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Film: Star Trek: First Contact

"I will not sacrifice the Enterprise. We've made too many compromises already, too many retreats. They invade our space, and we fall back. They assimilate entire worlds, and we fall back. Not again. The line must be drawn here! This far, no farther! And I will make them PAY for what they've done!"

Star Trek: First Contact is the eighth movie in the Star Trek film series, released in 1996.

The most popular Next Generation villain, the Borg, make another attempt to assimilate Earth. The newly-commissioned USS Enterprise-E scrambles to confront them, only to learn that the Borg have decided to use Time Travel to stop Earth's First Contact with aliens and Take Over the World, thus preventing The Federation from ever existing. Arriving above Earth in the year 2063, the Borg aim to stop Zefram Cochrane, the inventor of warp drive, from making his historic flight.

Captain Picard is having none of that. An away team (led by Riker, Troi, and Geordi) immediately beams down to Set Right What Once Went Wrong, discovering in the process that the man their history paints as a visionary luminary was really a cynical drunk who just wanted to get rich. Regardless, they work to restore the damage the Borg caused and make sure that first contact goes as planned.

Meanwhile, as if the remaining crew didn't have enough problems, they soon discover the Borg have invaded the Enterprise and are slowly assimilating it. Picard, who was assimilated by the Borg in the TNG two-parter "The Best of Both Worlds", is a little unstable, and becomes moreso as the plot progresses. His third-in-command, Data, isn't of much use either, as he's been captured and brainwashed by the Borg Queen.

Considered the best movie with the Next Generation crew, and a strong contender for second best Star Trek movie behind Wrath of Khan. Among the reasons behind its popularity includes strong continuity ties with the series while remaining a reasonable Gateway Series entry (everything you need to know about the characters is well-explained and it is action-oriented), as well as introducing some backstory elements of how the Star Trek universe came to be. It was also a box office hit, earning $146,027,888 in the worldwide market, putting it behind only the new Star Trek and The One With The Whales in absolute dollars (adjusted for inflation, it would fall in the middle of the pack, though still well ahead of the other TNG movies).

Spoilers below

Tropes seen in First Contact include

  • Accidental Misnaming: Cochrane to Troi, establishing the former as a Bunny-Ears Lawyer.
    Cochrane: Look, Deena—
    Troi: Deanna!
  • Adorkable: Cochrane attempting to do the Vulcan salute.
  • After the End: The crew travels back in time to the mid-21st century, when civilization is in ruins after a nuclear war (the Enterprise itself comes from centuries further ahead, After-the-After the End, and Zefram Cochrane's warp-drive experiment is about to give Earth a huge push in the right direction).
  • Alas, Poor Villain: Data, and to a lesser degree, Picard, are a little sorry that the Borg Queen is dead in the end.
  • Alien Arts Are Appreciated: Apparently not, since the Vulcans seem a little weirded out by Cochrane's choice of music.
  • Alien Invasion
  • All Your Base Are Belong to Us:
    • Earth (and, by proxy, the Alpha Quadrant) has already been conquered in alt-A.D. 2374.
    • By the end of the movie, the Enterprise-E interior resembles a Borg Cube. Picard's madness is more understandable when you recall that he's now lost three ships.
  • Anywhere but Their Lips: Picard gives Lily a peck on the cheek. The way Lily reacted, she wanted something more intimate.
  • Apocalypse How: It's set shortly after a major nuclear exchange has caused a human die-back on Earthnote . Naturally the Borg want to escalate it to engineered human extinction or Assimilation.
  • Assimilation Plot: Naturally.
  • Ax-Crazy: Picard, after being confronted with the decision to destroy the Enterprise or to continue fighting a near-hopeless battle against the Borg. (See his quote above.)
  • Bad Present: Borgified Earth. The atmosphere is copper brown, the landscape metallic grey, and catwalks stretch like cobwebs over the oceans.
  • Badass: Worf recovers his reputation in this film after The Worf Effect had led to Badass Decay.
  • Badass Boast: "Brave words. I've heard them before, from thousands of species across thousands of worlds, since long before you were created. And now, they are all Borg."
  • Batman Gambit: Data's attempts at lying earlier in the movie are really really REALLY poor. This turns out to be a ploy to trick the Borg Queen into thinking he's a terrible liar, so when he later lies about his change of allegiance convincingly, the Borg Queen fails to realize he's playing her.
  • Become a Real Boy: The Borg Queen attempts to win Data over by giving him the gift of organic skin and the ability to experience tactile sensations as a human would, something that the movie sets up earlier on that he can't do.
  • Been There, Shaped History: Played straight and averted. The only change that the crew really does is that Riker and Geordi take the flight with Cochrane instead of Lily. However, Picard instructs his crew while abandoning the Enterprise to take their lifepods to Gravett Island (an isolated isle in the South Pacific) and as for the rest of the crew already in Bozeman, to find a "quiet corner of North America and stay out of history's way." The crew also only stick around in the background to watch first contact (who wouldn't?) before making a quiet exit, stage left.
  • Big Bad: The Borg Queen.
  • Big Damn Heroes: After the Enterprise saved the Defiant, Worf returns the favor when he saves Picard from an assimilated Hawk.
  • Big "NO!": Complete with smashing his model ship collection.
  • Body Horror:
    • The Borg take a level in gross for their trip to the big screen. Especially the Queen, who is introduced as a disembodied head attached to a snakelike robotic spine before she's fitted onto her largely mechanical body. Also, assimilation in general. There is entire montage of footage in the film showing the Borg quickly assimilating the ship and crew, ending with the fresh drones being escorted in with their skin in patches, turning white with gray blood vessels; the sickbay converted to an assimilation chamber with crew hooked up to strange medical equipment; and seeing the attachment of the Borg prostheses. Bonus horror points: the score for the entire scene is "Smorgasborg."
    • Data, as more and more of his artificial skin is replaced with organic flesh takes on a ghoulish appearance as if sewn together from several corpses. Appropriate, since the only source of flesh the Borg would have is what their new drones don't need... Even worse is after the climax, seeing Data after all of the organic flesh has been burned off his body and you can see the exposed circuitry underneath.
