Follow TV Tropes

Following

Characters / Marvel Comics Miscellaneous
aka: Marvel Comics Blue Marvel

Go To

    open/close all folders 

Creations of Galactus

    Punisher 

Punisher

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/1569240_punish_them.jpg

No, not that one. A relatively small purple and green humanoid robot that protects Galactus' interests. Not to be underestimated, it was able to take on three of the Fantastic Four, and they were only spared when Galactus recalled the robot. When Galactus created the Silver Surfer, he modified the Punisher's programming so that the robot would seek out the Herald if he ever became rebellious. When the Silver Surfer turned against Galactus, the Punisher was teleported to Earth to defeat him and return him to the Worldship. Although the Punisher could have defeated the Surfer, it was unable to defeat the Surfer AND the Fantastic Four. It was destroyed. A second Punisher was sent to force the Silver Surfer to reclaim his job of Herald. It was recalled before the Four could destroy it.


Advertisement:

    Tyrant 

Tyrant

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/83619_145419_tyrant.jpg
While not an official herald, Tyrant was the first creation of Galactus that was imbued with the Power Cosmic.
  • A God Am I: What he thinks after he gained his masters' power.
  • Galactic Conqueror: Could easily be the poster child for it. He often boasts of enslaving entire galaxies and carving an empire from the stars, even though it was never showed him actually ruling planets.
  • Robot Master: Commands an army of Mecha-Mooks to enact his conquests.
  • Psycho Prototype: One of the first prototypes of his master, and definitely insane.
  • Satanic Archetype: He as been described as the Devil to Galactus' God.
  • Technopathy: His main ability, he is extremely adept at technology.
  • The Worf Effect: Easily defeated Silver Surfer, Gladiator, Beta Ray Bill and Terrax together soon after his debut.
  • Time Abyss: He's almost as old as Galactus.

Other Heroes

    Blue Marvel 

Blue Marvel

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/blue_marvel.jpg

Alter Ego: Adam Bernard Brashear

First Appearance: Adam: Legends of the Blue Marvel #1 (January 2009)

Team Affiliations: Mighty Avengers, The Ultimates

Joined In: Mighty Avengers Vol 2 #2

Adam is a veteran of the Korean War who gained tremendous power from an experiment with anti-matter gone wrong. For several years after the war, he protected America as the masked superhero known as the Blue Marvel, until his helmet was damaged during a battle and the country found out he was black. Wary of inflaming racial tensions, the President asked Adam to quietly retire, and he agreed to do so.

Adam stayed underground until the modern day, sharing several secret adventures with his eldest son Kevin and not bothering to use a superhero identity at all. Kevin was eventually sucked into an alternate plane of existence that Adam called the Neutral Zone; Adam and his second son, Max, spent many years trying to figure out how to reach and save Kevin to no avail.

During Tony Stark's tenure as the director of SHIELD, Adam's arch-enemy Anti-Man resurfaced. In an attempt to figure out where he'd come from, Tony declassified the story of the Blue Marvel and got back in touch with Adam, who had retired to teach physics at the University of Maryland. In the ensuing struggle, Adam's wife Candace was killed and Adam, in accordance with her wishes, resumed his activities as the Blue Marvel, albeit without a mask or a secret identity to speak of.

Adam continued to operate out of an underwater base near the Marianas Trench, working mostly outside the United States and continuing his personal research. During the Infinity crossover, he helped to protect New York alongside Luke Cage's hastily-formed Avengers team, and despite some friction with Luke, continued to work alongside him until the events of Secret Wars.

In the modern Marvel Universe, Adam is a member of the The Ultimates, working proactively to keep the world and universe safe. His son Max, a.k.a. Doctor Positron, worked at Roberto da Costa's "Avengers Idea Mechanics", and his daughter Adrienne has a position at the super-science laboratory Project Pegasus.


Blue Marvel appears in the following works:

Notable Comic Books

Notable Video Games


Blue Marvel provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Amazingly Embarrassing Parents: The opening scene of an issue of Ultimates has him being amazingly embarrassing to his son, Kevin, when they're in the middle of an adventure, as Adam tries to use 90s slang.
  • Antagonistic Offspring: His second son, Max, is pissed at him, blaming him for what happened to his brother. They do eventually reconcile.
  • Antimatter: His powers were the result of an accident when he was working on a negative reactor which would harness anti-matter by creating a bridge between the negative zone and the positive matter universe.
  • Arch-Enemy: Doctor Evald Skorpion, a nihilistic Mad Scientist. Their last encounter ended with a portal Evald had created sucking Adam's son into the Neutral Zone, while it vaporised Evald. His legacy was continued in the form of the terrorist organisation W.E.S.P.E. (in a further note of irony, Adam's son Max worked with them trying to recover Kevin).
  • Badass Teacher: A nominally-retired superhero and a college professor.
  • Becoming the Mask: Adam's wife Candace was born as Marlene Frazier, a government agent tasked with keeping an eye on Adam in the years after he went underground. Candace wasn't expecting to fall in love with Adam, and eventually committed entirely to her new identity, claiming to her husband and children that she was an orphan. Adam didn't find out about her birth identity or her government ties until their children were in college, when Tony Stark uncovered her secret.
  • Blue Is Heroic: As his name implies, all of his costumes are blue.
  • Came Back Wrong: Kevin Brashear was sucked into an alternate dimension in the late 1990s, and by the time his little brother Max figured out how to reach him, Kevin had adapted to the point where he can no longer survive on Earth. In fact, if he spends any longer than a few seconds on Earth, it'll cause a cataclysmic explosion due to his body now being comprised largely of anti-matter.
  • The Cape: Despite his issues and poor luck, he's likely one of the most moral heroes in the Marvel Universe... something that often puts him at odds with the others.
  • Combo Platter Powers:
    • One of a handful of Superman-level superheroes in the Marvel Universe. Adam can fly at high speeds, survive in hard vacuum, is a super-scientist, is virtually invulnerable, ages slowly, doesn't need to sleep, can project destructive blasts, and has limited control of anti-matter particles.
    • His arch-enemy, Connor "Anti-Man" Sims, was capable of wiping the floor with one of the most powerful squads of Avengers ever formed.
  • Cool Old Guy: Though he looks like he's in his late 40's, he's actually around his mid to late 80's.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: He took out Ultimate Hulk (who, in the interest of accuracy, we should note is not quite as strong as regular Hulk) with one punch.
  • Formula with a Twist: As per Word of God, this character was created based on the question: "What if Superman had been a Black guy?"
  • Happily Married: Until shortly before her death, Adam and Candace were happily married for several decades.
  • Hero of Another Story: In Mighty Avengers, it's made clear that, being a Superman Expy, he's busy a lot of the time. When investigating Doctor Positron's secret lair, he just remarks it's the third secret volcano lair he's dealt with that week. Infact, Adam has had a long life full of strange adventures, including among other things fighting the sentient Y2K virus.
  • Kryptonite Factor: Neutronium, also known by some as Iso-8, an unstable element from outside conventional reality, is one of the few things that can actually hurt him.
  • Lamarck Was Right: Averted. Adam has three children with Candace/Marlene: Kevin, Max, and Adrienne. While all three of his kids are extremely intelligent, and Max is a straight-up Mad Scientist, none of them inherited any of Adam's powers. Adam does theorize at one point that proximity to him may have slowed down his family members' aging process, as Candace/Marlene was just as slow to age as he was.
    • That said, New Avengers shows a potential grandkid of his as inheriting his powers, becoming a legacy version of Ms. Marvel.
  • May–December Romance: During Ultimates, he and Monica Rambeau start a relationship, Adam having at least fifty years on Mon.
  • Military Superhero: Adam was a member of the Marine Corps when he fought in Korea.
  • My Greatest Failure: His son Kevin is trapped in the neutral zone, and he's incapable of doing anything to save him. Eventually, it turns out Kevin changed in his time out there, and meaning he couldn't come home if he wanted to.
  • The Needless: He doesn't need to eat or sleep, though he notes after Candace's death that he wouldn't be doing much of the later anyway.
  • Older Than They Look: Adam's powers slow his ageing, meaning he looks no older than his early fifties. His wife, Candace/Marlene, was perhaps an even more dramatic case of this, not looking any older than 35 prior to her death, when she could have been at least 75. To explain this, Adam later speculates that proximity to him slowed her ageing process.
  • Omnidisciplinary Scientist: Has a wide knowledge of a lot of sciences. But then, he has had several decades to study them.
  • Politically Correct History: Averted on his backstory: the moment it was revealed that the Blue Marvel was actually a black man, the U.S. Government (and President John F. Kennedy himself) asked Brashear to retire immediately.
  • Remember the New Guy?:
    • The 2009 Adam miniseries retroactively acquaints Adam with the Watcher and with Namor. His original superheroic career is explained as being extremely brief, to the point where many modern superheroes don't remember him at all. He was a legend in the African-American community, however, to the point where Luke Cage chews him out over his retirement in Mighty Avengers.
    • Adam's oldest son Kevin was introduced by Al Ewing in Mighty Avengers and isn't mentioned at all in the original Adam miniseries.
    • This gets a Lampshade Hanging during The Ultimates (2015), when Galactus gives a lecture on Comic-Book Time, and as he addresses how the past can change, he directly speaks to Adam. Adam has no idea what he means, but is unsettled all the same.
  • Required Secondary Powers: His powers come from being a "living anti-matter reactor", but his actual body is still composed of normal matter. Fortunately for him (and everything around him), he's also immune to the effects of the anti-matter he generates.
  • Retired Badass: He was forced out of business by the U.S. government in the 60s, but took up adventuring on the quiet after a few decades, until his son's accident and his wife's passing. It took Thanos' invasion for him to get back into business again.
  • Superman Stays Out of Gotham: He was doing his own superheroics when the Fantastic Four were just starting out. An issue of Mighty Avengers even shows what he was doing when Galactus first came to Earth - dealing with his own problems (and confident Uatu knew what he was doing)).
  • Superman Substitute: He's got the right powers, the right costume, and the right personality. Even his creator basically said he was "What if Superman was a black guy in the 60s?" Answer: the U.S. Government was thankful for him saving the world again and again, but the moment it was revealed that he was black, they asked him to retire.
  • Teeth-Clenched Teamwork:
    • He and Luke Cage headbutt a little. Luke is resentful of Adam for retiring when he could've been an important symbol for African-Americans, and Adam isn't too fond of Luke's criminal past. They do at least get over it (and in fairness, Luke tends to headbutt with everyone).
    • With T'Challa, on the Ultimates. Adam previously expressed dislike for T'Challa's autocratic tendencies, and this gets worse when the subject of Connor Sims comes up, as T'Challa thinks he should be executed as a danger, while Adam (who has more reason to be angry than the King of Wakanda) would rather see he got a fair trial.
  • Tragic Villain: Connor Sims, who initially appears to be a Well-Intentioned Extremist who was outraged by the mistreatment Adam received for being black, and how he wasn't given the credit he deserved for being a genius war-hero with multiple doctorates. As it turns out, thanks to a combination of his powers and the helmet Adam built for him to try and stabilise his visions actually amplifying them into an unstable form of cosmic awareness, he was actually driven mad by it.
  • Underwater Base: Kadesh, Adam's "science fortress" at the bottom of the Mariana Trench. He cut a deal with Namor in order to build it there.
  • We Used to Be Friends: Adam served in Korea with Connor Sims, saving the man's life on his first day on duty. They then gained their superpowers in the same lab accident (Connor was serving as security), and Adam risked his life to recover Connor from the Neutral Zone afterward. Then his powers caused him to Go Mad from the Revelation, and the two spent years fighting. And then during Connor's last rampage, he killed Candace.
  • Worf Had the Flu: In Hickman's Avengers, Adam and the rest of the Mighty Avengers are used as little more than muscle against a team they should easily be able to mop the floor with. Captain America and the Mighty Avengers explains they were holding back because they didn't actually agree with Steve Rogers or the Illuminati.

    Human Torch (Android) 

Human Torch (Android)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/human_torch_1.jpg

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rco001_1462775293_6.jpg

Alter Ego:

Notable Aliases: Jim Hammond, The Torch

Debut: Marvel Comics #1 (Oct. 1939)

Joined Team In: Avengers West Coast #50 (November, 1989)

The Human Torch (no, not that one) was a character and ongoing anthology story created by Carl Burgos in 1939 for Timely Comics, which would become Marvel Comics, anthology Marvel Mystery Comics. He debuted in the first issue, and would go on to have his own comic series, cross over with Namor the Sub-Mariner and Captain America, and join The Avengers. He is still appearing in comics in 2019.


The Human Torch provides examples of:

  • Artistic License – Physics: He is a robot who spontaneously combusts when in the presence of oxygen. Until he learns about nitrogen and then doesn't. Also, flames apparently obey him. And he can carry fabric sometimes while he's on fire, while at other times he's melting steel.
  • Eating Machine
  • Elemental Armor: When flamed up, his fire is so hot that, sometimes, bullets melt before they can reach him.
  • Flight
  • Hero with Bad Publicity: Sometimes it's thought that he's a bad guy or even actually behind what he's trying to stop.
    • Justified in that, not only is his power inherently destructive, but his first appearance in the world resulted in quite a lot of destruction, almost certainly the deaths of innocents, and definitely the deaths of criminals, and he killed his creator and has been known to act contrary to the police.
  • In a Single Bound: The Torch can't fly (at this point in time, not even Superman could fly), but he might as well. He leaps at times over small mountains.
  • Kill It with Fire: The Torch does not especially shy away from killing his foes.
  • Lightning Bruiser: He's the precursor to Johnny Storm, who's 6'3 and 300 lbs.
  • The Mafia: Many of his foes were generic mobsters — supervillains hadn't been invented yet.
    • Funetik Aksent: Many bad guys are written with phonetic "Joisey" accents.
  • Never Given a Name: The Torch's creator never gave him a humanlike name, he was just "the Torch". He eventually, several stories in, takes the human alias Jim Hammond.
  • Nigh-Invulnerability: Nothing really seems to harm him.
  • Playing with Fire: Control of fire is his primary ability. Not just that he can create and throw it, but fire appears to actively obey him. His most impressive feats include not just melting but sublimating sheets of steel.
  • Protagonist-Centered Morality: Even in stories where it starts with the Torch on the wrong side of the law, by the end he is usually forgiven and right all along.
    • Enforced, more or less, by the era; it would be difficult to find comic books before the '70s where this isn't the case, unless they are presented as a villain. Namor the Sub-Mariner is an interesting aversion.
  • Ridiculously Human Robot: The Torch is an android, but no one seems to know that who wasn't told.
  • Screw the Rules, I Have Supernatural Powers!: In early installments, at least, the Torch is still using his power for good, but that doesn't mean he has any problem committing wanton destruction of property, escaping (and destroying) jail, resisting the police, letting bad guys die... His mindset is that because he's right and going after the real bad guy, the actual law doesn't matter.
  • Super Speed: He ran-slash-leapt a two day car journey in a day or less.
  • Super Strength: He can lift steel beams and catch hurtling boulders.
  • Think Nothing of It: He seems to do heroics for the sake of themselves, and tells grateful people not to mention it.
  • Turned Against Their Masters: In the first issue, The Torch desired to return to the scientist who created him, but turned his back on him and goes it alone once he realizes he just wanted to exploit him like the mobsters he just dealt with. And then apparently promptly and unapologetically attempted to kill him.

