on the same day as the Gravity Falls series finale. It's worth noting that the latter won in both ratings and critical acclaim, to the point that "Pyramid Scheme" came off as a No-Hoper Repeat.
    • A crossover with The Powerpuff Girls (2016) was announced a year after Tara Strong caused a stink over being replaced as the voice of Bubbles. It could be seen as being Harsher in Hindsight if you feel bad for Strong.
    • All the jokes about Young Justice being cancelled, following the announcement of its renewal.
    • How Cartoon Network kept claiming about how it's "your new favorite show!", has since lost a lot of weight, since as of lately, The Amazing World of Gumball and Steven Universe have been surpassing Teen Titans Go! in ratings. CN actually stopped using the tagline a few months after it was introduced, after alot of backlash over the network's Blatant Lies.
    • In "Missing", Robin, Cyborg, and Beast Boy are given a check for billions of dollars. They fantasize this in a parody of the DuckTales opening sequence, with the song "We're Rich (Whoo Hoo)". Guess which show got its own reboot two years later?
    • In "Second Christmas", the Titans trick Starfire into making another day of Christmas to enjoy it more, with a whole new Santa even helping them celebrate it. It's a good thing that they didn't wait until July 25th to celebrate it. Otherwise, they would've just been robbed.
  • Ho Yay:
    • In "Double Trouble," the numerous duplicates of Beast Boy and Cyborg take over Titans Tower, and one group of them are seen playing a game of Spin the Bottle. Take from that what you will.
    • For some fans, the very fact that Beast Boy and Cyborg are close friends, is enough of a reason to ship them together.
    • In "You're Fired", Cyborg is shown to be the only one who's actually upset about Beast Boy being fired, is shown crying over a picture of him at the "Hero Audition" and it's even implied that he might have had something to do with Beast Boy trying to sneak back in.
    • In "Power Moves", Robin is obsessed with merging with Cyborg and even merges against his will.
  • Hype Backlash: If you don't hear people hating it for its content, or because it's a poor cash-in on the original Teen Titans show, then it's most likely this. The show isn't necessarily completely terrible on its own, just not really that good. However, because CN keeps airing it for hours upon hours every day of the week and seemingly viewing it as the Second Coming of animation, making sure you're going to catch it if you flip the channel to it at any moment. This has had the side effect of influencing The Firefly Effect on to some of the older and newer shows, since they don't get the proper amount of love they should (and several getting cancelled as a result of reruns being taken off the schedule and replaced by Go! reruns and thus being deprived of ratings, which has led several to believe that Go! is part of a conspiracy concocted by Moral Guardians to cancel any series they deem family-unfriendly, using Go! as a weapon to artificially manipulate ratings so they can justify screwing whatever show they deem inappropriate), despite being better-received than Go! has in its lifespan. It has also been compared to SpongeBob when Nickelodeon really started overexposing that series, leading to many of their other shows to not get the viewership they deserve because people who hate the show due to its overexposure alone aren't tuning in.
  • Idiot Plot: The 5 Part Island Adventure special has the Titans stranded on an island despite the fact that all of the Titans sans Robin can fly. Made all the more egregious by the fact that the Titans are clearly shown using their powers even though Robin says their powers don't work for some reason and yet none of them think to use their powers to simply fly off the island. It's also not helped by the fact that despite their circumstances, Robin (as per usual with this series) is constantly stirring trouble and making everything worse for everyone for the sake of trying to make the island survival scenario 'authentic'.
  • Internet Backdraft:
    • Constantly with this show, where there are places on the Internet where Teen Titans Go! is universally hated, and any fan of the show wandering in or trying to defend it will get struck down and accused of having zero taste in cartoons.
    • As the comments section of this page shows, the news that the show would be doing a crossover episode with the already controversial The Powerpuff Girls (2016) reboot in July was not warmly received by fans, especially since Go! is not a Cartoon Network Original Series, but is made by Warner Bros. Animation and acquired by CN (doesn't stop the network from treating it as one of their own). At the very least, the Hatedom hoped the Powerpuff Girls would knock some sense into the Titans, or at least give them the brutal beatdown they so rightfully deserve. Following the airing, complaints died down, with the special being pretty well received. In that the Powerpuff Girls and Mojo Jojo were written more like their original incarnations than the reboot versions, as it focused more on their respective heroic and villainous traits.
    • Whenever there is an episode devoted to mocking detractors, such as "Let's Get Serious" and "The Return of Slade". At first, these were tolerated, but soon devolved into groans and Flame War when they started happening so frequently that they became annoying. Episodes that make fun of the haters are among the few things fans and haters of Teen Titans Go! alike despise.
    • The show has received flak for its Adored by the Network status due to how overly excessive it is, which usually comprise a good part to almost all of the day's schedule. It got to the point that from July 31 to August 4, 2017, Teen Titans Go! absolutely dominated the schedule, where the week was only comprised of it, OK K.O.! Let's Be Heroes, and two airings of Megamind.
