YMMV / Devil May Cry

  • Accidental Innuendo: From "Shall Never Surrender" in the fourth game, "The time has come and so have I!"
    • "Devil Trigger", which is again a battle theme for Nero in the fifth game is still pretty easy to misinterpret.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Many fans are saying that the DmC preboot being an Alternate Continuity is clearly this due to the backdraft caused by it. Basically, this means that it's a reboot, but it's still canon to the previous games in that it takes place in the same multiverse, so the classic Dante and lore still "exist."
    • The Devil May Cry 2 novel, which takes place before the events of the second game, can also be considered one for providing some explanation for Dante's shift in personality. He is very much like how he was portrayed in the first game until near the end when it ends on a bittersweet note. He expresses regret for having to kill an Alternate Universe Trish who remained loyal to that universe's Mundus after repeatedly trying to persuade her to pull a Heel–Face Turn.
  • Awesome Ego: A handful of characters, but none more so than Dante, who spends nearly every encounter with enemy bosses (including when the player finds themselves fighting against Dante) mocking and belittling them at every turn, then proceeds to back it up, both in cutscenes and under the guidance of a skilled enough player.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment:
    • Comes right out of nowhere? Check. Has nearly nothing to do with the plot? Check. Ridiculously way over the top? Check. Never mentioned again? Check. If Dante and Agnus going Shakespeare on one another isn't a complete BLAM, what is?
    • Phantom's reappearance towards the end of 2. He just randomly pops out of nowhere, despite (in his last appearance) melting after being impaled on a spiked pillar. The fact that he's inexplicably mute doesn't help, although the description for that particular mission hints that Time Travel may be involved.
  • Breather Boss:
    • The Infested Tank in 2 - sure, both its main cannon and its flamethrower are highly damaging, and the machinegun fire is hard to dodge. However, once you get right next to one, it will no longer be able to hit you with a cannon/flamethrower, and the tanks never use the machinegun unless you try to climb on top of them - and they have no other form of offence whatsoever. The only problems when fighting those come from the fact that, as Dante, you fight three tanks at once, while for Lucia, a tank is supported by infinitely respawing Msiras.
    • Baal in 4 isn't a very hard fight, probably because he comes after a long slog through the castle collecting all the Gyro Blades. He telegraphs his attacks from a mile away, they're all easy enough to dodge, and he gives you tons of opportunities to damage him. He can become a pain in hard mode, though.
    • Due to not hitting too hard, being easy to kill just through whittling away with guns, and easily opening up to attacks, Echidna is one on any difficulty.
  • Broken Base:
    • The biggest point of contention in the fandom (DmC notwithstanding) likely comes from the canonical status of Devil May Cry 4: Deadly Fortune, a two-volume graphic novel written by Morihashi Bingo, the scenario writer for DMC3 and DMC4, and his assistant Yasui Kentarou. Bingo considers the novel to be the definitive version of the fourth game's story but it deviates from the game's plot at multiple points and was written after he left Capcom's employ. Because of this, it's been questioned if the novel can be considered anything more than semi-canon at best, and not all fans (for example) are on board with certain portions of the narrative, such as Nero's mother being some nameless prostitute that Vergil had a one-night stand with when he visited Fortuna sixteen/seventeen years ago (to learn more about Sparda's legacy).
    • Devil May Cry 2 might as well be a landmine. Some think it holds up fine and just isn't as good as the rest of the franchise, others swear off its existence and events entirely. The fact that it take place at the end of the timeline doesn't help matters.
    • Capcom's idea to release Devil May Cry 4 Special Edition physically only in Japan and Asia. Some people were fine just so long as they got the game and encouraged others to import, while others demanded the physical release, especially considering DmC Definitive Edition was given one. Capcom's official statement was too complicated to get a physical release didn't help matters.
