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YMMV for the Franchise:

  • Accidental Aesop: The reason for the Flip-Flop of God regarding Cloak and Dagger's origin; the "latent mutations" were added because the original origin had the implication that drugs can give you superpowers.
  • Adaptation Displacement:
    • Younger Marvel fans, particularly those introduced to the major characters through the modern films, may be shocked when they find out that not only is Samuel L. Jackson's portrayal based on an Ultimate/"alternate" Nick Fury, the original Nick Fury is white.
      616 Nick Fury: "I bust my hump in comics for 40 years, and he note  gets the movie!"
    • Blade. More people are familiar with the movies than with the comic book character, up to the point where Blade was all but turned into an African-American in the books to better match up with Wesley Snipes' portrayal. In the comics, he was canonically Black British for years beforehand.
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  • Archive Panic: According to Complete Marvel Reading Order, Marvel has put out some 17,000 "core" stories/issues in 50 years, or 22,000 if you want to include obscure stuff as well. And that's still discounting a lot of stories that are clearly out of continuity or just take place in the past, and the fact that they constantly produce new ones. Most of them can easily be read via Marvel Unlimited, but completionists obviously better not have a life.
  • Awesome Art: Paul Gulacy's artwork in his run on Shang-Chi with Doug Moench is considered to be revolutionary for its day, highlighted by the fight between Shang-Chi and The Cat. The panels bring a photorealistic quality with frequent use of angles and varying panel sizes to showcase movement and action.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Jim McCann and Brian Michael Bendis essentially reinvented Mockingbird when she reappeared following Secret Invasion. She had not been well-served by her previous arcs in the 1980s, but McCann in particular reinforced her espionage training and ruthlessness.
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    • The Thanosi retcon in Infinity Abyss.
    • Al Ewing handwaved Thanos' use as a throwaway Starter Villain in Civil War II by having Thanos explain in The Ultimates that he let himself be easily defeated by Captain Marvel's team in order to be brought in their HQ.
  • Awesome Ego:
    • Ultron's a huge egomaniac, but he's also absolutely brilliant and insanely powerful.
    • Thanos is entirely aware of his great power and intellect and flouts it with incredible bravado that would rival Doctor Doom.
  • Badass Decay: Though largely a street-level hero, Darkhawk is one of the most powerful street-level heroes and can take on whole gangs single-handed. During Arena he gets his armor stolen in issue 3 with barely a fight and spends most of the story on the sidelines. Of course this because Darkhawk at his full strength could've effortlessly broken Arcade's whole scheme.
    • Several years before that, he had his armor stolen by Phil Urich, a D-lister whose major accomplishment was stealing the Green Goblin costume and equipment and trying to use them to begin a superhero career.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Shang-Chi seems to have a polarizing reception in China, as evidenced by their social media's responses to the announcement of a Shang-Chi movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Some expressed derision due to the character's link with the Yellow Peril stigma associated with Fu Manchu. Others seem to like him enough to eagerly discuss the potential of actors rumored for the role.
    • Ultimate Fury is either a badass, awesome leader guy, or a manipulative jerkass who only cares about himself. Depending on the Writer, both is true.
    • Marcus Fury, 616 Fury's son who's an expy of Ultimate Fury, has been getting heat from portion of the fanbase for being 'a cheap way to cash in on the film' or praised for being 'a great way to bring Fury back to his roots'. The fact that he's all but replacing the original Fury hasn't helped matters.note  Some people are hoping its a Dork Age and will be ignored later, some are hoping that, if it is a Dork Age, that Marcus!Fury will stick around afterwards. Although Secret Avengers has shown that he isn't very much like either Fury, particularly when it comes to feeling guilty about the work SHIELD does.
      • This has heated even more up by Original Sin killing off Dum Dum Dugan after retconning that he's been a series of LMDs all this time that merely think they've been taking the same immortality drugs that Fury has kept around because of some desperate need to keep his buddy around, as well as ending with Fury trapped on the moon as the Watcher's replacement.
    • Thanos. You either think he's a tragic figure or a selfish mass murderer, love him for being a Magnificent Bastard or accuse him of being a boring Invincible Villain and Creator's Pet, etc. Whatever the Mad Titan might be, he's certainly one of Marvel's most debated villains, but also one of its most popular.
    • Hannibal King and Bible John, have been disliked since forever for reminding them too much of Luke Cage and Iron-Fist. This also extended to Blade himself in Tomb Of Dracula but subsided since his movie trilogy. Still, Hannibal King has his own fans for kick starting the Vampire Detective sub genre, while Bible John has his for making Blade less of a Jerkass.
  • Best Known for the Fanservice: The Frank Cho Shanna the She-Devil series.
  • Broken Base:
    • The quality of the Frank Cho helmed Shanna the She-Devil miniseries has fans split. Its detractors often cite its lack of continuity and Shanna's frequent Out of Character moments, while its defenders tend to cite Frank Cho's art as its saving grace.