    Shang Chi 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/master_of_kung_fu.jpg
Lady Deathstrike: I've fought all kinds of people...ones whose bodies burned like fire...ones with superhuman healing and adamantium bones. What are you compared to them?
Shang-Chi: Well...just someone who's good with his hands.
The Legend of Shang-Chi #1

Shang-Chi (literally translates as "the rising of the spirit" in Chinese) is a Marvel Comics character, first conceived in 1972 by Steve Englehart and Jim Starlin, and first appearing in Marvel Special Edition #15 (1973).

Originally, he was the renegade son of the infamous Fu Manchu, a Chinese crime lord, and was constantly pulled into adventures against his will (which he frequently referred to as "games of deceit and death"). He was the protagonist and star of Master of Kung Fu, which ran until Issue #125 in 1983.

The Real Life story of his creation is unusual. Jim Starlin and Steve Englehart were fans of the, then popular, TV series Kung Fu and wanted to adapt the series to comics; however, the series belonged to Warner Communications, owner of Marvel's main rival, DC Comics.

Marvel had acquired the rights to publish comics based on the character Fu Manchu. Rather than do a straight adaptation of either, however, they combined the concepts and made the evil Fu's heroic opponent his own son, based loosely on Kwai-Chang Caine from Kung Fu.

For most of his time following the end of his original title, Shang-Chi was a C-list character appearing every now and then and disappearing just as quickly. First, he was part of the Heroes for Hire, then didn't appear until Spider-Island. He became also one of Earth's Mightiest Heroes in Jonathan Hickman's Avengers. Since then, he has risen in popularity, even getting a miniseries in Secret Wars (2015).

Former Marvel Productions President and CEO Margaret Loesch has stated that in the 1980s, Stan Lee tried to get a Shang-Chi movie or television series made with Brandon Lee as Shang-Chi.

In December 2018, Marvel Studios hired David Callaham to write the screenplay for a Shang-Chi film as part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and then in March 2019, hired Destin Daniel Cretton (the director of Short Term 12 and Just Mercy) to direct the film. In July 2019, the film's title was confirmed as being Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, to be released on September 3, 2021, with Simu Liu portraying the eponymous character.


Shang-Chi's adventures include examples of the following tropes:

  • Always Someone Better: He's considered THE best Earth-based Martial Artist in the Marvel Verse, but is only human and various superhuman characters who are both Strong and Skilled enough have been shown to trounce him quickly such as the case with the mutant Gorgon and a demon-possessed Daredevil.
  • Aborted Arc: In the decades since, Shang's connection to his father has been downplayed, largely due to Marvel losing the rights to Sax Rohmer's work.
  • The Ace: Considered to be THE best martial artist/hand-to-hand fighter in the Marvel Universe.
  • Action Girl: Leiko Wu in Deadly Hands of Kung Fu is a formidable secret agent.
  • Badass Normal: Despite being a baseline human, Shang-Chi is one of, if not THE single most dangerous hand-to-hand fighter in the Marvel Universe, and is capable of holding his own both alongside and against superhuman opponents. He's even been known to turn down offers of technological upgrades, on the basis that he doesn't really need anything else, and he's usually right. (He does use a pair of Stark Industries-brand power nunchaku at one point in Avengers, though.) During the Infinity crossover Shang-Chi is on the team of Avengers that goes into space to fight in an interstellar war, and he still holds his own, albeit mostly through a stubborn refusal to stay down and his new-found Ki Manipulation powers courtesy of Hickman.
  • Bald Women: Shi-Hua, Sister Hammer is Shang-Chi's sister and completely bald.
  • Bash Brothers: With Lin Lie/Sword Master while both are at the Agents of Atlas. Also with his half-brother Takeshi/Brother Sabre.
  • Beware the Quiet Ones: Usually Shang-Chi is The Stoic; he says few words and is generally very mellow. But piss him off enough and you'll find out first-hand why he's the Master of Kung Fu.
  • Boxing Lessons for Superman: He often provides these to other superheroes, including Sword Master and Spider-Man.
  • Bruce Lee Clone: These days, Depending on the Writer and Artist, he is sometimes a Bruce Lee Clone, something that began even at the time when it was illustrated by Paul Gulacy. During Warren Ellis' Secret Avengers stint, Shang-Chi even wore a black and red variant of Lee's iconic Game of Death tracksuit. (Ultimate Shang-Chi, by contrast, is a Jackie Chan Clone — his Ultimate Marvel Teamup appearance even featured Uncle from Jackie Chan Adventures.) When he was first created, though, he was largely based on Kwai-Chang Caine from Kung Fu.
  • But Not Too Foreign: Shang-Chi's white mother was a requirement from Editor-in-Chief Roy Thomas.
  • Charles Atlas Superpower: See the Badass Normal entry above.
  • Death by Adaptation: Narrowly subverted. Before finding out his father's true nature (he was raised to believe the doctor was a benevolent humanitarian), Shang-Chi is assigned to assassinate Dr. James Petrie (whom his father tells him is evil), the narrator of the first three novels and a long-time friend and associate of Fu Manchu's arch-nemesis Sir Denis Nayland Smith. It's only after Smith himself confronts Shang-Chi and reveals Dr. Fu Manchu's true villainous character, triggering Shang-Chi's Heel–Face Turn, that Petrie is revealed to have survived.
  • Does Not Like Shoes: He went barefoot everywhere in The '70s. Called out on this by a security guard at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City ("Hey, kid! Why Don't you get some shoes?"), he replied, "Why do you fear to touch the ground? Does the concrete not separate you from it enough?".
  • Exposed to the Elements: In an issue of Heroes for Hire, the team has to travel through the South Pole on the way to the Savage Land for a job. Shang Chi is shown standing shirtless in the cold while Misty and Colleen are noticably shivering despite wearing warm clothing. Shang Chi claims that his exposure to the cold was helping him take his mind off his growing attraction to Tarantula.
  • Formerly Friendly Family: Shang-Chi and his sister Shi-Hua used to be very close as children, but after many years separated, not only she has embraced their father's teachings, she's willing to kill Shang in order to be considered Zheng Zu's true successor, something Shang-Chi was completely unaware of and uninterested in.
  • Good Is Not Soft: Shang is one of the genuinely nicest heroic sorts in the Marvel Universe, and generally prefers to avoid violence. If someone forces his hand however, Shang rarely holds back.
    "You do not brush a reed to the ground if you want it to stay out of your path. You snap it."
  • Mixed Ancestry: His parents include Chinese Fu Manchu/Zheng Zu and a white American woman with powerful genes. And he's not the only one, since he found out in Brothers and Sisters that he has half-siblings in other countries, like Brother Sabre who is half-Japanese, and Sister Dagger who is half-French.
  • More Deadly Than the Male: Both Sister Dagger and Sister Hammer have very little compunction killing while Shang-Chi and Brother Sabre need a bit more time to fight lethally.
  • The Rival: Shen Kuei, the Cat, is a sometime-ally, sometime-enemy of Shang's. They have both loved the same woman more than once, and it's been repeatedly stated that neither really knows who is the better martial artist.
  • Self-Duplication: Gains this ability in Avengers Volume 5, #38 due to exposure to Ex Nihilo's Origin Bomb in Kobe, Japan.
  • Slap-Slap-Kiss: Overlaps with Belligerent Sexual Tension and Interplayof Sexand Violence; during his tenure as a Hero for Hire, he starts liking Tarantula (Maria Vasquez). In one arc, after a brief but big fight, the two start kissing. Shang-Chi is at first disgusted, but eventually gives in to both his hormones and Maria and the two have sex.
  • Took a Level in Badass: While Shang-Chi could always use his chi ala Immortal Iron Fist-style, it was never as flashy as Marvel's other kung fu guy. Come Jonathan Hickman's Avengers, it's as flashy and arguably as powerful as Danny Rand's. Even in his Secret Wars (2015) story, he knows Nine of Zheng Zu's Ten techniques, later creating one of his own to fill the tenth slot.
  • World's Best Warrior: Usually considered to be Marvel's greatest martial artist by a considerable margin, with the exception of Iron Fist, who is usually considered his equal — though the Fist has supernatural abilities, meaning Shang is definitely the greatest non-superpowered martial artist in the world.
Advertisement:

Civilians

    Danielle Cage 

Danielle Cage

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/5160343_danielle.jpg

Alter Ego: Danielle "Dani" Cage-Jones

Notable Aliases: Danielle Jones-Cage

Debut: The Pulse #13 (March, 2006)

Luke Cage and Jessica Jones daughter.


  • Adult Fear: During the events of the storyline "Purple Daughter," her skin had mysteriously turned the color purple, a sign she may have actually been the daughter of Jessica's Compelling Voice arch enemy Purple Man. Thankfully, it turned out to all be a temporary issue caused by the Purple Man's Muggle Born of Mages son, who did it in a failed attempt to break Jessica.
  • Ambiguously Gay: She is married to Lucy Rand, daughter of Danny Rand and Misty Knight, in one universe. However, this seems to be the only universe where she is romantically interested in anyone.
  • Cheerful Child: Being as she is a toddler. When Doctor Strange exposed the New Avengers to a magic spell that was meant to expose everyone's true nature, Dani just giggled, much to Jessica's surprise. Stephen explains that there's no purer spirit than a baby.
  • Future Badass: Her future in multiple universes is as her generation's Captain America, and in at least one universe she is that universe's Thor.
  • LEGO Genetics: Most future versions of her have inherited a mix of both her parents' powers, making her a Flying Brick.
  • Mixed Ancestry: Her father is black while her mother is white.

    James Lucas, Sr. 

James Lucas, Sr.

Luke's father, a former NYPD cop.


  • Doting Grandparent: Whatever flaws as a father he might have aside, he is a pretty good granddad to little Dani.
  • Fish out of Water: He's an entirely normal human being, which is why he stayed away from Luke's life for so long. He's just too weirded out by the typical super-hero goings on that surround his son.
  • Freak Out: In the 70s, he had a run-in with Blade, Kaluu and the Blue Marvel that involved foiling four supernatural villains trying to attain unlimited power. Being a regular cop, he was too terrified at the bizareness to do anything.

    Claire Temple 

Claire Temple

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/claire_temple_earth_616_from_captain_america_sam_wilson_vol_1_4_001.jpg

Alter Ego: Claire Temple

Notable Aliases:

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Hero for Hire #2 (August 1972)

A fierce night nurse who tended to superheroes. She was Luke Cage's love interest from his Hero for Hire days. She's also the ex-wife of Bill Foster.

    David Griffith 

David Griffith

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/3864726_david_griffith_earth_616_from_mighty_avengers_vol_2_4inh_002.jpg

Alter Ego: David Griffith

Notable Aliases: D.W. Griffith

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Hero for Hire #2 (August 1972)

David Griffith was a long time associate and friend of Luke Cage when they shared the same apartment-building in a movie theater.


  • The Bus Came Back: After disappearing for a long while, he reappeared in Mighty Avengers in 2013. He disappeared again after the end of Captain America & the Mighty Avengers in 2015.
Advertisement:

    Big Ben Donovan 

Big Ben Donovan

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/1901118_ben.jpg

Alter Ego: Benjamin Donovan

Notable Aliases:

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Hero for Hire #14 (October 1973)


    Noah Burstein 

Noah Burstein

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2080800_drnoah_burnstein_avengers_origins_luke_cage_1.jpg

Alter Ego: Dr. Noah Burstein

Notable Aliases: Noah Bernstein

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Hero For Hire #1 (June 1972)

Dr. Noah Burnstein is a scientist whose experiments for the creation of super-soldiers have created several superhumans, most notably Luke Cage.

    Reva Connors 

Reva Connors

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/5337879_reva_connors.jpg

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Hero For Hire #1 (June 1972)

A friend and love interest of Luke Cage, also known as Power Man.
  • Killed Off for Real: Reva died in a conflict between Cage, Stryker and the Maggia. Her death still weighs heavy on Luke's memory.

    Wendell Rand 

Wendell Rand

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/623095_wendell_rand.jpg

Alter Ego: Wendell Rand-K'ai

Notable Aliases:

First Appearance: Marvel Premiere #15 (May, 1974)

Wendell Rand was the ward of Orson Randall, he learned how to fight at his side. After their falling out he went to K'un-Lun and earned the right to become the Iron Fist. Instead of facing Shou-Lao, he returned to Earth and fathered Danny Rand, the current Iron Fist.


  • Big Bad: Of Iron Fist: The Living Weapon.
  • The Determinator: He refuses to give up, and due to his training in K'un-Lun, he can almost afford to be that persistent.
  • Fusion Dance: With The One android.
  • Heel Realization: During the finale of Iron Fist: The Living Weapon.
  • Slasher Smile: His default expression as a villain.

    Heather Rand 

Heather Rand

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/3750947_silver_dragon.jpg

Alter Ego: Heather Duncan Rand

Notable Aliases: Silver Dragon

First Appearance: Marvel Premiere #15 (May, 1974)

Born to Thomas Duncan, member of one of the wealthiest merchant families in the United States, she fell in love and married Wendell Rand, a businessman of obscure origins and later gave birth to a son named Daniel Thomas Rand.