  • Complete Monster:
    • Devil May Cry 3: Arkham, initially The Dragon to Dante's brother Vergil, is revealed as a sinister, power-hungry man who sacrificed his own wife to become a devil himself, as his alter ego Jester. Arkham manipulates everyone to lure them into a battle, resulting in Dante, Vergil and Arkham's own daughter Lady weakened enough for Arkham to step in and seize the power of Sparda for himself. Arkham has no compunction brutalizing Lady or trying to kill her. When he unlocks the power of Sparda, Arkham plans to, as he puts it, "welcome Chaos" all through the world. When Lady confronts him at the game's end, Arkham angrily demands to know what he's done wrong, declaring he wanted to be a God and for that he had sacrificed just "one miserable human life, that's all! Was that really so awful!?"
    • Devil May Cry 4: Sanctus, while appearing to be the benevolent head of the corrupt Order of the Sword, is in fact a vicious monster. Sanctus covets the powers of Sparda and Vergil and plans on using their swords to control the power of a giant godlike golem, the Savior. To do this he feeds Nero and Kyrie to it, and had Dante not intevened they would have both been digested alive. Sanctus is the only person to kill a human on-screen by murdering his own loyal servant Credo for daring to defend his sister Kyrie. Sanctus even mocks Credo for his love while impaling him on Yamato, claiming that the only thing that matters "is absolute power." The demons that have been killing people throughout the game have been released on Sanctus's orders. When Nero fights Sanctus, Sanctus uses Kyrie as a Human Shield. Despite his holy trappings and grandfatherly appearance, Sanctus was an evil monster and one of the worst villains the series had to offer.
  • Counterpart Comparison:
    • Nell in the first novel is extremely similar to Eva. She's so similar that Vergil uses her to recreate Eva's sacrifice and trigger Dante's memories. Then, the second novel featured a redhead human hunter with a big gun working with Dante to stop an evil businessman who wanted the power of a god, specifically Sparda. Then, 2 (which came later), had a redhead hunter working with Dante to stop an evil businessman who wanted the power of a god, and 3 had a human hunter with a big gun working with Dante to stop an evil man who wanted the power of Sparda.
    • White haired half-demon who fights demons using a sword he inherited from his legendary demon father, who fell in love with a human woman before his death. His brother, similarly white haired and wielding a sword inherited from their father. Did we just describe Dante or Inuyasha?
  • Crazy Awesome:
    • For Sparda's sake, Dante uses Bike Fu in 3!
    • Geryon in 3 is a demonic fire horse that carries around a chariot that shoots missiles at Dante,can teleport and even releases orbs that slow down time. To top this off,you fight it in a coliseum. It frankly doesn't get much more metal than this.
    • Most cutscenes in DMC4 also qualify. Dante performs Jeet Kune Do on a demon, Nero recharges bullets by throwing them and making his gun grab them, etc.
  • Cry for the Devil: Dante literally does so when Vergil falls into Demon World of his own volition at the end of 3, which is followed soon after by a Title Drop from Lady. Players never receive an in-depth look at Vergil's life prior to Eva's death and his Start of Darkness, but get a vague idea of happier times from Dante's late-game dynamics with Vergil and reaction to his brother's death. Both of them.
  • Demonic Spiders:
    • Blitz from DMC4. They're more like Demonic Beetles, really, but most players can agree they'd rather fight an actual boss than one of these. Far from the only one though.
    • Chimera Assaults are especially so. To put it simply, in higher difficulty mode, simply trying to get near them is potential suicide.
    • Then there's Alto Angelo. Its lesser brethren, Bianco Angelo, can't fight back if backstabbed, but Alto can and will teleport like kids on crack, impossible to buster unless their shield is down, and like Bianco, cannot be snatched. EVER.note 
    • Shadows from DMC1: they're fast, hit hard, can't be damaged by melee attacks, and can only be finished off by attacking a core which is revealed briefly after a certain amount of damage — plus they're spiteful enough to try a Taking You with Me, which you have to run around like a headless chicken for upwards of 10 seconds to avoid. Have fun trying to beat three of them at once on a 100% run.
