History YMMV / SesameStreet

8th Dec '17 7:09:49 AM JJHIL325
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** "Meet Julia": Elmo, Abby Cadabby, and Alan introduce Julia to Big Bird. When she doesn't talk to him right away, he thinks she doesn't like him, but Alan explains that she has autism, so she interacts differently than most people. They help him understand that although she doesn't say much, stims constantly, and has sensitivities that need to be acknowledged (she doesn't like the way paint feels on her skin and hates loud noises, demonstrated when she has a meltdown when a fire engine siren goes off) she is a happy person and a great friend. The episode ends with Elmo, Abby, Big Bird, and Julia playing "Boing Tag", a game Julia invented earlier in the episode. Julia (whose actress herself has an autistic son) was widely praised for providing both a sensitive and accurate portrayal of the neurological condition in a way that can be explained to kids. The showrunners also get bonus points for partnering with the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network instead of the much-maligned Autism Speaks when they did the research.

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** "Meet Julia": Elmo, Abby Cadabby, and Alan introduce Julia to Big Bird. When she doesn't talk to him right away, he thinks she doesn't like him, but Alan explains that she has autism, so she interacts differently than most people. They Throughout the episode, Elmo, Abby, and Alan help him understand that although she doesn't say much, stims constantly, and has sensitivities that need to be acknowledged (she doesn't like the way paint feels on her skin and hates loud noises, demonstrated when she has a meltdown when a fire engine siren goes off) she is a happy person and a great friend. The episode ends with Elmo, Abby, Big Bird, and Julia the kids playing "Boing Tag", a game Julia invented earlier in the episode. Julia (whose actress herself has an autistic son) was widely praised for providing both subverting HollywoodAutism in favor of a sensitive and accurate portrayal of the neurological condition in a way that can be explained to kids.condition. The showrunners also get bonus points for partnering with the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network instead of the much-maligned Autism Speaks when they did the research.
7th Dec '17 9:07:42 PM JJHIL325
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** One episode dealt directly with racism, and, in true ''Sesame Street'' fashion, the showrunners dealt with the issue bluntly and directly, rather than sugarcoating the idea. In the episode, Gina (who is white) and Savion (who is black) go to see a movie together, then, on the walk back to Hooper's Store, clown around and generally act like best friends. When they arrive, an anonymous person calls up the store and says some ''very'' nasty things about the idea of black and white people being friendly with each other (we don't hear exactly what, but Gina and Savion's reactions say it all). Telly, who's confused, asks what happened, and Gina and Savion explain that there are "some really stupid people in the world who can't stand to see it when people of different races are friends." When asked why, the two are forced to admit that they don't know, but point out that Sesame Street is full of people (and monsters, and birds...) who are all different colors and races, but still friends. Telly sums it all up--"What does color have to do with friendship?" And, in a bittersweet but TruthInTelevision ending, the show closes with Gina and Savion remarking that the racist who saw them earlier could very well still be watching them, and might never change their mind. They resolve to stay best friends anyway, which promotes a message about doing what's right, but it's also powerful to acknowledge that racism isn't going to go away after forty-five minutes. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovoilDJethU Check out]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKsxwvhK_C8 the relevant scenes.]]
** "Meet Julia": Elmo, Abby Cadabby, and Alan introduce Julia to Big Bird. When she doesn't talk to him right away, he thinks she doesn't like him, but Alan explains that she has autism, so she interacts differently than most people. They help him understand that although she doesn't talk much and has sensitivities that need to be acknowledged (she doesn't like the way paint feels on her skin and hates loud noises, demonstrated when she has a meltdown upon hearing a fire engine siren) she is a happy person and a great friend. The episode ends with Elmo, Abby, Big Bird, and Julia playing "Boing Tag", a game Julia invented earlier in the episode. Julia (whose actress herself has an autistic son) was widely praised for providing both a sensitive and accurate portrayal of the neurological condition in a way that can be explained to kids. The showrunners also get bonus points for partnering with the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network instead of the much-maligned Autism Speaks when they did the research.

to:

** One episode dealt directly with racism, and, in true ''Sesame Street'' fashion, the showrunners dealt with the issue bluntly and directly, rather than sugarcoating the idea. In the episode, Gina (who is white) and Savion (who is black) go to see a movie together, then, on the walk back to Hooper's Store, clown around and generally act like best friends. When they arrive, an anonymous person calls up the store and says some ''very'' nasty things about the idea of black and white people being friendly with each other (we don't hear exactly what, but Gina and Savion's reactions say it all). Telly, who's confused, asks what happened, and Gina and Savion explain that there are "some really stupid people in the world who can't stand to see it when people of different races are friends." When asked why, the two are forced to admit that they don't know, but point out that Sesame Street is full of people (and monsters, and birds...) who are all different colors and races, but still friends. Telly sums it all up--"What does color have to do with friendship?" being friends?" And, in a bittersweet but TruthInTelevision ending, the show closes with Gina and Savion remarking that the racist who saw them earlier could very well still be watching them, and might never change their mind. They resolve to stay best friends anyway, which promotes a message about doing what's right, but it's also powerful to acknowledge that racism isn't going to go away after forty-five minutes. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovoilDJethU Check out]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKsxwvhK_C8 the relevant scenes.]]
** "Meet Julia": Elmo, Abby Cadabby, and Alan introduce Julia to Big Bird. When she doesn't talk to him right away, he thinks she doesn't like him, but Alan explains that she has autism, so she interacts differently than most people. They help him understand that although she doesn't talk much say much, stims constantly, and has sensitivities that need to be acknowledged (she doesn't like the way paint feels on her skin and hates loud noises, demonstrated when she has a meltdown upon hearing when a fire engine siren) siren goes off) she is a happy person and a great friend. The episode ends with Elmo, Abby, Big Bird, and Julia playing "Boing Tag", a game Julia invented earlier in the episode. Julia (whose actress herself has an autistic son) was widely praised for providing both a sensitive and accurate portrayal of the neurological condition in a way that can be explained to kids. The showrunners also get bonus points for partnering with the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network instead of the much-maligned Autism Speaks when they did the research.
7th Dec '17 9:01:15 PM JJHIL325
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** "Meet Julia": Elmo, Abby Cadabby, and Alan introduce Julia to Big Bird. When she doesn't talk to him right away, he thinks she doesn't like him, but Alan explains that she has autism, so she interacts differently than most people. They help him understand that although she doesn't talk much and has sensitivities that need to be acknowledged (she doesn't like the way paint feels on her skin and hates loud noises, demonstrated when she has a meltdown upon hearing a fire engine siren) she is a happy person and a great friend. The episode ends with Elmo, Abby, Big Bird, and Julia playing "Boing Tag", a game Julia invented earlier in the episode. Julia (whose actress herself has an autistic son) was widely praised for providing both a sensitive and accurate portrayal of the neurological condition in a way that can be explained to kids. The showrunners also get bonus points for partnering with the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network instead of the much-maligned Autism Speaks when they did the research.
18th Oct '17 2:04:14 PM Pamina
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** WordOfGod says that originally Bert was going to be the father and Ernie his son, which is why they live together. There were concerns that this would encourage kids to talk back to their parents, so the relationship was changed to make them brothers. More specifically, Bert is an older brother as perceived by his kid sibling (kind but boring), while Ernie is a younger brother (affectionate but annoying) from the elder's perspective. The writers eventually kept this vague, to allow more kinds of plots between the two.
** [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory Bert and Ernie aren't adults, but a pair of preadolescent boys living an ideal boy's fantasy life, with the freedoms of adulthood but none (or few—they occasionally clean the apartment and do laundry) of the adult responsibilities. Their lack of any apparent paying jobs and constant habit of playing with toys support this interpretation. Bert's obsession with collecting fits right in with their role as the "latency period" characters in the original cast (just as Cookie Monster appears to represent the oral stage, Oscar the anal and Big Bird, age 6, the Oedipal).]] C.S. Lewis cites the characters in ''Literature/TheWindInTheWillows'' as an example of a similar trope, using animals instead of people to let them have the freedoms of both children and adults at the same time; likewise, ''Sesame Street'' uses puppets to get away with the same fantasy.

