Mighty Glacier

"Their only tactic seems to be 'slow advance'. The problem is, they're really good at it."

A common character build in Competitive Balance that emphasizes pure power at the cost of speed and mobility. Strong and slow.

As the name implies, the Mighty Glacier is one of the strongest people in the world. A single hit from a Mighty Glacier is like ten hits from anyone else. Mighty Glaciers also tend to carry weapons that would break anyone else's arms just to pick up, and can hold open doors that would break a lesser person's fingers off when they slammed shut.

The catch is this: they're slow. Reeeeeeaaaaalllly slow. They would need rocket skates to be described as "inching along". Some games mitigate the Mighty Glacier's slowness by providing support units which can carry it around more quickly than it can move on its own.

A greater muscle mass (to a point) theoretically provides speed but the Mighty Glacier tends to use the heaviest equipment possible, sacrificing any speed for the pure crushing power that only he can achieve. Too much muscle can hinder speed and endurance to a degree, as some deconstructions of Mighty Glacier characters show.note 

They tend to play as Difficult but Awesome in video games, requiring intimate knowledge of their move-set in order to consistently land powerful blows. However, some games punish this build when landing more hits than the enemy over time is easier and just as effective as strong individual hits. Racing games tend to have a variant where the heavier vehicles have slow acceleration and turning, but once they get moving their powerful engines allow them to go really fast. They also tend to be able to knock lighter vehicles around.

Contrast the Fragile Speedster, which sacrifices toughness for speed. Compare Glass Cannon, which sacrifices toughness (as opposed to speed) for the ability to deal massive damage. Contrast the Lightning Bruiser, who is strong, fast and tough. See Glacier Waif for when a Mighty Glacier is of average or below-average size.

See also: Necessary Drawback, PVP Balanced, and Character Roster Global Warming, which they are frequent victims of because it appears to be harder to be "creative" with strong-and-slow characters.

Should not be confused with the pro wrestler Glacier, who, despite his name, is not this trope.

Examples:

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    Anime and Manga 
  • Niko/Scarlet Rain from Accel World is this when using her armor. Her fortress armor is so huge and heavy that she literally can't move from the spot, and turning is a rather slow procedure. That said, even without turning she can launch a barrage of missiles able to take out most enemies in any direction.
  • The Knightmare Frame Mordred from Code Geass is this. Heavily armed, all of its projectiles are Hadron cannons to some extent, either small ones that fire hundreds of pin-point lasers or a massive quad Hadron Cannon that can destroy an Airborne Aircraft Carrier in one shot. Problem is, it's slow and has no effective close-ranged weapons, so a group of anybody better than a mook can generally surround and shoot it down, and its Float Unit is quite vulnerable.
  • In Ranma ˝, Ryoga Hibiki is this to Ranma Saotome, being incredibly strong with little control over it, but Ranma is capable of dodging his attacks and outmaneuvering him with ease, particularly after studying the Kachu Tenshin Amaguriken. However, against anyone else, Ryoga is more of a Lightning Bruiser, capable of moving with frightening speed himself, so either Ranma Saotome just has greater heights of Super Speed or Ryoga's rivalry with him has helped him overcome this weakness.
  • Lyrical Nanoha:
    • Cute Bruiser Vita. She isn't particularly fast by the heroes' standards, and her attacks use a really big hammer that doesn't swing particularly fast. On the other hand, she deals out immense amounts of damage.
    • Reinforce. Her speed is also middling, but her attack power is among the strongest - who else have you seen throw out a city-sized Starlight Breaker?
    • Nanoha herself, too. She's not slow in terms of agility, but her attacks are rather slow but extremely powerful beams. Starlight Breaker alone takes significant time to charge, which is why she only uses it when her enemy is being held by magic binds.
    • From Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha ViVid, we have The Ojou Victoria Dahlgrün. Unlike other fighters in Nanoha, she doesn't move beyond a walking pace. However, as her Fragile Speedster opponent in the Tournament Arc found out, most attacks dealt to her are reduced to Scratch Damage, and she's a One Woman Army who only needs to land one hit to decide a duel. Unusually for this trope, Victoria specializes in lightning-based attacks, which are usually associated with speedsters.
  • One Piece:
    • Blackbeard has incredible strength and endurance. However, he is also very slow, and his Devil Fruit has the Necessary Drawback of attracting damage to his huge frame. His Charles Atlas Superpower endurance is usually enough to compensate.
    • Whitebeard. He's no slouch, and many fighters would probably lose to him in a contest of speed, but he has no feats that suggest truly superhuman speed which is pretty uncommon amongst the absolute top tiers in the series. Actually he almost doesn't evade any attacks in the war because he relies on his reflexes to block the attacks. To his defense, his lack of real super speed is only so easily noticed because his raw strength is so absolutely massive. It's implied that Whitebeard is only so slow due to the fact that he was dying of disease during his only on-page fight. When he's stabbed in the back by Squard, Marco says flat-out that Whitebeard should've been able to dodge it with ease, and in Ace's flashback to his early days with Whitebeard, the guy was pretty much untouchable.
  • In Pokémon, despite the fact that his strategies usually emphasize speed, Ash Ketchum has caught a few Pokémon that qualify as this trope. His Snorlax is a notable example. It's pretty slow, but it can really dish it out and can take a lot of hits easily, thanks in part to its large, heavy body. Ash's Turtwig was fairly fast and agile, but once it evolved into Grotle, it lost most of its speed due to its new size. Thanks to some coaching from Paul's Torterra, however, it learned that it could make up for this with incredible endurance. There is also Ash's Goodra. As a Goomy, it could only move at a snail's pace, and got a little bit faster once evolving all the way to Goodra, but not much. However, it can tank hits like a pro and has very powerful attacks of its own. This is especially true when it uses Bide, since it's able to patiently endure a few hits and then unleash a massive attack at twice their collective power.
  • Using the "Ultra Super Saiyan" state can have this effect in Dragon Ball Z. They're still fast compared to almost anyone else, but the bulky muscles make it tougher for them to keep up with someone on the same level. Both Goku and Vegeta spotted this flaw while training (Goku worked around it with a more efficient way to power up the Super Saiyan form, and Vegeta went with an intermediate step that bulked him up a little bit but not enough to slow him down), but Future Trunks only caught on after getting his butt kicked by Cell, who stresses the important difference between a Mighty Glacier and a Lightning Bruiser. Gohan sidestepped it entirely by being the first to achieve Super Saiyan 2.
    • Cell himself briefly attempts something similar to "Ultra Super Saiyan" when he panics due to Super Saiyan 2 Gohan dominating him. It worked out just as well for him as it did for Trunks.
  • Bleach: Poww, one of the few fracciones who needed a bankai-wielding captain to defeat. He is a mountain of strength but, as he himself complained, movement was a nightmare for him, and he was sluggish at best.
  • The Akimichi clan in Naruto are a clan made up of Mighty Glaciers. They're all pretty big, due to eating a lot in order to convert calories into chakra, are physically very strong, and can expand their arms, legs, and entire bodies. However, they are also very slow, and as we've seen in Chouji's fights, this lack of speed tends to put him at somewhat of a disadvantage. They compensate for this by teaming up with the Yamanaka and Nara Clans - the former can control their opponent's mind, and the latter can immobilize them physically.
    • When using the first three tails of the Kyuubi's chakra Naruto becomes a Lightning Bruiser. The fourth tail's transformation leaves him immobile due to the strainng on his muscles, but also renders him nigh-invulnerable and packing serious artillery. He goes right back to Lightning Bruiser with six tails as he acquires an exoskeleton to move his body for him.
  • Subverted in Fullmetal Alchemist, where Sloth can ironically travel at high speeds despite his oversize muscled form. The catch is he can't control himself, and most of the time stops by slamming into something. That, and most of the time he's too lazy to use his speed. Played straight up until the fight where he does this, though. Think of the scene at Briggs, for instance, where he just kind of meanders about while Armstrong tries to figure out how much ordinance it will take to deal with him.
  • Gundam franchise:
    • The Destroy in Mobile Suit Gundam SEED Destiny is a giant mobile armor/Gundam cross. At 400-tons it's heavily armed and can shrug off most attacks, but lacks the mobility of the regular Gundams and mobile suits. Stella more or less uses hers as The Juggernaut, bludgeoning her way across Eurasia and to her fiery death in downtown Berlin.
    • The Big Zam in Gundam 0079 also counts. It was arrayed with 28 mega particle cannons and one even larger one on it's chest which allowed it to rip the EFSF forces a new one. Unfortunately, it was incredibly slow and had no close-combat capabilities whatsoever and was destroyed when the Gundam got behind the I-fields protection.
    • The Destroy's ancestors are the Psyco Gundam and Psyco Gundam Mk-II from Mobile Suit Zeta Gundam. Ranking in at 41 meters, the Psycos are armed with the teeth with beam weaponry, with the Mk-II adding in Reflector Bits to allow all-ranged attacks and is a general terror to all.
  • Ramiel in Neon Genesis Evangelion. For those unfamiliar with the show, it is a giant octahedron which flies slowly, with the most powerful cannon in the whole series. Nothing in the series could have gotten close to it without being destroyed. It eventually takes a sniper rifle shot powered by the entire energy output of Japan to take it down.
  • In a rather rare case nowadays, this is how the titular mechs (the Megadei) are portrayed in The Big O. Unlike most of the show's contemporaries that employ Giant Mecha with Lightning Bruiser qualities, all but one of the Megadei move like real-world tanks. They're big, unsubtle, lumbering, not very graceful, but near catastrophic in damage output.
  • In Attack on Titan, the Colossal Titan takes this to Crippling Overspecialization levels. It can smash the Walls and doom humanity, but can hardly lay a massive finger on the Survey Corps used to much faster opponents. It would be dead if it didn't have the power to emit scorching hot steam to protect itself.
  • In Tokyo Ghoul, this is the defining characteristic of the Koukaku Ghouls. The muscle that forms their kagune has a metallic quality, making it extremely strong but also unusually heavy. Most lack the flexibility or mobility of other kagune types, making them best suited for use as a sword or shield.
  • Enter Corporal Randall Oland of Pumpkin Scissors: your everyday Gentle Giant that feeds kittens, sleeps with hobos, cares for his new comrades and slowly, really slowly, takes on armored vehicles and kills the enemy crew one armor piercing bullet at Zero Distance at a time.
  • Kurita in Eyeshield21 is arguably the strongest linesman in Japan, being the only person being able to take on and win against Gaou. He is also the slowest in the entire Devilbat team.
  • In Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V, this is the idea behind Gongenzaka's "Superheavy Samurai", especially his ace card, the "Superheavy Samurai Big Benkei", who can use its DEF as its ATK, allowing him to pummel opponents while taking powerful hits.