    • The Arachne from DMC3 also fit this trope when you fight them in swarms. Bonus points for being literal Demonic Spiders.
  • Designated Hero: Trish in 4, for giving the most powerful weapon in the game to the Order, allowing them to wreak havoc much faster than they would have originally. The only thing possibly keeping Trish a hero is that she's sided with Dante.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Vergil. The combination of being attractive, being evil, and having sympathetic motives causes many fans to ignore the fact he's a villain completely.
  • Ear Worm:
    • "Devils Never Cry" from Devil May Cry 3. The battle music ("Taste the Blood" and "Divine Hate") will also get stuck in your head eventually, considering how often you'll be hearing it.
    • Same goes for the introduction of "Shall Never Surrender" (Nero's battle theme and the main theme of DMC4).
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Vergil. A lot of fans were already intrigued by Nelo Angelo, but the character's popularity skyrocketed after Vergil's role in 3. There was much rejoicing when he was confirmed to be returning in 4's Special Edition.
    • Lady is probably the most popular of Dante's female companions despite having slightly less appearances inside and outside of the series when compared to Trish, owing to her tragic backstory, straight-laced personality, and More Dakka brand of gunslinging. Likewise, many fans were delighted to see her finally Promoted to Playable in 4:SE, where she turns out to have some of the most unique gameplay mechanics in the series.
    • As poorly received as Devil May Cry 2 was, the final boss fight with the Despair Embodied is often reported as one of the few highlights.
  • Epileptic Trees:
    • Some fans believe that the zweihander Nelo Angelo wields is actually a corrupted version of the Yamato (in 3: SE, Corrupted Vergil's DT has him become Nelo Angelo, with the Yamato replaced by Nelo's sword). Similarly, they believe that Nelo's death factors into the Yamato's broken appearance in 4.
    • The collection of swords along the walls of Dante's shop could be a collection of Devil Arms from his off-screen missions.
    • Besides the Continuity Snarl behind the Word of God-confirmed facts that Vergil is dead and Nero is his son, there's questioning over whether or not the Yamato is acting as his Soul Jar, considering that Nero's DT looks considerably like a fusion of Vergil's DT from 3 and Nelo Angelo. Not to mention that the quote in Nero's section is a pseudo-Call-Back to one of Vergil's Motive Rants in 3.
  • Escapist Character: A witty, snarky, badass Half-Demon Hunter of His Own Kind who does all kinds of ridiculous over-the-top stylish stunts in both gameplay and cutscenes and runs his own kickass Demon Hunting business. Who wouldn't want to be as cool as him?
  • Even Better Sequel: Though they had to Win Back the Crowd from the lackluster Devil May Cry 2 as well, 3 is typically considered the series' finest hour as it introduced a full Real-Time Weapon Change system (something that was played with in 2) and made the combo gameplay much deeper than the original game's (in part due to the ability to change weapons but also the complexity of the combat itself with additions like the Style system). 4 may have even been able to surpass it (thanks to Nero's completely fresh approach with the Devil Bringer and Dante gaining the ability to shift between Styles during gameplay, as well as a streamlined upgrade system) but the poor job done with Dante's part kept it from achieving its potential.
  • Evil Is Cool: Vergil seems to have more than/as many fans as Dante even though he gets defeated in both of the games that have him. This is likely because Vergil and Dante are badass on different scales. Dante's the carefree badass, and Vergil's the refined badass, with a katana, a slick outfit, deadly precision, and a more formal attitude.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
    • Vergil looks like his Mr. Fanservice brother Dante, but classier. He may not expose as much skin as Dante, but he's nonetheless quite attractive.
    • Trish, thanks to being in a skimpy outfit and having an attractive design, but only until her Heel–Face Turn. Then it becomes full-on Good Is Sexy.
