Adolf Hitlarious

http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/great_dictator_1.jpg
Heilarity ensues.

"I was never crazy about Hitler. If you stand on a soapbox and trade rhetoric with a dictator, you never win. That's what they do so well: they seduce people. But if you ridicule them, bring them down with laughter, they can't win. You show how crazy they are."

In short: Adolf Hitler is treated as a joke instead of a monster.

No, this doesn't intend to excuse anything done under his regime. The point is that instead of being treated as some kind of boogeyman or evil incarnate, he's treated as something stupid, for reasons stated in the above quote.

This was essentially the default portrayal of Hitler in most Allied media during World War II. German atrocities in eastern Europe, which were dismissed as propaganda elsewhere, made this portrayal a little more controversial there. After Franco-Anglo-American citizens became aware of The Holocaust in the late 1960s and 1970s, this trope became controversial there as well. This is because some people think that making fun of the Nazis makes the War Crimes and genocides they perpetrated seem less serious.

A Sub-Trope of Those Wacky Nazis (with actual emphasis on the "wacky") and Historical Hilarity. Compare Stupid Jetpack Hitler.


Examples:

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    Anime & Manga 

    Comic Books 
  • Many issues of the original run of Captain America treated Hitler this way. In one story, Captain America and his boy sidekick Bucky battle Hitler and Göring. Both senior Nazis squabble over who will get to fight the child hero rather than Cap himself...and then Bucky beats them both up before the heroes just leave the two behind despite the wartime setting. Of course, this is obviously a case of Real Life Writes the Plot, since the real Nazis hadn't been defeated and deposed.
  • Several Captain Marvel stories of the 1940s also had Hitler as an almost childlike villain, including one where he is defeated temporarily when exposed to an "honesty ray" that forces him to tell the truth for 24 hours. Or Reltih, the Reverse Hitler, who chose to try and conquer his own world by marrying into the United Kingdom's Royal Family. You get the idea.
  • Addie and Hermy - The Nasty Nazis was a British wartime propaganda comic strip which featured child-like versions of Hitler and Göring hatching schemes and getting into trouble. A similar comic called Musso the Wop satirized Mussolini.
  • Hitler was often portrayed as an egotistical loudmouth and a buffoonish villain during The Silver Age of Comic Books in Marvel Comics' Nick Fury and His Howling Commandos comic.
  • Adolf, die Nazisau ("Adolf, the Nazi Pig") by German writer/cartoonist Walter Moers tells the story of Hitler, who survived in the sewers of Berlin, reemerging in the 90s and trying to cope with modern life. There is also a music video based on the same work. It's indeed hitlarious
  • In Savage Dragon, it is revealed that Hitler's brain was saved and was in the body of a super-powered gorilla. Thus, the villain Brainape was born. The character obviously started off as a joke but once it was discovered whose brain was in there, he became even more buffoonish.
  • This was a staple of wartime British cartoons, sometimes pairing him up with Benito Mussolini as a pair of Butt Monkeys.
  • Nero: In certain albums he is shown to be still alive, hiding in an igloo or on an island. Yet in later stories he is shown as a denizen in Hell.
  • One of Hergé's comic strips "Quick and Flupke" was made during the 1930s. In a some episodes the little boys dress up as Hitler and Mussolini. After World War II these innocent jokes were suddenly not that funny anymore and are kept out of the official Quick & Flupke albums.
  • Werner – Oder was? has a one-page rhyme comic which claims that the Führer didn't have a Führerschein (driver's license).
  • Adventures in the Rifle Brigade, a Garth Ennis comic about English sterotypes (and an American) during World War II, has the Brigade defeat a Baroness by singing "Hitler Has Only Got One Ball".