  • Brick Joke: The jukebox's loud music.
  • Broken Faceplate: Picard takes a blow to the head while wearing a Starfleet space suit, causing the visor to crack. Fortunately for him, it still holds.
  • Broken Pedestal: Cochrane. Unusually for this trope, the crew doesn't seem to mind. Cochrane slowly coming around is a lighter inversion of Picard falling from the "more evolved" sense of responsibility and morality he tells Lily humans have in the 24th century.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer:
    • Cochrane is without a doubt one of the brightest minds of his time. He's also a heavy drinker and thinks first contact is best celebrated with whiskey and dancing. In the Novelization, based on the original script, it's revealed that Cochrane is bipolar and was fitted with a cerebral implant to administer the proper medication, but due to the lack of pharmaceutical production in the period after World War III to refill it, he took to self-medicating with alcohol.
    • Reg Barclay, Enterprise's own resident Bunny-Ears Lawyer, also has a small cameo as part of the engineering team helping to fix the damaged Phoenix. In between showing Geordi the makeshift plasma conduit he managed to rig together out of bits of spare junk, he also geeks out over meeting Cochrane.
  • Can't Hold His Liquor: Troi gets royally plastered trying to get information with Cochrane. Then again, if you spent most of your life drinking Synthehol, what chance would you have against Post-Apocalyptic Moonshine?!
  • Call Back:
    • Moby-Dick is a major theme in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, though from a villainous angle, with Khan quoting Ahab, "To the last, I will grapple with thee... from Hell's heart, I stab at thee! For hate's sake, I spit my last breath at thee!" Picard quotes from the exact same scene, from the narrator's perspective.
    • One of the ships in the Fleet vs. the Borg was the Bozeman from "Cause and Effect."
    • When the Borg Queen asks Data when the last time he had sexual intercourse was, his answer (including Data's comment that's he's "fully functional" and "programmed in multiple techniques") dates back to TNG's second episode "The Naked Now." (On a side note, this means that he never had sex with Jenna D'Sora in the episode "In Theory.")
    • The holonovel Picard runs in order to access a Tommy Gun is The Big Goodbye. This callback is especially apt as the plot of that episode is not only the first ever Holodeck malfunction, but also features a character being maimed with a hologramatic gun. In this case, the safeties were deliberately turned off to achieve the same effect.
    • Worf's "Perhaps today is a good day to die!'' is a call-back to a few Klingon episodes.
    • Riker calls the Defiant a "tough little ship"; Thomas Riker had said the exact same thing to Sisko.
      Worf: (displeased) ...'Little'??
    • Data rapidly encrypts the Enterprise systems, just like he did in the TNG episode "Brothers".
  • The Cameo: Robert Picardo as the Enterprise-E EMH and Ethan Phillips along with producer Brannon Braga in the holodeck club scene, with Phillips being the one stopping the drones and being disrupted by Borg laser scanners. Dwight Schultz as recurring character Reginald Barclay also appears. Michael Zaslow, who played Star Trek's first ever Red Shirt, appears as Eddie the bartender. The Millennium Falcon can (just barely) be seen zipping around the battle with the Borg cube. And as noted above, the Bozeman from "Cause and Effect" is also shown as part of the assembled fleet.
  • Cargo Ship: Lampooned in-universe by Troi. Picard reaches out and touches the Phoenix, because he was never allowed to do so seeing it at a museum, and Data tries to understand why touching it would mean anything, which makes for an interesting conversation for Troi to walk in on...
    Troi: (amused) Would you three like to be alone for a while?
  • Catapult Nightmare: Averted and then played straight during Picard's Dream Within a Dream. When he falsely wakes up from his first nightmare he simply opens his eyes while sitting in his desk chair; when he wakes up for real, he jumps up from his bed (although what wakes him up is a distress call, so there's somewhat more logic to it).
  • Chekhov's Lecture: Picard's plan in the battle on Deck 16 is to rupture one of the coolant tanks by the warp core, flooding Engineering with the corrosive materials inside and destroying the Collective the Borg have established there. This plan is repelled by the Borg before Picard's team even gets inside Engineering, but breaking one of the coolant tanks is how Data finally defeats the Borg in the climax of the film.
  • China Takes Over the World: The Eastern Coalition or ECON, one of the factions in the Third World War (and who Cochrane originally thinks the Borg's attack comes from) is said to be a version of this in the Star Trek Expanded Universe, although it's not detailed in the film itself.
  • City Planet: Earth has become this under Borg rule in an alternate timeline. Oddly enough the population consists of only 9 billion Borg even though the planet's entire surface seems to have been completely urbanized and technified. Presumably, the rest of the space is taken up by automated factories or other automated urbanization. Possibly justified—at the end of 2012, the world population was only 7 billion, and realistically, without significant advances in farming and food production, the world cannot support much more than about 9 or 10 billion. A significant amount of humans were most likely rendered unable to be assimilated by use of nuclear weaponry. 9 billion may be a high number.
  • Comic Book Adaptation: By Marvel Comics.
  • Conqueror From The Future: The Borg's plan.
  • Continuity Lockout: Worf's presence on the Defiant at the beginning of the film is not explained and doesn't make sense unless you're aware Michael Dorn had joined the cast of DS9 .
  • Continuity Nod:
    • The moon hiding the Enterprise-E from the approaching Vulcan ship is probably a nod to The Wrath of Khan, where the Enterprise hid from the Reliant by circling around Regula on its opposite side.
    • When Picard shatters the glass case in the Ready Room and the starship models fall to the ground he takes a long look at the Enterprise-D, destroyed in the previous film. Heavily implied, the novelization confirms that he was wondering if he was upset over losing another Enterprise or if he was actually lost in revenge.
  • Continuity Overlap: The film premiered during Season 5 of DS9 and Season 3 of VOY. It had to acknowledged developments elsewhere in the franchise:
    • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Worf had joined the cast of DS9 the previous year, so the film had to bring him back into the TNG-corner of the 24th Century. Having the Defiant as part of the Starfleet armada both solves this and is a nod to the ship's origins as an anti-Borg project.
