YMMV / Sesame Street

  • Alternative Character Interpretation: Pretty much endless, as befits a kids' series with adult fans.
    • Bert and Ernie are a gay couple (debunked by Sesame Workshop). Spinoff rumours include a scenario where they're going to marry to teach kids tolerance, and a horrific variant in which Ernie is then to get AIDS and die graphically, again all in the name of understanding. Ironically enough, the series did eventually add an HIV-positive Muppet — but only in its South African version.
    • Word of God says that originally Bert was going to be the father and Ernie his son, which is why they live together. There were concerns that this would encourage kids to talk back to their parents, so the relationship was changed to make them friends who act like brothers. More specifically, Bert is an older brother as perceived by his kid sibling (kind but boring), while Ernie is a younger brother (affectionate but annoying) from the elder's perspective. The writers eventually kept their ages vague, to allow more kinds of plots between the two.
    • Bert and Ernie aren't adults, but a pair of preadolescent boys living an ideal boy's fantasy life, with the freedoms of adulthood but none (or few—they occasionally clean the apartment and do laundry) of the adult responsibilities. Their lack of any apparent paying jobs and constant habit of playing with toys support this interpretation. Bert's obsession with collecting fits right in with their role as the "latency period" characters in the original cast (just as Cookie Monster appears to represent the oral stage, Oscar the anal and Big Bird, age 6, the Oedipal). C.S. Lewis cites the characters in The Wind in the Willows as an example of a similar trope, using animals instead of people to let them have the freedoms of both children and adults at the same time; likewise, Sesame Street uses puppets to get away with the same fantasy.
    • More recently, Lefty has been perceived by some as representing a drug dealer.
    • Cracked interprets the cast as a case of Dysfunction Junction.
    • The little men from the song about the I in the sky who wear clothes that make them look like monks or medieval peasants and who are very happy to spend their entire existence cleaning the giant letter I that they live in are members of some kind of cult.
  • Animation Age Ghetto: Despite the series' Parental Bonuses, the success of Sesame Street is arguably responsible for reinforcing the stereotype that puppet shows are for very young children; most puppet shows on television are aimed at the preschool crowd, just like Sesame. This trope is in fact what inspired Jim Henson himself to create The Muppet Show, as he didn't want to be stereotyped as a children's entertainer, although this didn't stop the Muppet Show Muppets themselves from suffering from this trope at times.
  • Anvilicious: The Lead Away video. Some Anvils may have Needed to be Dropped at the time, but it is kinda weird that Oscar the grouch would agree to washing his hands before he eats and staying away from dust, and that he gets angry because he thinks they are not taking lead seriously.
  • Archive Panic: If you gave birth to a child, and immediately began watching the run of Sesame Street in succession, that child would be old enough for kindergarten by the time you were finished. That's amusing, given the show's mission and target audience. To date (2013) there are currently over 4,440 episodes... even Sesame Workshop supposedly has to hire people just to maintain that archive!
  • Awesome Ego: Although Grover's generally pretty personable, he often introduces himself as "cute, lovable, furry old Grover," and tends to overestimate his own knowledge and superhero abilities. Of course, this is just a part of what makes him so darn endearing.
  • Awesome Music: Now has its own page.
  • Broken Base:
    • Parents who watch Sesame Street now might be uncomfortable with the show's transition into "The Elmo Show" and the degree to which Elmo has pushed all the other Muppets into the background. Children, however, love the little red menace. Complicating matters further, it isn't just a matter of adults vs. children, as some parents have grown to love and passionately defend Elmo because he makes their kids so happy.
    • If there is enough parental outcry in regard to potentially objectionable material, e.g., Katy Perry wearing a revealing bridal outfit or Chris Brown beating up Rihanna, it is going to get pulled. As a result of both PBS standards and trying to appeal to both kids and parents, this show manages to defy and exaggerate this trope.
    • People who never really watched the show have a hard time understanding people who love it.
  • Crack Pairing: A majority of fans feel this way about how Elmo and Abby, or, at the very least, find that always pairing Elmo and Abby together in a scene seemed forced, as opposed to when Elmo was usually previously paired up with Zoe. It (Kinda) Makes Sense in Context, as Zoe was pretty much conceived to be a counterpart to Elmo (especially visually, as Zoe's orange fur compliments Elmo's orange nose, and his red fur compliments her red mouth). Abby, on the other hand, the writers and producers have been desperately wanting her to achieve the same star-power Elmo has (so the show would have a prominent female Muppet for little girls to relate to), which probably explains why the two of them are almost always paired together in scenes.
