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Pokémon Zeta and Omicron are fan games created by Reddit user thesuzerain (who would later make Pokémon Insurgence), and can be found here. It is a custom-built game using RPG Maker XP; it is not a ROM hack or other hacked game. The game has two regions, starting off in the Versyn region, and continuing into the Aroma region. Like most Pokémon games, your goal is to collect all eight gym badges and stop a villainous team along the way, which changes depending on the version you're playing, Team Asgard for Zeta, and Team Olympus for Omicron.


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Pokemon Zeta Omicron contains examples of:

  • Action Dad: Wilson, the player's father, is a member of the Elite Four.
  • Action Mom: Aria, the player's mother, is the now retired champion of Vesryn. Her first on-screen action is to take on Team Asgard/Olympus herself to defend your hometown. When you defeat the Elite Four, she takes up the mantle of champion again so she can see how far you've come herself.
  • Aerith and Bob: There is a trainer called Gggggg.
  • Alternate Timeline: It's specifically stated that your Evil Twin traveling through time and space and stealing Gold's Legendary corrupted the timeline. Which leads to everything else.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: One common criticism of Pokémon games is players having to use HM moves to progress, including ones that are either not particularly useful or just don't work with their team's setup. In these games, you can obtain key items that function exactly the same way and don't require you to know the move (aside from a little while before you get them). For example, an Inflatable Lapras replaces Surf, Rocket Boots replace Fly, and a Pickaxe replaces Rock Smash. The only particularly useful overworld move that doesn't get an item is Flash, but that technically isn't required to progress anyway.
    • The secret base offers a lot to make your adventure easier. You can purchase various upgrades including a Trainer (who has a team of Audinos, which you can choose the level of in increments of ten, for level grinding), a mine (where you can dig for treasure to get items and money), a dungeon (so you can find specific Pokémon), and gym leader rematches (who function for both level and money grinding). There are also entrances all over the region in the form of conspicuously-shaped rocks in various towns that you can enter, rather than having a single entrance, as long as you have Secret Power (or the Skeleton Key, which you get after purchasing all the upgrades for your base the first time).
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    • You can buy Ethers and Max Ethers from the Blackfist Department Store. You can rarely if ever actually buy them in Pokémon games despite being very helpful items when you can't get to a Pokémon Center. You can also buy Full Restores and Revives in all stores after a relatively early point, and money is in no way difficult to come by even without using the gym leaders in your secret base. Of course, given the game is significantly harder than regular Pokémon ones, this definitely helped prevent frustration by allowing you to stock up on insane amounts of overpowered healing items before going into dungeons and battles that you really need them in.
  • Big Bad: Gold, but by the name of Odin/Zeus (depending on version) in the Vesryn Region, Cipher in the Aroma region... until it turns out that Odin/Zeus was behind it all in the first place.
  • Black Comedy: All over the place.
  • Bragging Rights Reward: The "Nuzlocke Badge" if you get to the final zone without quitting a Nuzlocke challenge. It does nothing, of course.
  • Call-Back: Both Cyrus and N show up as allies of Oak and your mother against Zeus/Odin.
  • The Cameo: A few characters from the anime make appearances here:
  • Cluster F-Bomb: Successfully defeating the Ninja Guardians in Cassiopeia Town results in this type of reaction from them.
  • Creator Cameo: King Suzerain is an avatar of thesuzerain, writer of the game.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: What happens if you unknowingly enter the Developers' Challenge in Fianga City the first time you visit. The first Pokémon, Umbreon, is at level 65. Your Pokémon when you first arrive are most likely around level 20. To top it off, Umbreon holds Leftovers, so if you manage to do any damage to it, it will get healed.
    • As well as the Super-Ninja Bodyguards in Cassiopeia Town Gym.
  • Darker and Edgier: YES. The game starts with you fleeing your town as it is attacked by Team Asgard/Olympus as your mother leaves to try and fight them. Even as you beat the grunts, the team constantly achieves their goals, leading to your town being destroyed before your third gym.