    • Star Trek: Voyager: The Enterprise-E is equipped with the newly developed Emergency Medical Hologram.
  • Cool Starship:
    • The new and improved USS Enterprise NCC-1701-E makes her glorious debut in this film. The television version, 1701-D, had been destroyed in the previous film for no other reason than to introduce a more cinematic version in this one. This was a practical motivation as much as stylistic, since the old ship's sets were built for TV and the level of detail shown on film meant they had to make the them Darker and Edgier just to hide the lower quality.
    • The USS Defiant was introduced on Deep Space Nine as being a prototype starship specifically designed to fight the Borg. Apparently it was a running fight from where the fleet engaged the cube to when it came in orbit around Earth. This is the only time the ship got to fulfill its purpose and despite its size, it took a hit from a Borg weapon and returned fire.
    • Several other background starships from the opening battle, most notably the Akira-class, have gotten surprising amounts of love from the fans. Canonically the ships were designed and built after the devastating defeat at Wolf 359 from the episode "Best of Both Worlds," already forming a major backstory to this film, and were meant to be more battle-hardy than previous Starfleet ships.
    • One of the starships fighting the Borg was the Millennium Falcon in a sub-blink-and-you-miss-it cameo courtesy of ILM who worked on special effects for the film.
  • Crapsack World: By all accounts, Earth of 2063 is a pretty miserable Scavenger World in which everyone is suffering from radiation poisoning to one degree or another, and things like murder are commonplace. Not surprising, considering it's the aftermath of World War III.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death: The Borg Queen is killed by Data dragging her into a cloud of plasma coolant engulfing main engineering, liquifying her organic components as she screams in agony. Even that is not enough, however. After Picard uses the ventilation system to clear out the gas, her robotic brain is still helplessly writhing on the floor. Picard snaps her in two to finally kill her, at which point it's a mercy.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Starfleet fares better against the Borg than at Wolf 359, but the battle still goes very badly. Listening to the subspace transmissions of the damage and request for help convince Picard to take the Enterprise into battle. Picard's crew don't do so well against the Borg inside the ship either; they manage to assimilate half the ship in a matter of hours and only stop momentarily to use the Deflector Dish as an interstellar communication device so they can contact the other Borg.
  • Dawn of an Era
  • Darker and Edgier: TNG was sometimes criticized for lacking in action and character drama, which admittedly was because Gene Roddenberry wanted a series that spent more time on ideas rather than violence and characters who argue all the time. This movie is a rock-em action flick with some serious interpersonal conflict (Picard and Worf especially), with a literally darker color palette in both the new uniforms and the sets even before Borg assimilation. This was the first Star Trek film to receive the PG-13 ratingnote .
  • Deal with the Devil: Subverted. "0.68 seconds, sir."note 
  • Department of Redundancy Department: Think time travel is confusing now? Try discussing it with alcohol.
    Troi: TIME?! This is no time to argue about time! We don't have the time! (hic) What was I saying?
  • Did the Earth Move for You, Too?: When the Borg Queen blows lightly on Data's new skin, causing goosebumps, Data gasps at his first organic sensual experience. She invokes the trope, asking, "Was it good for you, too?"
  • Die Hard on an X: Picard's storyline in last third of the movie is pretty much Die Hard on the Enterprise. Picard ist the last (fully) human crewmember on the ship that has been taken over by the Borg and feels obliged to rescue Data. While all the Jeffries tube crawling has taken place already earlier in the movie, it should be noted that in this last segment Picard even sports a very John McClane-like wife-beater...
  • Distressed Dude: Data is captured early on by the Borg and held in engineering.
  • Does This Remind You of Anything?:
    • Picard's hate for the Borg in his "The line must be drawn here" speech is like a person's hate for a rapist. Many actors and producers have said Picard's trauma after assimilation was modelled on a rape victim, while the Body Horror of assimilation was specifically designed to evoke a sexual assault.
    • It's also a Cold War reference, containment and domino effect, it's why we fought in Vietnam, This Far, No Farther! Older pulp book sci fi often represented Communism as Borg-like, since that's what communism was supposed to be on paper. From each according to his ability, to each according to his need; working for the common good, everyone is equal, the end of class strata, the loss of individuality.
    • The interactions between Picard, Data, and the Borg Queen come across as a jilted girlfriend wanting to show her ex how he could never measure up to her new boyfriend, and prove that she's totally winning the break-up.
  • Dramatic Shattering: Picard with his Big "NO!".
  • Dream Within a Dream: The entire opening sequence. Picard is on the Borg cube, but it's all just a dream, so he rinses himself off when a Borg implant pops from his face, but that's all just a dream too!
  • The End of the Beginning
  • Epic Tracking Shot: The movies start almost inside Picard's eye and then pulls back to show the humongous Borg complex he was in, All Just a Dream, or rather a traumatic memory.
  • Evil Overlooker: The poster does this in a pretty interesting manner. Data and Picard are wary of an approaching army of Borg drones underneath them, but the Borg Queen, the film's Big Bad, is hovering over them both.
  • Eye Scream: To Picard. In the freaking opening sequences, no less! Later on, assimilated Enterprise crew appear to have had one of their eyes gouged out and replaced with some kind of interface circuitry prior the the installation of the prosthetic visualizer.
  • Facepalm: After Drunk Cochrane restores power to the jukebox and starts drunkenly dancing again, Riker dances slightly too... and then Troi passes out, which Riker promptly responds to with a facepalm.
  • Failed a Spot Check: When discussing why the Borg stopped on Deck 11, the crewmember names several departments including Deflector Control, before dismisses it as not being vital system. In "Best of Both Worlds," the crew of the Enterprise-D were capable of turning the deflector dish into an anti-Borg cannon. Thanks to Locutus, it didn't work, but the idea that that system could be turned into a weapon probably should have been considered by the crew. This becomes particularly baffling when you remember that the deflector dish is the only thing allowing the ship to travel at Warp without being destroyed by space dust. Considering at this point the Borg also controlled engineering, how did they know they weren't intending to head back to the Delta Quadrant after sabotaging First Contact?