    Films — Live-Action 
  • Mel Brooks, who provides the page quote, naturally has taken plenty of shots at Hitler in his films. On various occasions, Brooks has declared that his goal in life is to make Hitler and his philosophies impossible to ever take seriously again.
    • The Producers is based largely on this, by having a play about him try to be a flop (which is why the trope Springtime for Hitler is named so), and hiring a hippie to play Hitler in the film version, and then having a Camp Gay director play him in the stage version (where the character's name is "Adolf Elizabeth Hitler").
    • Brooks's 1983 remake of To Be or Not to Be plays up Hitler himself as an object of ridicule, as well as turning what in the original 1942 film was a serious play put on by the main characters about the Nazis called "Gestapo" into a blatant musical parody called "Naughty Nazis," which borrows more than a little from The Producers and "Springtime for Hitler."
    • History of the World Part I: "See... Hitler on ice!" Cut to Hitler in full uniform ice skating.
    • Blazing Saddles has a scene toward the end that takes place in the Warner Brothers commissary. An actor dressed as Hitler (who is implied to be Jewish) mentions "the bunker scene" before the place explodes into a hilarious pie fight. As the brawl unfolds, said actor can be seen in the background, tossing out rapid-fire Nazi salutes for absolutely no reason at all.
  • For Inglourious Basterds, Quentin Tarantino "introduces" Hitler as a Large Ham who whines about the title characters while Chewing the Scenery and Milking the Giant Cow.
    Hitler: NEIN!—NEIN!—NEIN!—NEIN!—NEIN!—NEIN!—NEIN!
  • One of the short films in the horror-comedy anthology, Chillerama, is called The Diary of Anne Frankenstein. The film has the distinction of making fun of both Hitler and Anne Frank.
  • The Great Dictator is Chaplin's lampoon of German Nazism and Italian fascism, with the serial numbers filed off. Chaplin plays both "Adenoid Hynkel, ruler of Tomainia," who is transparently an Expy of Hitler, and the nameless Jewish barber who is a dead ringer for him. Other Expies include Garbitsch (Goebbels), Herring (Göring), and Benzino Napaloni (Benito Mussolini).
  • The Three Stooges, who were all Jewish, were the first comics to publicly spoof Hitler, Goebbels, and Göring with the short "You Nazty Spy." Moe (whose real name was Moses Howard) was reportedly quite proud of that accomplishment. They followed up with other examples, including the scene in "High As A Kite" where Curly sits down on a photo of Hitler, causing Nazis to heil Curly's bottom.
  • In Little Nicky, Hitler's punishment in hell is to be forced to dress as a French Maid and repeatedly get an Ass Shove with a pineapple.
    Hitler: Holy schnitt!
  • The Devil with Hitler, a World War Two propaganda comedy film, has the Devil screwing around with Hitler, setting him up for all kinds of pratfalls.
  • Highway to Hell. Adolf Hitler (Gilbert Gottfried) is one of the inhabitants of Hell. He's played in Gottfried's standard over-the-top manner, very similar to the character of Iago in Disney's Aladdin.
  • Goebbels und Geduldig. Joseph Goebbels learns that there's a Jewish prisoner named Geduldig who looks exactly like him. He goes to the concentration camp to have him shot, but Geduldig is able to escape and pass himself off as Goebbels. Meanwhile, the real Goebbels is taken by the guards to be the Jewish prisoner.
  • The German film Mein Führer, featuring the comedian/singer/songwriter Helge Schneider in the title role, lives this trope. In an interview director Dany Levy said that he wanted to "knock the Nazis off their throne of vicious admiration".
  • The German comedy movie Der Wixxer has Alfons Hatler, a butler (and in the sequel the warden of a Bedlam House) who, additionally to his similar name, also looks and talks like Hitler. In a bit of a subversion (both to resembling hitler and being a butler in a crime mystery) he is neither villianous nor evil.
  • The 2008 Russian comedy Gitler Kaput (literally "Hitler's Kaput!") has this in spades, turning the Führer into an nervous wreck obsessed with, of all things, potatoes and who surrounds himself with white rappers decked out in Nazi-themed bling. It also lampoons German and Soviet troops, with the lead Pavel Derevyanko playing a blundering parody of SS mole Maxim Isaev from Seventeen Moments of Spring.
  • Kung Fury features Adolf Hitler, a.k.a. Kung Führer, the worst criminal of all time.
  • In Who Am I, a hacker group manages to hack the presentation laptop during a neo-Nazi conference and play their animation depicting Adolf Hitler in woman underwear being dry-humped by dogs. The audience is outraged.
  • Er Ist Wieder Da ("Look Who's Back"), based upon the comedic novel listed below, in which the Führer himself ends up in present day Germany, and becomes a media sensation. An absolute riot. That is, before the Mood Whiplash kicks in and it's shown how a man as savvy and driven as Hitler could do some terribly catastrophic harm to a fragile and fearful modern-day Germany.
  • In Rat Race, Randy Pear is a Jewish father of a family of four, who vehemently refuses to do or own anything even remotely associated with Those Wacky Nazis, including getting a Volkswagen. At one point, they are driving and pass a sign that says "Barbie Museum". His daughter insists they stop by. He agrees and is horrified to learn that the museum is actually dedicated to SS-Hauptsturmführer Klaus Barbie and is run by neo-Nazis and Holocaust deniers. After getting his family out of there, they notice that their car has been taken by their rivals. Determined to continue the race, and to spite the neo-Nazis, he steals the old-fashioned car displayed outside the museum (supposedly, one of Hitler's cars). While driving, he accidentally burns his middle finger and then throat with an electric lighter, ending up with him accidentally flipping off passing bikers. The bikers force the car off the road, resulting in them literally crashing a World War II veteran rally. During the crash, he also gets a smudge above his lip. You can see where this is going. Dazed, he gets to the podium and starts trying to explain to the veterans what happened, showing them his burned middle finger, but his words are mangled beyond recognition due to his throat damage. As his story gets more animated, he starts wildly gesticulating with his arms, with a lot of the movements involving rapidly throwing his straight arm up. This ends when one of the veterans takes a pot shot at him with his service revolver and misses.

