True Blue Femininity

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"Make it blue!"
Merryweather, Sleeping Beauty

Blue is a common color to represent femininity. Thus a girl or woman wearing blue is a sign that she is fair and gentle.

This could have started at least as far back as ancient Greece and Rome, and why the Virgin Mary is often depicted in a blue robe. The logic was that blue symbolizes peace, serenity, kindness, and other such aspects that were considered womanly virtues. (In the Mediterranean, it was also a sign of high rank, as the dye/paint color had to come from indigo, woad, or lapis lazuli which must be imported from a great distance and was therefore quite expensive).

From the early to mid 20th century, some argued that blue should be the color for girls, and red should be the color for boys. Yet even though we ended up with Pink Girl, Blue Boy after World War II, putting a woman in blue is still considered a sign of her femininity, if not as obvious as colors like pink and purple.

Blue has other meanings, such as sadness and loneliness. These can overlap with this trope (as in representing both femininity and sadness). Or that she is gentle (with blue representing peace and serenity). This can apply to any feminine woman at any age, some more than others, like a Winter Royal Lady.

A Sub-Trope of Tertiary Sexual Characteristics.

A Sister Trope to Pink Means Feminine, Princesses Prefer Pink, Graceful Ladies Like Purple, Heavenly Blue.

Compare Shy Blue-Haired Girl, Woman in White, Princess Classic.

Contrast Woman in Black and Lady in Red.


Examples

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    Anime and Manga 

    Films - Animated 
  • Brave: Merida has a turquoise silk dress as part of her royal attire, though she's more seen and much more comfortable with her dark green cotton one. This is likely being invoked by her mother, who resents Merida's tomboyish nature and wishes for her to be more ladylike.
  • Marnie from When Marnie Was There favors wearing blue dresses. Her style of dress could be foreshadowing to the fact she's not a modern day child. She is a sweet, outgoing Girly Girl in contrast to the shy and somewhat tomboyish Marnie.

    Film - Live Action 
  • Yvaine chooses a blue gown when she boards Captain Shakespeare's ship in Stardust and it also coincides with her and Tristan falling in love. She completes the image with a blue travelling cloak. Tristan's mother Princess Una also wears a blue dress - she's much nicer and calmer than her brothers.
  • Bridget Jones is gentle-hearted and very girly, along with favoring blue in her wardrobe, which is likely chosen to match her eyes.

    Literature 
  • Song at Dawn: When a lady wears blue it is consistently referred to as '(Virgin) Mary's color'. When the Arch Bishop sees Emerganda or Alienor wearing it he scoffs at the hypocrisy because (in his mind) they are anything but 'fair and gentle'.

    Live-Action TV 

     Professional Wrestling 
  • Bayley's first recognisable outfit was a light shade of baby blue, to reflect her innocence as The Ingenue. While she eventually wore more colours, she frequently has plenty of blue on her gear as well.

    Religion 
  • As mentioned above, the Virgin Mary is often depicted dressed in blue. Another explanation for this convention is that medieval artists wanted to dress the Mother of God in the richest clothing they could think of, and ultramarine (which is made of ground-up lapis lazuli) was the most expensive dye. St. Peter is also usually shown dressed in blue, but usually a lighter shade (i.e. with little or no ultramarine in it) or in blue and orange-y yellow.

    Theatre 
  • Edward Albee's Tiny Alice has the Original Cast Precedent of Alice wearing blue. As theatre critic Otis L. Guernsey pointed out, though many people took this as symbolic, "nowhere does the Tiny Alice script specify that Miss Alice wear blue, though it does describe her boudoir as 'Feminine, but not frilly. Blues instead of pinks.'"

    Video Games 
  • In Bioshock Infinite, Elizabeth at first wears a blue skirt with a white shirt that has blue details. She then changes into a long blue skirt and blue shrug (which are a replica of clothes Lady Comstock wore who also is an example of this trope). Here the blue symbolizes sadness, peace and isolation.
  • Rinoa in Final Fantasy VIII wears a blue coat, and is perhaps the most feminine of the female player characters (aside from Selphie, who is more perky).

    Webcomics 

    Western Animation 

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