  • It's Not Supposed to Win Oscars: A common defense for the show is that it's a purely comedic show and geared towards a younger audience, thus it's not supposed to be taken seriously. Even the writers themselves have admitted that they wanted to make a "stupid show" and didn't put much effort into it. This is even invoked and used as An Aesop in the episode "Real Magic", where Robin's lame attempts at magic are constantly heckled by Raven, who is then banished to the mines by the Magic God, who says he hates hecklers. At the end, Raven learns that just because something's terrible doesn't mean you should hate it. The Aesop obviously holds little water to the show's vocal hatedom and for many, this reasoning only makes the show worse.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Robin may be an egotistical Control Freak, but despite his negative actions, it's not hard to feel sorry for him (even those that hate him can feel sad for him). In "Dude Relax", it was revealed that the animals in his circus would often abuse him as a baby, which was the reason why he's always paranoid and uptight. His team would also treat him like a joke sometimes, to the point of them wanting him to be replaced with either another leader or one of their own numbers committing mutiny. It could be justified due to his obnoxious behavior, but many felt that this kind of treatment he gets from his teammates is just plain miserable.
    • Raven may have a cynical attitude, but that doesn't stop her from having her sympathetic moments (the last scene of "Be Mine" was her most evident so far). She's also the Only Sane Woman in a cast full of clowns.
    • Even Beast Boy and Cyborg in their occasional Butt-Monkey moments. For example, the former is the first to die in "Salty Codgers". The latter has gotten mauled on multiple occasions and lost his body to a virus because of Robin's inner body wanderlust taking precedence over finding a cure in "Body Adventure".
    • The H.I.V.E. can be this in episodes where the Titans are excessively stupid or violent. Gizmo and Mammoth are the most frequent victims. Notable examples include "Artful Dodgers" where the Titans have the H.I.V.E. sent to jail after losing a dodgeball match to them despite their blatant cheating, "Breakfast Cheese" where they are viciously attacked for the simple, petty crime of loitering, and "In and Out" where all five Titans viciously beat up Mammoth when they infiltrate the H.I.V.E.'s new base.
      • This gets taken Up to Eleven in their titular episode "The Hive Five", where not only do the Titans constantly prank call them, but the H.I.V.E.'s attempts at enjoying their day off are completely ruined by the Titans' obnoxious antics.
    • Blackfire maliciously frames her sister Starfire for her own crimes and gets her thrown in jail. The "Woobie" section comes in when it occurs to Blackfire that Starfire is the only one who unconditionally loved her and makes a sincere attempt to become a good sister, only for her previous jerkass actions to bite her in the form of Starfire escaping from prison and giving her a severe beatdown.
    • Even Trigon is this. He's trying to be a good father, but doesn't have a way with his anger. Though in some ways, it's an act.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships:
    • Raven already had this status in the original show, but now she has even more shipping candidates to add to the list. She's shipped with Beast Boy, Robin, Starfire, Terra, Jinx, Aqualad, and Rose Wilson.
    • Starfire also has no shortage of ships, with Robin, Raven, Beast Boy, Jinx, Speedy, and Kid Flash.
  • Les Yay:
    • Starfire licking Raven behind her ears, which could also count as Squick.
    • Also, Starfire kisses Raven at the end of "Caramel Apples". Granted, it wasn't in a romantic way, but it still counts.
    • Raven's time spent with Rose Wilson in "Cool School", edges into Les Yay territory at a few points. They get more of it in "Operation Dude Rescue". Not only does Rose begrudgingly admit to missing Raven, but there's also this exchange, spoken rather seductively by both girls:
    Raven: Alright, Rose, this is your chance to break as much stuff as you want.
    Rose: You really know what I like. I like that.
    Raven: I like that you like that I know what you like.
    Rose: I like that you like that I like that you like knowing what I like.
    • In "The Inner Beauty of a Cactus", one of the last people Starfire attempts to kiss is a woman.
  • Like You Would Really Do It:
    • In "Pie Bros", it looks like Robin, Starfire, and Raven have been baked into pies and Cyborg and Beast Boy are eating them. It turns out they escaped and only their hair and clothes were in the pies.
    • It's pretty much averted every other time where any of the Titans can die by the end of the episode without revival, and still be alive in the next.
  • Memetic Loser: Robin, full stop. The show seems to take a near sadistic glee in thoroughly portraying him as a pathetic Loser Protagonist, putting him through Torture Porns that make the ones Squidward go through look tame in comparison. His own teammates even view him as one. They rarely follow his orders, treat him like absolute dirt, constantly look to get him kicked out of the team or get replaced by a new leader, and only seem to let him be the leader out of pity. Raven outright says he's the one she likes the least out of the Titans, and Starfire never returns his affections and even outright says she doesn't love him nor could she learn to love him.