    • Mockingbird #8 reveals that Bobbi wasn't drugged and raped by the Phantom Rider, instead she cheated on Clint with him and just let Clint believe she had been raped, because it was easier for Clint to believe that than to believe that he had been cheated on. Rape aside, fans are divided on whether this is a good or bad thing as some feel this changes Bobbi from being a strong survivor to a cheating wife. In addition, Bobbi casually waves off the fact that she killed Phantom Rider despite their encounter now being consensual. - on the other hand, others think this erases a somewhat cheap piece of Rape as Drama, even if the execution was botched, though then others argue that Bobbi's rape was actually handled well for the time, and find the implication that she can't be a strong hero if she's been raped is quite insulting towards rape and sexual assault survivors.
    • In general, Bobbi's recent Straw Feminist characterisation has been controversial, following Chelsea Cain's brief run, and her appearances in other books like Dan Slott's Spider-Man and Unstoppable Wasp. As such some fans (either due to agreeing with the politics or simply already adoring her character prior to this political push) like this about her, while others (either due to being anti-feminist or even feminists/social justice advocates who dislike the handling of this aspect) really dislike this. Cain's ongoing and Slott's manMan are particularly sour points due to being the most Straw Feminist examples, while Unstoppable Wasp plays it more as just You Go, Girl!.
    • Which Nick Fury, Classic or Ultimate, should be considered the Nick Fury. This has been a massive debate ever since the Ultimate likeness has supplanted classic in just about every media adaptation. The fact that Nick Fury Jr. was created as a 616 counterpart heated up the debate even more.
    • After seeing the Badass Decay that happened to Darkseid, which ultimately required his very own Cosmic Retcon event to undo, some see Starlin's monitoring and retconning of Thanos's poorer showings as a necessary evil to keep the same from happening to him. Others have no desire to see a Darkseid-type villain in Marvel Comics.
  • Can't Un-Hear It:
  • Continuity Lock-Out: Frequently, and is, along with the DC Universe, one of the biggest poster-franchises for this trope.
  • Creator's Favorite: After his original miniseries, Adam Brashear / Blue Marvel only showed up in works that Kevin Grevioux was writing, up until Al Ewing (who also seems to like the character) used the character as part of the Mighty Avengers lineup in volume 3, and later in The Ultimates (2015) and its follow-up series, Ultimates 2. Very few other creators have ever touched the character.
  • Creator's Pet:
    • The Sentry. Writers love using him, fans hate seeing him. If they wanted to see Superman with mental problems, they would've just gone to Superdickery.
      • The Good News: He's finally dead! The Bad News: despite being utterly useless for most of his comics existence and a Face–Heel Turn that also revealed he was an Eldritch Abomination and saw him try to destroy the world, his send-off issue was nothing but the entire cast of Marvelverse heroes waxing poetic about how wonderful he was and how he'd made their lives better in flashback retcons. The hamfisted attempt at Alas, Poor Scrappy was not well-received.
      • Rogue had sex with him first, despite the fact that was established in the pages of Xtreme X-Men that Rogue lost her virginity to Gambit when the two lost their powers.
      • Ben Grimm told how Sentry stopped him from killing the Wrecker, because Heroes don't kill, no matter which crimes the villain committed. Hum, hello? Just after awakening in New Avengers, Sentry carried Carnage into space and ripped him. Of course Carnage recovered, but Sentry clearly intended to kill him, despite Carnage not being a serious threat for someone as powerful as Sentry. Spider-Man always overcame any temptation to kill Carnage, even if he's one of his most fearful nemesis.
      • He's better at everything than everyone else, better at molecular manipulation than Molecule Man, for instance (it is debatable as to whether this was the Sentry or the Void, an issue even further complicated by the fact that no one really knows what the hell either of them are). All this may come with the territory, given that he's heavily implied to be Death and all that...
      • He's a perfect example of an interesting character/idea turned into a walking plot device.
      • This was dialed down somewhat following his return in Uncanny Avengers, when he returned without the Void, and with a new and entertaining form of insanity/nature as a Humanoid Abomination as one of the Horsemen of Death, then in Doctor Strange, which was followed by a surprisingly well-received miniseries that resulted in him merging 'Robert Reynolds', 'the Sentry', and 'the Void' into a new cheerful, somewhat psychotic Well-Intentioned Extremist persona that identifies itself as the true Sentry.
    • In issues written by Jim Starlin that primarily feature Thanos, he's always written so that he would almost never lose for real against anyone. It's either his own subconscious desire to lose or it was a clone. This tends to annoy fans of other characters or even fans of Thanos who felt it was getting too much.
  • Crosses the Line Twice: Thanos Annual #1, where Thanos literally makes a point of tormenting a random guy every year on his birthday for his entire life in increasingly cruel and murderous ways, just because he can.
  • Designated Hero:
    • A growing sentiment thanks to the "hero vs hero" Crisis Crossover event series like Civil War and Avengers vs X-Men, along with plenty of other morally dubious acts has led to many people finding it hard to root for many of Marvel's heroes (with the exception of more lighthearted ones).
    • The Illuminati. A secret society of wealthy, powerful and connected superheroes deciding to manipulate world events from behind the scenes for the "Greater Good" sounds like the villains of an Alternate Universe story from The '80s, so trying to push them as flawed but well meaning do-gooders was always going to be tricky to say the least.