  • Creator's Favorite: Cookie Monster has rightfully gotten a lot of attention in recent years: he's taken to YouTube with an audition tape to host Saturday Night Live as well as currently participating in the current unboxing fad, he's gotten his own TV special, he's been given the Cookie's Crumby Pictures segment on the show and has another new recurring segment in the works. In fact, not too many years ago, there was an entire episode dedicated to him spoofing Elmo's World.
  • Creator's Pet: Nearly everyone's had their turn, but the two most recent are Elmo and Abby Cadabby.
  • Dork Age:
    • The "around the corner" era from 1993 to 1998 could arguably be seen as an awkward transitional period between the "old school" years and the modern incarnation of the show, with some characters and elements that weren't present either before or after. Of course, some old-school fans would argue that the show is still in a Dork Age. Funny thing is, even during this supposed Dork Age, old segments (some dating as far back as the first and second seasons), continued airing, so it's not like they completely forgot their roots.
    • The 2002-2007 era of the show could be seen as this, when the show had abandoned their original "magazine" format for a more structured "blocks" format, starting the episodes with a single 10-15 minute street story and then going into recurring segments hosted by various Muppet characters (such as Prairie Dawn and Cookie Monster's "Letter of the Day," and Count von Count's "Number of the Day," and Big Bird's "Journey to Ernie"). Older segments were shown less and less, and the show got more and more childish during this period, not to mention the "building blocks" opening sequence utilized during this time concluding with Super Grover holding up the episode number.
    • Some could say season 46 is this; still trying to figure out a much more abridged running time, cramming in a ton of segments (including the return of the dreaded Elmo's World, albeit much shorter now) and making the street stories a lot more childish and less mature.
  • Ear Worm: Too many to count, really.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Elmo, after Kevin Clash started performing him, so much so that he's now become a Creator's Pet to a lot of the show's older fans. Clash, on the other hand, has developed into the Derek Jeter of children's television, set with the task of training Muppeteers all over the world.
    • For those who aren't freaked out by them, the Martians could also qualify. YIP YIP YIP YIP YIP. UH HUH. UH HUH. YIP YIP YIP.
    • The Two-Headed Monster! Their segments aired constantly throughout the '80s and '90s, then they were re-cast, started appearing in the "Journey to Ernie" segments, and eventually had entirely new segments made. Fans love quoting them (though now that Joey Mazzarino has left the show, who knows if they'll still be around?).
  • Fandom Rivalry: Some fans of The Muppet Show find it strange for Sesame fans to enjoy a show for preschoolers rather than one for all ages.
  • Friendly Fandoms: With The Muppet Show. It's pretty common for Muppet fansites to cover both shows (as well as other Henson/Muppet projects such as Fraggle Rock). There's also the tons of inter-series crossovers Sesame Street had with The Muppet Show in its first decade or so, and there's even a couple of fleeting references in 2014's Muppets Most Wanted.
  • Fanon: With the addition of the new vertical neon sign for Hooper's Store, many fans have decided the logical explanation is that Alan and Chris happened to find the old, rusty sign in the basement and decided to put it to use.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment:
    • The cover of Monsters on the Loose!.
    • In this 1992 clip, Elmo pretends to be an obnoxious wind-up toy. Four years later comes Tickle Me Elmo, amid other merchandise. Though 'Tickle Me Elmo' isn't so funny anymore.
    • In The Movie The Adventures of Elmo in Grouchland, Elmo has a poster of Tiger Woods in his bedroom. Woods' career was nearly destroyed when it was found out he was having affairs with multiple women. The career of Elmo's puppeteer, Kevin Clash, was destroyed by similar circumstances.
    • Bill Cosby once made frequent cameo appearances on Sesame Street and various other kids' shows. After numerous rape allegations, it's unlikely he'll ever show up again.
    • The second verse of the theme song is this. Maybe it's a good thing that the theme song was trimmed down at the same time the cast was.
    Come and play. Everything's A-okay.
    Friendly neighbors there. That's where we meet..
    • Gee, guys, we know you were trying to teach skip counting, but did you have to recalibrate the episode numbering protocol and skip over seventy four numbers in the process?