  • Memetic Molester:
    • Robin in "Power Moves". He spends most of the episode inside Cyborg and forcing him to come up with off-the-wall power moves.
    • Scary Teri from "Slumber Party". The way she makes Cyborg scream like a little girl, along with the fact that she stalks anyone nearby when summoned, little kids included.
    • Cyborg in "Rocks and Water", where his attempts to be the third wheel to Robin and Starfire reach disturbing levels, going so far as to get in the way of their kiss (with him kissing Robin).
    • The Tooth Fairy in the episode "The Dignity of Teeth". His appearance, voice, and the fact that he eats teeth are creepy enough, but his touchy-feely mannerisms towards Raven and the lecherous way he covets her teeth makes him come off as a sexual predator. Unlike the other examples, which are mostly Played for Laughs, it comes off as legitimately disturbing. The "ta-ta-ta-ta" can be considered pretty funny though.
    Tooth Fairy: No need for introductions. Ta-ta-ta-ta-ta. We met while you were sleeping. Yes. I wiggled my fingers under all of your pillows to extract the pearly treasures held under them. Ta-ta-ta-ta-ta. All except you, Raven. You never gave me your precious teeth. It made me covet them even more. (Menacingly) Ta-ta-ta-ta-ta.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Portraying Raven and Robin as bronies is starting to become a thing for fan fiction writers. (The only non-canon thing about that for Raven would be replacing the parody with the actual show.)
    • Oddly enough, the Ship Tease between Raven and Beast Boy has become an in joke with some circles of the fandom.
    • Robin's lack of sleep in "Nose Mouth" is partially because he saw the Silence.
    • Fans occasionally, and jokingly compare the show to the various dork ages of the comics. The most often being the New 52 variant of the Titans. There's rarely ever a clear “winner.”
    • All of the songs.
    • "Fresh!"note 
    • "Law of the jungle, baby!"note 
    • Beast Boy dancing as cat with a boom box.
    • LAST TUESDAY!
    • "MEATBALL PARTY!!!"note 
    • "Dem legs"note 
    • "Waffles, waffles, waffles!"note 
    • Aquaman/Starfire FOREVER!
    • The Pee-Pee Dance.
    • "This isn't the episode I was promised!"note 
    • "Snug as a bug (in a rug)!"note 
    • "Let's Get Serious x.0" note 
  • Mis-blamed:
    • A lot of fans have blamed this show for getting Young Justice cancelled, despite the fact that the latter's producers have already listed out the causes for cancellation, and those causes having nothing to do with Teen Titans Go!.note  This pic of the Titans beating up the cast of Young Justice made by Copernicus Studios, an animation company in Halifax that does some of the animation for Teen Titans Go!, didn't help.
    • The show has often been blamed for causing the cancellation of Adventure Time and Regular Show. In actuality, both series were ended by their creators themselves. The show was also blamed for causing Super Noobs to not do well and eventually become forgotten by Cartoon Network, using "Teen Titans Go" interrupting "Super Noobs"'s schedule to air the rest of the season in August and September after an eight month hiatus, but said return only lasting for two weeks, as an example. In reality, "Super Noobs" suffered from low ratings right from the start, and the return not being properly advertised made it doomed to fail.
  • Moe:
    • Starfire, of course. Her Fish out of Water status is played up for all its worth in this show, particularly in episodes like "Parasite". She's especially adorable autotuned ("Uncle Jokes").
    • Raven has a lot of Moe moments herself. Even her '20s Bob Haircut makes her look cute when it's seen.
      • When she got a toothache after Cyborg fed her a cybernetic meatball.
      • Her cuteness is really expressed in "Pirates". This episode has her blushing and smiling a lot and she gets a cute fishbone hair dec from Aqualad.
      • "Baby Hands" gives us a look at Raven's original comic outfit; combining it with an eager-to-please attitude makes her absolutely adorable.
      • Just a quick cutaway, but when she's tapdancing in the bathroom in "Serious Business", the results are adorable and funny.
    • Cyborg and Beast Boy as babies. Cyborg had daddy issues and Beast Boy was apparently abandoned at a zoo.
    • Baby Robin. Those mean circus animals kept stealing his stuff.
    • Silkie. The creators dialed up his cuteness, save for a few gross moments.
    • The Titans in the episode "Halloween" when they are turned into kids by the Halloween Spirit. They are downright huggable, especially when they're wearing their costumes.
    • Young Cyborg during the Scary Teri flashback in "Slumber Party".
    • Beast Boy doing his maraca head wiggle song in the beginning and end of "Head Fruit".
    • Blackfire too.
  • Most Wonderful Sound: Starfire's singing at the end of "Breakfast Cheese".
  • No Such Thing as Bad Publicity: Despite the sheer hate this show has gotten, the ratings are still climbing, ironically because of said vitriol. As the advertisement say, it's "your new favorite show".