  • Fake Defector: Data is seduced by the Borg Queen with the promise of becoming more human by having human skin grafted onto his body and serving as her consort. He pretends to join them by deactivating the Enterprise's self-destruct and firing at the Phoenix, before killing the Borg Queen and defeating the Borg single-handedly. Data notes that he actually considered the offer for 0.68 seconds — for an android like him that is an eternity.
  • Fan Disservice: What's left of the Borg Queen after her flesh melts off.
  • Fashions Never Change: Averted. Picard tells the computer to replicate mid-21st century clothing for the away team before beaming down.
  • Fate Worse than Death: Picard expresses this conviction about being turned into a Borg drone. While the strike team is preparing after the Borg are found to have infiltrated the Enterprise, he tells his men that when they encounter assimilated crew members they shouldn't hesitate to kill them, because they'll be doing them a favor.
  • First Contact: Obviously.
  • Future Imperfect: Only applies in the crew's hero worship of Cochrane. Otherwise — like many other Time Travel Tropes in this film — averted. Picard simply asks the computer to make them some period costume and then they fit right in.
  • The Future Will Be Better: Not from the perspective of the viewers, but from that of the people living in the wreck of late twenty-first century Earth.
  • Get Out: Picard says this to Lily when she confronts him about his lust for revenge against the Borg.
  • Giving Someone the Pointer Finger / Punctuated! For! Emphasis!: Marina Sirtis likes the bar scene the best, because seven years of playing Troi had erased her ability to be funny.
    "So (poke) don't (poke) go criticizing (poke) my counseling (poke) techniques!"
  • Go Look at the Distraction: The Federation sends the Enterprise to patrol the Romulan Neutral Zone during the initial Borg attack. In truth, they didn't want Picard within a mile of the Borg.
  • Gunship Rescue: During the space battle between the Federation fleet and the Borg cube, the Defiant (captained by Lt. Commander Worf) is almost destroyed and prepares to ram itself into the cube, before the Enterprise shows up to position itself between the Borg and Worf's ship.
    Helmsman: "Sir, there's another starship coming in. It's the Enterprise!".
  • Hearing Voices: Picard can't get the Collective out of his head...
  • Hidden Depths: The holodeck program does this for Picard, hinting that this supposedly-upright captain with his liking for opera also enjoys fist-fighting thugs and snogging ditzy blondes. This isn't a surprise to Trekkies (familiar with Picard's more racy past in "Tapestry") but leads to the more serious drama of Picard screaming in rage as he machine-guns an assimilated ensign, then trying to bash his body with a tommy gun.
  • Historical Hero Upgrade: In-Universe example. Cochrane in the future is seen as a great visionary. In reality though, he was a drunken jerkass who was just trying to get rich.
  • Hive Queen: The Borg Queen, who claims to somehow be the Collective rather than simply control it (don't worry, the characters don't quite get it, either). Presumably the "Queen" is simply a personification of the Collective, assembled whenever one is deemed necessary for one-on-one interaction. Especially considering the number of times she has come back from the dead. Ever since her debut in First Contact, whether her existence is a good or bad idea has been a matter of great debate. Note that she never actually refers to herself as a Queen, or even the leader of the Borg. The other characters do.
  • Horde of Alien Locusts: The Borg exist only to assimilate everything into their collective to bring them closer to "perfection" and expand indefinately. Like a swarm of insects, they can't be bargained with.
  • Hold the Line. The Captain Ahab variety.
    Picard: They invade our space and we fall back. They assimilate entire worlds and we fall back. Not again. The line must be drawn here! This far, no further!
  • Humans Are Morons: Humans of the mid-21st Century live in a post-apocalyptic society with just barely enough infrastructure to continue research on a warp drive, while the other races have already begun exploring the galaxy and view humanity as being "too primitive". The main goal in the movie is to ensure that humanity overcomes that notion and gains recognition from the alien community at large (or at least the Vulcans). Naturally, as the large majority of the rest of Star Trek canon shows, humanity generally overcomes this view among alien races to become the dominant space-faring race.
  • Humans Are Special: Why are the Borg going to such extreme lengths to assimilate Earth? Because once Earth rolls over, the rest of the Federation will be a piece of cake and assimilating Earth in the past saves them even more trouble by preventing the Federation from even existing. Makes sense considering the Federation only exists because humans worked so hard to unite the other races and encourage trade and development between them as opposed to the apparent "every species for itself" approach of before, leading to massive developments in technology and resistance.
  • I Am the Trope: The Borg Queen is the Borg. Data himself isn't quite sure what this means.
  • I'm a Doctor, Not a Placeholder: The EMH calls this by name - he's a doctor, not a doorstop. Appropriate for the franchise that named the trope.
  • Immune to Bullets:
    • Data, being made of metal and all. Rule of Funny also plays a small part, as well.
    • Averted with the Borg, fortunately for Picard. This started a long fan debate over why Starfleet doesn't issue firearms, which ignores the fact that Picard's submachine gun worked because it was unexpected, not necessarily because it's a Weaksauce Weakness (it successfully killed two drones, but the number of drones that get sacrificed before the Borg adapt is usually about three).
  • "I Know You're in There Somewhere" Fight: Picard tries this with an assimilated Data and fails. Subverted when Data reveals he was faking the whole time.
  • I Need a Freaking Drink:
    • As Geordi goes on and on about Cochrane's impact upon human history, Cochrane tells him he has to take a leak, but it's just an excuse to go off and drink in private.
    • A subtle one, but the Vulcan Cochrane decides to serenade with a loud rendition of Little Richard's "Hoobie Doobie" takes a very quick, long gulp of his drink.
  • Info Dump: Actually handles this very well, getting out all the information the non-Trek fans need in a few lines after the Enterprise travels back in time. Particularly impressive when they have to describe an up to now entirely unseen time period (Earth in the 2060s).
