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Dethroning Moment / Steven Universe

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Even though Steven Universe is often considered one of the best, if not the best show currently airing on Cartoon Network, even it can give more than a few moments that the Crystal Gems really need to poof and keep bubbled for life.

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  • One moment per work to a troper. If multiple entries are signed to the same troper the more recent one will be cut.
  • Moments only, no "just everything he said," or "This entire show," or "This entire series" entries.
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  • No natter. As above, anything contesting an entry will be cut, and anything that's just contributing more can be made its own entry.
  • Explain why it's a Dethroning Moment of Suck.
  • No Real Life examples, including Executive Meddling. It only invites a flame war.
  • No ALLCAPS, no bold, and no italics unless it's the title of a work. We are not yelling the DMoSs out loud.


  • djx1100: "Rose's Scabbard", I believe, was a very moving and well written episode. However I believe Pearl acted completely selfish in the episode and showed no regard for anybody else's feelings. Especially when she tells Steven "You never even knew her!" Of course it's supposed to show how important Rose meant to Pearl but she comes off as incredibly selfish and rude. Worst part is that she never even apologizes for the line.
    • bsw17: My moment also comes from "Rose's Scabbard". While I think for the most part it shows Pearl's grief well, the moment where Steven nearly falls to his death and she doesn't try to save him goes too far. I understand she's upset but considering she's the gem who constantly worries for Steven's safety this is wildly out of character for her.
  • Skapokon: I really like Steven Universe, but I hate Uncle Grandpa, so I wasn't very pleased when the Crossover Episode "Say Uncle" was revealed. While it resulted to be a pleasant surprise and much better than I expected, there's something about this episode that bugs me. Pearl's portrayal during the episode. I don't know why they did it, but this episode really destroyed the character and made me glad it's not canon. Why? Because they made her way too overprotective on Steven and made her overreact way too much. In the show, she cares of Steven and tries to protect him, but only a bit more than the other two Gems. Here, she is screaming all the time, makes weird faces every time and it just gets irritating. Seeing how this episode parodies parts of the Fandom (Gemsonas, Lars and Sadie's Ship...), something tells me that this is how fans see Pearl. If that's the case, I don't want to know how they portray the rest of the cast.
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  • CJ Croen 1393: While I found the humor of the episode hilarious, something about "Too Far" really bothered me, and it wasn't until I saw this post that I realized what it was: Amethyst's behavior. Her laughing at Peridot's unintentional humor was understandable at first, but later it gets pretty curvy when Amethyst starts goading Peridot into roasting the Crystal Gems. What follows is a(n admittedly funny) thinly veiled metaphor for homophobia (Peridot mocking Garnet's semi-permanent fusion) and a stab at Steven being a Half-Human Hybrid. Amethyst laughs at all of these... and then stops when Peridot turns around and starts making jokes about her. Now granted, it makes sense that Amethyst would be offended (Peridot literally called her "defective") but she had just laughed hysterically at Peridot mocking her best friends—calling Steven an abomination, Pearl a slave and Garnet disgusting—and yet is outraged at what Peridot says to her personally. And at no point does anyone point out the hypocrisy of this. The sad thing is, this could have been a great lesson for Amethyst as well as Peridot, as Amethyst could have learned something to the effect of "if you can't take it, don't dish it out", but instead Peridot is expected to apologize to her (even though Amethyst took advantage of her lack of knowledge of Earth humor) and only her (i.e., not Garnet, Pearl or Steven).
  • On The Hillside: For this troper, it's Log-date-7-15-2. Full stop. Garnet proposes fusing to Peridot, and when Peridot doesn't immediately jump at the idea, Garnet states as a fact that she "isn't ready" — a condescending assumption that figures Peridot can't possibly be bawking at the idea of doing something new and intimate with Garnet, someone she still feels uneasy around. It's a challenge, and of course Peridot is going to try and save face by attempting it anyway. Their attempted fusion dance is more reminiscent of Lapis and Jasper's than anything, with Garnet grabbing Peridot forcefully by the hands and yanking her around while she's visibly uncomfortable, then demanding she "get ready." It's only then that Peridot pulls away and straight up says no, and while Garnet respects this, she also tells Peridot she's "proud of her" for ignoring her own limitations and allowing Garnet to do this to her at all. It's an absolutely disgusting, hypocritical scene that's come very close to turning me off the show as a whole.
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    • Stealthlock: I completely agree. I always felt, watching that scene, like Garnet was supposed to be coming off as polite, but it just made me uncomfortable for reasons I previously couldn't explain. The way she disregards Peridot's obvious discomfort during the fusion attempt without offering to back down, the way she treats Peridot like a paranoid amateur for her very legitimate hesitation, and the subtle pressure she puts on her to get over it by saying she's "proud of her". It felt like Garnet was saying, "It was very grown-up and mature of you to not say no even when you were uncomfortable! I hope you always say 'yes' even if you don't want it in the future." The way Peridot's legitimate aversion to fusion was treated just doesn't sit right with me.