    Literature 
  • Die galaktische Gurke, a parody one-shot of Perry Rhodan, had a crazy android named Adlof Hilter, who thought he was the Führer. Since in the 70s, Rhodan was too often compared to Hitler by leftist critics (there are enough reasons pro and contra this opinion), Rhodan fans fumed.
  • Er Ist Wieder Da ("Look Who's Back") is a comedic novel in which the Führer himself ends up in present day Germany, and becomes a media sensation. At least, that's the general plot. The book opens with Hitler blithely wondering why Germany isn't an uninhabitable wasteland as per his Salt the Earth instructions shortly before his actual death, and the man himself gradually worms his way into popularity with the ills of intentions. It should be noted though that this portrayal of Hitler aims not to make yet another carricature (unlike countless others) but to portray him as a people person, someone funny but trustworthy, to explain how he got so far in Real Life. In a way, this is much more terrifying than the bumbling idiot or screaming madman portrayals typically seen.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Harry Enfield and Chums had a series of skits that portrayed Hitler, Goebbels, Himmler, and Göring as being super Camp Gay.
    Hitler: Not too camp?
    Goebbels: No, not the way you do it.
  • The Doctor Who episode "Let's Kill Hitler", where the Führer gets locked in a storage cupboard early in the episode, and is still there when it ends.
    Rory: Shut up, Hitler!
  • The Whitest Kids U' Know did a skit called "Triumph of the Ill" which featured Hitler rapping.
  • The IT Crowd features a rather throwaway gag where Douglas, upon passing out after accidentally shooting himself in the leg, meets his father, Denholm in heaven, who attempts to persuade him into coming into the light. Before he can do this, however, Hitler pokes his head round the door and Douglas starts to suspect that This Isn't Heaven. This leads to Denholm trying to play him off as a woman dressed up for a heaven Hitler party.
  • The failed sitcom Heil Honey, I'm Home! attempted this.
  • Monty Python's Flying Circus:
    • Episode 12: Adolf Hitler survived World War II and is living in Britain under the name "Hilter". He tries (badly) to pretend to be British but tends to lose his temper and act in a stupid and crazed manner (he hasn't slept since 1945).
    • There's also the "Funniest Joke in the World" sketch, wherein said joke is used as a war weapon against the Nazis, but the parts that best fit the trope are the German "counter-joke" (which are just captions superimposed on Hitler's speech footage) and the Allied soldier being interrogated at Gestapo.
  • Dad's Army refers to this on occasion. The theme tune, Who Do You Think You Are Kidding Mister Hitler?, is a pastiche of wartime songs that treated Hitler as a joke.
  • When some people complained that 'Allo 'Allo! made Nazis look fun and harmless, thus encouraging people to embrace Neo-Nazism, the counterargument was portraying the Gestapo as bumbling idiots, and the Wehrmacht as corrupt fools was a better way to make them unattractive to mindless thugs, rather then making them Ubermensch killing machines.
  • Soap: In a throwaway gag it's revealed that Hitler is alive and well working as a waiter in a cafe in Ecuador.
  • Mystery Science Theater 3000: Mike and the Bots' reaction to the infamous "Hitler Building" scene from Invasion of the Neptune Men.
    All: (upon seeing the building) WHAT?!
    Tom: They blew up the Hitler Building! Now where are the children going to go to see Hitler memorabilia?!
    Crow: All the Hitler rides and games! The Hitler salt and pepper shakers!
    Mike: That great restaurant The Bunker... gone!
  • Hogan's Heroes:
    • Carter impersonates Hitler several times to dupe Colonel Klink.
    • Kinchloe, played by African-American actor Ivan Dixon, also impersonated Hitler a few times—over the phone, naturally. He once ordered Klink to send a German Officer to the Russian Front—the officer was secretly a Russian POW.
  • The Obersalzberg skits from German comedy series Switch! are essentially The Office, Third Reich style, with Hitler as the hapless David Brent figure (Or rather, his counterpart from the German version of the Office, Stromberg).
  • Hitler appears in an episode of El Chapulín Colorado, played by Chespirito himself, with the expected results.
  • Done a few times in Red Dwarf, most notably when Lister managed to get himself inserted into the Nuremberg Rally.
    Lister: No, don't listen! He's a complete and total nutter! And he's only got one testicle!
  • Discussed Trope in The Kids in the Hall: According to one skit, a bawdy sketch involving Hitler among the pigs was deemed too offensive to show.
  • Mr. Show:
    • A sketch took the form of a news item about cloned Hitlers being given out to Jewish families, who use them for all sorts of mundane purposes. If the owners die, the Hitler is on its own. Turns out life is pretty tough when everybody knows you're Hitler.
      Cynical Hitler (David Cross): You know, the young ones are always grumbling about how "we never asked to be grown in a lab." Well, let me tell you something, we have a saying around here: Get used to it, Hitler!
    • In the very first episode, David performs a piece from his one man show "Hitler Sings", in which he puts on a mustache and gazes longingly out the window singing, "When will I be special? When will I be someone who's loved for me?" Turns out he confuses Hitler with Anne Frank.
  • In Misfits after a time travel plot goes wrong, Hitler gets beaten up by violent chav, Kelly. First by headbutting him, then kicking him in the crotch a few times when he is on the ground.
    Kelly: Oi, 'Itler. Why 'ave you gotta be such a dick!?
  • SCTV: A tabloid news show has a clip of Hitler, alive and working as a short-order cook (played by Andrea Martin). There's a sign above the counter reading "Have Hitler cook your breakfast!"
  • Horrible Histories makes fun of bad people from history all the time (and everyone else from history, for that matter) so it's not surprising they've had one or two instances of poking fun at the Fuhrer. "If we wake him up, such a paddy he will get in!"