  • Older Than They Think:
    • Terra's hatred for Beast Boy may be surprising to fans of the 2003 show, though this originates from the 80's comics. "Be Mine" has given Terra back some of her 2003 qualities, what with her actually falling for BB whereas the original comics version hated him from start to finish.
    • Beast Boy and Raven being in a romantic relationship actually dates all the way back to the comics, and isn't something Teen Titans Go! made up. Even though it wasn't explored in the original Teen Titans series, and the Word of God for that show clarified several times that these versions weren't supposed to have that kind of relationship and were more Like Brother and Sister.
    • This show itself wasn't the first time a Teen Titans based series went for slapstick humor which preceded it. The first time was actually the 2003 series.
  • Pandering to the Base:
    • "Rocks and Water" finally has Beast Boy and Raven kissing, which is something the colossal BBRae fanbase had been dying for since their first Ship Tease in "Matched".
    • "Some of Their Parts" is a sequel to "Colors of Raven", one of the most popular episodes in the series.
      • "Legs", another one of the show's most popular episodes, received two sequels—"Leg Day" and "Arms Race With Legs".
    • Defied with "The Return of Slade", which has everything that many fans wanted happen offscreen. The rest of the episode is another Take That! towards anybody that has a complaint about this show. The episode was so reviled that many saw it as a low point for the series.
    • "BBRae" is one giant love letter to the BBRae fanbase, which was one the most anticipated episodes in the show's run, featuring the "BBRae (Bae)" song performed by Greg Cipes.
  • Paranoia Fuel:
    • This line from a shrunken Robin to Starfire in "Body Adventure" comes off as a bit creepy due to his Stalker With a Crush tendencies toward her.
    Robin: I could be anywhere, at any time, and you would never know. Anyway, just pretend I'm not here. (Stares at Starfire while creepy music plays.)
    • This line from the talking TV to Cyborg in the episode "Oil Drums", while meant to come off as heartwarming, has shades of this. Not helped by the TV staring directly at the screen.
    TV: You might be surprised to know that all those years you spent staring at me, I was staring right back at you and it has been a joy to help shape you into the man you are today.
  • Periphery Demographic: Surprisingly, most viewers of Teen Titans Go! are toddlers. This could be due to the attractive artstyle of the show and the fact that it's one of the few things Cartoon Network airs during the time when toddlers watch TV. It constantly gets higher ratings than shows actually aimed at preschoolers (most notably Sesame Street) and has been the top show of the month in ratings with that demographic twice and often appears at the top of the list. This has lead to Cartoon Network holding a few mini Teen Titans Go! marathons on weekdays specifically for this demographic. Due to this fanbase (and because the characters on the show act like they are that age), the Hatedom gave the series the derogatory nickname Toddler Titans.
    • Many adults also enjoy the series, though their attempts to defend the series are often drowned out by the Hatedom, and have been called everything, from tasteless to even philistines.
    • A big part of the reason for adults enjoying the show is that it caters to them, especially those who grew up in the late 70s and early 80s. Many of the references are to 80s shows, culture, and aesthetic. "Night Begins to Shine" comes to mind.
  • Rooting for the Empire:
    • Many viewers have found themselves rooting for the villains, especially in episodes where the Titans are being excessively stupid and unsympathetic, while the bad guys are the sane ones. Prominent examples are "Waffles" where Brother Blood is the Straight Man while Beast Boy and Cyborg are being childish Jerkasses, or "Breakfast Cheese" where the Titans literally beat up the H.I.V.E. for standing around doing nothing.
    • The episode "A Farce" takes this Up to Eleven where Brother Blood and the Brain take the Titans to court for their careless and reckless destruction of Jump City. They are all found guilty at the end of the episode.
    • In the Island Adventure episodes, Robin invokes a blatant Expy of the Predator and stirs a panic as they're hunted before telling them they learned nothing about hard survival and running off. Except they befriend the alien anyway. But with all of the absolute hell Robin stirs during this batch of episodes, it's not surprising to see people cheer at the alien mounting Robin's skull (with hair shapes) on a wall in The Stinger.
  • The Scrappy:
    • Cyborg in this incarnation. His deeper, more nuanced characterization from the 2003 series is completely nonexistent. Alongside his best buddy Beast Boy, he is nothing more than a stupid, wild party guy, or mentally backward teenager who only cares about himself.
    • This version of Robin is one as well, going from being an actual strong leader to a whiny, arrogant, egotist who never stops obsessing how he's the "Lone Wolf Leader", and actually values getting glory over doing heroic deeds.
    • This version of Aqualad isn't very popular, due to his Chick Magnet persona being escalated to The Casanova and he acts like he owns every girl. Not to mention him hitting on Raven clashing with the show's colossal BBRae fandom.