    Comic Books 
  • Among the X-Men's foes, there's the Blob and Stone Wall, who fight side by side in a version of the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants that serves the U.S. government as Freedom Force. Both of them are immensely strong, but neither one is known for his speed. Heck, the Blob likes to brag that his mutant power literally makes him the proverbial "immovable object". He may as well be the trope codifier.
    • Colossus counts too. Even though he's easily much, much stronger than he is heavy, this doesn't translate into any speed advantage. In one X-Men issue, he is summoned to Limbo by his sister and has to chase down Baba Yaga - he could barely run faster than a shriveled old hag. Not only is he a slow runner but he's pretty sluggish in a fist fight too; Thor lampshades this when he curbstomps Peter without taking any hits in an issue of Cable and X-Force. This is pretty much why Colossus sticks to going toe-to-toe with opposing heavy-weight big guys and leaves the quicker ones to Beast or Wolverine. This is a case of Depending on the Writer, as early editions of the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe attributed Colossus with impressive levels of speed in human form, and claimed he reached peak Olympic athlete levels of speed when he turned into metal.
  • Solomon Grundy from DC Comics. Being a zombie, he is very slow-moving, but he possesses great strength and power nonetheless. His strength tends to vary, however, as he has gotten beaten down by Batman before, while other times he has had enough strength to outbrawl Superman with ease.

     Fan Works 
  • In the Star Wars/Mass Effect crossover fic Fractured, the Trans-Galactic Republic has produced Star Dreadnaughts 35,000 meters in length. At least one mounts a retractable superlaser in the sequel, but regardless of firepower they all eat fuel and are at best difficult to maneuver. That said, get close enough and you are very, very dead.
  • In the Fusion Fic Renegade, the Global Defense Initiative has developed "Glacier-class" dreadnoughts, which are massive warships that are so ponderous that they are primarily used either to defend static locations like resource-collecting "supercarriers" and strategic planets, or to assault worlds of major strategic importance, with the objective in this case being to either force the enemy to stand and fight to defend the planet and get subsequently annihilated by the Glacier, or to flee and surrender a critical strategic resource.
  • The Pokèmon They Carried features a land battleship known as the M1-12 Rhydon. This is a large vehicle that weighs about 130 tons and carries a 105 mm smoothbore gun and is bristling with 30 mm autocannon. As a tradeoff, it is insanely slow with a top speed of twenty five miles per hour.
  • In the Lunaverse, this is how Raindrops is depicted - slow and clumsy for a pegasus, but stronger than the average earth pony, who are the designated strong pony subtype.

    Film 
  • Jason Voorhees from Friday the 13th films. Offscreen Teleportation notwithstanding, the fastest he ever moves after his resurrection as a zombie is a slow shamble. But he's strong enough to literally punch people's heads off, and he can use his trusty machete to chop through things a normal human wouldn't be able to. This is especially evident in Freddy vs. Jason, where he is put against much faster Freddy Krueger.
  • Star Wars:
    • Darth Vader. Although a Lightning Bruiser as Anakin, once he gets the cybernetic treatment he becomes the giant, lumbering, but powerful villain of the original trilogy. Fittingly, his personal starfighter in A New Hope, the TIE Advanced x1, has a more powerful armament but less maneuverability compared to the standard TIE fighter.
    • Also in Star Wars are several other fighters, most notably the B-Wing and the TIE Bomber, which carry large payloads of powerful torpedoes but are relatively slow and unwieldy. The Y-Wing was this originally, but by the time of A New Hope their ordnance had been matched or surpassed by the faster X-Wing, leaving them as a Master of None. (Notably, only one survived the Battle of Yavin.)
    • The AT-AT Imperial walker is a terrestrial vehicle example - painfully slow, but making up for it in blaster-proof armor and firepower.
    • The ultimate Star Wars example may be the Death Star itself. A mobile space station the size of a small moon, it moves at a crawl compared to even the slowest starship, but once it gets within range, it can and will blow your planet up.
  • Rocky was initially portrayed as this- he was slow and had pretty poor technique, but he had massive punching power and could absorb insane amounts of punishment. Over the course of the series he would become faster and a better boxer and more of a Lightning Bruiser, but by Rocky Balboa his age and injuries had caught up to him and he was back to taking a beating, waiting for an opening and then hitting his opponent as hard as possible.
  • RoboCop is strong and has superhuman aiming skills, but he walks very slowly. ED-209 is an even better example, being a giant robot with massive firepower that also happens to be sluggish, clumsy, unstable, and incapable of navigating stairs.
  • Godzilla (2014): While he's not as particularly fast as some of his previous incarnations, Godzilla here keeps true to the Big G's tradition of dishing out various flavors of pain and destruction.
  • The Terminator is an infamous example. It just manages a brisk walking pace as it chases its prey, but by God, it will walk through anything. Plus it can dual-wield assault rifles due to its immense strength.