    Music 
  • The Amon Düül II album Made In Germany has "5.5.55," where Wally Whitefish interviews (stock audio of) Hitler before the latter takes the stage at a White House rock concert.
  • Der Fuehrer's Face, a Spike Jones tune ridiculing Nazi ideology and Hitler in particular, later the basis for an animated short (see below).
  • Several sets of unofficial lyrics to the "Colonel Bogey March" include references to Hitler's rumored testicular problems.
  • The Bonzo Dog Band: On "The Intro & the Outro" of their debut album, Gorilla, Hitler apparently plays along in the band.
  • In Nick Lowe's song "Little Hitler", he compares Jake Riviera, his notoriously thuggish manager, to the Fuhrer.
  • Possibly an Ur-Example: In 1939, some Nazi leaders denounced the popular music-hall song "The Lambeth Walk" as "Jewish mischief and animalistic hopping." So Charles Ridley of the British Ministry of Information took some footage of Nazi troops from Triumph of the Will and remixed it to make it look like they were dancing to (you guessed it) the Lambeth Walk. Comics historian Mark Evanier remarks, "It is said the film was shown for Joseph Goebbels and he exploded and ran screaming from the room in anger. If so, that alone was reason enough to make it." You can watch it on his blog here.
  • The Residents devoted an entire concept album, Third Reich And Roll, to poking fun at Hitler and Nazis.
  • Subverted for shock value in Anal Cunt's "Hitler Was a Sensitive Man" and "I Went Back in Time and Voted for Hitler".
  • The sound track for the Mel Brooks film, To Be or Not to Be (1983) has an extra bonus track called "Hitler Rap," not in the film. Brooks made a video of it.

    Puppet Shows 

    Radio 

    Theatre 
  • The Em-Fuehrer Jones, Langston Hughes' parody of The Emperor Jones, has Hitler lost in a black forest, trying in vain to goosestep away from the non-Aryan voices confronting him from all directions and giving him "Heel!" for "Heil!"
  • Martin Downing's The House of Frankenstein features a "Phantom of the Opera" whose crippling facial deformity is a face that's a spitting image of Hitler's, fetish fuel for Ilsa the German maid...

    Video Games 
  • Hearts of Iron 3 consistently pokes fun at Hitler in the tutorial which he narrates, reminding you that his facial hair is inadequate and he's not a very good painter. The tutorial also ends with him shooting himself in the head.
  • The online game Double Hitler, a QWOP-style adventure game that suggests Hitler was actually two young boys in a Totem Pole Trench.