    Lei Kung 

Lei Kung

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2657795_lei_kung_new_avengers_25.jpg

Notable Aliases: The Thunderer, Yu-Ti

First Appearance: Marvel Premiere #16 (July, 1974)

The immortal teacher of the legacy of Iron Fist.

    Jeryn Hogarth 

Jeryn Hogarth

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/4422862_jeryn_hogarth.png
Daniel Rand's attorney.
  • Obstructive Bureaucrat: During an appearance in New Avengers, he manages to stall and bluff Iron Man, in full-on Inspector Javert Mode, stating the man has no recourse to arrest Danny for "allegedly" being Iron Fist and that even if he tries, they'll make sure the trial is long and painful. It reduces Ms. Marvel to screaming rage.

    Pei 

Pei

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/7770115_pei_28earth_61629_from_contagion_vol_1_3_cover.jpg

Notable Aliases: Kung Fu Girl, Iron Fist, Jr., Kid Fist

First Appearance: Iron Fist: The Living Weapon #1 (April, 2014)

A little girl with the potential to become Iron Fist.


  • Girlish Pigtails: Her preferred style.
  • Little Miss Badass: She might be half the height of Luke Cage but as a possible future Iron Fist, she's more than capable to fight alongside him and Danny.
  • Only One Name: Pei is the only name she's known as.

    Bride of Nine Spiders 

Bride of Nine Spiders

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/bride_of_nine_spiders_earth_616_from_avengers_roll_call_vol_1_1_0001.jpg

Alter Ego: Unknown

First Appearance: Immortal Iron Fist #8 (October, 2007)

The Bride of Nine Spiders is the protector of the Kingdom of Spiders in Nepal. A dark city covered in spider-webs. Her heart pumps the coldest blood imaginable and she is host to horrors inconceivable to mortal men. She is said to be descended from the Nine Spider Kings of Nepal.
  • Collared by Fashion: Her signature spiked collar.
  • Fan Disservice: Bride of Nine Spiders seductively removing her top... to reveal that her torso is a hollow shell filled with vicious spiders.
  • Perky Goth: She seems to have a morbid sense of humor, "giggling" ("Che Che Che Che") with delight at the prospect of violence and death (even her own).
  • Spikes of Villainy: A Dark Is Not Evil example, as Bride of Nine Spiders' combat gear includes a collar with very long spikes on it. Her social wear also involves a collar with short, decorative spikes.
  • The Worm That Walks: The Bride of Nine Spiders can release a swarm of ravenous spiders from her chest or mouth; the spiders can subdue opponents with venom or ensnare them in webbing.

    Tiger's Beautiful Daughter 

Tiger's Beautiful Daughter

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/1893436_tigersbeautifuldaughter009.jpg

Alter Ego: Li Hua

First Appearance: Immortal Iron Fist #8 (October, 2007)

Tiger's Beautiful Daughter, Li Hua, is one of the Seven Immortal Weapons and daughter of Tiger Warrior.
  • Amazon Brigade: She is the boss of one of these back in her home town.
  • Combat Hand Fan: Uses two of these in her fight with Steel Phoenix.
  • Killed Offscreen: She's killed at the start of Iron Fist: Heart of the Dragon alongside the dragon of her city.
  • Stripperiffic: Only covers herself with strategically placed belts, lots of belts. And a loincloth.
  • Too Many Belts: Lots of belts are the only clothes she wears while fighting. She's fully clothed every other time.

    Fat Cobra 

Fat Cobra

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/7270867_fatcobra.jpg

Alter Ego: Unknown

First Appearance: Immortal Iron Fist #8 (October, 2007)

Fat Cobra is the Immortal Weapon of Peng Lai Island one of the Seven Capital Cities of Heaven. His size and strength are only outclassed by his speed.
  • Acrofatic: He's built like a sumo wrestler and is incredibly agile.
  • Big Eater: Fat Cobra's appetite as an infant led his parents to abandon him. And then the orphanage that housed him did the same for the same reason; they just couldn't support that kind of hunger.
  • The Fog of Ages: Fat Cobra has forgotten most of his life, due to a combination of his debauched lifestyle and how crappy and dishonorable much of it was.
  • Nonindicative Name: Fat Cobra's totem animal is actually the turtle, not the cobra.
  • Stout Strength: He's fat, but damn is he strong.

    Dog Brother # 1 

Dog Brother #1

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/975499_dogbro.png

Alter Ego: Sihing

First Appearance: Immortal Iron Fist #8 (October, 2007)


  • Cherry Tapping: Dog Brother #1 once killed a man with a mere "Standard Issue Punch" after slicing his head into three perfect segments but leaving him momentarily barely alive.
  • Death by Origin Story: To become Dog Brother #1, your parents need to be dead.
  • Really 700 Years Old: He was born in 1841, making him over 200 years old.
  • You Kill It, You Bought It: How the mantle of Dog Brother #1 is passed down.

    Prince of Orphans 

Prince of Orphans

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2206168_2206167_prince_of_orphans.png

Alter Ego: John Aman

Notable Aliases: The Green Mist of Death, Amazing Man

First Appearance: Immortal Iron Fist #8 (October, 2007)

John Aman, the Prince of Orphans, is one of the seven Immortal Weapons. Mysterious even to those who cultivate unending mystery, Aman is one of the deadliest combatants on Earth.

    Shou-Lao the Undying 

Shou-Lao the Undying

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/3655042_ironfist2014002_text_layer_andrews_5b4e3.jpg

First Appearance: Marvel Premiere #16 (July, 1974)

An immortal dragon whose heart grants people the power of the Iron Fist. She has been defeated and reborn 66 times so far.
  • Only the Worthy May Pass: First, you've got to be worthy to fight Shou-Lao. Then you kind of have to survive the fight. Then you've got to be worthy enough to bear the Iron Fist, which is not guaranteed by either of the former.
  • Our Dragons Are Different: For one thing, that stuff about the "molten heart"? Not exaggeration.
  • Resurrective Immortality: Whenever she's killed she eventually revives.

    Modred the Mystic 

Modred the Mystic

Alter Ego:

Notable Aliases:

First Appearance: Marvel Chillers #1


    Victoria Montesi 

Victoria Montesi

Alter Ego:

Notable Aliases:

First Appearance:


    Louise Hastings 

Louise Hastings

Notable Aliases: Professor Hastings

First Appearance: Darkhold: Pages from the Book of Sins #1 (October, 1992)

    Samson Buchanan 

Samson Buchanan

First Appearance: Darkhold: Pages from the Book of Sins #1 (October, 1992)

    Jennifer Kale 

Jennifer Kale

Alter Ego:

Notable Aliases:

First Appearance: Adventure Into Fear #11

    Paradox 

Paradox

Alter Ego:

Notable Aliases:

First Appearance:

Villains

    Black Mariah 

Black Mariah

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/5160341_mariah.jpg

Alter Ego: Mariah Dillard

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Hero for Hire #5 (January, 1973)

Black Mariah was a drug racketeering 400-pound woman who crossed paths with Luke Cage. Cage went toe-to-toe with her and shut down her operation. She got her name from the alias of an ambulance, symbolizing the way she ran her operations.