  • Seasonal Rot:
    • Many view season 2 as this due to the Titans's increasingly idiotic and mean-spirited natures as well as episode plots becoming more bizarre with nonsensical and often abrupt endings. Even a portion of those who were previously fans of season 1 have lost faith in the show. The season also contains some of the most controversial episodes such as "Let's Get Serious", "Truth, Justice, and What?", and "The Return of Slade". The latter of the three was particularly scorned for being both another cruel jab at the show's critics and a blatant, shallow ratings trap that shamelessly lied to its fans, causing many to lose whatever respect for the show they had by that point.
    • Season 3 is considered this by some due to more emphasis being put on the Titans' mean-spirited natures, the overuse of '80s references and predictable fourth wall gags, and interesting plots being wasted for the sake of comedy such as the episode "Two Parter", which is considered the worst offender.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat
    • Most of Teen Titans Go!'s older fandom comes from fans of the 2003 cartoon; as a result, as of both "Terra-ized" and "Matched", the fandom has revived the Ship to Ship Combat between BB/Rae and BB/Terra shippers.
    • It got worse with "Be Mine", when Terra comes around to BB's feelings.
    • Zigzagged with "Staring at the Future". Fans of Go! didn't mind that Robin hooks up, and has a baby, with Batgirl, but fans only familiar with the original series found it insulting.
  • Snark Bait: One of the biggest favored critic punching bags on the internet. Find a fan of the comics or original show and ask them what they think about it. You'll get essay length comments on how stupid the Titans behave, how it's offensive to the original series, teaches bad morals, and is being milked by CN due to the appeal to little kids.
  • So Okay, It's Average:
    • Those who don't outright despise the series usually see it as this, stating that while it has more than its share of flaws, it's still watchable.
    • Most people's opinion on the crossover with The Powerpuff Girls (2016) after it finally aired. While many praised the episode for giving Blossom, Bubbles, Buttercup, and Mojo Jojo characterizations more in line with how they were in the original series as well as the girls and the PPG Narrator delivering several Take That, Scrappy! statements to the Titans, the same people are irritated that the Titans treated the girls like babies and ended the episode without learning a thing (as usual) after the girls proved to be better crimefighters.
  • Spiritual Adaptation: The episode "Belly Bros" is sometimes jokingly called "DeviantArt: The Animated Series," referencing the site's perchance to attract those with belly kinks (who, of course, loved this episode).
  • Squick:
    • The frequent vomiting fits the characters do throughout the series.
    • The pies made out of people. The Titans even ate some.
    • If you know what "owl pellets" were, Beast Boy puking it into Cyborg's cereal as a prank in "Ghost Boy" is this in spades.
    • Muscley Robin. Especially when he flexes his butt cheeks.
    • The entirety of the "Parasite" episode. "Parry" is just nasty. Particularly cringeworthy when Robin lets loose several parasites to latch onto his face, and they drain him of all his nutrients.
    • It's bad enough that it was on the floor beforehand, but Cyborg eating a moldy 30-year-old pizza in "Staring at the Future" was pretty gross.
    • Beast Boy agonizingly pushing a fish into his head through his ear in "Brain Food". He also put a banana in his ear later in the episode.
    • Robin regurgitating ping pong balls nonstop at the end of "Real Magic".
    • The Titans being turned into old people by Mad Mod in the episode "Salty Codgers". Also Raven's affections toward old people, which has her hugging and kissing them like one would do a pet, also comes off as this to some. In-Universe, even the Titans think it's disturbing.
    • In "Serious Business", you can't tell what's worse: the fact that Starfire uses the toilet to make chili, or that the Titans now know this and still eat it.
    • In "Smile Bones", the image of the Titans' bloated stomachs, particular Starfire's, who has nine stomachs, has been getting this reaction; as has the image of Cyborg and Beast Boy's bellies coming to life. There's also the fact the Titans take out their teeth and put it in each other's mouths.
    • The mutation scene in "Truth, Justice, and What".
    • Beast Boy getting repeatedly stung by bees and eventually bloating to grotesque proportions in the episode "Two Bumblebees and a Wasp".
    • "Head Fruit" has a tree growing out of Beast Boy's head and sprouting fruit, which the Titans eat and even make a drink out of. The episode also has him again jamming things in his ear like a book and a slice of pizza.
    • "The Dignity of Teeth" reveals that the Tooth Fairy takes your teeth so he can eat them. And him challenging Raven to an eating competition causes her to develop an appetite for teeth as well.
    • Pretty much the entirety of the episode "The Croissant", from Silkie's friend, to the Titans being turned into humanoid insects by Killer Moth, to the vomiting fits being turned Up to Eleven.
    • "Leg Day" takes a premise from a previous episode (where Raven becomes the Kick Chick-themed Lady Legasus) and drives it straight into this territory. All of the Titans get leg-themed names and musculature... but only in certain areas. Cyborg, a.k.a. Thunder Thighs, has absolutely massive thighs... and little else. Beast Boy, a.k.a. Calves has, you guessed it, massive calves. And the rest of his legs are his normal noodly thinness. The song at the end that borderline fetishizes their hypermuscular legs just adds to the creepy.