    • There's the more humanoid female demons, such as Nevan, Bael and Dagon's Rusalka feelers, and Arius' Secretaries. Even the serpentine Echidna (in her human form, at least) arguably makes a good case for this.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
  • Game-Breaker:
    • Devil May Cry 3's Quicksilver Style puts Dante into bullet time for rather long periods of time, though it eats up his Devil Gauge. However, with enough Devil Gauge-restoring items, it becomes a little broken. That said, in an unlocked mode with a certain costume, infinite Devil Trigger lets you butcher enemies in bullet time.
    • Devil May Cry has Shotgun Hiking. With Air Hike and a shotgun you can endlessly jump and juggle an airborne target until it dies or you mess up the trick. (This isn't a bug; it's an exploit.)
    • The Sparda sword in the first game seems pointless because it uses Alastor's moveset but lacks a Devil Trigger until the final boss. What the game never tells you, however, is that Sparda always deals the extra damage Alastor does during Devil Trigger. This may not seem like a good trade-off, but it helps tremendously on Hard and especially on Dante Must Die, where Dante does not gain health while in Devil Trigger and the damage from the attacks Dante can do while in Devil Trigger do not scale up with the difficulty. That Air Raid you used to slaughter enemies on your first playthrough barely scratches even the basic mooks. Melee becomes your main method of dealing damage, and always having the extra damage by using Sparda makes getting through DMD mode significantly less frustrating.
    • Ebony and Ivory are, in the first game, outclassed in damage by all the other guns, but like Sparda above they become significantly more useful than those other guns on higher difficulties. The pistols give you a significant amount of air control and using it to help evade attacks that will take off half your life bar or to more easily get into melee range is far more useful than a little more ranged damage.
    • The reboot has a Devil Trigger that paralyzes enemies. It gets even crazier with certain combinations. Using Devil Trigger and Demon Evade, Succubus can be defeated in 3 hits. Using Demon Evade, Devil Trigger, and Overdrive results in the most anticlimactic boss fights. Even Mundus can be defeated in 11 hits.
    • Vergil in DMC4: Special Edition. Carefully using the Concentration Gauge coupled with the Devil Trigger and Beowulf makes The Savior a 2-hit job.
    • From a platforming standpoint, Vergil now also has the ability to collect orbs at a distance by hitting them with his Summoned Swords. This renders the challenge of retrieving most of the hard-to-reach orbs scattered throughout the game completely moot, due to the sheer range at which the Summoned Swords are able to travel.
    • Lady is this as well, thanks to being a character designed around fighting at a distance in a game where most enemies are designed around characters fighting in melee. Her inherent flaws are supposedly 1.) No devil trigger and no accompanying health regeneration making her significantly squishier than her demonic allies; and 2.) She has very limited close range options. Those might sound like good trade-offs for her gun combat, but almost nothing in the game can deal with the fact that she just sits across the room and mows everything down, and even up close, her fully charged shotgun blasts deal ludicrous damage.
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • From DMC4, you have the Chimera Seeds. Blady Planty thingies that just love to attach to other monsters so they can interrupt your combo. And that's just the tip of the iceberg, as on higher difficulties pretty much every mook is one.
    • The Nefasturris boss in 2 is apparently made of them.
  • Goddamned Boss
    • The Infested Chopper from 2. No only does the damn thing chase you through half the level, once you actually fight it, the fight mostly consists of mashing shoot button, occasionally dodging homing missiles, and trying not to fall off a skyscraper. At least the music is really good.
    • The Tateobesu from the same game is not very dangerous, but fighting it is quite annoying on difficulties lower than Lucia Must Die, as swords are useless, guns are occasionally turned useless by the boss becoming invisible, and the Devil Trigger is hard to recover without melee attacks. On Lucia Must Die though, the annoyance just turns into a straight up sadism by the devs.
  • Good Bad Bugs: DmC is full of these.
    • Though commonly mistaken to be actual bugs, there are several unintentional exploits in the series: Jump Canceling in the third and fourth games, which allows for infinite aerial maneuvers; roll cancelling out of the Grenadegun's firing animation and Shotgun Hiking in the first game.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Arius' corporation goes by the name of Uroboros. Sound familiar? Doubly so if you consider Arius' international enterprise and the fact that Possessed Arius sports some pseudo-Ouroboros tentacles.