  • Ciel 12: The handling of the aesop in 'Barn Mates'. I guess the point of the episode is that we should always try to forgive and see the best in people, but it was handled very poorly. Lapis dislikes being around Peridot because Peridot was once her jailer. When she initially brushes off Peridot, both Peridot and Steven go to increasing lengths to win her over. Lapis tells Period all she wants is for Peridot to leave, and (to her credit) Peridot immediately complies. My problem is with Steven chewing Lapis out afterwards - he tells her that she should give Peridot a chance and not decide that she dislikes Peridot without getting to know her. The thing is, this isn't about Lapis not liking Peridot - it's about Lapis being so angry at Peridot that she doesn't even want to be in the same vicinity as her. Lapis had every right to be angry as she had been through some terrible things, but the episode casts Steven as being in the right because he's the All-Loving Hero who fixes everything with friendship. The thing is, he expects Lapis to put aside her legitimate feelings of anger just to please him and Peridot and so he can have a happy family. But genuine forgiveness takes time - the aesop could have been so much better if it had been 'you can ask someone for forgiveness if you show them you've changed, but don't expect them to warm up to you when you tell them to.' Instead we get Steven essentially shaming Lapis into repressing her own feelings, rather than the episode admitting Lapis needed more time to heal (for contrast, Pearl and Greg's animosity went on for some time before it was addressed, and that was over their feelings for Rose, not severe harm one party had inflicted on another). Steven is usually wise beyond his years, but here he's just insufferably naive and insensitive, and the episode never calls him out on it.
  • Animeking 1108: Ronaldo’s subplot in Restaurant Wars. In order to get the Fryman and Pizza families to stop feuding, Steven suggests having Ronaldo and Kiki pretend to date each other. However, Ronaldo objects because he has a girlfriend. Naturally, nobody believes him. This leads to a very predictable gag where it turns out his made-up girlfriend was real after all and she breaks up with him because of the misunderstanding and he spends the rest of the episode moping. For starters, nobody comes to Ronaldo’s defense when he claims that it was just a ruse to get the families to stop fighting. Second, Steven never apologizes for unintentionally ruining Ronaldo’s relationship. Lastly, nobody, not even Ronaldo’s family, seems to care that he’s depressed. I get that Ronaldo isn’t exactly the most loved character in the series, but sometimes even a Take That, Scrappy! can go too far (as Family Guy can attest to). This wouldn’t be a problem if the breakup was caused by Ronaldo’s own stupidity, but it wasn’t.
  • Senor Cornholio: "Last One Out of Beach City" was just... bleh, to me. We hardly learned anything new from it; it was nothing more than a filler episode that had no business really even existing. Basically, Pearl wants to join Amethyst and Steven in going to a rock show, and while she's at it she tries to get her "bad girl" on by acting all cool and stuff despite several episodes showing that she's fine with who she normally is. Then she finds someone that just happened to have her hair dyed pink like Rose, with a similar hairstyle to boot, at a point where Pearl's been trying to get over Rose. What really bothers me is when Pearl decides to intentionally run a red stoplight and evade the police, which Pearl does admittedly berate herself for because she essentially ruined the trip by running out of gas during those points... and then Amethyst heaps a bunch of praise on Pearl for all this. And lo and behold, they just so happen to be at the show they were going to! And Rose-haired girl is there! What a twist! I'm sorry, but as a huge Steven Universe fan who likes (even partially) the above and below episodes, this one was almost impossible to salvage. I could tolerate the likes of Lars and Ronaldo, but I couldn't stand this episode; that says a lot. And if Pearl's relationship with Rose-head gets turned into a subplot, those are some episodes I'll watch probably once, then never rewatch again.
  • Mighty Mewtron: I considered putting "Bismuth" up here for its controversial message. But "Gem Harvest" is a double length episode that managed to introduce a more pointless and uncomfortable character to the show. We meet Greg's cousin Andy, who accuses Lapis and Peridot of being "hippies" who overtook his barn, calls the gems entitled, scorns at Greg for moving away and not marrying an American, and calls the Gems "illegal aliens". He's not even a fantastic racist, as his lingo mirrors anti-immigrant ideology and he doesn't seem to know that the Gems are literally from outer space. Steven doesn't care that Andy is saying this to his family and believes, as usual, that he can change him by holding a feast. Most of the episode is filler (though at least all the Gems interact with one another) with Gems trying to act "more human", in the process ruining Andy's family heirloom (which he fumes over at first, then suddenly forgives them for?). Later Andy flies off, upset that nobody thanked him (even though he didn't help with the feast, and it was for him) and because he doesn't like how everything is changing. Steven decides he's family anyway, and Andy never has to apologize for his insults towards the Gems. If the episode was about teaching Andy that the Gems are on Earth to save it and he shouldn't hate them on the basis of them being "un-American", or just educating him about not holding racist ideals, it wouldn't have been as bad, but it tried to act like having one feast with aliens would stop him from being racist- which, as far as we know, may not even be true. Not to mention the... very awkward timing considering this was the first episode to air after the U.S. election. Also, the first part of the episode, which was the only part in the advertising, had nothing to do with the rest of the plot, and the pumpkin pup was only there to look cute and fit the Thanksgiving theme.
