History YMMV / SesameStreet

23rd Sep '17 1:32:53 PM YuukiT03
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** People who never really watched the show have a hard time understanding people who love it.
19th Sep '17 2:50:30 PM tyrekecorrea
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** The second verse of the theme song is this. Maybe it's a good thing that the theme song was trimmed down at the same time the cast was.
--> Come and play. Everything's A-okay. \\
Friendly neighbors there. That's where we meet...
16th Sep '17 5:57:56 PM nombretomado
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** With Herbert's friendly demeanor and mustached, bespectacled appearance, he actually bears a strong resemblance to [[Series/TheSimpsons Ned Flanders]]. [[http://mightyfilm.deviantart.com/art/Homer-meets-Herbert-254940087 deviantART, anyone?]]

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** With Herbert's friendly demeanor and mustached, bespectacled appearance, he actually bears a strong resemblance to [[Series/TheSimpsons [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Ned Flanders]]. [[http://mightyfilm.deviantart.com/art/Homer-meets-Herbert-254940087 deviantART, anyone?]]
1st Sep '17 1:38:14 PM DaScarecrow
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** Big Bird is, pardon the pun, one of the biggest on the show. He's basically a sweet child who manages to avoid much of the misfortune that the other characters get into but when he does have problems he gets the ''big'' ones. Losing Mr. Hooper, not being believed about [[NotSoImaginaryFriend Snuffy] to the point that he started doubting his own friend's existence because no one else ever saw him, having his nest destroyed by a hurricane, etc. You want to hug him sometimes just because of how unfair the world can be to him.

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** Big Bird is, pardon the pun, one of the biggest on the show. He's basically a sweet child who manages to avoid much of the misfortune that the other characters get into but when he does have problems he gets the ''big'' ones. Losing Mr. Hooper, not being believed about [[NotSoImaginaryFriend Snuffy] Snuffy]] to the point that he started doubting once doubted his own friend's existence because no one else ever saw him, having his nest destroyed by a hurricane, etc. You want to hug him sometimes just because of how unfair the world can be to him.
1st Sep '17 1:37:05 PM DaScarecrow
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** Bert gets this a bit too. Most of the time he's just going about his day or keeping to himself but he invariably gets drawn into whatever antics Ernie feels like doing, even when he actively tries to avoid or get out of them.
** Big Bird is, pardon the pun, one of the biggest on the show. He's basically a sweet child who manages to avoid much of the misfortune that the other characters get into but when he does have problems he gets the ''big'' ones. Losing Mr. Hooper, not being believed about [[NotSoImaginaryFriend Snuffy] to the point that he started doubting his own friend's existence because no one else ever saw him, having his nest destroyed by a hurricane, etc. You want to hug him sometimes just because of how unfair the world can be to him.
18th Aug '17 10:39:36 AM Gravidef
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* SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped: While the show has always provided lessons on school topics to preschoolers, there's another, subtler message that every episode broadcast: namely, diversity. From the very first episode, Sesame Street itself was full of people of ''all'' races, ages, religious orientations, sexes, and physical abilities. Better yet, they were all friends who valued each other's differences and opinions, never ignored one another, and got along just fine without fighting or arguing. A deaf woman (Linda) is an active part of the community, and everyone around her knows enough sign language to communicate; black and white children play with each other and share everything; Christmas and Hanukkah are celebrated on the street, and people of both creeds happily wish each other specific holiday greetings. To a child in a metropolitan area like New York, this is relatively common--but ''Sesame Street'' was nationally broadcast, including in places where children had ''never seen a person of color.'' By plainly showing children that people who look, act, or believe different things than you are human beings worthy of respect and love, ''Sesame Street'' has been quietly advancing a message of tolerance, acceptance, and love for nearly fifty years.
** One episode dealt directly with racism, and, in true ''Sesame Street'' fashion, the showrunners dealt with the issue bluntly and directly, rather than sugarcoating the idea. In the episode, Gina (who is white) and Savion (who is black) go to see a movie together, then, on the walk back to Hooper's Store, clown around and generally act like best friends. When they arrive, an anonymous person calls up the store and says some ''very'' nasty things about the idea of black and white people being friendly with each other (we don't hear exactly what, but Gina and Savion's reactions say it all). Telly, who's confused, asks what happened, and Gina and Savion explain that there are "some really stupid people in the world who can't stand to see it when people of different races are friends." When asked why, the two are forced to admit that they don't know, but point out that Sesame Street is full of people (and monsters, and birds...) who are all different colors and races, but still friends. Telly sums it all up--"What does color have to do with friendship?" And, in a bittersweet but TruthInTelevision ending, the show closes with Gina and Savion remarking that the racist who saw them earlier could very well still be watching them, and might never change their mind. They resolve to stay best friends anyway, which promotes a message about doing what's right, but it's also powerful to acknowledge that racism isn't going to go away after forty-five minutes. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovoilDJethU Check out]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKsxwvhK_C8 the relevant scenes.]]
6th Jul '17 1:34:57 PM jm9101983
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** In Season 30 (1998-99), Elmo received his own half-hour segment, considerably slowing the breakneck pace and kitchen-sink randomness of the show's structure.