    Billy Bob Rackham 

Billy Bob Rackham

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2044617_10_15_2011_001.jpg

Alter Ego: Albert Rackham

Debut: Luke Cage, Hero for Hire #1 (June, 1972)

Racist prison warden who terrorized Luke Cage. He was eventually busted down to guard when a reformist came to the prison. In an act of revenge, Rackham accidentally caused the process that changed Luke Cage. He would later re-appear to seek revenge, but justice prevailed with him being hit and killed by a speeding ambulance.


    Bushmaster 

Bushmaster I

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/john_mciver_earth_616_from_power_man_and_iron_fist_vol_1_67_001.jpg

Alter Ego: John McIver

Notable Aliases: John Bushmaster, Power Master

First Appearance: Iron Fist #15 (September, 1977)

John McIver, known as John Bushmaster, became a Maggia crime boss in Europe and later expanded into the United States. In the United States, he was confronted by Misty Knight, Iron Fist and Power Man. Due to an accident during a fight with Power Man, Bushmaster was transformed into "Unliving metal", which later led to his death.


  • Killed Off for Real: Killed in 1983 and has never been revived.
  • Legacy Character: After his death his brother Quincy took the Bushmaster codename, and also his son Cruz McIver

Bushmaster II

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/6991499_bushmaster2.jpg

Alter Ego: Quincy McIver

First Appearance: Captain America #310 (October, 1985)

Bushmaster is a human being with cybernetic arms as well as a cybernetic serpent's tail in place of his legs after his limbs were destroyed in an accident.


Bushmaster III

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/cruz_bushmaster_earth_616_1.jpg

Alter Ego: Cruz McIver

First Appearance: Cage #1 (April, 1992)

Cruz McIver, the son of Bushmaster (John McIver), attempted to restore his father to normal he used the family fortune to hire the Untouchables to capture people and put them through the process that Dr. Noah Burnstein used to create Luke Cage in order to perfect the process.


    Chemistro 

Chemistro I

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2633896_07530903526813068.jpg

Alter Ego: Curtis Carr

Notable Aliases: High-Tech

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Hero For Hire #12 (August, 1973)

While working as a chemist for Mainstream Motors, Curtis Carr created an "alchemy gun" capable of transmuting matter from one form to another by an unknown process (wood to glass, etc.). Horace Claymore, the company's president, was impressed until Curtis voiced his intent to keep the device. Claymore argued that since the gun was made on company time, it belonged to Mainstream. When Claymore fired him, Curtis adopted the persona of Chemistro to gain revenge and to extort his former employers.


  • Alliterative Name: Curtis Carr.
  • Cut Lex Luthor a Check: An inversion from the usual way around, where the Luthor in question becomes a criminal after being offered a legit way to make money. And then, as seen just below, he actually did take a paying job.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Eventually, Curtis went to prison, and helped Luke fight the second Chemistro. After that, he took a job at Stark Enterprises.

Chemistro II

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/arch_morton_earth_616_from_power_man_vol_1_38_0001.jpg

Alter Ego: Archibald Morton

Notable Aliases: Arch Morton

First Appearance: Power Man #37 (November, 1976)

Arch Morton was the fellow inmate of Curtis Carr, the original Chemistro, and forced Carr to reveal the secret of the alchemy gun to him. After his release, Arch tried to recreate the alchemy gun, only for it to blow up in his face, but as a result it gave his hands transformative powers.


Chemistro III

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/calvin_carr_earth_616_from_new_avengers_vol_1_55_001.jpg

Alter Ego: Calvin Carr

First Appearance: Power Man and Iron Fist #93 (June, 1983)

Calvin Carr, the brother to the original Chemistro, became the third and most well known man to use the Chemistro identity.


  • Alliterative Name: Just like his brother.
  • Anti-Magic: Calvin was able to use his chemistry gun to break the wards of Doctor Strange's Sanctum Sanctorum. Magic ain't no match for chemistry.
  • Character Death: Killed during Matt Fraction's Iron Man.
  • Legacy Character: There has been three characters to fight Cage with the identity of Chemistro.
  • Legion of Doom: Calvin was a high-profile member of the Hood's crime syndicate.
  • Rogues Gallery Transplant: Starting off as an enemy to Luke and Iron Fist, during Acts of Vengeance he goes after Iron Man, which was enough for the Mandarin to consider him one of Tony's enemies years later.

    Cheshire Cat 

Cheshire Cat

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/cheshire_earth_616.jpg

Alter Ego: Unknown

Notable Aliases: Cheshire

First Appearance: Power Man #37 (November, 1976)

An associate and trusted employee of Big Brother, the two came into conflict with Power Man when they threatened to override all computers in New York City and demanded a substantial ransom.


    Cockroach Hamilton 

Cockroach Hamilton

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/109072_83486_cockroach_hamilton.jpg

Alter Ego: Dontrell Hamilton

Notable Aliases: Cockroach, Roach

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Power Man #28 (December, 1975)

Dontrell "Cockroach" Hamilton was a hitman in New York City.


  • I Call It "Vera": Hamilton had a six-barrel shotgun, which he named "Josh", that he was very possessive of. It fired lethal ammunition blasts as well as gas.

    Coldfire 

Coldfire

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/418884_coldfire.jpg

Alter Ego: James Lucas, Jr.

Notable Aliases: Jim Lucas, Junior, James Lucas

First Appearance: Cage #3 (June, 1992)

James Lucas, Jr. is the brother of Luke Cage. He was given superpowers by the Corporation with the sole purpose of fighting Cage.


  • Playing with Fire: Coldfire is capable of turning his own body temperature into fire to shoot out of his palms. He can also turn the body temperature of someone else into flames, incinerating the person.
  • Remote Body: He is able to leave his human body and inhabit the white out plasma and control it as if it was his body.

    Comanche 

Comanche

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/1414446_comanche.jpg

Alter Ego: Darius Jones

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Hero for Hire #1 (June, 1972)

Comanche was a man Luke Cage met in prison. He was usually seen partnered with Shades. Between the two, Shades & Comanche, Comanche was the muscle.


    Cottonmouth 

Cottonmouth

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/1892426_cornell_cottonmouth_shadowland_power_man_1.jpg

Alter Ego: Cornell Stokes

Notable Aliases: Cornell Cottonmouth

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Power Man #18 (June, 1974)

A drug kingpin who had the shipment of heroin stolen from him. This resulted in the framing of Luke Cage.


  • Badass Decay: While he is still a good crime boss, his strength has been downplayed heavily.
  • One Steve Limit: He has the same codename as the member of the Serpent Society Burchell Clemens, although Clemens has indeed fought Luke Cage.
  • Scary Teeth: Sharp teeth like those of a reptile.

    Diamondback 

Diamondback

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/195635_145068_diamondback.jpg

Alter Ego: Willis Stryker

Notable Aliases: Stryker, Mr. Sky

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Hero for Hire #1 (June, 1972)

Willis Stryker, formerly friends with Luke Cage, framed Cage, who ended up in prison. Stryker was a knife specialist. He died when one of his own customized explosive knives detonated.