  • Insignificant Little Blue Planet: Discussed Trope after Cochrane's first brief warp flight and he turns the ship around to look at the Earth behind them.
    Cochrane: Is that it? It's...so small...
  • Instant Expert: Data learns deception. He goes from unconvincingly lying about "mimicking the behavior of humans" when his arm flesh gets slashed, to convincing Queenie that he had sided with her and would betray Humanity to the Borg.
    • On the other hand, Data is shown numerous times during the run of TNG that he's a very good actor, so he might simply be putting these skills on display.
  • Ironic Echo: Data repeats the Borg's famous line "Resistance is futile" right before he reveals he was playing the Borg Queen and releases the gas which will destroy them.
  • It Is Pronounced Tro PAY: When the Borg deliver the line, it's generally "Resistance is few-tile." Towards the end it instead gets spoken as "Resistance is feudal."
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Cochrane.
  • Keystone Army
  • Kinetic Weapons Are Just Better:
    • After the Borg adapt to their phasers, Picard lures a couple of drones into the Holodeck and shoots them with a Tommy gun. This has led to fan speculation that Borg shields suck against kinetic attacks, which is semi-verified in noncanonical novels. It's reflected in the visual effect of the Borg adapting to weapons fire. The series had what looked like an actual shield pop up and the phaser shot doing no damage. Starting with this movie the phaser blast seems to be dissipated into the full body of the drone, which suggests that it isn't a personal shield but the actual body armor of the drone allowing it to absorb energy. This makes projectile weapons logical.
    • Melee attacks weave in and out. On the one hand, Worf is inhumanly strong and Data is outright superhumanly strong and both do alright in physical combat but still ended up taking hits. The one human Red Shirt that attempts to Phaser-butt a drone gets his ass handed to him in short order. Another officer balks at the idea of hand-to-hand combat, clearly aware that such an attempt would fail horribly. Unless you can shut down the drone in one hit there is no real chance of a prolonged fight because they are like zombies with assimilation tubes, they touch you you join them.
  • Know When To Fold Them: Lily makes Picard re-evaluate his priorities.
    Lily: I guess he (Captain Ahab) didn't know when to quit.
    (Picard smiles.)
  • Large Ham: Picard, when letting his desire for revenge get the better of him, descends to a state where "chewing the scenery" is only putting it mildly, telling Lily that "The line must be drawn heeyah!" and: "IIIIII, will make them pay, for what they've done!" An example of Tropes Are Not Bad. That monologue is freaking epic, and it's mainly Patrick Stewart's skill as an actor that keeps it from turning into Narm.
  • Last Note Nightmare: The opening titles. Beautiful, uplifting music that fades into silence...and then... WHAM!
  • Let Me Get This Straight: Invoked by Cochrane.
  • Limb-Sensation Fascination: Data is captured by the Borg and then has patches of organic matter — actual skin — grafted onto his exterior and integrated into his systems by the Borg Queen. Notably, when he tries to escape, one of the patches is cut, allowing Data to experience pain for the first time; the experience confuses and fascinates him so much that he agrees to allow the Borg to graft more of it onto him.
  • A Little Something We Call "Rock and Roll": An inversion of the trope, as it's Cochrane (re)introducing it to the time travelers from the future. Never lift off without it!
  • Macgyvering: On the hull of the Enterprise-E. Once Worf runs out of phaser ammo (the Borg shrug off each modulation), he resorts to using his Mek'leth sword. He lops off a Borg's arm, but his adversary doesn't even blink and swipes at his leg, causing Worf's spacesuit to decompress. When we next cut to Worf, he has tied the Borg's severed cables to his breached suit, sealing it shut.
  • Magic Countdown
  • Mauve Shirt: Lt. Hawk.
  • Meaningful Name: The Phoenix, the first warp-drive ship, can be seen as having risen from the ashes of World War III.
  • Mercy Kill: Picard shoots a crewmember as he is being assimilated by the Borg.
  • Mundanisation: Averted. This is one of the few time-travel stories that involves people from the far future going back to the near future, rather than the present day or past. Another Star Trek example is the Deep Space Nine episode "Past Tense".
  • Mission Control: Troi acts as ground control for the Phoenix launch.
  • Moby Schtick: "Captain Ahab has to fight his whale!" Picard is dumbfounded by this accusation, then denies it, and then finally — and resignedly — agrees that she's right.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: Picard's reaction after Lily's quoting of Moby-Dick and his Unstoppable Rage smashing his model ships (Enterprise-D and -C for extra pathos, if you're an astute observer) makes him realize he's throwing the crew's lives away because of his own vendetta against the Borg.
  • Mythology Gag:
  • Near Villain Victory: "Watch your future's end...".
  • Neck Snap: During the assault team's attack on Borg-held Engineering, Data kills one of the drones by breaking his neck, undoubtedly helped by his superhuman strength.
  • Never Trust a Trailer:
    • The trailer depicts Picard's "The line must be drawn HERE!" speech as a Badass Boast, instead of the Roaring Rampage of Revenge / Sanity Slippage on Picard's part. Additionally, the trailer also features Data's sneering "Resistance is futile" retort, but makes it seem as if Data had been fully subverted by the Borg, instead of being a Pre-Mortem One-Liner aimed at the Borg Queen. And more importantly, the trailers made it look like the Borg were mounting a full-scale invasion against the Federation, instead of only attacking Earth.
    • The original teaser did not feature any new ship footage and was comprised entirely of stock footage from TNG episodes and Star Trek: Generations. This seemed to suggest that the new Enterprise would be the same model as the old ship. It also featured a shot of Voyager fighting a Borg cube.
  • Nice Hat: Cochrane's cap. An interviewer asked Cromwell where they could get one, but the actor's daughter already had dibs on it.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: Well done, Starfleet, take the one Captain with the most experience dealing with the Borg out of the fleet assembled to fight them. Nor consider at least relieving him temporarily of command if you're that worried he'll be a risk, as he only has the most powerful and advanced ship in your entire armada at his disposal. Because when the fate of Earth is at stake, you want this man and the crowning achievement of shipbuilding he commands to be studying... comets. Its not like if Picard showed up, he'd managed to Curb Stomp the Borg cube in less than 2 minutes... oh wait... he does. Well, I'm sure the families of all those good men and women lost before the Enterprise-E got there don't blame you for that very intelligent decision, Admiral Hayes.