    Literature 
  • Lensman: The true Mighty Glaciers of the Civilization-Boskone conflict are the armed planets. They carry armaments far beyond anything that can be mounted on a ship, but even inertialess, drag makes them so much slower than everything else that they're nearly useless against anything smaller than another planet.
  • Ronald Niedermann, the blond giant in The Millennium Trilogy is freakishly strong, to the point that every blow seems to shatter bones. However, he's a terrible boxer and telegraphs his lumbering punches.
  • In Warrior Cats, ThunderClan and RiverClan cats are described as being large and powerful, but slow.

    Live Action TV 
  • In the second series of Gladiators the contender Roland Hill, a strength athlete who dragged cars uphill for fun and held the world record for tearing telephone directories in half, went into the Eliminator assault course with a huge points lead over his opponent, giving him a massive 15.5 second headstart. He lost to Steve Quick.
  • Star Trek franchise:
    • Star Trek: The Original Series has this in the form of the Gorn Kirk is forced to fight against. He can outrun it walking backwards, but the Gorn is strong enough to pick up and throw a rock that is at least as big as Kirk himself.
    • Averted with the Gorn in the Star Trek: Enterprise episode "In a Mirror, Darkly", in which a Gorn was capable of moving much faster (and looked scarier) and is capable of navigating maintenance tunnels on the Defiant.
    • The most powerful warships among the Xindi are operated by the Aquatics. They're also the slowest.
  • In Angel, The Beast is so slow that Angelus can easily dodge his attacks while cracking jokes, but he's an order of magnitude stronger than a Slayer.