    • In "The Cape" a redub of the original series episode "Divide and Conquer", in one of the redubbed lines, Cyborg calls the electricity crackling between his and Robin's eyes "eye milk", complete with the sound of milk being poured. There are several disturbing squick conclusions that can be drawn from this. Firstly, Cyborg's eye is discharging fluid, which by itself should be telltale warning of serious health problems. Secondly, the fluid from Cyborg's eye is draining into Robin's eye. Exchange of body fluid in any shape or form is generally discouraged due to what could be passed onto someone else. Thirdly, Starfire wishes to drink the eye milk. That's right, she wants to consume the lactic fluid produced by another person, especially when said fluid appears to be an infectious discharge coming from someone's ocular region.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song: A few pop up over the series:
    • The rap song that Robin is jamming to in "Driver's Ed" is basically an instrumental version of "Stuntin' Like My Daddy".
    • In "The Cruel Giggling Ghoul", during the Scooby-Dooby Doors chase sequence, the song playing is very similar to Patty Smith's "The Warrior."
    • The music that plays during the Dragon Ball Z-esque fight sequence between Robin and the Leprechaun in "Beast Boy's St. Patrick's Day Luck and it's Bad" has the same general arrangement as "I'm Shipping Up to Boston" by Dropkick Murphys.
    • Scary Figure Dance is almost identical to the Monster Mash.
  • Tainted by the Preview: Fans complained about it just from seeing the previews. The show itself only made it worse.
  • Take That, Scrappy!:
    • For those who hate this incarnation of Robin, anytime he gets punished for his actions is quite satisfying. Unless you find it a tad excessive, such as his own friends constantly gunning for his position as leader.
    • If you're not fond of Cyborg and Beast Boy, seeing them getting repeatedly pummeled in "Caramel Apples" might be cathartic to watch. At least, until the ending. Similarly, seeing Brother Blood torture them with his Pain Bot in "Waffles" might have you rooting for him, though the ending where Beast Boy's body has been skeletonized might be a tad bit excessive.
    • "Let's Get Serious" has Aqualad from Young Justice tear into Robin for having a team full of clowns that are a disgrace to real crime fighters. Not that anything changes, which the episode itself lampshades and in fact makes a joke of.
    • "Cool School" has Rose Wilson dishing painful insults which hurt all of the Titans except Raven.
    • To some, the entirety of "The Fourth Wall", due to Control Freak directly telling the Titans why Periphery Demographic hates their show and has the Titans watch the original series to show them the difference between them.
    • The The Powerpuff Girls (2016) crossover pretty much goes out of its way to show the Titans at their worst, being rude and incompetent to the Powerpuff Girls. And unlike other episodes that point out the flaws of the show, but ultimately tries to lay at least partial blame on the audience for "not getting it", the episode ends with the Powerpuff Girls being disgusted at how amoral and petty the Titans are and the Powerpuff Girls narrator calls them out for being useless and unheroic.
  • Tastes Like Diabetes:
    • Raven's happy facet is so sickeningly sweet, she'll make you go into diabetic shock. When she gets loose in "Colors of Raven", she goes around making everything a Sugar Bowl.
    • Weaponized against Rose Wilson. Sincere, unironic expressions of The Power of Friendship physically debilitate Rose to the point where she is literally sick to her stomach.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: As one can tell from the previous tropes, this show has gotten quite a bit of this reaction. Before the show actually aired, even:
    • The excessive personality changes of the Titans to much sillier, jerkish natures is one of the most heavily criticized aspects of the show.
    • It replacing Young Justice in DC Nation didn't help.
    • Some fans hated Young Justice for not being like the early 2000s Teen Titans. Now some people hate this show for not being like Young Justice.
    • Back in the day, some fans hated the Teen Titans series for not being like the Teen Titans comics or any of the Timm/Diniverse toons. Now, some fans hate Teen Titans Go! for not being like the Teen Titans series.
    • Some have complained about how Raven's hair was changed from her earlier unhooded design.
    • There's also the fact that this series isn't the same as the New Teen Titans shorts that aired during Cartoon Network's Saturday morning DC Nation block. Said shorts were based more on the original show than Go! is, had a different style of comedy, and overall didn't make the Titans into extreme caricatures of themselves. The changes in style that Go! has are so significant that fans feel incensed that they didn't get the expanded version of the New Teen Titans shorts they were expecting to get.
  • They Copied It, So It Sucks:
    • A common criticism against the show is that it apes the comedy of other shows on Cartoon Network like Regular Show and Uncle Grandpa albeit very poorly.