    • Also remember that they were afraid that Picard would take this extremely personally (which he does), go into a roaring rampage of revenge (he does), and nearly screw everything up for everyone. The only reason why the Borg didn't win was because Lily managed to snap Picard out of his crazy revenge mode. Both sides have points.
  • Nightmare Sequence: The film opens with Picard finding himself inside a Borg cube and part of the collective hive mind, before he's experimented on and his eyes are almost pierced by a needle. There's a fakeout where it seems like he's woken up, but then a Borg implant bursts out of his cheek before he wakes up for real.
  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot: Klingon Borg!
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: There are more than a few similarities between the character of Zefram Cochrane and Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry. Both were men who were elevated to near-mythic status posthumously, seen as legends and visionaries with "a dream" — and both were lecherous, with substance abuse problems, and primarily motivated by money (not to mention extremely tall). The filmmakers claim they didn't base Cochrane on Roddenberry, but the similarities are there. One commentary noted that the scene where a star-struck Reg Barclay meets Cochrane was like a star-struck Trek fan meeting Roddenberry. And both, in different senses, created the world of Star Trek.
  • No One Gets Left Behind: Picard refuses to leave the self-destructing Enterprise without Data.
  • The Not-Love Interest: Picard and Lily actually display a great amount of mutual attraction on screen, but given their different worlds and timelines, they don't end together.
  • Not So Different:
    • The Borg Queen tries to convince Data that they are not so dissimilar when they try to assimilate him.
    Data: You must be aware that I am programmed to evolve — to better myself.
    Borg Queen: We, too, are on a quest to better ourselves, bringing us closer to perfection.
    • Picard introduces Lily to the better future of the twenty-fourth century in their conversations, but then she points out that his hatred of the Borg is making him not act like a member of the perfect future society he's describing.
  • Not Using the Z Word: Averted, the Borg are described as bionic zombies on a couple of occasions.
  • Oh Crap:
    • Riker and Geordi share a look that just screams this when, after being told that a system has malfunctioned, Cochrane proceeds to hit the controls, shrug, and say, "Don't worry!"
    • The helmsman of the Defiant has a major one upon realising that they've lost weapons and shields. Then Worf orders him to ram the Borg Cube.
    • When the engineers on the ship are ambushed by Borg, Picard briefly hears the Collective's voice.
  • The Oner: The opening shot which pulls back from Picard's eye to show the Borg cube's interior.
  • Only in It for the Money: In the Star Trek universe, Federation scientists and engineers such as Geordi LaForge revere Zefram Cochrane for inventing the warp drive, which allowed the Federation to form. The Cochrane that Geordi meets in this film breaks the pedestal somewhat: he invented the warp drive to get rich and had no idea what would happen because of it.
  • OOC Is Serious Business:
    • Worf the Proud Warrior Race Guy is saying Picard's plan is too dangerous. Picard calls him a coward when he should know full well how deadly an insult that is to a Klingon: this is the same Picard whom in the series is the only person Worf trusts enough to confide in about Klingon problems and is trusted enough by the Klingon government to arbitrate a succession dispute. So both Picard chewing out Worf this way and Worf's "If you were any other man" statement are significant.
    • Earlier, with Picard's berserk rage as he machine-guns the Borg on the holodeck, then tries to smash their dead bodies, showing how far he's fallen from the compassionate and philosophic leader he aims to be.
  • Our Founder: When informed that he's standing in the exact same spot as his future statue, Cochrane goes a little bit nuts. (See Refusal of the Call below.)
  • Out-of-Character Moment: Troi getting drunk trying to reason with Cochrane. Rule of Funny at play. Justified because she's, well, drunk.
  • Palette Swap: The Starfleet uniforms seen here are an inversion of the uniforms worn on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Voyager, being predominantly black with grey shoulders and colored shirts, unlike DS9/Voyager's uniforms which had gray shirts and colored shoulders. The DS9 crew would shortly switch to these uniforms for the rest of the series, whereas Voyager's crew, stuck in the Delta Quadrant, stuck with their uniforms till the end, though subsequent episodes involving the Federation at home featured these uniforms.
  • Percussive Maintenance: Averted. Cochrane attempts to fix a warning light on the Phoenix by hitting the console. It doesn't work, and he ultimately tells Riker and Geordi to ignore it.
  • Pop-Cultural Osmosis: Lily never read Moby-Dick, but it's so well known, the basic point was still clear to her.
  • Precision F-Strike: "BULLSHIT!"
    • Make no mistake, when the Borg Queen realizes Data has been playing her all along, his "Resistance is futile" Ironic Echo is merely an English translation for "Fuck you!"
  • Pre-Mortem One-Liner:
  • Production Foreshadowing: Crusher states that in the 22nd Century, the Borg are still in the Delta Quadrant. Within the film, this is just exposition. But when it was released, it was a reminder that as Star Trek: Voyager was set in the Delta Quadrant, sooner or later the ship would hit Borg space — something which came to pass several months later.
  • Psychic Link: Picard can hear the Borg speak through him. This is implied to be a lingering effect of his time as Locutus. (He can also hear Data pleading for help, though this could be a feint by the Queen.)
  • Punctuated! For! Emphasis!: "Resistance. Is. Futile."
  • Ramming Always Works: Worf was going to do this before the Enteprise-E decided to have a Big Damn Heroes moment.
  • Rapid-Fire Typing: Data shutting down the main computer. Justified: Data's an android and can type at super speed (he did it all the time during the show). That's why he was asked to do it.
  • Recycled Set: Aside from exceptions like the Bridge and Engineering, most of the Enterprise-E's sets are actually modified versions of Star Trek: Voyager's sets.
  • Red Shirt: Or rather, goldshirt: Neal McDonough's Lt. Sean Hawk, who gets Borgified on the deflector dish. Also a case of Bury Your Gays, if the Expanded Universe is to be believed.