    Professional Wrestling 
  • The Great Khali. He could often take out wrestlers with just a few punches and a chop to the side of the head, but he Slow Walked everywhere.
  • Hulk Hogan, as a result of his age and cumulative injuries, has lost most of his mobility and speed. He can still knock people down with one punch, but he needs his opponents to come to him these days.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Dungeons & Dragons:
    • In the 3rd Edition of Dungeons & Dragons, Clerics tend to be this. Though casters, they get most of the best offensive buffs in the game. It will also take them a round or two to buff. As a result most fights start with the heavily armored Cleric clanking toward the foe as he buffs himself, then smacking said foe down with one or two hits from his heavy mace when he gets there.
    • In 3.5, the Stone Dragon techniques from the Book of Nine Swords rely on keeping yourself grounded and balanced so you can deliver massive damage, punch through defenses, and break rock and metal. All its attacks require you to be on the ground, and most of its stances require you to not move or break the stance. The Dwarf-only class Deepstone Sentinel goes further, allowing you to control the ground around you with martial arts, as long as you don't move at more than a crawl.
    • Also in 3.5 the Dwarven Defender prestige class, which gives you a limited use ability that increases your strength and constitution but preventing you from moving. It's dwarf exclusive. It's very useful for Hold the Line situations in a bottlenecked dungeon where all enemies must get through the dwarf's square to reach your Glass Cannons. In most open spaces, considerably less so.
  • Most American battleships in Victory In The Pacific are this - not only are they slower than their Japanese counterparts, but they have no central base to operate from, adding to the "glacier" effect by limiting the amount of ocean over which they can project their "mighty" surface combat power.
  • Warhammer 40,000:
    • The new Imperial Guard codex of ''Warhammer 40,000 turns the Leman Russ into one of these. Has slow movement, but can fire its turret weapon in addition to any attacks allowed depending on how far it moved.
    • Space Marine Assault Centurions can shred almost anything they engage in close combat, which is unlikely given that their movement speed tends to be only marginally better than the scenery. They can be mounted in a Land Raider, at least, which gives them increased mobility at the expense of a very, very large "shoot me" sign.
  • BattleTech's selection of 'mechs is grouped into four classes, the biggest and slowest being Assault. Assault 'mechs are most often slow, plodding, ultra-durable behemoths, and usually pack enough firepower to destroy a Light mech or cripple a Medium with one salvo. They also don't have to worry too much about their speed, since most Assault 'mechs are equipped to deliver death at extremely long range. And the Assault mech has even been one-upped, now, as rules for Colossal class mechs from 105-200 tons now exist. They're bigger, tougher, more heavily armed, and slower than even Assault mechs. Unfortunately, they're also saddled with a few extra drawbacks, like being easier to hit than other mechs due to their massive size and being unable to use certain types of tech, like Stealth Armor or Jump Jets.
  • Exalted:
    • Mount Mostath, a glacier-mammoth Behemoth whose assigned duty is to arrange glaciers in the arctic north. Its normal movement is too slow for anything with a human lifespan to notice that it's animate at all, but when sufficiently agitated, it does attack the aggressors. It has Strength rating of Immeasurable and its stomps usually inflicts infinite damage to those without divine constitution. Even a mere mortal can run quickly enough to evade Mount Mostath's stomps, given its tremendous size and weight.
    • Malfeas Charms are also heavy on things like "if you screw with me I will hit you with hate-powered lasers that will give you radiation sickness"...but has absolutely nothing published to enhance flurries, Join Battle rolls, Dodge DV or movement speed. An Infernal can take both Malfeas brute-force mojo and Adorjani movement magic, producing a Lightning Bruiser powered by radiation, pain and crazy.
  • The Neu Swabian League of the space combat miniatures game Full Thrust have tendencies in this direction, with many ship classes that are big, heavily armed, but slow for their types.
  • Dwarf teams in Blood Bowl. A well-built dwarfen line or cage is a bulwark of death that will slowly, inexorably, slide across the field and leave your players pummelled and senseless in the dirt and leave your star blitzers marked by linemen that could probably take them in a one-on-one block. And that's before we factor in their Big Guy, a steamroller.
  • Warhammer: Dwarves are all over this trope, with durable and hard-hitting units that are nevertheless meaningfully slower than everything else (the Dwarven movement score of 3 is the worst available in the game without a unit that's actually been hexed by an enemy spell). The Lizardmen also have this kind of thing in their frontline combat troops, Saurus Warriors, which have standard movement distances and an Initiative score that's unlikely to impress even the slowest troops from other armies. The Lizardmen do, however, have Fragile Speedster Skink units, while everything in the dwarf army is either a) really good at killing things up close or b) really good at making the enemy want to come closer so they don't have to take another rune-enhanced boulder to the face.
  • Star Fleet Battles has battleships. Fearsome things, bristling with weapons, with tremendously thick shields, but their gigantic engines are only enough to drive their gigantic bulk as fast as other ships in the fleet, and they turn like drunk pigs. Only the Klingons actually built any, and they handle as badly as anything else anyone ever built. The Federation designed one, and it handles even worse than that.
  • Heavy Gear and its first Licensed Game feature the Mammoth Strider. The design is different from Gears in that it is not a true humanoid biped; instead, it is a hunched, broad shouldered machine with very short legs. As a result, it has the absolute slowest land speed in either game, hardly able to reach 30 kilometers per hour and with less maneuverability than even a modern tank. The most basic, bottom of the barrel Gear starts off with a 42 kph top speed. This also makes it slower than the setting's land-warships. To compensate for its sluggishness, the Mammoth is extremely tough and even more well-armed. It can absorb repeated strikes from missiles designed specifically to kill mech units, shuffle unharmed through machine gun fire, and basically ignore anything smaller than battleship cannons. The Mammoth is also armed to the teeth with five weapon mounts for the largest missiles, cannons, and lasers, such that it is considered a legitimate match against six enemy Gears. Simultaneously. The Naga Strider is essentially the AST's answer to the CNCS' Mammoth Strider, except slightly faster and with less armor and firepower. It is also the only Strider in its class to mount wheels in its feet, allowing the Naga to use hit-and-run tactics against its opponents.

    Web Comics 

    Web Original 
  • The Troll from the Global Guardians PBEM Universe, favored son and hero of Newark, New Jersey is eight-foot tall, has lumpy green skin, and horns coming out of his forehead. Not the fastest fighter. But it takes a howitzer to even bruise him, and he can lift tanker trucks over his head, so when he does get around to hitting you, you're going to feel it for days.
  • RWBY: The White Fang Lieutenant is clearly out-manoeuvred by Weiss, even when she's not using her Haste-spells. She is able to land many more hits on him than he can on her. Unfortunately for her, he tanks all her blows and is so powerful he only needs to hit her once for her to go down.

    Western Animation 
  • In Avatar: The Last Airbender, earthbenders are this. Earthbending emphasizes strength and endurance, as well as a balance between offense and defense. Earthbenders must stand their ground and endure what their opponents throw at them, then strike back at the right moment.
  • Tohru from Jackie Chan Adventures. The strongest, slowest and biggest member of both the Dark Hand and, post-Heel–Face Turn, the J-Team.
    • Po Kong the Mountain Demon from the same series is the largest character, let alone villain, and she's every bit the Implacable Woman you'd expect. Likewise, she's every bit as nimble as you'd expect, so she's not too difficult to deal with if you know a good banishment spell.
  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic gives us King Sombra. He has a Living Shadow form that's massive enough to surround his entire Place of Power, and his magic is strong enough to make even Physical Gods like Princess Celestia and Princess Luna worry. However, he also moves like an Advancing Wall of Doom and takes a while to react to any unexpected threats — though he's also Crazy-Prepared and Dangerously Genre Savvy enough to where said "unexpected threats" are few and far between for him (in fact, most of his threat comes from all his precautions set before the good guys managed to come and slow him down).