    • At its worst, many fans even compare it to Family Guy in its later seasons, in that they feel that it's plagued with lazy characterization, unfunny jokes, rampant, unnecessary assholery and abrupt nonsensical endings.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Darkseid appears in "Two Parter". It turns out that his grovely voice is because he has a cold, and actually has the voice of "Weird Al" Yankovic. Unfortunately, we barely get to hear this voice, let alone sing, and is defeated shortly after. To many fans, and even haters, it could have been seen as a saving grace of "Two Parter" let alone Season 3.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • "Sidekick" has trouble brewing in Gotham. Instead of it being a Batman villain, it's the H.I.V.E. again, who appear often enough in Jump City as it is.
    • "In and Out" toyed with the idea of the heroes dressing up as their evil counterparts to infiltrate the H.I.V.E. tower. So, we get Robin as Red X and Cyborg as Stone. Beast Boy even comes in with an even bigger throwback of the '80s comics with a nostalgic costume.note  So, this is where we get to see Blackfire, or at least Starfire's villainous self from a previous episode, and Red Raven costumes, right? Wrong. What we get is the girls dressing up as Rummage Sale Reject villains. Even if we overlook all of that, the cool premise of seeing Red X again seems to be wasted by Robin making him look like an unstable jackass from the start, instead of the unflappable stoic badass he was always portrayed as.
    • The B plot of "I See You" has a very interesting premise, where Raven is trying to hide a potentially devastating secret, and Cyborg and Beast Boy are tailing her to find out just what the secret is after being told that they were terrible at stakeouts. It is something that could have been dramatically built up across several episodes, thus giving the show a genuine Growing the Beard moment and even a Continuity Nod of the Trigon Arc from the original show. Instead, Raven quickly solves her problem by the episode's end. Despite nearly being killed, and not realizing the gravity of the situation happening right in front of them even after they are accidentally banished to an alternate dimension, Cyborg and Beast Boy celebrate when they believe that Raven's big secret was that she had a crush on the latter.
    • "The Return of Slade" has been heavily criticized for this. The promised battle against Slade happens offscreen after he's mentioned for a few minutes. The rest of the episode deals with Cyborg and Beast Boy trying to make a clown Darker and Edgier when they feel the clown is too kiddy, and the Titans trying to stop said clown after Cyborg and Beast Boy succeed. To many fans, the episode came off as both a shallow ratings trap and yet another jab at the show's critics.
      • Another plot they forgot in this episode was having Robin be afraid of clowns, instead of Starfire, giving both some background on Robin but also having a Joker cameo.
    • Played with to "They Missed a Perfectly Good Joke" during the The Powerpuff Girls (2016) crossover. While it's probably because Bubbles is no longer voiced by Tara Strong, does anyone else wanted Raven and Bubbles to comment on each other's voices?
    • The main conflict of "Hot Salad Water", the Independence day special, had to do with a shipment of tea that resulted in the Titans acting more and more British. This would have been a good place to have Mad Mod (a known British mind-controlling villain who once tried to sabotage Independence Day in the original series) show up, but instead the culprit ended up being the Queen of England, trying to get revenge on America for the Boston tea party.
  • Unfortunate Implications: It has been noted that "Hot Garbage" sends the message that it's okay to embrace hoarding, which is a serious psychological issue for many people today.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion: The Tooth Fairy, due to her lack of Tertiary Sexual Characteristics and her voice actor being a man, though she's referred to by female pronouns several times and refers to herself as a girl in "Easter Creeps".
  • What an Idiot:
    • From "In and Out". Want to get rid of a few freeloaders? Blow up your own base! What makes this worse is that both Gizmo and Robin come up with this idea, with equally disastrous results. Lampshaded somewhat when Jinx is rather disapproving of the idea.
    • It seems that Robin learned absolutely nothing from "In and Out", and installed a bomb in the Titans' bathroom that goes off in five minutes in "Serious Business". The first time it happens, it nearly sets the whole place on fire and sends the other Titans into a panic.
    • In "Real Magic", Robin almost drowns himself in an attempt to do a magic trick. Were it not for Raven pulling his soul back into his body after rescuing him, he'd be dead that episode.
    • In the "BB Rae" two-parter, Beast Boy finally wins Raven over with a new song that he wrote. Raven at first expresses discomfort at Beast Boy sharing the song on radio but Beast Boy decides to "fiddle" anyways and pimp out his new single. Even after Raven finds out and gets mad initially, Beast Boy manages to show her that the song has managed to bring happiness to a lot of couples and she relents. You'd think by then Beast Boy would have learned to be happy with what he accomplished and not push his luck any further but then he decides it's a good idea to go on tour, ignore Raven's feelings, and finally give all of himself over to the fans instead of maintaining any kind of relationship with Raven. Unsurprisingly, this gets Raven so mad and emotional that she casts a spell which screws up Beast Boy's singing and inadvertently causes a lot of havoc across the country, all because of Beast Boy's abysmally low emotional intelligence.