    • Zombie_Jack: I completely agree with all of this. Additionally, I felt like "Gem Harvest" is really similar to the episode "Beach Party", only worse in just about every aspect. At least in "Beach Party" they didn't write some nonsense reason for Amethyst to not eat and didn't have the humans spout some weird anti-immigrant rhetoric.
  • Mazzafraz: Ugh, Rocknaldo... let's ignore the bait and switch pulled by the show's Facebook teasing a new Crystal Gem. I will also say that the episode's main lesson is an important one which likely comes from a personal place on the part of the show's creators. I can even admit that the ending was pretty satisfactory and might signal the beginning of much-needed character development for Ronaldo. But jeez, did the episode really need to be so obnoxious? I get that this is an uncomfortable issue that can't be edged around lightly, and from a writing standpoint I guess we do need to see Ronaldo at his worst before we see his change at the end. But good god, Ronaldo at his worst is just plain hard to watch. His smugness, pretentiousness and tactlessness were really pushed beyond the limit, making the episode just an unpleasant experience. It's especially galling because we've just had two emotional rollercoasters for Steven, and watching Ronaldo going full-on douchequake on him is frustrating to watch. The episode could have really benefited from a few humorous moments, maybe a scene or two of Steven legitimately enjoying Ronaldo's company, but Steven barely catches a break. It makes you want to hug the kid and protect him from Ronaldo.
  • Capricious Salmon: I changed my DMOS multiple times for this show. First I chose "Barn Mates" because they treat the CG forever imprisoning Peridot, the gem equivalent of IT support/cable guy/mailman as a good thing. Next I chose "The Answer" because it seemed Hypocritical by making fusion sexual and having the overall Broken Aesop. I was going to choose "Rocknaldo" because it's an eleven minute excuse to have a Steven torture porn (I don't like Steven as a character as I find him uninteresting, but I digress). But nothing makes me angrier than the entire Stevenbomb that came after "Wanted" and one episode that I can point out for that is "Dewey Wins." The episode starts off with Steven walking Connie home. Now, they don't have any scene with Steven and the Crystal Gems or his father in this episode, kinda ignoring how he spent a day or two on Homeworld and had pretty much zero chance of being rescued. All we get from any of them is them intently watching Steven when he walks Connie home. You'd think Steven, who considers the Crystal Gems to be family on par with Greg, would spend five minutes with them or have where they follow him into town. No, they don't. Now, let's move onto Connie. I don't get why she's upset at Steven, and they never make it clear besides to add more conflict to him and show his immaturity. And to top it off, she pretty much takes his mother's sword, which he never officially gave her and more or less let her borrow, and took his pet lion, and the way things seemed, she was never gonna come back. What a great sendoff! Next, Steven decides to go into town and hang with the townies. Now, they could've done where Steven has to go talk to Lars's parents, but all he does is talk to Sadie. Yes, Sadie is his unofficial girlfriend, but I still think it would've made more of an impact if they did where he goes to talk to Sadie and he finds the trio at the Big Donut. Now, the worst part of the episode: because of the abductions, they blame Mayor Dewey and not Steven. They even act like Steven is blameless here, even though part of it is his fault. Now, I will admit, I don't like Mayor Dewey's character and I do think he is a bad mayor, but I do think he didn't really do anything wrong here. It was an issue outside of his control. I guess you can say he does at least get the police involved if "Doug Out" is anything to go by, but they treat it like he's the issue. Steven even points this out, as does his opponent, Nanufua. Steven decides to help with the campaign, but nobody takes him seriously, even after he says that its his fault. Steven never really shows any remorse for his actions and comes off as a Karma Houdini, his only actual punishment being that he realizes why Connie was upset, which feels pretty shoehorned. Overall, the episode felt rushed, an excuse to change up the Status Quo, the cast was seriously Out of Character, and it was a pretty weak episode, probably even weaker than "Rocknaldo" which did at least keep everybody in character and gave Steven a backbone. If I had to change it, I'd do where Steven is welcomed back by the CG in the beginning, but has to escort Connie home and then she leaves, while the speech Steven gives to help Dewey comes at the end at his debate, where he has a Jerkass Realization and apologizes.