    Real Life 
  • Tanks. They started out in The Great War as the ultimate Mighty Glaciers, with horrendous top speeds slower than that of a running infantryman, but great firepower, and nigh invulnerability to small arms fire. As wars became increasingly dynamic and mobile, though, tanks underwent progressive evolution to become Lightning Bruisers, with modern Main Battle Tanks striking an even balance between firepower, armor and mobility. The image, however, still sticks. The last true Glaciers would have to be the heavy monsters built or designed by the Nazis and Soviets in World War 2.
    • The Nazis had several super-heavy tank projects. You have the Landkreuzer projects, which were never completed. The Ratte would be a 1000-ton mobile fortress armed to the teeth (including naval artillery), while the (nominally) 1500-ton Monster would be armed with a railway artillery gun (800-mm; a single shell is twice the size of a Soviet T-34 tank). Both projects were scrapped in 1943, as their mass would make the tanks move at a snail's pace (if they could get them moving at all), or more critically, make a barn-sized target for even the high-altitude Allied aircraft.
      • These were preceded by the 190 ton Panzer VIII Maus, the largest tank ever actually built (barely; only two prototypes and one never had its turret installed), wasn't quite as insane but still very much an example. Its turret alone was as large as many tanks, and this allowed it to carry a huge 128mm main gun and a 75mm secondary gun side by side in it. Its front armor was 200-230mm (8-9 inches) thick and even its "weak point" at the rear had 150mm (6 inch) thick armor. That makes its thinnest armor only 1 inch thicker than the "thickest" armor on the King Tiger Heavy tank, the most well protected tank of any nation to see mass production during the entire war. But it had only slightly better mobility than a beached whale, with a top speed of 20 km/h (12 mph), and even that only on firm, level ground. Its massive weight meant that it would be unable to move at all in muddy ground, and it was too heavy for most bridges. Essentially the Maus was a barely-mobile heavy pillbox.
    • The French Char B1-bis heavy tank was slow, ponderous, and based on an outdated design paradigm, but they were exceptionally tough and had a powerful 75mm main gun and a respectable 47mm turret-mounted gun. One such tank called Eure was ambushed by several German Panzer IIIs and Panzer IVs and sustained 140 hits without significant damage. Alone, it destroyed thirteen of its ambushers. In his book Panzer Leader, tank ace Heinz Guderian recounted an incident where an enemy B1-bis was inflicting heavy casualties and he could only watch helplessly as all the shells that he and his comrades shot at it simply bounced off its armor.
  • Any tank destroyer that didn't fall into the category of Glass Cannon fit this role. They have powerful, forward-facing guns and tough frontal armor but slow traverse and acceleration speeds. The German military in particular fell into this doctrine of tank destroyer combat.
    • Elefant tank destroyer was insanely heavy at almost 70 tons and could barely hit 20 km/h on road and moved at a snail's pace off-road, yet it was practically impervious to nearly all Soviet tank-mounted weapon and could leisurely snipe at enemy tanks from under cover.
    • The Jagdtiger took this Up to Eleven, mounting an even heavier 128mm gun and adding sloped armor. Like the Elefant, it was also sluggish since it used the Tiger I tank's engine despite weighing 30% more than the Tiger I.
    • Although the American army relied more on nimble turreted tank destroyers, they did contemplate on building assault vehicles similar to those of the German army. Their finest example was the experimental T28/T95 superheavy tank, which was designed for assaulting the heavily fortified walls and bunkers guarding the Axis homelands. Its frontal armor has a thickness of 305 mm (12 in), its gun had a caliber of 105 mm, and its max speed is only 13 km/h (8 mph). So it had more protection and firepower than the Elefant and Jagdtiger while also having worse mobility. However, the Army ultimately passed up on the T28/95, viewing it as unusable in combat as the heavy weight limited movement across terrain and couldn't arrive in time for combat.
  • The Japanese Battleships ''Yamato'' and ''Musashi'' were designed to take hits and shrug it off. Both took huge amounts of ordnance before they were sunk. When Yamato was sacrificed in Operation Ten-Go, the US Navy mobilised close to FOUR HUNDRED planes to sink her. She was so scary, that fourteen battleships were kept in reserve in case the planes failed.
    • On a similar note, ''Bismarck'' was hunted by as many as forty Royal Navy ships after she sank the HMS Hood, was shelled for hours by two battleships, torpedo by planes and ships, and only went down when her crew blew her up themselves. Worth pointing out Bismarck only got the Hood with a tremendously unfortunate shot, and the wild overkill in bringing her down was more to do with a big Roaring Rampage of Revenge on the Royal Navy's part rather than impressive durability.