  • What Do You Mean, It's for Kids?: While the creators have often stated that the show was intended for a younger audience than the original series, this seems suspect when you take into account the following: a) a lot of the humor seems inappropriate for the young audience, including a considerable amount of violence pushing the show into a TV-PG rating, not to mention the series' Aesops seeming to encourage kids to behave badly and even commit crimes to get what they want; and b) many of the pop culture references featured in the show are relatable only to older audiences (kids of the '70s and '80s mostly), including full-episode parodies of Fantasy Island and Gilligan's Island and loving homages to The A-Team and The Golden Girls.
  • What Do You Mean, It Wasn't Made on Drugs?: A vast number of the more bizarre episodes of the show, especially in season 2, will more often than not have you wondering how high the writers were during the creation of these episodes.
    • "Dude Relax" has a high-strung Robin attempting to relax by following Beast Boy's advice and being "one with the couch", which has him literally sinking into a world within the couch where he meets the Couch Spirit and goes on a trip through his past life in the circus.
    • "Burger vs. Burrito" where a contest between Beast Boy and Cyborg to see which is the better food culminates in the two fighting each other with a burger-shaped giant robot and a giant burrito monster created by Raven's magic, respectively.
    • "Breakfast Cheese" has Robin being bitten by a spider and ends up getting a Disney Acid Sequence, which involves a green-skinned Cyborg and Raven with six arms.
    • The second half of "Puppets Whaaaaat?" where the Titans are turned into realistic puppets by the evil Puppet Wizard, who himself is a real-life sock puppet. The entire second half of the episode takes place in the real world and at one point, the Titans are chased by a literal paper tiger.
    • "Sandwich Thief" has Robin dragging the team to outer space under the belief that his sandwich became sentient and flew to outer space. Not only does this prove to be true, but the sandwich also has been meditating and decides that all life must be destroyed, leading to a fight between the Titans and the superpowered sandwich.
    • "Money Grandma", where an attempt to teach Robin humility as a leader results in Raven using a time machine to bring George Washington to the present to talk to him. When Robin loses an election to him, he spitefully decides to go back and change the past so that he can be the first President of the United States.
    • The chase scene with the Titans and Mad Mod in "Salty Codgers", which also doubles as a Mythology Gag to the original series.
    • The episode "Serious Business". Particularly the ending, where it turns out bathrooms are an alien species that moved to Earth.
    • Pretty much the entire trip inside Raven's mind in the episode "Crazy Day" which features Starfire as the Sphinx, Beast Boy and Cyborg as Chess pieces, and Robin as a gate. And when it's revealed that it was all a part of Trigon's plot to drive her insane and turn her evil, Raven turns the tables and uses her magic to transport the Titans into his mind to annoy him.
    • "Smile Bones", where a crack at morbid obesity leads to extreme Balloon Bellies, which sprout limbs, faces, and gain lives of their own.
    • "Hose Water", which has Starfire and Cyborg regressing younger after they "embrace their inner-child", and end up reverting to eggs. They then get taken to "Baby Land" which is apparently where every baby comes from.
    • "Oil Drums" has the Titans's brains rotting from lack of television (with the exception of Cyborg), which eventually turns them into zombies obsessed with outdoor activities. Cyborg is then rescued by an anthropomorphic TV, which then leads to the two of them going on an adventure to find the missing remote, which was kidnapped by criminals for an unknown purpose.
    • "Kicking a Ball and Pretending to Be Hurt", which reveals that every ball on earth are eggs that contains a magical troll or animal.
    • "Head Fruit" has Beast Boy's brain planting a tree in his head and using it to escape into a world in the clouds.
    • "And the Award for Sound Design Goes to Rob" has Raven wishing away sound due to an ill-conceived deal with an evil spirit called the Whisperer. After tricking the Whisperer to return the Titans voices, they discover the rest of the world has become a "sound vacuum" and retains the sounds the Titans make. The rest of the episode has the voice actors making silly sound effects for everything in the show, including misfitting ones like farting sounds for punches, a tongue wagging sound for farts, and "Hey hey hey" for Silkie crawling.
    • "BBBDay" came up with the crack induced explanation that failure to celebrate birthdays causes the person to start aging out of control, spontaneously becoming older and younger. This happens to Beast Boy who becomes an old man and a baby throughout the episode.
  • What The Hell, Casting Agency?:
  • The Woobie:
    • Raven in any episode when the other Titans are being immature, obnoxious jerks and she has to put up with them.
    • Gray Raven in "Colors of Raven". She's in a constant state of helpless fear, has frequent vomiting fits out of sheer nervousness, and her last act before Robin and Starfire sneakily send her back into the prism is to silently weep to herself in the city park.
    • Starfire. Even when she was younger, her sister would often act jerkish to her and she would only forgive her at the end. In "Starfire the Terrible", she gets mocked for being nice when trying to be a villain.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/TeenTitansGo