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** WordOfGod says that originally Bert was going to be the father and Ernie his son, which is why they live together. There were concerns that this would encourage kids to talk back to their parents, so the relationship was changed to make them friends who act like brothers. More specifically, Bert is an older brother as perceived by his kid sibling (kind but boring), while Ernie is a younger brother (affectionate but annoying) from the elder's perspective. The writers eventually kept this vague, their ages [[VagueAge vague]], to allow more kinds of plots between the two.
** [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory Bert and Ernie aren't adults, but a pair of preadolescent boys living an ideal boy's fantasy life, life]], with the freedoms of adulthood but none (or few—they occasionally clean the apartment and do laundry) of the adult responsibilities. Their lack of any apparent paying jobs and constant habit of playing with toys support this interpretation. Bert's obsession with collecting fits right in with their role as the "latency period" characters in the original cast (just as Cookie Monster appears to represent the oral stage, Oscar the anal and Big Bird, age 6, the Oedipal).]] C.S. Lewis cites the characters in ''Literature/TheWindInTheWillows'' as an example of a similar trope, using animals instead of people to let them have the freedoms of both children and adults at the same time; likewise, ''Sesame Street'' uses puppets to get away with the same fantasy.
4th Oct '17 8:45:37 PM WileK209
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** Some could say the current season is this; still trying to figure out a much more abridged running time, cramming in a ton of segments (including the return of the dreaded ''Elmo's World'') and making the street stories a lot more childish and less mature.

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** The 2002-2007 era of the show could be seen as this, when the show had abandoned their original "magazine" format for a more structured "blocks" format, starting the episodes with a single 10-15 minute street story and then going into recurring segments hosted by various Muppet characters (such as Prairie Dawn and Cookie Monster's "Letter of the Day," and Count von Count's "Number of the Day," and Big Bird's "Journey to Ernie"). Older segments were shown less and less, and the show got more and more childish during this period, not to mention the "building blocks" opening sequence utilized during this time concluding with Super Grover holding up the episode number.
** Some could say the current season is this; still trying to figure out a much more abridged running time, cramming in a ton of segments (including the return of the dreaded ''Elmo's World'') World'', albeit much shorter now) and making the street stories a lot more childish and less mature.


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** The "Around the Corner" era (1993-98) and "Blocks" era (2002-07) are often seen as this by old-school ''Sesame Street'' fans (see DorkAge above.)
23rd Sep '17 1:32:53 PM YuukiT03
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** People who never really watched the show have a hard time understanding people who love it.
19th Sep '17 2:50:30 PM tyrekecorrea
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** The second verse of the theme song is this. Maybe it's a good thing that the theme song was trimmed down at the same time the cast was.
--> Come and play. Everything's A-okay. \\
Friendly neighbors there. That's where we meet...
16th Sep '17 5:57:56 PM nombretomado
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** With Herbert's friendly demeanor and mustached, bespectacled appearance, he actually bears a strong resemblance to [[Series/TheSimpsons Ned Flanders]]. [[http://mightyfilm.deviantart.com/art/Homer-meets-Herbert-254940087 deviantART, anyone?]]

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** With Herbert's friendly demeanor and mustached, bespectacled appearance, he actually bears a strong resemblance to [[Series/TheSimpsons [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Ned Flanders]]. [[http://mightyfilm.deviantart.com/art/Homer-meets-Herbert-254940087 deviantART, anyone?]]
1st Sep '17 1:38:14 PM DaScarecrow
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** Big Bird is, pardon the pun, one of the biggest on the show. He's basically a sweet child who manages to avoid much of the misfortune that the other characters get into but when he does have problems he gets the ''big'' ones. Losing Mr. Hooper, not being believed about [[NotSoImaginaryFriend Snuffy] to the point that he started doubting his own friend's existence because no one else ever saw him, having his nest destroyed by a hurricane, etc. You want to hug him sometimes just because of how unfair the world can be to him.

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** Big Bird is, pardon the pun, one of the biggest on the show. He's basically a sweet child who manages to avoid much of the misfortune that the other characters get into but when he does have problems he gets the ''big'' ones. Losing Mr. Hooper, not being believed about [[NotSoImaginaryFriend Snuffy] Snuffy]] to the point that he started doubting once doubted his own friend's existence because no one else ever saw him, having his nest destroyed by a hurricane, etc. You want to hug him sometimes just because of how unfair the world can be to him.
1st Sep '17 1:37:05 PM DaScarecrow
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** Bert gets this a bit too. Most of the time he's just going about his day or keeping to himself but he invariably gets drawn into whatever antics Ernie feels like doing, even when he actively tries to avoid or get out of them.
** Big Bird is, pardon the pun, one of the biggest on the show. He's basically a sweet child who manages to avoid much of the misfortune that the other characters get into but when he does have problems he gets the ''big'' ones. Losing Mr. Hooper, not being believed about [[NotSoImaginaryFriend Snuffy] to the point that he started doubting his own friend's existence because no one else ever saw him, having his nest destroyed by a hurricane, etc. You want to hug him sometimes just because of how unfair the world can be to him.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.SesameStreet