  • Tercio infantry. This infantry formation dominated the battlefields in renaissance Europe for nearly two centuries. It was the combination of pikemen with very long pikes, and gunners armed with matchlock muskets. Their attack power was formidable, as nothing could stand in the way of a wall of advancing pikes, and the guns (a novelty on the battlefields) could punch through even the strongest armor at a close enough range. Their durability is also legendary: they had to move in a close formation, and they were the slowest unit on the battlefield, so they were specifically trained to march forward no matter the casualties. Actually, their only hope of survival was to keep on pressing forward, because a pikeman with his long pike is defenseless alone if someone with a sword comes too close, and the matchlock was both heavy, unwieldy, and took nearly a minute to reload. If they break formation, even a small cavalry unit can cut them all down. So the formation had to be able to take a lot of punishment, they could deal a lot of punishment in close and medium range, but they were horribly slow: a stellar example for the Mighty Glacier trope. (the tercio was made obsolete only when flintlock muskets replaced the matchlock: their better rate of fire and ability to mount a bayonet made the pike square obsolete)
    • Tercio infantry were especially effective against the Ottoman Turks as the pikes could repel any cavalry attacks and the armoured front ranks were impervious against archery, and the Turks had no decent heavy infantry of their own.
  • Cataphract cavalry. The ancient precursors of knights (who themselves were Lightning Bruisers), cataphracts had both horse and rider fully encased in scale, lamellar or mail armor. They were armed with long spear used with both hands. These guys never could do faster than trot, but they were invulnerable to arrows and javelins, and could break almost any period infantry. Romans calculated it took eight ranks of legionaries to stop a Parthian cataphract charge. Cataphracts eventually superseded legionaries in late Roman armies.
  • The slugger. This type of boxer moves slowly and doesn't maneuver too much, but has extremely strong chin and stronger punch. Usually one well-placed punch by a slugger is able to finish the boxing game.
    • George Foreman late on in his boxing career, after his comeback. The fight with Michael Moorer being an example - George is mighty slow, can barely land a punch on Moorer all fight, but has a decent defense and a chin good enough that Moorer can't knock him out but is miles ahead on points, and then in the last round Moorer's concentration slips, one punch, WHAM, and Foreman has another world title belt.
  • Indian cricketer Sachin Tendulkar. Not renowned for running ability but he'll smash the ball so hard he doesn't need to run.
  • The B-52 Stratofortress is a massive plane that needs eight jets to fly and can't break the sound barrier... but what it's meant to do— bomb the crap out of things— it does even better than the B-1B Lancers and B-2A Spirits supposed to replace it.
  • In the marching band world, we have the bottom bass drum. The bass five/six/seven(!?) player is usually a big guy to better counter the weight of the drum, and also tall, so that when the drum is on, their long legs can get them further and their long arms can still get the right technique. In other words, big and slow, but got the loudest beats.
  • Schwerer Gustav was a heavy artillery piece which needed double tracked railroads to support its weight, with 2500 people setting up the tracks. Once it was in position it would launch 800mm 7.1 metric ton shells to a position over 37000 meters away.
    • Railway Guns in general. Heavier than the largest tanks, firing larger shells than even the largest battleships could dream of, but they can't be moved at all without railway tracks and a locomotive to tow them.
  • David Ortiz of the Boston Red Sox. The man is slow as dirt when it comes to running. But when he hits the ball...
    • Barry Bonds in his later years (when he ironically won most of his MVP's). He lost a lot of speed with age, but he hit homer after homer.
  • Prince Fielder, now of the Texas Rangers. Even though he's passable enough at first base, one look at his massive, somewhat rotund form tells you all you need to know about him as a baseball player. He'll beat very few people in a foot race. But if he squares up a baseball with his bat, the ball's not coming back.
  • The Greek hoplite was designed to fight as a part of a huge, unstoppable steamroller; slow, but virtually impossible to halt with anything short of another hoplite formation. It took quite a while for ranged skirmisher tactics to be figured out to abuse the glacier aspect of them. Later taken to it's logical conclusion by the Macedonian phalanx, which utilized smaller shields with enormous two-handed spears to be even less manueverable, but even more unstoppable.note 
  • Former NFL nose tackle Ted Washington (and nose tackles in general). In roughly his last 8 seasons, Ted broke the scales at weights as low as 350 pounds to as high as 400+ pounds. While not a big playmaker, Ted regularly shoved offensive linemen (300+ pound men themselves) off with one hand while pulling down the ball carrier with the other. Too bad he couldn't actually catch a player in the backfield with a 20 minute head start.
  • A mountain being chewed up by a Bucket Wheel Excavator will take a few days to disappear. Unfortunately, it takes a few days to move a mile or so.
  • The Cool Train Norfolk and Western Y5/Y6 class was extremely strong so it could pull heavy coal trains over the Appalachian Mountains, but was very slow.
  • Any bulldozer will qualify, but the Badass Israeli conversion of the Caterpillar D9 for the IDF is the best. It cannot go much faster than seven miles an hour (a fast walking pace), but is impervious to small and medium weapons. It can usually be seen razing houses and bunkers as part of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, but was also used for firefighting by burying the fire under the soil.