    • Gloria's physical similarities to Lady Gaga, who made her debut in 2008 not long after the release of DMC4, have not gone unnoticed by the fans.
    • Devil May Cry 4 had That One Level where you had to play a board game by hitting a die, with a random chance of either fighting enemies or a previous boss, which fans hated. Nine years later, Cuphead used a similar mechanic for a boss fight, which fans really liked.
  • Internet Backdraft: So, after a picture of Johnny Yong Bosch and Reuben Langdon in motion capture gear hit the web, the internet went wild with speculation for Devil May Cry 5 possibly happening. Come May, and what came with it was the announcement of Devil May Cry X: The Last Judgement! A brand new... Pachinko machine. With original cutscenes and voice clips, indicating this was what the duo were working on. Fans were not pleased. But then Devil May Cry 5 was unveiled on E3 2018 so... Subverted Trope?
  • It's Easy, So It Sucks!: The usual reaction to 2, and to the reboot. 2 took away much of the challenge of the first game that made it so popular, and the reboot's reworked style system, Devil Trigger, and weapons systems make it a breeze for series veterans.
  • Memetic Badass: Dante, although it's not entirely memetic.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • UR A FAGET.
    • It didn't take long for a DmC: Devil May Cry variant to pop up. The fans are having a field day with this one.
    • Is sanity the price to pay... FOR POWER?!
    • I should have been the one to fill this dark page with LIIIIIIIIIIIGHT!!!!!
    • Vergil's Boss Banter in 3 and his words to Dante after their first battle (see Narm below). A good 90% of his iconic lines from DMC3 were re-recorded for Vergil's appearance in Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 for this very reason.
    • Nero's theme from DMC4 managed to inspire a variation of the popular "I Came" image macros, featuring a picture of an orgasmically smug Nero with the opening lyrics of "Shall Never Surrender" ("The time has come — and so have I") as the caption.
    • "Shall Never Surrender"'s opening line itself is a meme not only for the song almost always playing during battles with Nero, but for said opening line, which is a gigantic case of Accidental Innuendo, hence the above entry.
    • Featuring Dante from the Devil May Cry series! This one is a mockery of the PAL cover of Nocturne (called Lucifer's Call there for copyright reasons) which seemed to imply that Dante would be the main selling point (which in some cases could be true) despite his relatively minimal role in the plot. The label has been used in many a parody whenever a game is trying too hard to appeal to a "mainstream" crowd, or for crossovers in general.
    • A slight one came after Dante's redesign, where people drew other famous characters such as Mario and Sonic in a similar style, mocking the "edgy" look of Donte. Being drawn in MS Paint helped.
    • The response from Ninja Theory director Tameen Antoniades regarding how people feel about the remake, as follows:
    Tameen looked at me a moment and took a drag of his cigarette. Then without blinking, and without pausing to exhale the smoke from his mouth he said, "I don't care."
  • Misaimed Fandom: While Vergil is sympathetic, he's still a villain, and willing to unleash a demonic invasion on a town by opening Sparda's seal if it will get him power. Some fans gloss over this.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Arkham crosses this line several times in Devil May Cry 3 due to how he used his wife and daughter. Sanctus and Mundus, too, but their actions feel less personal.
    • Half of the stuff the reboot's Vergil does, including not caring about Kat's safety, shooting Lilith and her child when she was completely defenseless, his plans after Mundus' death, and his "revenge" in the DLC chapter.
    • Some see the reboot's Dante as crossing it as well, when he mocks Mundus about his dead child. Even though he only does it to get Mundus away from the Hellgate. It's rather divisive.
  • Most Annoying Sound:
    • "KYRIE!!! KYRIEEEEEEE!!!!" Made even worse when Nero starts to have a reverse puberty similar to Dante's below when he cries after fighting Agnus.