  • Die for Our Ship: Because The Avengers has been so successful, and as such been seen by many who never read the comics, Bobbi has recently been getting slated by fans of BlackHawk/Clintasha for the slight of being Clint's wife in the comics. From being villainized to becoming an Alpha Bitch in High School A.U. fics, its now almost impossible to find a fanfic that includes Bobbi that doesn't involve her being attacked and bashed, sadly. Likely this will be mitigated somewhat by her joining Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.
    • Saying that, some Clint/Bobbi fans have not taken kindly to Jessica moving in on him. Its generally not so bad, since a lot of them liked her before Bendis began pairing the two, they just want her out of the way. Doesn't help that Jess is replacing her on the Secret Avengers, and its been confirmed that there's no plans with her right now, meaning she's stuck in limbo before someone brings her back.
    • In Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Lance Hunter, who in the MCU is now Bobbi's ex-husband, has been getting some flack from Hawkingbird shippers for taking Clint's role as the ex-husband. Not helped by him being fairly similar to Clint, and the two having some similarities in how their relationship with Bobbi is portrayed.
      • Interestingly though, Hawkeye's wife has not received much hatred, or at least not as vocal of hatred as those against Lance Hunter, at least not from Hawkingbird shippers (less can be said for other Clint shippers on that front). The fact people seemed to expect her and the kids to die in Civil War probably explains that.
  • Dork Age: Civil War and Avengers Vs X-Men. Some people are being quick to also add the 2016 Secret Wars (because of it ending the Ultimate universe and bringing its characters to the 616) and the second Civil War to this.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: The Marvel Cinematic Universe version of Thanos tends to get a lot of this, despite being perhaps the greatest mass murderer in all of fiction.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Amongst the villains: Batroc, Shocker, Baron Helmut Zemo, Mr. Negative, the Hood, Ghost, Taskmaster, 8-Ball, Roderick Kingsley, and Boomerang.
    • Amongst the heroes: Blade, Deadpool (well, Anti-Hero more than anything), Hannibal King, Hercules, Darkhawk, Iron Fist, the Thing, Moon Knight, War Machine, Hawkeye, the Great Lakes Avengers (especially Squirrel Girl), Sleepwalker, Nova (primarily Richard Rider), Ms. Marvel (both Carol Danvers and Kamala Khan), Scarlet Spider, Venom, Agent Venom and Spider-Gwen.
    • Amongst the supporting casts: Mary Jane Watson (no matter how much the executive wished otherwise), J. Jonah Jameson, Aracely, Everett Ross, Anna Maria Marconi, Amadeus Cho, Maria Hill, Bob Agent Of Hydra, Doop, Dr. Nemesis, Kate Bishop, the Warriors Three, and Jessica Jones.
    • Darkhawk is an Ensemble Darkhorse in the greater Marvel universe. He's a C-lister at best (hell, one of the few superhero teams he's joined was called the League of Losers) but fans love him and wish he was used more.
    • The Hood has a surprisingly large fanbase, considering how new the character is.
    • Though only because he's not quite made the transition onto Breakout Character. Taskmaster is rather popular with fans, and has a large following himself, but he's never been exposed much. Iron Man & Captain America: Heroes United, Marvel vs. Capcom 3, Ultimate Spider-Man, and Spider-Man (PS4) are his only outside media and he's never had an ongoing, despite positive reception to his various miniseries' and guest appearances. When Secret Avengers was announced as being rebooted for Marvel NOW!, Taskmaster was probably the most well received of the characters listed. To wit, when he appeared as a character players could unlock in a tournament for another character (Rocket Racoon) in Marvel: Avengers Alliance, many of the players competed just to get Taskmaster. For further perspective, when it was revealed that the Big Bad of the 2020 Black Widow movie was Taskmaster, after many years of fans wanting him in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, a great amount of fans were substantially more interested in seeing Tasky on the big screen than the movie's titular Breakout Character.
      • Taskmaster's short lived Udon-Designed costume, which resembles a heather/sport blue sweatsuit and a hockey mask, is a rather popular design. Considering the number of custom figures and costumes made of it, and the fact that he's often drawn in this outfit, for some who hear about the character before reading him in a comic, it comes as a surprise to know he only wore it for a short while, unfortunately.
    • Daimon Hellstrom. The character's had a few series, and appeared in a handful of books, but he's never branched past C-lister. Doesn't stop him often being a scene-stealing fan-favourite when he does.
    • Mockingbird has gained a lot of hype after she was revealed to be joining the show's cast for Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Season 2. CBR's SDCC announcement poll actually has her announcement as the highest rated announcement of the second day, even beating Sam Raimi's Evil Dead TV series announcement, The Walking Dead season 5 trailer reveal, and Guardians of the Galaxy sequel announcements. When she appeared, it became the most highly-regarded episode of the show, and has instantly became a fan-favourite, even among people not familiar with the comics.
    • She was also this in Secret Avengers; despite having almost no advertisements and being one of the only three characters in the story who weren't in the films yet despite the vary blatant pandering to film fans (the other two being Taskmaster and Daisy Johnson, both of whom were no slouches in fan acceptance either), she easily attracted the most fan attention due to being a fun character who got a good few moments to shine in the earlier issues. She arguably became the Breakout Character due to the amount of focus she got later, including an arc focusing on her, but this ended when she was Put On The Bus when a creative team change happened.
    • When The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes! featured her for an episode, fan response was so positive, the writers decided to bring her back for the second season with a much bigger role in their take on the Secret Invasion story arc, and took the place of Spider-Woman in the story.