  • Difficulty Spike: Everything from the E4 upwards in Vesryn, and much of Aroma. The E4 forces you to change your battle style to set, which doesn't give free switches after defeating a Pokémon, and the later battles have you fighting Pokémon up to level 120!
    • If you actually try to set your battle style back to shift, the game will simply ignore it.
  • Disc-One Nuke: Rotom, forms included, is available in Onega Town, right before the second gym. Try bringing its Heat Forme to the Grass or Steel gyms. It only stops being absurdly overpowered around the sixth gym, and remains useful for the whole game.
  • Doppelgänger: Divaevus and Maladeux are exactly the same, except that Maladeux is black and Dark type, while Divaevus is yellow and its typing is currently unknown.
  • Doomed Hometown: The player's hometown, Nyasa Town, is destroyed by Team Asgard/Olympus.
  • Dungeon Bypass: Defeating either of the first two trainers in Cassiopeia Gym allows you to access the final area of Katana Cave, skipping over all the trainer battles in the cave in the process. Of course, see Hopeless Boss Fight below...
  • Eternal Recurrence: Ash says he went through a "variance" of the events including Mewtwo; this was before Mewtwo is created in-game. Red existing as well implies he did the same thing.
  • Evil Twin: An alternate-universe possibly genderflipped version of you pulled Gold through time and dimensions and shadow-corrupted Gold's Legendary Ho-oh/Lugia and then stole it, starting his path of darkness.
  • Fixed Damage Attack: The [Planet]force series of moves deal 20 damage to every Pokémon in a party in addition to the main target.
  • Game-Breaker: In-universe when the admin you fight at the collider realizes that he can use the Time Caller to return his team to their condition from before you beat them, forcing you to fight over and over until you just can't win. Thankfully, Wilson shows up and scares him off before he is able to go through with it.
  • Giant Space Flea from Nowhere: Stan. Appearing right before fighting Arceus, he's a red stick figure who speaks like he's in a chatroom and claims he made Arceus out of Paper Mache before battling you with a team of Pokémon at the level cap. After finishing the battle, he leaves and is never seen again.
  • Hard Mode Perks: Nuzlocke mode does give access to the Nuzlocke Lord early on, a merchant with T Ms, Pokémon, and a special kind of Pokéball inbetween Great Balls and Ultra Balls in effectiveness.
  • Hopeless Boss Fight: The Cassiopeia Town Gym has Gym Leader Enelle's "Super-Ninja Bodyguards." Level 120, fully buffed and kitted. You are supposed to sneak past them. (The Gym even has a sign warning Nuzlocke players that they will likely die if they fight them.) It is possible to defeat them, but you receive no special rewards for doing so other than a humorous reaction.
  • House Rules: The game offers a built-in Nuzlocke mode, a Randomizer (every Pokémon, wild trained or gifted, is chosen randomly) mode, and a Randomlocke (both of those together) mode. The next update will also include Solo (you can choose any Pokémon at the beginning of the game and you will not be able to catch any more) and PP Challenge (PP can only be restored with items).
    • You can also select how much "swag" your rival has depending on how much you wish to hate him.
  • Just Desserts: After defeating Red, the Big Bad, Odin/Zeus enters, kills him with Divaevus to overpower himself, but then gets eaten by Wilson's Megasparce, thus defeating him once and for all and making Team Asgard/Olympus no longer a threat.
  • Karma Houdini: The Elite Four Fanboys (and girls). They steal Professor Elm's Pokémon, but aside from you battling them and preventing them from getting to meet the Elite Four members they idolize (even though said Elite Four members are apparently aware of them, find them annoying, and just ignore them), nothing ever happens to them and they presumably keep the Pokémon they stole.
  • Large Ham: A man in Fianga Town talks IN ALL CAPS LIKE THIS and offers to teach your Pokémon how to do the same.
  • LEGO Genetics: Wilson's Megasparce is a combination of Dunsparce, Darkrai, and Zekrom. His team during the second battle is composed entirely of cyborg Pokémon and more LEGO Genetics.
  • Loads and Loads of Characters: Even compared to other games in the official series, where Pokémon from past generations can be obtained, this game stands out. Between the two versions, EVERY Pokémon from Generation V and earlier is obtainable (and a few later ones as well).