    • The "EEEEEYYAA!!" of Dante's Stinger gets pretty repetitive after a while.
    • The first time you here Nero's theme music, it's a badass introduction. But since it's the only battle music the game has for Nero, you'll be hearing that four-note sequence so frequently that after a few levels it will drive you completely nuts.
  • Narm: The writers are bad at dramatic moments... DMC1 being especially bad, and DMC3 being somewhat more competent.
    Dante: "I should have been the one to fill your dark soul with liiiiiiiiiiiight!"
    • For bonus points, Dante's voice cracks very unmanfully right at the end of that line, like he was suddenly struck with reverse puberty.
    • Just before then, Mundus's Evil Gloating.
    Vergil: "Foolishness, Dante. Foolishness."
  • Narm Charm: The franchise practically runs on silliness. Of particular note is his costume in 4, which includes ass-less and crotchless chaps, though given how stylishly "American" Dante's design is seen to be by fans (despite being pretty anime-influenced for a guy who seemingly lives in the States, though that's not necessarily a strike against him) and how over the top his antics are in the fourth game, it works as a whole, though perhaps not as well as his other looks, the first and third games in particular. His "cowboy" outfit also features slight Italian touches to it which happen to match how Fortuna's Gothic architecture draws inspiration from The Renaissance.
  • Polished Port: The PC version of Devil May Cry 4, which not only runs very smoothly on a wide array of systems, but puts higher-end systems to the test with Legendary Dark Knight Mode, which fills the screen with enemies. Quite the breath of fresh air for PC gamers. It doesn't have a leaderboard, though.
  • Porting Disaster: The port of 3 from console to PC, thanks to Capcom outsourcing the porting job to another developer (one of the notable problems is missing crucial cutscenes). Thankfully, Capcom learned their lesson after DMC3 and Resident Evil 4, resulting in the above.
  • Relationship Writing Fumble: Hideki Kamiya states that it wasn't his intention to portray Trish as Dante's love interest in the original game (although his response that she's more than that is open to interpretation). In spite of this, there was enough romantic subtext in some of their more touching scenes later on that Trish is still a popular partner for Dante among shippers. It doesn't help that the first game's staff roll is titled "Dante & Trish ~ Seeds of Love."
  • Replacement Scrappy:
    • Many fans saw Nero as one of these before the game finally came out. Although most agreed that the hate was ill-placed, some could never shake the image off.
    • A general complaint about DmC is that Ninja Theory and Capcom have somehow managed to make Dante a Replacement Scrappy to himself. His brash attitude and foul-mouthed behavior have made many dislike him compared to the original.
    • Lucia became this to Trish in the second game and ironically so, as Lucia's creation was likely in response to the lack of a playable Trish in the original DMC. It seems to have died down in the intervening years, partially because a good number of fans actually like the character (or feel that she was wasted potential), but mainly because most of the fanbase still wants to blot out Devil May Cry 2 from memory.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • Okay, so whose great idea was it to invent the Proud Soul system and have it work the exact same way as the regular Red Orb purchases? Some have argued it works due to allowing customizability, some have stated that it's frustrating due to only getting them at mission ends. And we'll leave it at that.
    • Whose great idea was it to put a time limit on Bloody Palace?
    • While the underwater sequences in the first game were neither horrible nor impressive, in 2, they become this. And guess what? You get to play as them with only Lucia. And did we mention that there's a boss to be faced? Have fun!
    • The style system in 3. Why the hell should the player choose between the ability to Flash Step and that to guard? Between multi-aiming with guns and additional melee attacks? This is a great source of Fake Difficulty against bosses or enemies you face for the first time, and gets especially annoying in the penultimate boss, where the fact of having Vergil fighting with you prevents you from using any of your styles. Thankfully, 4 allows you to change styles whenever you want, including mid-combo, making the system much more interesting to exploit, if tricky to master.