  • Epileptic Trees: There have been several made of the fact that Thaons's chin looks similar to those of Skrulls. In an alternate universe, it was revealed that his mother was one in disguise.
    • This actually has an in-universe explanation. The godlike aliens known as the Celestials went to various different planets and created on two different strains of races on them, the ugly shapeshifting Deviants and The Beautiful Elite Physical God race called the Eternals (humans are a separate but related species predating both; mutants are an offshoot of separate Celestial experiments on humans). The Skrulls are descendants of alien Deviants while Thanos is a descendant of the Earth Eternals who was born with a mutation that makes him resemble the Deviants. Since his design is based on the unrelated DC character Darkseid, this is a marvellous case of Canon Welding.
  • Evil Is Cool:
    • Ultron. He's a killer AI who can challenge the Earth's Mightiest Heroes as well as a brilliant Evil Genius.
    • Thanos. Through all of his interpretations, the one constant through most of them is that he is by far the most almighty, tyrannical Blood Knight of the universe - something he always loves to show with massive strides. Even in his earliest appearances, he takes the concept of "an obsessed guy trying to win over a girl", jumps it up to a galactic scale, makes the girl Death herself, and still makes it much less comically stupid, and far more absolutely awesome.
    • The Masters of Evil is basically a whole club of badass villains.
  • Fair for Its Day: Shang-Chi, in the original Master of Kung Fu comics, was a heroic Asian character who didn't need a white character to fight his battles and was shown to be exceptionally competent at his work. However, he was also the son of the original Yellow Peril villain Fu Manchu, would occasionally speak with Ice-Cream Koan littered monologues, boasted goldenrod skin in his earliest appearances, and his main ability is "being really good at martial arts". Later writers emphasized the former aspects of Shang, while giving him a more realistic-looking design, and downplaying his connections to Yellow Peril styled villains. As Marvel lost the rights to Fu Manchu, they renamed Shang-Chi's father Zheng Zu (during Ed Brubaker's Secret Avengers run) and kept his narrative function intact but used him rarely.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: While Clint is probably Mockingbird's most popular shipping partner thanks to once being an Official Couple with him, she's got quite a few people who instead ship her with Spider-Man, Black Widow, and Bucky Barnes.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • With DC Comics, which is probably one of, if not the most famous fandom rivalry known to man. Debates on who has the better stories, who has the more well-rounded characters, which treats the talent better, and of course, the inevitable movie successes can get bloodied, and annoying for people who don't care about this sort of thing.
    • An internal one is developing from fans of the comics towards the films. While it's hardly the first time adaptations have influenced the comics, these fans believe Marvel is letting the films turn into a tail that wags the dog at the expense of drastically rear-ending previously established characterizations, storylines, and design elements, sometimes for entire series.
      • The complaints have been heavily against the way Marvel short-changes comics and brands simply because they don't have the rights to it, and the film studios that do have those rights don't want to give the goose that lays the golden egg. One controversial example is how the X-Men are transparently being downgraded in the Marvel Universe simply because of Fox's X-Men Film Series, while Fantastic Four, the comic on which Marvel was founded, was outright canceled (with some noting that it's analogous to DC cutting off Superman comics simply because his recent films have been weak). With the acquisition of Fox's properties and Marvel Studios confirming plans to integrate the two teams into the MCU, however, this is looking to change.
    • Thanos fans vs. Darkseid fans.
    • Starlin's Thanos fans vs. Hickman's Thanos fans.
    • MCU Thanos fans vs. comics Thanos fans.
  • Fanon Discontinuity:
    • The Frank Cho Shanna the She-Devil series. Even fans of it prefer to treat it as its own separate thing.
    • Sam Wilson was never a pimp, ever. (As of All New Captain America this is the official canon, explicitly stating that the pimp origin as false memories implanted by the Red Skull to make Sam question his identity.)
    • For Jim Starlin's fans, every comic not written by Starlin that depicts Thanos as a by the numbers Evil Overlord and punching bag for the heroes tends to be dismissed.
    • Thanos's appearance in the Avengers Assemble miniseries is a notable example. Last he was seen, he was raging out of control in the Cancerverse, he inexplicably shows up, steals a Cosmic Cube, fights the Avengers and the Guardians of the Galaxy, uses the Cube to humiliate the Elders of the Universe for some reason (including the In-Betweener who's an avatar of Chaos and Order, and the Stranger; neither of whom are Elders of the Universe yet are referred to as such), merges with the Cube to become a god, only to easily lose it and then gets arrested by said "Elders". Many fans mistook the miniseries as a tie-in to the Avengers film (since the team line-up is the same as the film's), and thought that was an alternative continuity. It doesn't help that the comic has Iron Man say "We barely know anything about Thanos," despite the Avengers fighting him on numerous occasions and having extensive files on him, and Iron Man was the very first superhero to battle him. Another thing was stating Thanos' goal was "He wants the Earth. He's always wanted the Earth." when in nearly every single prior encounter Thanos has ignored the Earth entirely.