  • Fun for Some: Bert invokes this trope constantly. All of his interests qualify to some extent as nerdy or lame: feeding pigeons (actually a pretty routine thing to do in New York City, since they're everywhere), collecting bottle caps and paper clips, and reading a book of boring stories entitled...Boring Stories. ("The prince drank a glass of water...")
  • Genius Bonus:
    • Most people think Count von Count's counting obsession is just a pun on his name. It's not. A largely forgotten vampire legend holds that the best way to escape a vampire is to spill a bag of rice, sand or pebbles, because vampires, being a neurotic species, must stop whatever they're doing until they've counted every last item in a pile. That's why the Count has never killed anyone: he never runs out of things to count!
    • During a promo with Entertainment Weekly, Grover and Cookie Monster manage to work in a reference to stage door Johnnies of all things- a term which would probably be a GRANDparental bonus for modern kids. (They also manage to rhyme dystopia and cookie-copia.)
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff:
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    Don: No, I don't think that will work. Lambs aren't yellow. I mean, who ever heard of a yellow lamb!?
    • Count von Count being a vampire(-like) guy that loves counting is a concept on its own that will be pretty funny when you know legends of the Chinese Vampire say that it can be escaped by strewing many small objects (like grains of rice) in its path that it would be compelled to stop and count.
      • It's also part of legends about Western Vampires, as mentioned under Genius Bonus.
    • With Herbert's friendly demeanor and mustached, bespectacled appearance, he actually bears a strong resemblance to Ned Flanders. deviantART, anyone?
    • Back in 1987 Cookie Monster accurately predicted the whole "Veggie Monster" kerfluffle that would happen in a couple decades in the opening lines of "Healthy Food":
    Well, me known for eating cookie
    When I don't they shout "Look, he
    Tryin' to throw loyal fans a curve!
    What he doing eating fish?
    Or vegetable dish?
    Man, he sure got lot of nerve!"
    • An early song had Lefty the Salesman asking Ernie, "Would You Like to Buy an O?" a few years before Wheel of Fortune offered vowels for sale.
  • Hype Backlash:
    • Some modern Sesame Street segments (particularly ones that spoof popular media) can get this reaction if they go particularly viral, as some people can find it baffling how segments from an educational preschool show become unanimously praised and loved.
    • The show itself suffers from this sometimes, as Sesame Street fans rarely have anything bad to say about the show even though they are well outside its target demographicnote , similar to (but not to the same extent as) My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic.
  • Memetic Molester: Elmo may become this in light of some unfortunate events. South Park had a field day with this with their own take on the Big Hugs Elmo doll.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "OM NOM NOM NOM", to the point of possibly being more recognizable than the Cookie Monster who originally said it. Ironically, the phrase has become more associated with the Tyranids than with its original source. This also means that Sesame Street is responsible for the term "noms" and about 1/3 of all cat macros. A skit has Cookie Monster find out about the meme and wondering why he hasn't gotten any royalties from it.
    • "One of these things is not like the others..."
    • This desecration of "The Count's Song"... by Lemon Demon.
    • Neil Patrick Harris and Elmo dancing.
    • Mark Ruffalo and Murray's "Dance of Happiness."
    • 'Seven! Seven memes originating from this show! Ah ha ha!'
    • The facial expressions Kermit makes when Joey keeps adding the Cookie Monster into the Alphabet song. Can be viewed here and here.
    • Jack Black teaching the octagon has become remixed on quite a few occasions, as well as a component of many a YouTube Poop.
    • A particular image of Kermit making a scrunched up, annoyed face is a somewhat popular reaction image (image within this GIF).
    • This parody of Huey Lewis and the News's "It's Hip To Be Square" has overlapped with another meme from a decidedly not child-friendly movie. There are many YouTube comments how it's "so catchy that people don't even listen to the lyrics" or how they should "try getting a reservation at Hooper's store now...!"
  • Memetic Psychopath:
    • Bert via the "Bert is Evil" meme.
    • Both Ernie and Bert (with everyone else in the cast joining occasionally) via the Bertstrips meme.
    • Elmo also gets this treatment as well as a way to vent frustration.
  • Misblamed: When it was announced that Bob McGrath, Emillio Degardo, and Roscoe Orman were being let go from the show, a number of fans thought this was because of the switch from PBS to HBO. Sesame Workshop had to make a statement on Facebook saying that the channel has no control over such decisions.
  • My Real Daddy: Kevin Clash is no longer with Sesame Street, but we owe to him most of what makes Elmo who he is.