  • "Seinfeld" Is Unfunny: When it came out, reviews lauded the first game for its fast action and deep gameplay; today many players who try it find it kind of slow, clunky, and limited (not to mention the infamous triangle jump). It has the right to be, since it basically set all the foundations of the modern beat 'em all genre, three years before God of War and Itagaki's Ninja Gaiden.
  • Spiritual Adaptation:
    • The first game is often thought of as the best 3D Castlevania ever made.
    • The third game is either in the same league or surpasses DMC1 in this regard. The majority of Dante's Awakening may takes place in a Gothic tower, but it has the trappings of a Castlevania game. The Nintendo Hard difficulty of the classics (CV1, CV3, & CV4) and the exploration/backtracking of the Metroidvanias with a white haired Half-Human Hybrid hero (Castlevania: Symphony of the Night).
    • The PC version of Devil May Cry 4 (and the Special Edition on both consoles and PC) on Legendary Dark Knight is the best Dynasty Warriors game ever made.
  • Star Trek Movie Curse: The second and the fourth games are steps down from the predecessors. The reboot broke the trend being more controversial.
  • "Stop Having Fun" Guys: Some players criticize those who use Easy Automatic mode, partly because they are seen as unwilling to learn the game in depth. Another reason is that (in DMC3 and 4) it results in a loss of precision as combos are largely random. As noted on the Wiki, the mode restricts what the controls can do, rather than simply making a real jumping-on point for for beginners. Other players don't mind either way.
  • Surprisingly Improved Sequel: Devil May Cry 2, helmed by Hideaki Itsuno, is considered borderline Canon Discontinuity. Devil May Cry 3, also directed by Itsuno, revived the wise-cracking Dante, brought back the Nintendo Hard difficulty (so much so that they had to do an Updated Re-release in part to reorder the difficulties so the classifications would make more sense), and restored a tighter physics engine more akin to the first game (but now with a diverse Stance System called "Styles" and the ability for true Real-Time Weapon Change on both firearms and Devil Arms). 4 retains much of the core design from 3 while adding its own features (although all the backtracking might have dropped it a peg or two with the fans).
  • Suspiciously Similar Song: Nero's battle theme, The Time Has Come sounds rather similar to Rob Zombie's Reload which appeared on the soundtrack to The Matrix Reloaded. Which is fitting seeing as both franchises and the artist came into prominence in the early 2000's.
  • Tainted by the Preview:
    • "NERO!" For context, Nero's mere existence, as a love-struck, foul-mouthed replacement for Dante got many people up in arms.
    • DmC: Devil May Cry received (and still receives to this day) an astronomical amount of this, with several fans refusing to acknowledge its existence. We're talking about even more flak than Devil May Cry 2 got.
  • That One Attack:
    • If you get swallowed by Nightmare, you're sent into a demonic dimension where you must fight several Sargassoes and one of the previous bosses to get out.
    • This also doubles as Nightmare's Achilles' Heel. Escaping from this dimension deals a sizable portion of damage to Nightmare's health bar, and also makes the light switches needed to keep Nightmare solid last longer for the rest of the battle. However, it only works once; you can only be swallowed up by Nightmare once, as all subsequent attempts to eat Dante simply results in a normal bite. The fact it only works once is Fridge Brilliance; the dimension is stated to be a result of Dante's underlying mental trauma from all his demon-hunting. The bosses that appear are also Killed Off for Real by the time the fight they can appear in happens. So Dante is facing his demons in the form of his most recent traumas; the most recent bosses. The attack only works once for that fight because it's Dante overcoming that particular trauma.
  • That One Boss: Quite logically, Dante in the fourth game will kill an inexperienced player countless times. Using cheap moves, incredible combos, and with few openings to attack him, he will brutalize the player all too often.
  • That One Level: Mission 10 in 4 will make you hate lasers thanks to their difficulty in dodging. And that's just before fighting Dante, who fights like a player would.