    • Marc Guggenheim's run on Blade brought about some very...unpopular ideas for the character. Blade curing Spider-man of vampirism by shooting him the knees. The Continuity Snarl created from the suggestion Blade has always had all of his vampire powers except Detect Evil. Blade not only carrying vampire blood on his person, but threatening to turn Wolverine with it. The mere suggestion Lucas Cross might be Blade's father. That Blade seems to be modeled after Mike Tyson.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Storm/Wolverine (especially after the Storm/Black Panther marriage broke up on rather harsh terms), Rictor/Shatterstar, Rogue/Gambit, Peter/Mary Jane (after One More Day and in place of Carlie or Silk), Hawkeye/Mockingbird (instead of Hawkeye/Spider-Woman)
    • Non-canon: Professor X/Magneto, Iron Man/Captain America, Ms. Marvel/Spider-Woman, Thor/Loki.
  • Foe Yay:
    • Eddie Brock sure is obsessed with Spider-Man...
    • Mr. Hyde's obsession with the Cobra, his former partner in crime, verges on this.
    • Norman Osborn with... just about every hero he's ever fought. A common description of him is "a walking Amber Alert".
    • And then, of course, there's Dr. Doom's obsession with RIIIIICCCCCHHHHHHHHAAAARRRDS.
    • One might often get this impression when Thanos interacts with Adam Warlock.
      • His Infinity Revelation graphic novel has a scene where he fights Ronan and describes the pleasure he takes in beating the Kree hero to be almost orgasmic.
  • Fridge Brilliance:
    • The people in the Marvel Universe are constantly shown to value security over freedom, taking up anyone who claims they can provide that safety even if they're obviously supervillains and show a relentless hatred to anything that even possibly could threaten it like Mutants. You'd probably be too if you lived in a Crapsack World where there's battles between supervillains and superheros going on somewhere constantly and causing mass destruction. Not to mention the Earth being nearly destroyed and/or invaded by aliens every other week. They're sick and tired of putting up with this crap but unable to actually do anything about it. As a result they pile on their support to absolutely anyone who claims to be able to put an end to this crap just on the off chance someone at some point actually does.
    • Phil Urich's descent into insanity and his Face–Heel Turn actually make a lot more sense than you'd think when you consider that people who take the Goblin formula often suffer from mental instability. Roderick Kingsley modified the serum he took so it wouldn't drive him crazy... but Phil wasn't so lucky.
  • Fridge Logic: For Captain Universe. The powers make sense, but why the costume? Why does a cosmic force care what its host wears? It is the Rule of Perception; We see it in a superhero spandex costume because that's how we perceive things. Aliens don't necessarily see it that way. King in Black all but states that the host gets to choose his or her form.
  • Friendly Fandoms: Cloak and Dagger fans and Runaways fans have a longstanding and deep bond stemming from their guest appearance in the original Runaways maxiseries. Alternate versions of Ty and Tandy even became Runaways themselves in Runaways (2015). This has also carried over to their respective shows.
  • Growing the Beard: When Jim Steranko had Nick Fury shave his scraggly beard off that became the sign that the comic was taking its own innovative path.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: A driving force of Fury's actions in the MAX miniseries are the fact that he has run out of wars to fight and must scrounge for armed conflict (like being loaned out to the DEA to bring down drug manufacturers). He is desperate to have some sort of battle to fight to escape from his crummy domestic life. The first issue came out in November 2001 but it was clearly written before 9/11. Within a few months, Fury would have his war.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Shang-Chi's interest in Fleetwood Mac became this after Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 made prominent use of "The Chain", quoted in this panel of Master of Kung-Fu.
  • Ho Yay:
    • Iron Man and Captain America.
    • On the Les Yay side of things, Carol Danvers has some with Jessica Drew.
  • Idiot Plot: Tony convenes the initial meeting of The Illuminati to say that the Kree Skrull War would have been less of a mess if Earth's heroes had done a better job of sharing information with each other. Fair enough. So the solution they all come up with is... to agree not to share useful information with anyone except each other. Because... reasons. This bit of pointless illogic eventually ends up destroying almost all of reality. Nice job, guys.
  • Iron Woobie: Mockingbird. Lets see...Before she got married, she was in a coma after an explosion, and decided to fake her death so her mother and brother don't have to deal with the dangers of her life. She was drugged and raped when lost in time, leading her to allow the man responsible to die. Then the spirit of her rapist came to her husband and gave him a half story, making it sound like it was a cold blooded kill, resulting in her and Clint's marriage to break down. Just as she was filing the divorce papers, she was abducted by the Skrulls, who played mind games with her at first (with two skrulls using the identities of her teammates so they could try to trick her into sleeping with one), before leaving her on a Skrull planet. She spent years being hunted by them until they found her and tortured her, ending with her killing a Skrull with her bare hands as it took the form of her husband. She eventually escaped but found herself unable to fully adapt to all the changes to the world and had to relive past issues with her now-ex husband (who believed the two were still married). After reuniting with Clint, however, the spirit of her rapist comes back, while Clint's well intentioned attempt to help her resulting in her mom and brother finding out the truth, leading the former to get shot, and the latter to declare he wishes she really was dead, putting her on a slippery slope that ends with the two breaking up again. Then, she gets shot on a mission, to which she nearly died, and the only way to save her leaves her immortal, meaning that, unless they gain immortality as well, she will outlive all of her friends. For someone just barely out of the C-Lister category, she's got one shitload of issues.