  • Narm: The show is full of pop-culture parodies, but the presence of elements meant to be relevant to preschoolers, educational or otherwise (such as counting, healthy food and crayons) make them a bit hard to take seriously for non-parents.
  • Narm Charm: This is the reason why the show continues to be so popular today, even among adults. Seeing humans act alongside puppets and treating them as if they're real sounds hard to take seriously, but the puppets have so much personality and the humans go along with them so believably that you're inclined to believe it with them too. The skits are also preschool level simple so children can understand them, but it's oddly charming to watch Patrick Stewart wondering "B? Or not a B?" or Liam Neeson emotionally counting to 20.
  • Nightmare Fuel: Plenty. See this page for examples.
  • No Such Thing as Bad Publicity: Supposedly averted with Sesame Street, or at least its Latin Spanish counterpart Plaza Sésamo. In the late 90s, Abelardo appeared in Otro Rollo, a popular Mexican night time show. That alone wouldn't be an issue... except the sketch was full of adult jokes, references, and puns. While it was never confirmed, supposedly the Children's Television Workshop (now Sesame Workshop) wasn't too pleased when they found out both the official performer and suit were used in such a sketch, and demanded that their characters never get involved with the show or such a stunt ever again, even when it could be debated the sketch was successful in making the show relevant to adults again. Abelardo, Pancho Contreras, and Lola would appear several years later in the show to promote Plaza Sésamo, but the interview is obviously scripted and, compared to the Abelardo sketch from years before, the adult humor is kept at the very minimun.
  • Periphery Demographic: Part of the reason there are so many Parental Bonuses.
    • Joan Ganz Cooney once said that when she once checked into a hotel in The '70s, the manager came to her room to bring her suitcases... and to tell her that he watches Sesame Street everyday, because it's his favorite show; in fact, Cooney once said that many adults have come to her to tell her how much they enjoy the show, and that it seems most older people who watch the show do so because they dislike most of anything else on television (and especially today, who could blame 'em?).
    • Sesame Street itself has such a large fanbase among teenagers and adults, that it could very well be in a league all its own if it were to ever have cons associated with it. In fact, this actually causes problems for the show itself: it's still a children's show aimed at preschoolers, and always will be; however, older fans are the vocal ones (since they have the ability to do so, especially with the advent of social media), so the people involved with making this show are always looking for ways to not lose the show's focus and goal, while at the same time, find some way(s) to cater to older and longtime fans to make them happy (Season 38 is a great example of this, because it was the first time in five years the show had an episode presented in its original magazine format, rather that the block format it adopted in 2002, and it was also the first time in nine years that the show had an episode that did not include an Elmo's World segment during the final fifteen minutes).
    • Due to the Muppet characters' universal appeal, they make frequent guest appearances and interviews on adult-oriented talk shows and websites. While still mostly clean, the change in audience allows them to make more allusions and references that their show's usual audience wouldn't understand.
    • It helps that the show was originally conceived to educate adults as well as children.
  • Replacement Scrappy: Abby is this to many Zoe fans. Zoe was the original Distaff Counterpart to Elmo, however later on the writers decided to capitalize on girls in their Princess Phase and create Abby. With many fans who grew up with Zoe, Abby was an unwelcome addition who is seen as causing Zoe to be Demoted to Extra.
  • Retroactive Recognition:
    • Many, but probably the strangest and most surreal would be Giancarlo Esposito as Big Bird's friendly camp counselor, years before he would go on to play Gustavo Fring in Breaking Bad, one of the most terrifying villains ever put on television.
    • Among the show's earliest sketches were James Earl Jones slowly saying the alphabet and counting to ten, noted at the time as being the ones that drew the biggest responses from focus group children.
  • Ron the Death Eater: A website in the late 90s entitled "Bert is evil" depicted Bert either siding with evil people or present at controversial events.
  • Scapegoat Creator: In-universe, in the pageant on teeth, Prairie Dawn points out that Bert is the writer and director of the play, "so if you like it, you can thank Bert, but if you don't likke it, you have no one but Bert to blame."
  • The Scrappy:
    • Elmo, to a lot of adult fans.
    • Some fans have seen Rodeo Rosie as this back in the 1970s.
  • Seasonal Rot:
    • The subject matter is up for dispute, however, a majority of fans (and some of the cast and crew) felt alienated when the "Around the Corner" era first surfaced in 1993, when the street itself was cleaned and brightened up, and extended to include a number of new locales. Another majority feel the same way starting with 2002, when the show changed from its original magazine format, and adopted a block format.