    El Aguila 

El Aguila

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/1733164_el_aguila.jpg

Alter Ego: Alejandro Montoya

Notable Aliases:

First Appearance: Power Man and Iron Fist #58 (August, 1979)

A modern day Robin Hood, Alejandro Montoya has the power to shoot bursts of electricity through metal conductors.


    Gideon Mace 

Gideon Mace

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/147239_75376_gideon_mace.jpg

Alter Ego: Gideon Mace

Notable Aliases: A01372712

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Hero For Hire #3 (October, 1972)

An American solider who lost his right hand during Vietnam War. He had his hand fitted for a prosthetic mace and began to recruit soldiers into his own personal army to gain revenge on the nation that had mistreated him.


  • Asshole Victim: He's eventually brutally murdered by an Eldritch Abomination for outliving any potential usefulness. Even when the abomination is defeated and the effect it has on the Mighty Avengers is undone, Mace remains completely dead.
  • It's Personal: With Hector and later Ava Alaya, the White Tiger, having killed their family.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: As your stereotypical right-wing militia nut.
  • Rogues Gallery Transplant: He's tussled with Spider-Man, but his biggest nemeses, as noted, is probably the White Tigers, for the things he did to them.
  • Would Hurt a Child: Mace, or one of his men, shot a young Ava

    Lionfang 

Lionfang

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/alejandro_cortez_earth_616_from_new_avengers_luke_cage_vol_1_2_0001.jpg

Alter Ego: Alejandro Cortez

First Appearance: Hero for Hire #13 (September, 1973)

Doctor Alejandro Cortez created a helmet that linked his mind with those of three jungle cats, giving them the ability to speak and Cortez their inhuman agility and skill.


  • The Beastmaster: Can control wild cats with his helmet.
  • Not Quite Dead: Surviving an assassination attempt by the Scourge is remarkable for a C-list character.
  • Retired Badass: He moved to Philadelphia and stopped using the identity of Lionfang a long time ago, but he is still a powerful mob enforcer with the authority to command tigers who has beaten death twice, one being against the Scourge of the Underworld himself.
  • Unexpected Character: He showed up for the first time in decades back in 2010.

    Mangler 

Mangler

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/shadrick_daniels_earth_616_from_power_man_vol_1_34_001.jpg

Alter Ego: Shadrick Daniels

First Appearance: Power Man #34 (August, 1976)

The Mangler is a wrestler who assisted his brother, the Spear, in his scheme for revenge against Noah Burstein who had experimented on their brother, Jack, while in prison. They were defeated by Luke Cage and subsequently imprisoned.


    Mister Fish 

Mister Fish I

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/1414445_mister_fish.jpg

Alter Ego: Mortimer George Norris

Notable Aliases: Mort

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Power Man #29 (April, 1975)

Mister Fish, an infamous villain from Luke Cage's rogue gallery, was a man who worked for the Maggia. During a heist he was effected by the radioactive isotope that they were stealing, and instead of killing him, he was mutated into a fish humanoid.


Mister Fish II

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/william_norris_earth_616_from_shadowland_power_man_vol_1_2.jpg

Alter Ego: William "Bill" Norris

First Appearance: Daughters of the Dragon #4 (June, 2006)

Bill Norris ended up with the same mutation and became his successor to his brother Mortimer Norris.[


  • Joke Character: He's never been treated that seriously as a threat, even back when he was first created.
  • Legacy Character: The Norris Brothers (Mortimer and Bill) share the identity of Mister Fish.

    Nightshade 

Nightshade

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/tilda_johnson_earth_616_from_occupy_avengers_vol_1_4_001.jpg

Alter Ego: Tilda Johnson

Notable Aliases: Deadly Nightshade, Doctor Nightshade, Nighthawk

First Appearance: Captain America #164 (August, 1973)

Nightshade is a biochemist with a strong interest in lycanthropy. She uses potions, manipulation and seduction as a means to get her own way and if that doesn't work she also has an army of wolves ready to tear you apart.


  • Affirmative Action Legacy: During Secret Empire, she becomes the new Nighthawk.
  • Afro Asskicker: Used to have a prominent afro before cutting it to her current short hairstyle.
  • Dark Is Not Evil: Her Nighthawk appearance is quite intimidating, but she fought against HYDRA during Secret Empire.
  • The Dragon: Was Superia's second-in-command while at the Femizons.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Kind of. After being an enemy of the Heroes for Hire for years, she became a non-official member of the Avengers when she fought against the Secret Empire to honor the Supreme Power Kyle Richmond by taking his mantle.
  • Mad Scientist: Turning people into werewolves... yeah...
  • Scary Black Woman: Not as intimidating as Nightshade, but certainly scary as the new Nighthawk.
  • Stripperiffic: Back when she was only Nightshade her outfit was very revealing. Basically, a bra and panties.
  • Take Up My Sword: Took the Nighthawk moniker after the death of Kyle Richmond.
  • Villain: Exit, Stage Left: Well, wouldn't you run from the Hulk if he'd just found out you'd lied to him?

    Pirahna Jones 

Pirahna Jones

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/raymond_jones_earth_616_from_power_man_vol_1_30_001.jpg

Alter Ego: Raymond Jones

First Appearance: Power Man #30 (April, 1976)

Crime boss and enemy of Luke Cage.


  • Scary Teeth: Like Cottonmouth his teeth are sharpened like his namesake.

    Señor Muerte 

Señor Muerte

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/phillip_garcia_earth_616.jpg

Alter Ego: Phillip Garcia

Notable Aliases:

First Appearance: Captain America #224 (August, 1978)

After Ramon's death, his younger brothers Jaime and Phillip took over his operations, and became the co-owners of their brother's gambling casinos. Jaime became "Señor Suerte" and Phillip became "Señor Muerte". Jaime was a professional thief, and Phillip was a professional assassin.


  • Legacy Character: Took the Señor Muerte codename after the death of his brother Ramón.

    Señor Suerte 

Señor Suerte I

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ramon_garcia_earth_616_from_spider_woman_vol_5_6_001.png

Alter Ego: Ramon Garcia

Notable Aliases: Señor Muerte

First Appearance: Hero For Hire #10 (June, 1973)

Ramon went by Senor Suerte on a regular. It is not until he changes into his killer costume that goes by Senor Muerte. After his death his younger brothers, Phillip and Jaime, split the alias amongst themselves. Phillip took the Muerte title, and Jaime took Suerte.


  • Unexplained Recovery: After being dead since 1973, he somehow reappeared alive during Spider-Woman Vol 5 #5 in 2015.

Señor Suerte II

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/jaime_garcia_earth_616.jpg

Alter Ego: Jaime Garcia

First Appearance: Power Man/Iron Fist #56 (April, 1979)

After Ramon's death, his younger brothers Jaime and Phillip took over his operations, and became the co-owners of their brother's gambling casinos. Jaime became "Señor Suerte" and Phillip became "Señor Muerte". Jaime was a professional thief, and Phillip was a professional assassin.


  • Legacy Character: His brother Phillip took the Señor Muerte moniker, while he used his brother Ramón's original codename of Señor Suerte.