  • Refusal of the Call: Cochrane, when he got overwhelmed with his role in history. He gets over it eventually.
    Cochrane: "I don't want to be a statue!"
  • Remember the New Guy: Captain Picard remembers the Borg Queen when she's first introduced. Could be justified by the fact he was a borg for a while, but that doesn't explain why he doesn't mention this vital piece of information about a dangerous enemy onscreen, and Data seemingly knows nothing about her despite the fact that he presumably would have read any report Picard made after the incident. They attempt to Handwave this by implying that Picard had forgotten about her until they're reintroduced in the film.
  • Retcon:
    • This movie shows Zefram Cochrane as the man who not only created warp drive, but also conducted the first warp flight and made first contact with an extraterrestrial species shortly afterward. In the TOS episode "Metamorphosis", where the character originated, he was simply said to be the inventor of warp drive. No more, no less. Cochrane was also called "Cochrane of Alpha Centauri" in "Metamorphosis". However, fanon had long since decided he was a human who just moved to Alpha Centauri after inventing warp drive, under the assumption that he was the inventor of warp drive for humans (where other races may have had it much earlier), and because of the unlikelihood that humans colonized Alpha Centauri prior to faster-than-light travel. Cochrane also looks much older than he should, according to dates given in "Metamorphosis." The semi-official explanation for this is that he is younger than he looks because of radiation poisoning.
    • Combined with Remember the New Guy is how the film fits the Borg Queen into "The Best of Both Worlds".
  • Retool: Due to a higher budget than the show, the Borg underwent a dramatic change in appearance, instead of pale guys in armored suits it looked like they were almost rotting out from the inside. Great change too, as befits the Rule of Scary. This actually fits in with the original concept of The Borg as a race that simply replaces biological parts with mechanical ones as they wear out.
  • Revenge Before Reason: Picard's motivation for fighting the Borg at any cost. Lily points this out with "Captain Ahab has to go hunt his whale!"
  • Ripple-Effect-Proof Memory: The Enterprise can see the timeline created by the Borg's interference, but since they're in the wake of the time disturbance caused by the Borg Sphere, they're unaffected. It's strongly implied that they'd vanish from existence had they not gone through the time aperture themselves.
  • Robots Enslaving Robots: The Borg trying to make Data join them. They wanted him to choose to join them of his own free will, though. With a very tempting benefits package, too.
  • Rule of Symbolism: The three release clamps for the deflector dish (upon which the Borg are building a transmitter) are colored red, blue, and gold. You can guess which console Lt. Hawk is stuck with when he gets tackled and assimilated.
  • Sacrificial Lamb: Lt. Hawk
  • Say My Name: At the climax.
    Borg Queen: DATA!!!
  • Scale Model Destruction: Picard takes some of his anger out on the model ships in the stateroom.
  • Screw the Rules, I'm Doing What's Right: Captain Jean-Luc Picard disobeys the orders of Starfleet and goes to the front line to engage the Borg. And the crew are behind him.
    Data: Captain, I believe I speak for the crew when I say... (beat) to hell with our orders.
  • Screaming Warrior: When Picard empties a clip into two Borg drones. Lily notices that Picard is a little too bloodthirsty, and even continues to hold the trigger down after the clip empties.
  • Self-Destruct Mechanism
  • Sesquipedalian Loquaciousness: Lampshaded.
    Borg Queen: Do you always talk this much?
    Data: Not always. But often.
    Borg Queen: Why do you insist on utilizing this primitive linguistic communication? Your android brain is capable of so much more.
  • Set Right What Once Went Wrong: An interesting use of the trope because, unusually, the historical event in question lies in our (the viewers') future, and we don't know exactly what it is until the end of the film.
  • Shooting Superman: Lily unloading her machine gun at Data, who barely shrugs.
  • Shout-Out:
  • Songs of Solace: After being told he will not be part of the fleet to defend Earth, Picard spends his time in his office listening to opera with the volume turned up so loud that objects on his desk vibrate.
  • Sophisticated as Hell: (drunkenly) "In my professional opinion as ship's counselor... he's nuts."
  • Shouting Shooter: Picard when taking down the Borg with a Tommy gun.
  • Sleeves Are for Wimps: Picard is in a sleeveless uniform for the climactic showdown, and damn.
  • Spheroid Dropship: The Borg Sphere.
  • Team Rocket Wins: The crew spend most of the movie getting their collective asses repeatedly handed to them by the Borg.
  • Theme Music Powerup: During the Enterprise's Gunship Rescue moment.
  • This Is Gonna Suck: After Data locks out the main computer, Worf reports, "The Borg have cut primary power to all decks, except 16."
    Picard: The Borg won't stay on deck 16.
  • Time Travel
  • Tired of Running: Subverted because it showcases Picard's obsession to destroy the Borg.
    "We've made too many compromises already. Too many retreats. They invade our space, and we fall back. They assimilate entire worlds, and we fall back. Not again. The line must be drawn here! This far and no further!"
  • Title Drop:
    • The only one in the whole series: "You're all... astronauts, on... some kinda star trek!" This points further to Cochrane being an expy of Roddenberry.
    • Naturally, the phrase "first contact" is also used a few times. However, this is to be expected; the phrase is a very common science fiction term describing when two intelligent races meet for the first time. In fact, there was an episode of The Next Generation that is also titled "First Contact," though the plots are very different.
  • Too Dumb to Live: LaForge heads down to Earth and leaves someone else in charge of engineering. That character crawls into the Jefferies tubes in order to try to solve a seemingly minor problem. He hears sounds of the Borg and asks a female ensign still in Engineering if she's the one making the noise. He asks if someone else is there and then is seized by the Borg and screams. The female ensign, hearing this, decides to enter the Jefferies tubes herself to see if she can find out what is going on. She is promptly seized by the Borg.