    • Some old-school fans also feel that the show has indulged in too much of Political Correctness Gone Mad. However, the show caused an uproar in its early years because of its cultural pluralism, so accusations of this are pretty baseless.
  • "Seinfeld" Is Unfunny: Now that everybody does it, it's hard to remember that Sesame Street invented quality, research-based, curriculum-based, entertaining and educational children's TV that has an ethnically diverse cast and doesn't talk down to its audience.
  • Signature Song
    • Cookie Monster has "C is for Cookie"
    • Ernie has "Rubber Duckie"
    • Bert has "Doin' the Pigeon"
    • Oscar has "I Love Trash"
    • Kermit has "It's Not Easy Being Green"
    • Elmo has... "Elmo's Song"
    • For non-Muppets, Bob has "The People in Your Neighborhood"
    • The Count has "The Song of the Count" and "The Batty Bat"
    • Grover has "Proud of Me" and "Monster in the Mirror"
  • Snark Bait: While not nearly as bad a target as other young children's shows, Sesame Street's educational elements are a frequent target of parodies, both aimed at older kids (as in The Fairly Oddparents) and adults (as in South Park).
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped: While the show has always provided lessons on school topics to preschoolers, there's another, subtler message that every episode broadcast: namely, diversity. From the very first episode, Sesame Street itself was full of people of all races, ages, religious orientations, sexes, and physical abilities. Better yet, they were all friends who valued each other's differences and opinions, never ignored one another, and got along just fine without fighting or arguing. A deaf woman (Linda) is an active part of the community, and everyone around her knows enough sign language to communicate; black and white children play with each other and share everything; Christmas and Hanukkah are celebrated on the street, and people of both creeds happily wish each other specific holiday greetings. To a child in a metropolitan area like New York, this is relatively common—but Sesame Street was nationally broadcast, including in places where children had never seen a person of color. By plainly showing children that people who look, act, or believe different things than you are human beings worthy of respect and love, Sesame Street has been quietly advancing a message of tolerance, acceptance, and love for nearly fifty years.
    • One episode dealt directly with racism, and, in true Sesame Street fashion, the showrunners dealt with the issue bluntly and directly, rather than sugarcoating the idea. In the episode, Gina (who is white) and Savion (who is black) go to see a movie together, then, on the walk back to Hooper's Store, clown around and generally act like best friends. When they arrive, an anonymous person calls up the store and says some very nasty things about the idea of black and white people being friendly with each other (we don't hear exactly what, but Gina and Savion's reactions say it all). Telly, who's confused, asks what happened, and Gina and Savion explain that there are "some really stupid people in the world who can't stand to see it when people of different races are friends." When asked why, the two are forced to admit that they don't know, but point out that Sesame Street is full of people (and monsters, and birds...) who are all different colors and races, but still friends. Telly sums it all up—"What does color have to do with being friends?" And, in a bittersweet but Truth in Television ending, the show closes with Gina and Savion remarking that the racist who saw them earlier could very well still be watching them, and might never change their mind. They resolve to stay best friends anyway, which promotes a message about doing what's right, but it's also powerful to acknowledge that racism isn't going to go away after forty-five minutes. Check out the relevant scenes.
    • "Meet Julia": Elmo, Abby Cadabby, and Alan introduce Julia to Big Bird. When she doesn't talk to him right away, he thinks she doesn't like him, but Alan explains that she has autism, so she interacts differently than most people. Throughout the episode, Elmo, Abby, and Alan help him understand that although she doesn't say much, stims constantly, and has sensitivities that need to be acknowledged (she doesn't like the way paint feels on her skin and hates loud noises, demonstrated when she has a meltdown when a fire engine siren goes off) she is a happy person and a great friend. The episode ends with the kids playing "Boing Tag", a game Julia invented earlier in the episode. Julia (whose actress herself has an autistic son) was widely praised for subverting Hollywood Autism in favor of a sensitive and accurate portrayal of the neurological condition. The showrunners also get bonus points for partnering with the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network instead of the much-maligned Autism Speaks when they did the research.
  • Squick:
    • When watching the Hawaii episodes, your eyes are guaranteed to burn when seeing a very hairy Mr. Hooper without his shirt.
    • Basically everything that Oscar the Grouch eats.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song: Very prevalent with most of the Parental Bonus segments, but most egregious with the "Let It Be" Affectionate Parody "Letter B".