  • Rivermint: I had previously given up on Steven Universe after "Gem Harvest" aired, but I returned after I had heard all the good things about "Now We're Only Falling Apart" and the episodes that followed. I watched, and was incredibly surprised at the increase in quality storytelling, heartwarming moments, bringing back some of the best characters in the show, and an overall solid plot. I was so hyped for Ruby and Sapphire's wedding, and enjoyed the entire first half of "Reunited". It was everything I wanted- positive LGBT representation, characters who were complex but sympathetic, heartwarming moments, and beautiful music. And then they redeemed the diamonds. Now, I have no inherent problem with redemption arcs, but in order to be a real redemption three things have to happen: One, the person being redeemed has to realize that what they've done is wrong: Two, they have to have consequences for their previous actions: and Three, they have to make reparations to those they've hurt. The diamonds do none of this. There is no way around it- the diamonds are totalitarians who own slaves, regularly destroy planets, create bioweapons consisting of destroying a person's soul and forcibly gluing them to another shard of soul, multiplied to such a magnitude that Garnet, the embodiment of love, viewed them as an atrocity, uphold a rigid caste system to the point where acting outside your station can be met with death, and who were willing to kill an entire planet of gems simply because it had bad memories for them. That isn't just evil, it crosses the Moral Event Horizon and jumps right into the center. Any one of their actions would be grounds for shattering, but instead their actions are treated as minor scruples. These aren't things that can just be forgiven, and they certainly can't just be shrugged off. The diamonds aren't sympathetic, they're monsters with a coat of Freudian Excuse haphazardly slapped on at the last second because the writers want to think they're clever. Think of how many people have suffered because of the diamonds' actions, and then think of how the show still wants you to sympathize with them. Yeah, I don't buy it. When you've caused so much pain and death in the galaxy, you don't deserve my sympathy.
    • skullsnsouls91:These were my thoughts on this moment too. Like can we just have villains who aren’t redeemed or forgiven for once? And it was such a lazily done moment too. You can’t always try to have a villain be sympathized with. Especially ones like the Diamonds. They’re horrible beings who don’t deserve a single bit of sympathy or forgiveness. No matter what happens with them after this I still won’t see them as redeemed, they aren’t characters deserving of a redemption arc because of their crimes being far worse than any other character who’s been redeemed. This is pretty much one of the worst things this show has done.
      • Zombie_Jack: Yeah that part really bothered me, especially since even if you wanted to go with a pacifist route, you could have just....Imprisoned the diamonds or at least remove them from power, kinda like how At LA ended.
  • The Lucky Cat: I thought Steven Universe had an interesting premise of a kid going on adventures with gemstone-themed aliens, but I agree with a lot of the complaints about the bad pacing, inconsistent animation and awkward characterisation. However my DMOS would be "Change Your Mind". Specifically, the handling of Steven and White Diamond. Now, I loved White Diamond when she was first revealed, because she was the only villain who seemed like a legitimate threat and I honestly considered her the most interesting character in the whole show, way more than Steven, the Crystal Gems or any of his friends. Then "Change Your Mind" ruined all of that. She gets the laziest Heel–Face Turn I've ever seen - Steven basically tells her "Hey, you should let people be who they wanna be!", White Diamond accepts she isn't perfect in about five seconds (by the way, she's the most powerful Diamond and millions of years old and it takes a little boy standing up to her to reverse all that?) and...that's it? She's a good guy now? "Going to be the ultimate challenge to the show's "problems can be solved by communicating your feelings" mentality," my ass. Not to mention I was really hoping she'd be as intimidating as her debut, and she does have some cool powers and genuinely scary moments, but she still gets insultingly easily defeated by Mary S- I mean, Steven. Such a cool villain was totally ruined by the terrible writing of this show.
  • The Purple Meanie: For the most part, I found the Movie to be pretty entertaining. The animation was nice and a few of the songs were bangers... but I would have enjoyed the movie a whole lot more if it weren't for the Diamonds, especially the scenes at the beginning and end of the movie where they act very clingy toward Steven and say how they've "stopped shattering" and try to refer to other Gems as "equal life forms." If they're having so much trouble acting like decent people and basically just doing all this to please Steven, why on Earth are they still allowed to be in power? Granted, Homeworld seems to be changing into a constitutional monarchy, but everyone seems to be cool with the Diamonds still having the same position they always did. The Movie does show Steven being uncomfortable around them and gently telling them how to behave, but his attitude toward them is still too lackadaisical. This is just building from "Change Your Mind" sweeping everything the Diamonds did under the rug, even joking about it, and it just leaves a bad taste in my mouth.
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