  • It Was His Sled: Believe it or not, Ultron's very being used to be this trope. When he was first introduced, posing as a mysterious mastermind known as the Crimson Cowl, he was initially presented as Actually a Doombot used by Jarvis as a decoy, only to reveal later Jarvis was innocent and the real villain was the alleged decoy. Back when the comic came out, this was a huge twist, but nowaday, Ultron has become such a popular character people are actually more familiar with him as his true self than as the Crimson Cowl alias.
  • Jerkass Woobie: Besides Eddie Brock, a lot of the villains are this trope. Notable examples include Baron Helmut Zemo, Dr. Octopus, Magneto, and Ghost.
  • Les Yay: Mockingbird and Black Widow. When they worked together briefly in one story, they both couldn't help but think that the other is pretty, while Natasha once kissed her to free her from being controlled by brainwashing nanites (and admits later that she didn't have to kiss her, and there were alternatives), and was fairly caring towards her when her mind was breaking down thanks to what happens in Secret Avengers. The two don't spend much time together, but when they do they tend to have chemistry. May be a case of If It's You, It's Okay.
    • Bobbi and Janet Van Dyne, The Wasp, moreso. Admittedly Janet has this with virtually everyone, but besides the fact Janet was the only Avengers besides Clint who was shown to remember her after her death, the two are always shown very chummy. The apex is Unstoppable Wasp Volume 2, where the two are more-or-less co-parenting Nadia and Ying (and the rest of GIRL Labs), and lampshade the fact they're practically a married couple (the only reminder of their heterosexuality being that Janet was dating Tony Stark at the time).
  • Love to Hate:
    • Ultron's possibly one of the most evil characters in the Marvel universe, and fans love him because of it. Imagine someone with the intelligence of Hank Pym, only completely amoral and basically immortal.
    • When written well, Mephisto's irredeemable sadism makes him this trope.
  • Memetic Badass:
  • Memetic Loser:
    • No matter how monstrous and ruthless M.O.D.O.K. is portrayed, there will always be fans to laugh about how utterly ridiculous he looks. There is a reason most of his animated adaptations portray him as more of a goof. Some of the comics have acknowledged this, notably how Gwenpool, early in her solo series, reacted to him as if he was the fanon version of him and got a very nasty shock.
    • Thanos's Marvel Cinematic Universe incarnation got this at first, since he gave up and promptly lost the only Infinity Stone he had, and every minion or ally he had in subsequent appearances ultimately betrayed him in the same movies they're introduced in. Avengers: Infinity War, however, quickly rectified this to very brutal effect.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Thanos's history with Madame Death has led to the term "friendzoned by Death".
    • His MCU incarnation became a Fountain of Memes after Avengers: Infinity War. He's so popular that a sort of "Thanos culture" has developed around him, with nearly every line he says becoming a meme. Just look at how much he's mentioned on Memes.Avengers Infinity War and Memes.Avengers Endgame.
    • Whenever discussing how powerful someone is, it is common for people to leave comments describing someone as one of "Top 10 characters who can beat Thanos (with or without the Infinity Gauntlet)", usually as an obvious joke.
  • Moment of Awesome: The Hood shot Wolverine. IN. THE. BALLS.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • The Sentry joining freakin' Norman Osborn in the first place, later killing Ares.
    • Ultron was always a serious and dangerous villain, but when he destroyed an entire country by himself, he cemented himself as pure evil. It got worse when he headed off into space.
    • If you prefer more personal and small moments for this trope, then Ultron mind-controlling Victor and killing his mother will do the trick.
    • For many, Fury Sr. sending Captain America, Spider-Man, Luke Cage, Daredevil and Wolverine to Latveria to carry out the unauthorised assassination of Von Bardas, because she was supplying villains with technology. This could have started a war with Latveria, and resulted in a lot of deaths. The fact that he then used mindwiping technology on them so they wouldn't remember it, which resulted in Luke Cage being unable to protect himself from an attack he had no idea was coming, which could have killed him, and left him in a coma (his girlfriend, who was pregnant at the time, was also there when the apartment exploded).
    • If that wasn't bad enough, him saving J.T. James' life, just to let him go so that he will fall to his death minutes later, then simply telling Daisy (J.T.'s girlfriend and the closest thing that Fury had to a daughter) that J.T. didn't make it, and completely forgetting to tell her that Fury himself killed him, is definitely one.
  • My Real Daddy:
    • Wendell Vaughn was created by Roy Thomas, John Buscema, and Don Glut, but the reason anyone remembers him is because of Mark Gruenwald.
    • Although Darkhawk was created by Tom DeFalco, it was actually written by Danny Fingeroth for its entire run.
    • Mark Gruenwald in the 80s deserves credit for taking Barbara "Bobbi" Morse, a minor SHIELD agent character who had fallen into Comic-Book Limbo, and reinventing her as a costumed superhero and Distaff Counterpart to Hawkeye, who she then married and became a popular Battle Couple with. Jim McCann deserves credit too for reviving her in the 2000s and reaffirming her spy routes, and playing her up as a Broken Bird badass. Chelsea Cain's run is also something that has firmly left an imprint on her character, for better or worse.