  • Baseball catchers: they squat nearly the entire time they're on defense, which has the side-effect of ruining their knees, so you're hard pressed to find ones that can run fast. There are, however, quite a few catchers who are power hitters.
  • World War One: the Huns used zeppelins for bombing raids. Massive, only half as fast as a fighter and having next to zero maneuverability, they made up for it in altitude and obscene payloads of bombs, in addition to being armed to the teeth with as many as twenty-four machine guns and an autocannon. The British thought that the volatile hydrogen gas of these slow airships would make them a Glass Cannon, but this Hope Spot was cruelly dashed when they discovered the bizarre fact that the Zeppelins' extreme fragility paradoxically made them monstrously durable; bullets and explosive shells couldn't detonate against their fabric-and-aluminum hulls. Zeppelins routinely took hundreds or even thousands of rounds on their raids, leaking so slowly that they could fly all the way back to Germany safely. It took two years for one to be shot down, due to the invention of the incendiary bullet, which turned the tides. By war's end a third had been shot down.
  • While the Grumman F4F Wildcat and F6F Hellcat weren't particularly agile (and the Wildcat was dog slow as well), they could take an extreme amount of punishment and were among the only planes that could stand a chance of withstanding direct hits from a Mitsubishi Zero's cannons. Infamous Japanese ace Saburo Sakai once put six hundred rounds of ammunition into a Wildcat and it kept on flying, said Wildcat was already being attacked by 3 other zeroes at the time. The Russian Il-2 Sturmovik ground attack plane was even more durable; its armor was so thick that some German pilots dumped their entire supply of ammunition into a Sturmovik without killing it. Even the canopy was known to sometimes stop 20mm cannon fire. Even more durable was the B-17 and later B-29 flying Fortresses outgunned most airplanes several times over, having caliber machine guns in every place they'd fit and some that they don't, heavy armor, and sheer mass on it's side. B-17s regularly went from Britain into Germany, and back, in the light of day, with no fighter escort (As no fighter until the late-war Mustang had the range to follow them) and came back in one piece.
    • The F6F Hellcat, however, mounted a more powerful engine compared to its older predecessor, and while the agility wasn't improved, the engineers did improve on its speed markedly, while keeping the touted toughness, strength, and simple design of its older sibling, making the Hellcat a legitimate Lightning Bruiser, and was the top ace-maker in the US Navy's inventory during the later half of the Pacific campaign.
      • The Hellcat stunned a lot of Japanese Zero pilots when it was first introduced. It looked so much like the Wildcat that Zero pilots simply barged right in, thinking they were up against a slow and lumbering Wildcat that they could fly circles around...until the Hellcat pilots pushed their engines up to Full Military Power. Surprise, surprise, surprise.
  • You can become one if you train hard without proper muscle-stretching exercises. This is the origin of the phrase "Muscle Bound"- people who built their muscles extensively but (without proper weightlifting knowledge) severely damaged their joints. Strong and slow.
  • It's believed that the largest sauropod dinosaurs like Diplodocus were extremely slow moving due to their sheer size and to conserve their energy, and may have only moved in slow, short bursts. However, their sheer size likely kept them off the menu of predators. Argentinosaurus may have weighed as much as 110 tons which for obvious reasons nobody wants stepping, stomping or landing on them. Many also possessed long, whip-like tails, which may have been used like bullwhips for defense. Imagine getting hit by a 60-foot (and, according to recent findings, serrated) bullwhip. Ouch.
  • A-10 Thunderbolt II, or as it is more often called the Warthog, is a rather slow aircraft (it can't break the sound barrier) has an insane amount of armor (1,200 pounds of it), can still fly if it is missing one engine and half a wing, and has a 30mm Gatling gun that shoots depleted Uranium shells. It's might is best recognized in that, unlike most aircraft, it was designed entirely around the main gun.
  • Catapults, trebuchets, and other medieval siege engines. Because they had to be pulled by horses or people, they weren't very fast, and couldn't be aimed without turning the entire machine around, but they were the perfect tool for launching boulders, bombs, and dead bodies over castle walls.
    • Cannons and artillery in general until fairly recently have been slow to set up and required animals/trucks to pull them around, but are some of the best ways to attack fixed positions and only the hardest of targets can survive the barrage.
  • Exaggerated for real glaciers. They can carve out entire landscapes, including Yosemite National Park, if you give them a few thousand years.
  • The Giant Ground Sloth. It was a slow creature, but let's look at it: bigger than most elephants, armed with sharp claws and protected by thick hides and nodules of bone that were embedded in their skin as natural armor. They were one of the few South American Creatures not to be driven out by Northern American competition, but instead managed to actually move as far north as ALASKA! If they had another thousand years, they could have taken on Russia.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/MIGHTYGlacier