  • The Missingno.: If you use the Mystery Gift to acquire the Cinnabar Ticket, you can travel to Cinnabar Island in Ladoga Town, where you can fight and capture the Trope Namer. As in the original games, it's a major Glass Cannon (ludicrously high Attack, agonizingly low everything else) with a small movepool, but this game adds its ability Glitch, which will KO anything that deals physical damage to it.
  • Mood Dissonance: Whenever you encounter anything, even a weak bird like Pidgey, the game plays dramatic and extremely unfitting music.
  • Obvious Beta: The whole game is significantly underpolished and bug-ridden, which is the whole reason why the online features were removed, and why a planned successor, Epsilon, has almost only the Vesryn region in common with this game. The piss-poor battle move animation library can pass, because it's an issue with Essentials itself. Other than that, its soundtrack consists of almost nothing but stock Essentials music, certain post-game boss areas are never locked, the selection would immediately go back to the last button used when moving it immediately after going back to the last menu, the level curve is atrocious, the legendaries and certain stationary-encountered mons are Permanently Missable Content (especially the safari legendaries), and the Aroma region arc is broken everywhere. There, for example, the level curve is no different, and the gym leaders don't use the gym leader battle theme.
  • Precision F-Strike: After a huge explosion that blows up Nyasa Town, Professor Oak lets out a sudden "OH SHIT!"
  • Shout-Out: Wilson's second team contains references to Terminator 2, Digimon, and Pacific Rim.
  • Stock Superpowers: In addition to Pokémon's bread and butter psychics (however, the vast majority of them are implied to be fake). Graham, the fifth Gym Leader, can apparently raise Trainers from the dead as ghosts. Whether this is actually his power or he's just having his Pokémon do it is never stated. His twin brother Tobias has some form of dark aura around him in his battle sprites, but as he's never seen using powers out of battle, it's unknown what this is.
  • Suddenly Voiced: Mewtwo now has dialogue much like its anime incarnation, and can even be fought as an enemy Trainer using its cloned Pokémon.
  • Suspiciously Specific Denial: This gem from a grunt outside of the PokéHadron Collider. "... and no, you'll never get into the Collider from the tube itself! And no, you can't get into the tube from up north! Where are you getting these ideas?"
  • The Computer Is a Cheating Bastard: AI controlled Pokémon like Corlett's Gavantula have illegal movesets like Ice Beam despite the fact that it's not part of the allowed moveset. Plus Wilson's Sigil Hall team is filled with unobtainable and overpowered Fakemon (though they can be defeated with strategy). Furthermore, at the Challenge Championships the player is limited to 3 Pokémon, but later opponents are able to use 4 Pokémon.
  • Theme Naming: All the towns in Vesryn are named after various lakes and rivers, and all the towns in Aroma except for one are named after constellations.
  • Time Travel: All Legendary Pokémon and Unown can use TMXX, Tesseract to travel into the past.
  • Too Awesome to Use: The Rare Boxes let you use very powerful moves normally reserved for legendaries, but they're gone after one use.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Some trainers have dialogue that makes your protagonist come off as a Jerkass, even though usually they're the ones challenging you.
    • One girl says she's doing a Nuzlocke run, lets out a Rapid-Fire "No!" when you beat her, and solemnly declares you killed her team.
    • In Vesryn's Victory Road, one trainer begs you to help him because he's been stabbed. You then fight him. Afterwards, he calmly asks, "Why did you fight me? I'm going to die."
  • Why Don't You Just Shoot Him?: Lampshaded by a Grunt of the game's Evil Team. He ponders why he doesn't have a gun on him so he can just shoot the player for interfering with their plans. After beating him for the first time, Odin/Zeus draws a pistol and decides to just kill you then and there. Lucky for you, Tobias of the Elite Four saves you.
  • You Monster!: There is a trainer that, upon defeat, says that she was doing a Nuzlocke and that you killed all of her Pokémon.

Alternative Title(s): Pokemon Zeta Omicron

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