  • Narm:
    • For many, M.O.D.O.K's design is so inherently silly he can't be taken seriously. This has caused several more comedic versions of M.O.D.O.K to come out.
    • The feminist zombie pirates in Mockingbird's recent series, who complain that they are not allowed to kill her because they think that's sexist.
  • Narm Charm:
    • Kang the Conqueror's outfit looks ridiculous - green and purple pajamas (okay, highly advanced future armor, but let's be serious here)? And yet the man has made it work for over forty years.
    • The fact Thanos is committing all these atrocities because he's desperately trying to woo his girlfriend (who just happens to be the Anthropomorphic Personification of Death). By all rights, this motivation should be absurd and ridiculous, but because it gives him a very unique motivation for a villain, plays up how over the top and larger than life he is, and shows how twisted and deranged his mind is, most fans agree this is by far one of the best parts in the character.
    • Batroc. So ridiculous, but so fun!
    • Electro's star mask looks goofy to some people, but it's so distinctive and such an iconic part of his character that it's hard to imagine him without it. Even after he loses the mask, he gains scars on his face that have the same pattern. His Ultimate version really loses out for not having it.
    • The setting in general runs on this and it's a big part of the reason Marvel's been so successful. Major characters include a guy in blue spandex fighting Nazis, a talking raccoon and a tree alien who are best friends, and a giant green rage monster. The fact that Marvel embraces the silliness of the characters allows them to derive surprising pathos from them.
  • Never Live It Down:
    • Mephisto has been around for years, committed numerous evil deeds, and is one of the most vile characters in the Marvel Universe. What does the average fan know him best for? Buying Spider-Man's marriage.
    • The Sentry threw one bad guy into the sun. But that doesn't stop fans (and even some characters) from sarcastically suggesting it as a solution for every fight. He even lampshades this himself when Ms. Marvel asks him not to throw a villain into the sun (because they're actually a transformed Tony Stark):
    "I don't throw everything into the sun."
    • It's quite possible that Dagger is better known for having an absurdly large slit down the front of her classic costume than for her powers.
    • The Thanos Copter, followed shortly by the Mad Titan being arrested by regular police officers at the end of that same story.
    • Thanos as a self-thinking Dogged Nice Guy for Death is also quite commonly invoked when discussing the weirdness of his concept.
    • To DC Fans, Thanos will always be seen as a Darkseid knock-off obsessed with the Infinity Gems. This was also shared by fence-sitters because for a long time, Darkseid (thanks to animated appearances and so on) was more famous and well-known than the Mad Titan. Then Avengers: Infinity War finally saw him exceed Darkseid in popularity and fame and the situation has reversed. Thanos got to headline a $2bn grossing film while Darkseid was a no-show in Justice League.
  • Older Than They Think: Mockingbird is occasionally accused of being a Black Canary rip-off who was created so that she could date Hawkeye, despite Bobbi Morse having first appeared as a scientist and SHIELD agent in Astonishing Tales in 1971, nine years before she became Mockingbird and twelve years before she even met Hawkeye.
    • Some assume that Chelsea Cain was the one who framed Bobbi as a 'feminist' character, but back in the West Coast Avengers days Bobbi was never shy about calling Clint out on chauvinistic behaviour or standing up for herself against sexist jerks like US Agent. Cain's run, though, is arguably guilty of being the most performative about it, given the issues with how it handled Phantom Rider.
  • Only the Creator Does It Right: It's common that fans of the character think that nobody but Jim Starlin himself has ever done Thanos justice yet, despite his massive favoritism towards the character. Part of this reason stems from other writers ignoring or forgetting much of the Character Development Thanos has undergone over the years and writing him like how he acted during his first appearance where he stole artifacts to kill and conquer the universe, which was over 40 years ago, as well as having him rely more on brute force rather than using his vast intellect.
    • Though quite a few fans would agree that Ron Marz, Peter David, Keith Giffen, Dan Abnett had a pretty good voice for Thanos.
  • One-Scene Wonder: All of Thanos's cameos in the MCU prior to Infinity War.
  • Replacement Scrappy:
    • Avril Kincaid. Not only are Wendell's fans upset that he's not donning the bands again for... reasons, but Phyla-Vell fans are pissed that she isn't coming back after being off'd by Thanos. Not helping matters is the fact that Marvel released a promo about the return of a character for Avengers Standoff, with a symbol that people saw as a streamlined Nova or Quasar symbol, so they assumed it would feature the return of either Richard Rider, Wendell Vaughn or Phyla-Vell, and instead get a new character taking up the Quasar mantle. Adding to this is that Avril was introduced during a period when Marvel was increasingly being criticized for not having any leading LGBT characters, causing some fans to complain that it was a waste to create a brand new female Quasar instead of just bringing back Phyla, who was one of Marvel's few lesbian superheroes.
    • Before Avril, Wendell fans pointed their hatred at Phyla-Vell, which led Dan Abnett to turn her into Martyr and bring back Wendell from the dead.
    • Suffice it to say that Macendale was a very poor substitute for Kingsley.
    • Mac Gargan when he became Venom. "A loser dressed like Venom is still a freaking loser."