  • Tear Jerker: See this page for examples.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: By its very nature, Sesame Street has to be constantly changing and evolving. It started out as a non-profit show intended to be educational for preschoolers, but now a bigger problem is an audience that's constantly turning over. The trouble comes when a viewer grows up and tunes in (often with their own kids) and finds out that the show isn't a carbon copy of what they grew up on and loved:
    • Old-time fans are not fond of the newer intro.
    • In Season 30 (1998-99), Elmo received his own 15-20 minute segment, Elmo's World, considerably slowing the breakneck pace and kitchen-sink randomness of the show's structure.
    • The "Around the Corner" era (1993-98) and "Blocks" era (2002-07) are often seen as this by old-school Sesame Street fans (see Dork Age above.)
    • Season 40 (2009-2010) was the first season to not have any clips featuring any characters performed by Jim Henson. This essentially obliterates the presence of the late Jim Henson from the show.
    • Season 46 (2016) is the biggest game-changer in the show's history. A move to HBO, reduction to a half-hour format, and the mission statement "fewer puppets, fewer parodies", which has made adult fans upset in particular. This is a reaction to changing demographics (fewer stay-at-home parents means less than 30 percent of children now watch Sesame Street with their parents, making Parental Bonus far less important to the show). This coming on the heels of several high-ranking performers leaving the show with varying degrees of grace hasn't helped.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: There was no 40th anniversary special (just a special two-DVD release of various inserts from the shows 40-year history), but shortly afterwards came The Best of Elmo 2, in which Elmo helps a robot that feeds on memories. This would have made a better plot for an anniversary special.
  • Toy Ship: Elmo tends to be shipped with either Zoe or Abby. In fact, in his Youtube interview, one of the unused questions shown for a split second is someone asking if he has a crush on any of them.
  • Values Dissonance: Standards for what's okay to show to kids in the show seem to have changed to the point that releases of the early seasons advise to the parents that they "may not meet your child's educational needs".
  • We're Still Relevant, Dammit!: Pretty much inevitable given the show's age, although not nearly as bad as it could be. Here is an article on the subject.
  • The Woobie:
    • Grover, on a kid's-TV level. He frequently pushes himself to literal exhaustion in his drive to be helpful, as when for example demonstrating concepts like "Near and Far".
    • Telly, who's constantly nervous, distressed, or even paranoid, getting himself worked up about almost anything even when everyone else is in a good mood.
    • Bert gets this a bit too. Most of the time he's just going about his day or keeping to himself but he invariably gets drawn into whatever antics Ernie feels like doing, even when he actively tries to avoid or get out of them.
    • Big Bird is, pardon the pun, one of the biggest on the show. He's basically a sweet child who manages to avoid much of the misfortune that the other characters get into but when he does have problems he gets the big ones. Losing Mr. Hooper, not being believed about Snuffy to the point that he once doubted his own friend's existence because no one else ever saw him, having his nest destroyed by a hurricane, etc. You want to hug him sometimes just because of how unfair the world can be to him.
  • Woolseyism:
    • In a Hebrew version of "It Sure Is Hot", instead of the boy trying to talk to the girl in Spanish, he tries to talk to her in Hebrew instead.
    • The Dutch version changes the girl to one who knows only English, and so the boy instead teaches her a little Dutch.
    • "C es de cebolla" from Plaza Sésamo, a remixed version of "C Is for Cookie". Here, Pancho sings about his love for onions.
    • AM Muppet Carlo teaching Betty Lou the Spanish word for friend "Amigo" is flipped around for the Spanish version on Plaza Sesamo in teaching her the English word for amigo is "Friend".
    • On the Dutch show, the voice actors for Ernie and Bert are allowed to write their own material, and have released several albums of original material with the characters. They are the only Ernie and Bert in the world who are allowed to do that (although the German version also has its own Ernie and Bert).
  • WTH, Casting Agency?: Max Headroom was a guest star in one episode. Let that sink in for a bit. To make matters worse, they have him talk down to the audience at the end. While that's completely in-character, that's something you'd never see on this show otherwise.
  • You Look Familiar:
    • Bip Bippadotta resembles Mahna-Mahna from The Muppet Show, only he has sunglasses in place of his big black eyes.
    • Betty Lou is often confused with Prairie Dawn, as they are based on the same Anything Muppet pattern.


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