    Shades 

Shades

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/415955_shades_4.jpg

Alter Ego: Hernan Alvarez

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Hero for Hire #1 (June, 1972)

Herman "Shades" Alvarez was a criminal that Luke Cage had once befriended and fought in his youth. He is the father of Victor Alvarez (Power Man) and partner of Comanche. He is the "brains" of the duo.


    Spear 

Spear

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/1414448_spear.jpg

Alter Ego: Jasper Daniels

First Appearance: Power Man #28 (February, 1976)

Luke Cage villain armed with a spear gun.


    Steeplejack 

Steeplejack

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/688083_anim009.jpg

Alter Ego: Jake Mallard

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Power Man #18 (April, 1974)

Three men have taken the identity of Steeplejack with the first two having battled Power Man and Ms. Marvel on separate occasions.


  • Legacy Character: After the death of Mallard, Maxwell Plumm took the costume and became the second Steeplejack, until his death by the Scourge of the Underworld during the Bar with No Name massacre. The third claimed the identity after it was sold to him by Roderick Kingsley.
  • Secondary Color Nemesis: The Steeplejack costume is green.

    White Jennie 

White Jennie

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/5160345_jeny.jpg

Alter Ego: Jennifer Royce

Notable Aliases: Jennie Royce

First Appearance: Power Man and Iron Fist #56 (April, 1979)

An employee of the Heroes for Hire team when Luke Cage and Iron Fist just started their business.


    Crane Mother 

Crane Mother

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/crane_mother_earth_616.png

First Appearance: Immortal Iron Fist #4 (May, 2007)

Crane Mother is a mystic and ruler of Ku'n-Zi, one of the Legendary Cities of Heaven.

    Death-Sting 

Death-Sting

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/175131_182037_death_sting.jpg

Alter Ego: Miranda Rand-K'ai

First Appearance: Iron Fist #2 (December, 1975)

Iron Fist's half-sister.

    Harold Meachum 

Harold Meachum

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2053853_meachum.png

First Appearance: Marvel Premiere #15

Wendell Rand's former business partner. He betrayed Wendell Rand in hopes of taking the company and Wendell's wife for himself.

    Joy Meachum 

Joy Meachum

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2166312_joy_meachum_close_up_edited_power_man_and_iron_fist_1.jpg

First Appearance: Marvel Premiere #18

Joy Meachum has served as head of the Ward/Meachum Corporation. She is a daughter to Harold Meachum and niece of Ward Meachum. She initially blamed Iron Fist for the death of her father but has since then gotten over it and even maintained an on and off relationship with him.

    Junzo Muto 

Junzo Muto

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/573409_junzo_profile.jpg

First Appearance: The New Warriors #5

Junzo Muto is a former leader of the Hand and is one of the most deadly martial artists in the Marvel Universe.

    Master Khan 

Master Khan

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/108250_21340_master_khan.jpg

Alter Ego: Khan

First Appearance: Marvel Premiere #22

A sinister sorcerer "god" of K'un L'un. He has fought Iron Fist on several occasions.
  • Dark Is Evil: He's an evil sorcerer that dresses in a black cloak.
  • A Villain Named Khan: He's only known as Master Khan and he's a major enemy of Iron Fist.
  • Rogues Gallery Transplant: His final story arc and death was against Namor of all people (who Khan only went after because he was pissed off that the Sub-Mariner had saved Danny from the H'ylthri).

    Mr. Xao 

Mr. Xao

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/3707927_xao.jpg

First Appearance: Immortal Iron Fist #1 (January, 2007)

Conspired with Hydra to break the barrier to K'un-Lun. The Immortal Weapons traced Xao's family lineage back to The Lightning Lords of Nepal. Dog Brother #1 and Orson Randall tangled with them in the past.

    Sabretooth 

Sabretooth

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wolverines_vol_1_1_dellotto_variant_textless.jpg

Alter Ego: Victor Creed

Notable Aliases: Slasher, El Tigre, Der Schlächter ("The Butcher" in German), Wolverine

First Appearance: Iron Fist #14 (August 1977)

See the Sabretooth page for more info.


    Scimitar 

Scimitar

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/87325_169575_scimitar.jpg

First Appearance: Iron Fist #5

Scimitar comes from a long generation of warriors and claims to be the master of bladed weapons. Scimitar's most hated foe is Iron Fist, but he also has come into conflict with members of Excalibur when he joined the Weaponeers.

    Scythe 

Scythe

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2053684_scythe2.png

First Appearance: Marvel Premiere #16 (July, 1974)

Scythe was a mercenary intent on collecting a 10 million dollar bounty that had been placed on Iron Fist when young Iron Fist was making his first trip as an adult to New York City. Scythe fell short and was quickly defeated by the Living Weapon.


    Steel Serpent 

Steel Serpent

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/327860_41686_steel_serpent.jpg

Alter Ego: Davos

Notable Aliases: Iron Fist, Steel Phoenix

First Appearance: Iron Fist #1 (November, 1975)

The son of Lei Kung who tried to challenge Shou-Lao illegally and was exiled. He left swearing revenge.
  • Antagonistic Offspring: Resentment towards his father is the reason he became Danny's enemy.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: His battle against Prince of Orphans was completely one-sided against him, all as payback for the way he fought against Tiger's Beautiful Daughter.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Through character development, he eventually manages to accept that he's been manipulated, and as an extension he's not as smart and skilled as he sees himself as, eventually helping the other Immortal Weapons fight off Xao's forces and helping Kun-L'un rebuild after the Army of Thunder's revolution.

    The One 

The One

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/hjtxvzdxhnyad3utc_i5sb0ddhba_otkov6e9zxycrms7wptuvrtmbqvz39wmlfr2ubafj2z6gxalieqclprk0__wg3yj0ilaekiba3dy8cib2ieqeqv.jpg

Alter Ego: Shu-Hu

Notable Aliases: The Divine Wolf of the House of the Wolf, Lightning (English translation)

First Appearance: Iron Fist Vol 5 #2 (June, 2017)


The One (Robot)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/shu_hu_marvel_comics_iron_fist_a.jpg

Alter Ego:

Notable Aliases: Lightning (English translation)

First Appearance: Marvel Premiere #15 (May, 1974)


    Ward Meachum 

Ward Meachum

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/3864694_964177_ward_meachum1.jpg

Notable Aliases: Marvel Premiere #19

Ward Meachum was a brother to Harold Meachum and uncle to Joy Meachum. Following the death of his brother, Ward assisted Joy in seeking vengeance from Iron Fist. They assumed the martial artist had killed Harold. Actually Harold was only humiliated by Danny Rand and had committed suicide.

    Zhou Cheng 

Zhou Cheng

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/1251688_440px_zhou.jpg

Notable Aliases: The Immortal Iron Fist #17


Miscellaneous

    Galacta 

Galacta

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/7c6ec42da7a5a033df91f13aff8f4a84.jpg

Galactus' daughter, who lives on Earth. Refuses to eat whole planets and instead targets dangerous organisms such as alien invaders. This diet keeps her weak and leaves her human-sized.


Alternative Title(s): Marvel Comics Shang Chi, Marvel Comics Blue Marvel, Marvel Comics Jim Hammond

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report