  • Trash the Set: The Defiant's bridge is shot to hell by the time the Borg Cube reaches Earth. Not surprising given the tough little ship lasted for the duration of the entire running battle. It was likely due to one of the reasons why the Enterprise-D was destroyed in the preceding film (because the sets had been built for a lower resolution - i.e. television, not film). The darkened lightening, smoke, and damage isn't just meant to show the beating the Defiant has taken; it's also meant to hide flaws or features that would have shown up on the big screen.
  • Try Not to Die: Lily asks this of Picard before he embarks onto the deflector dish.
  • Tuckerization: One of the Borg drones Picard guns down during the Dixon Hill program, Ensign Lynch, was widely believed to be named after TNG reviewer Tim Lynch. In fact, he was named after a friend of Brannon Braga.
  • Two-Faced: Data is only partially converted to flesh-and-blood. The exhaust gas burns the artificial skin away, exposing half of Data's metal skull.
  • Two-Keyed Lock: Just like in Star Trek III the Self-Destruct Mechanism requires three officers giving three codes in order to activate it.
  • Two Lines, No Waiting: For most of the film, there are three storylines going; Riker convincing Cochrane to make his flight, Picard fighting the Borg and Data's interrogation by the Borg Queen. Since Picard didn't voice his suspicion that the Borg are aboard the Enterprise before returning to the ship with Data (upon which they lost all communications), Riker, Troi, LaForge and the rest of the engineers on the surface never actually realize what's happening aboard the Enterprise.
  • Unexplained Recovery: Well there is one, it just makes no sense. When Picard protests she should have been destroyed along with the cube back in the series, she merely replies "You think in such three dimensional terms. How small you've become."
  • Unfazed Everyman: Lily. Overlaps with The Watson.
  • Verb This!: Occurs before destroying the Borg's interplexing beacon.
    Worf: Assimilate this!
  • Villainesses Want Heroes: The Borg Queen wanted Picard to willingly submit to the Borg and be her... "consort". When that didn't work out, she goes for the same approach with Data, seducing him with the promise of making him more human and her physical charms.
  • * Virtual Danger Denial: A woman from the mid 21st century exposed to holodeck technology for the first time. She is surprised when Picard's holographic Tommy Gun has very real (and very lethal) effects on the two Borg that follow them in.
  • Walking Spoiler: The Vulcans being the race to make first contact with Humanity has become so well-known to science fiction fans, that it's actually more surprising to realise upon second viewings that this fact is kept intentionally vague right until the last five minutes of the film.
  • Warts and All: Zefram Cochrane was the genius who gave the human race warp drive, thus taking the first step in the founding of The Federation. Star Trek: First Contact revealed that he was a cowardly, womanizing drunk whose intentions in building the first warp ship was "dollar signs, and lots of them".
    Commander Riker: Someone once said "Don't try to be a great man. Just be a man, and let history make its own judgment."
    Zefram Cochrane: That's rhetorical nonsense. Who said that?
    Commander Riker: You did, ten years from now.
  • Wham Line:
    • "Population: 9 billion. All Borg."
    • An in-universe one is "April fourth..." "The day before First Contact!" - but being a Title Drop it's not really one to the viewers.
    • Picard's reaction to Hawk's summation of the ship's environmental problems: " 39.1 degrees Celsius. . . like a Borg ship.
    • Picard makes a deal with the Borg Queen to let Data go in exchange for him. The Queen releases his restraints and Picard tells him to leave.
    Data: No. I do not wish to go.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: When Data seizes control of the main computer and fires a trio of quantum torpedoes at the Phoenix, beyond their deliberately missing the ship, shouldn't that be a worrying amount of ordnance sailing off into the unknown?.
  • What Measure Is a Mook?: Lily bashes Picard for his callous treatment of the crew and for killing Ensign Lynch (who got turned into a Borg) during the "The line must be drawn here!" scene.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Most of Picard's crew is hesitant to follow his increasingly judgment-impaired orders and Worf has a particularly venomous response when Picard calls him a coward for refusing to obey suicidal orders. Lily gives Picard a big one for his willingness to sacrifice his crew to get revenge on the Borg instead of doing the necessary thing. Picard finally wises up and orders the evacuation and destruction of his ship, like he should have earlier.
  • What Year Is This?: Averted, as the ship's sensors identify the approximate time period from orbit from the level of pollution in the atmosphere and then narrow it down to a specific date. Data also mentions taking astrometric readings, presumably comparing the stars where they are to where they should be in their present.
  • Why Don't You Just Shoot Him?: Averted by Lt. Hawk regarding simply shooting the Borg deflector dish modifications instead of manually detaching them. Picard responds with Made of Explodium technobabble. It's also consistent; when they finally detach the dish, Worf then hits it once and it ignites into a giant fireball. The writers (Ron Moore and Brannon Braga) state on the commentary that their original intention was to blow up the dish in this manner. Then the Trek technical advisers stated that they couldn't shoot the dish because it would blow up the ship. And this was clearly shown in an episode of Deep Space Nine where the Jem'Hadar rammed one of their fighters in the USS Odyssey's deflector dish... causing it to explode violently.
  • Woman Scorned: The Borg Queen, oh so much. It's revealed that part of the plot was a revenge against Picard for not being her consort. When Picard offers to be her consort once again, she accepts, and practically giggles when Data won't leave that she has a new consort, and Picard is no longer needed. Except as a new Borg drone, that is.
  • The World Is Just Awesome: After their short warp flight, an awed Cochrane comments how small Earth looks, finally starting to realize what he had just accomplished. Also when Picard shows Lily the Earth below her through a force field window.
  • Worthy Opponent: Worf tells Picard as much when Picard insults him;
    Worf: If you were any other man, I would kill you where you stand!
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness. Picard.
    Data: He will make an excellent drone.
  • You Look Familiar: Cromwell was previously seen in two roles on Next Generation. He was the Angosian Prime Minister in "The Hunted" and a Yridian information dealer named Jaglom Shrek in both parts of "Birthright"
  • You're Insane!: Data does point out that the Queen's assurance of her perfection is a symptom of "a delusional mind."

"Borg? Sounds Swedish."

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alternative title(s): Star Trek VIII; Star Trek First Contact
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