    Web Animation 
  • Downfall Hitler (of Hitler Rants fame) is one of the main villains of The Frollo Show, and one of the most incompetent and stupid. Even when a question was specifically designed to send Scanty on a risky mission instead of him...
    Stocking: The first one to name five German cities doesn't have to go.
    (smash cut)
    Hitler: Why did that question have to be so hard?!

    Web Comics 

    Web Original 

    Western Animation 
  • The Simpsons: Despite creator Matt Groening going on record claiming he is not fond of Hitler jokes, he has a let a few good ones pass. Sadly, some of Hitler's appearances on the show are more redundant than really funny.
    • In "Duffless", Hitler's head is seen passing by in a bottle with formol.
    • In "Rosebud" a flashback shows that Mr. Burns teddy bear Bobo fell into Hitler's hands after Charles Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic. During the bombing of Berlin, Hitler blamed Bobo for his downfall. "This is all your fault!"
    • In "Bart vs. Australia", Bart unknowingly dials Hitler's telephone number, as it appears he's still alive as an old man in Argentina.
    • In "New Kids on the Blecch", an Olympic TV special is broadcast showing Hitler enraged that in the 1936 Olympics, Jesse Owens outraces his Zeppelin. In the 1968 Olympics, Bob Beamon breaks the long jump record and gets him angry again.
    • In the episode "Itchy & Scratchy: The Movie", a cartoon from the 1940s is shown where Itchy and Scratchy beat, kick and decapitate Hitler. Then Itchy chops off Scratchy's head and Franklin D. Roosevelt appears, kicking both Hitler and Scratchy in the butt.
    • In "The Regina Monologues", Moe guesses that Hitler was the famous person depicted on the $1000 bill.
    • In "Bart Carny", Hitler's car is destroyed by Bart during a carnival. Nelson Muntz punches Bart and asks him: "That was Hitler's car. What did he ever do to you?"
    • In "Old Yeller Belly", Lisa and Santa's Little Helper watch an old Rin Tin Tin movie, where the dog bites Hitler for no other apparent reason than the fact that they both appeared in black-and-white movies.
    • In an Itchy and Scratchy cartoon that spoofs The King's Speech, Hitler is — again — thrown in at the last moment, crushing Scratchy with his tank. This causes Maggie to imitate Hitler's salute, to which Lisa quickly corrects her.
    • The alternative ending of the film Casablanca in "Natural Born Kissers" shows Hitler trying to kill Humphrey Bogart, but he is defeated in the end.
    • The Christmas special segment set in World War II ended with Marge breaking into a Nazi-filled movie theater, Inglorious Basterds style. When she asks where Hitler is, he quickly rips off his mustache and places it on the elephant next to him.
    • In "Whacking Day", Grandpa Simpson tells a (probably apocryphal) story in which he, in drag, performs as a cabaret singer for a room full of Nazis and catches the eye of Hitler... until his fake boob falls out.
    Hitler: "Auch du liber! Das ist nicht ein booby!"
  • Frequently, in Family Guy, Hitler is played for laughs in cutaways.
    • One such notable scene consists of nothing other than Hitler, on a unicycle, juggling fish. Later in the episode it cuts back to Hitler on a unicycle, only for Peter to run in and punch the Fuhrer's lights out.
      Peter: See, we had a plan for that all along.
    • Death tells Peter about how death is a necessary part of life, and gives an example by asking what the world would be like if Hitler never died. It then cuts to Hitler as a modern talk show host.
    • One scene has a scrawny Hitler struggling to lift tiny dumbbells, then looking enviously at a chiseled rabbi with floozies on his arms. And that was in the pilot episode as the very first Cutaway Gag in the series, after someone brought up the dangers of poor body image.
  • In one Hey Arnold! episode, Arnold's grandfather told an embellished tale of the time he fought Hitler in the war. He defeated Hitler by giving him a wedgie.
  • Looney Tunes:
    • The 1933 cartoon Bosko's Picture Show includes a mock newsreel, which at one point features vaudeville comedian Jimmy Durante on vacation in "Pretzel, Germany". Durante is shown being chased around by Hitler, who is wearing lederhosen and carrying an ax. This is believed to be the first depiction of Hitler in American pop culture. This section with Hitler is often cut in syndication, however.