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** In Season 30 (1998-99), Elmo received his own half-hour 15-20 minute segment, ''Elmo's World'', considerably slowing the breakneck pace and kitchen-sink randomness of the show's structure.



** And now, Season 46 is going to be possibly the biggest game-changer in the show's history. A move to HBO, reduction to a half-hour format, and the mission statement "fewer puppets, fewer parodies", which has made adult fans upset in particular. This is a reaction to changing demographics (fewer stay-at-home parents means less than 30 percent of children now watch ''Sesame Street'' with their parents, making ParentalBonus far less important to the show). This coming on the heels of several high-ranking performers leaving the show with varying degrees of grace hasn't helped.

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** And now, Season 46 (2016) is going to be possibly the biggest game-changer in the show's history. A move to HBO, reduction to a half-hour format, and the mission statement "fewer puppets, fewer parodies", which has made adult fans upset in particular. This is a reaction to changing demographics (fewer stay-at-home parents means less than 30 percent of children now watch ''Sesame Street'' with their parents, making ParentalBonus far less important to the show). This coming on the heels of several high-ranking performers leaving the show with varying degrees of grace hasn't helped.
6th Jul '17 1:26:27 PM jm9101983
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** In 1998, Elmo received his own half-hour segment, considerably slowing the breakneck pace and kitchen-sink randomness of the show's structure.
** Around Season 40, it was declared that no sketches filmed before the mid 1990s would be included in modern episodes. This essentially obliterates the presence of the late Jim Henson and Richard Hunt from the show.

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** In 1998, Season 30 (1998-99), Elmo received his own half-hour segment, considerably slowing the breakneck pace and kitchen-sink randomness of the show's structure.
** Around Season 40, it 40 (2009-2010) was declared that no sketches filmed before the mid 1990s would be included in modern episodes. first season to not have any clips featuring any characters performed by Jim Henson. This essentially obliterates the presence of the late Jim Henson and Richard Hunt from the show.
6th Jul '17 1:18:25 PM jm9101983
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** In the 1990s, Elmo received his own half-hour segment, considerably slowing the breakneck pace and kitchen-sink randomness of the show's structure.
** Around Season 40, it was declared that no sketches filmed before 1990 would be included in modern episodes. This essentially obliterates the presence of the late Jim Henson and Richard Hunt from the show.

to:

** In the 1990s, 1998, Elmo received his own half-hour segment, considerably slowing the breakneck pace and kitchen-sink randomness of the show's structure.
** Around Season 40, it was declared that no sketches filmed before 1990 the mid 1990s would be included in modern episodes. This essentially obliterates the presence of the late Jim Henson and Richard Hunt from the show.
21st Jun '17 7:52:19 AM tropower
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* ValuesDissonance: Standards for what's okay to show to kids have changed so much that releases of the early seasons now carry an "adults only" warning label.

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* ValuesDissonance: Standards for what's okay to show to kids in the show seem to have changed so much to the point that releases of the early seasons now carry an "adults only" warning label.advise to the parents that they "may not meet your child's educational needs".
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.SesameStreet