  • That One Sidequest: The first game had a secret mission called "The Three Beasts". In it, you had to slay the shadow demons. Not only was this taxing to first time players (and Shadows are no joke), but this is the only mission in the game in which you literally have one shot per run through (unless you re-loaded the entire level to try again). In it, the three beasts circle Dante and could overwhelm and kill him. Fast, cat-like reflexes and a steady eye on the entire battlefield were needed to prevail.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: How some people reacted to DmC. Its modern setting, new leads, reboot nature, and political commentary are still divisive.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • In DMC4, Nero is eventually revealed to "have the blood of Sparda." Nobody cares. Dante just ignores it, Kyrie and Nero never learn it. All anyone gets out of it is Nero acquiring Yamato and accessing his Devil Trigger.
    • This is how many fans are treating several plot threads left hanging (i.e. the full extent of Sparda (and Eva)'s tale, hints that Nero is Vergil's son, the Sequel Hook for Nero at the end of 4, etc.) in lieu of DmC being a reboot.
    • In general, Vergil Mode in 3:SE. It's a full-on retread of Dante's story, complete with facing a red-clad Vergil (dubbed "Vante" by fans). Playing as Vergil is undeniably cool, but it's a crying shame that you only get a glimpse of his side of the tale for all of two cutscenes.
    • Not only that, but They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character to fight against in Bloody Palace mode. When playing as Nero or Dante in Bloody Palace mode, the final boss... is Dante/Shadow Dante respectively. You never get to fight an A.I.-controlled Nero as the last boss when playing as Dante.
    • The entirety of Devil May Cry 2. It's such a footnote in the whole mythos: Dante has barely anything to do with the story (despite his father yet again having been embroiled in a past conflict that shaped the current narrative, something which Dante hardly comments or dwells on), with Lucia being the real hero at the center of everything with a personal stake in the battle. And even then we barely learn anything about her or how she was freed from Arius' control. Also, while Trish is a playable character, she has no role in the story, wasting the potential to tell tales of hers and Dante's partnership.
  • Unnecessary Makeover: Lady in 4, considering she wasn't unattractive to begin with and appealed to a lot of fans in 3.
  • Vindicated by History: Nero wasn't very well-received at first, and was still disliked by certain fans long after the release of Devil May Cry 4. After DmC: Devil May Cry was released, however, and after the negative reception of that game's version of Dante, people started to see Nero in a much better light.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: Devil May Cry 4 was released near the beginning of the seventh gen. To this day, it still looks damn good (on top of running at 60 FPS in an age where people would rather ignore playability for visuals).
  • What an Idiot!: Trish. Taking a powerful sword capable of subduing the Prince of Darkness and handing it to a Corrupt Church is NOT a good idea. It may not necessarily be idiotic and possibly done because it amused her. Judging from the way she and Dante act throughout the course of the game, it was a stunt she pulled without his permission because it was fun. Considering that Dante is a One-Man Army and will curbstomp the bad guys anyway, any entertainment is welcome. Yet Dante was right to respond to that by saying things will get messy: we see human casualties in Fortuna City as a result of the villain having the necessaries to bring the Savior out, opting Agnus to release demons. It can be thought of, however, that by gaining the trust of the Order, Trish was able to ascertain that they were evil far quicker than if they investigated by normal means, which may have possibly lead to them becoming too powerful thanks to the progress of Agnus' research by the time they knew for sure, resulting in more deaths.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Didactic?: The plot from Devil May Cry 3 appears to be loosely based on The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri with similar developments in the story. While in the poem Dante understands Christ's divinity, the Dante from Devil May Cry 3 learns to respect his father Sparda. There is also an amount of Fridge Brilliance such as Cerberus' frozen body.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Political?: The Order of the Sword in 4 seems like an obvious Take That! against Christianity, but the director denies this is the case.
  • WTH, Costuming Department?: For Devil May Cry 4, Dante upgrades his wardrobe to include cowboy boots and chaps. The guy's one step away from becoming the new Shawn Michaels.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/DevilMayCry