    • In the 1944 short Russian Rhapsody, Hitler pilots a bomber personally to attack Russia, but is defeated by "gremlins from the Kremlin", who do such things as putting tacks on his chair, scaring him with a Joseph Stalin mask, and disassembling the bomber out from under him.
    • In another 1940s short, Daffy the Commando (1943), Hitler is compared to a skunk and Daffy hits him with a mallet near the end of the cartoon.
    • Daffy, again, tricks Hitler, Goebbels, and Göring in the 1944 cartoon Plane Daffy
    • The 1942 short The Ducktators depicts Hitler as a duck taking over a barnyard. He is defeated along with Benito Mussolini and Hideki Tojo in the end.
    • The 1943 short Tokio Jokio has Hitler briefly appear for a joke involving Rudolph Hess.
    • A 1945 Bugs Bunny cartoon, Herr Meets Hare has Bugs make mock of Hermann Göring in the same manner that he usually takes on Elmer Fudd and Yosemite Sam. At the end, Bugs scares off Hitler and Göring by dressing up as Josef Stalin.
  • Robot Chicken:
    • "Li'l Hitler" shorts feature a child version of Hitler at school trying to take over the desks of other students.
    • Also, a series of "Dicks With Time Machines" sketches ends with the mischievous time traveler disrupting one of Hitler's speeches by projecting a picture of him on the toilet, making him into a laughingstock who can't get anyone's attention. (The title then changes to "Heroes With Time Machines").
  • In the South Park episodes "Hell on Earth 2006" and "Mr Hankey's Christmas Classics", he appears as a deranged resident of Hell. Cartman also admires him and frequently dresses up as him for fun, much to others' disgust.
    Narrator: Adolf Hitler was a very, very naughty man!
  • The Tex Avery short Blitz Wolf centers around a retelling of The Three Little Pigs where the Big Bad Wolf is a goofy, lupine caricature of Hitler.
  • In the Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode "Der Inflatable Fuhrer", it turns out that Hitler tried to smuggle his possessions out of Nazi Germany in a balloon hidden inside his anus. The balloon burst, trapping Hitler's soul inside it. (It Makes Just As Much Sense In Context.) The ATHF convince Talking Balloon!Hitler to stop hating Jews by pointing out that most of his favorite celebrities are Jewish, but when the Fuhrer starts hating on gays instead, Frylock decides he's had enough and literally bursts Hitler's bubble.
  • The Donald Duck cartoon Der Fuehrer's Face. All together now:
    Ven der fueherer says, "Ve ist der master race,"
    Ve heil! (Bronx cheer) Heil! (Bronx cheer) Right in der fuehrer's face!
    Not to love der fuehrer ist a great disgrace,
    So ve heil! (Bronx cheer) Heil! (Bronx cheer) Right in der fuehrer's face!
  • Another Disney short, Education for Death, is a relentlessly somber illustration of how Germans were conditioned from birth to the Nazi mentality — in a revisionist version of Sleeping Beauty taught to children, Hitler is shown as a buffoonish fairy tale hero. Yes, this film is so grim, they can use Hitler as comedy relief.
  • Hitler made a few appearances on The Critic as well. Once, to illustrate Jay's unpopularity, Duke shows him test audiences giving Hitler a higher approval rating. In another episode, a French waiter at Cannes reminiscences about Hitler and Eva Braun vacationing on the beach.
  • In the Popeye cartoon Seein' Red, White and Blue, Popeye's punch (which already knocked Hirohito over onto his horse's ass) K.O.s Hitler, whose dialogue is relegated to a simple and elongated "B.O.!"
  • One time on Code Monkeys, GameAvision gets sued by Hitler's descendants over a new game that Dave made about Hitler as part of a bet; they turn out to be a Nazi cabal trying to get a footing in America. While at Hitler Castle, Dave and Black Steve discover Hitler's frozen-in-carbonite body in a back room. They decide to thaw him out, beat him up, piss on him, and give him an atomic sit-up. He escaped and set off mind-controlled bears and Nazi troopers against the staff; a bunch of cowboys defeat his forces and Hitler shoots himself again. Another episode had a brief gag of the GameAvision freezer having a Hitler clone inside; Mr. Larrity claims it's there for "insurance".
  • Rick and Morty has Abradolf Lincler, a hybrid of Abraham Lincoln and Adolf Hitler created by Rick. He was intended to be a perfectly neutral political leader but his conflicting nature makes him act very strange. His first appearance has him show up at a party to attack Rick, only to end up getting the crap kicked out of him by a black guy.

    Real Life 

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/AdolfHitlarious