    • Many consider Riri Williams and America Chavez to be this.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • The Sentry's reappearance in the Apocalypse Twins arc of Uncanny Avengers as the Twins' Horseman of Death was well-received on the grounds that a) it made him look pretty cool, b) the Void was nowhere to be seen, having supposedly got bored with the constant resurrection-destruction he underwent in the sun, c) his insanity was now less 'destroy all the things!' more 'I am the heir to Apocalypse and I will protect Earth' and it stayed intact at the end of the arc.
      • The Age of the Sentry miniseries won a number of people over, mostly because it decided to drop any pretense of him being a dark deconstruction, in favor of just writing him as an Affectionate Parody Sue of the Silver Age Superman existing in the 60s Marvel universe. As it turned out, this had the side effect of making him actually heroic, likeable, and charming, and won over Superman fans who appreciated the homage. Even the Character Shilling worked, because it both was clearly a joke (one issue features every hero in the universe showing up to his birthday party) and somehow made more sense (since this Sentry was actually the sort of person who'd warrant such friendships). Sadly for the character, Age of the Sentry isn't canon to the main Marvel universe, so this didn't help the character much (though the good Sentry eventually came back in Contest of Champions).
    • The Sentry's appearance in Doctor Strange depicts him as the Only Sane Man between Loki and Strange. It's a far better characterization than the generic insane guy with superpowers according to the fans.
    • Furthermore The Sentry's miniseries by Jeff Lemire, which follows on from Doctor Strange, portrays Bob as struggling with Sentry in the same way normal people struggle with mental illnesses like schizophrenia. It's a rather good use of the character. Tellingly, Sentry himself doesn't actually appear (in the real world at least) until Issue #3. And when he finally does appear, it leads up to a finale with Bob merges himself, the Sentry, and the Void into a new gestalt Sentry, who ends up sharing the previous Sentry's focus on protecting humanity from the rest of the universe.
    • Maria Hill, Franklin Richards, Kaine, and Norah Winters.
  • Rooting for the Empire:
    • A lot of fans tended to side with The Hood over the heroes at times. The exception being his feud with Tigra (unless you didn't like Tigra). It helps he mainly used his cut of the profits to put his mother in a better hospital and for his wife and daughter to live better lives.
    • Thanos is one of the biggest mass-murderers in the Marvel Universe, yet Jim Starlin and many fans are incredibly enamoured with and defensive of the character.
  • The Scrappy:
    • The Sentry is one of Marvel comics' most hated characters, partly because he is so overpowered.
      • The fact we are told he is more noble, has more willpower and courage than anyone alive, then accepts being basically a foot soldier for Norman Osborn because he happens to be in charge, didn't help any...
      • He was actually well-received initially due to his interesting origins and that he had a cool fight with the Green Scar in World War Hulk, but when different writers got a hold of him, they started going crazy with his powers, skyrocketing them (take note that he couldn't beat the Green Scar), and making him immortal unless he wants to die, and despite the above, a massive amount of Character Shilling.
      • His origin itself was a pretty bare bones. He broke into a lab and stole a random vial, which upon drinking gain the power to shatter the axe of Terrax. Terrax, who was created from the alien science of Galactus, whose technology was advanced enough to survive the end of the prior universe before the restart of the next big bang, after which he "incubated" for eons in an "egg" after discovering and learning to manipulate "the power cosmic" and create things like an axe that could carry heralds across space to search out planets for him to eat. A random vial from a civilization still dependent on fossil fuels. At least Hulk had the 'gamma ray bursts are the strongest explosions so Hulk is strongest one there is' mantra.
    • Sally Floyd, Miriam Sharpe, Triathlon, the Sentry, Michelle Gonzales, Arcade, Alpha, Carlie Cooper, and the Inhumans. Wonder Man used to be this, but now it depends on who's writing him.
  • Spiritual Antithesis: Marvel like DC are the two longest comic book universes but the way they do things are different such as the DC heroes try not to commit morally questionable acts most of the time unless they have to while the Marvel heroes decide to commit morally questionable acts to save the ones they care about or the world. Most of the villains stay as straight-up bad guys most of the time while the villains in the DC universe try to change their ways and even become anti-heroes at times.
  • Take That, Scrappy!: His appearance in The Incredible Hercules, in which Hercules happily exploits the fact that Sentry doesn't have any real fighting skills.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • The Taskmaster: Unthinkable mini-series changed Taskmaster's character in ways that are not universally popular.
      • For some, while they largely like the changes Unthinkable brought and appreciate the added depth, they dislike that it seems the only thing writers (especially for adaptations) have taken from it is his real name and his past as a SHIELD agent. Ultimate Spider-Man and Marvel's Avengers made a big deal of him being a former SHIELD agent named Tony Masters, but left out the aspect of his character losing his long-term memory, that he was working for Fury as a double agent, and that he was haunted by his guilt for betraying his wife and he was genuinely loyal to SHIELD while working for them. Instead, he's written as a bitter traitor who was "betrayed" somehow, and loses a lot of the fun, sarcastic Wild Card personality to fit with this new characterization.
    • At least two adaptations have depicted Ultron as connected to Tony Stark rather than Hank Pym. Many fans had negative reactions to this, complaining it takes away one of the coolest villains from a fairly obscure character to non-comic fans and gives him to a character who already is quite popular of his own.
      • As an evil robot, Ultron in adaptations has mostly involved a voice actor. There have been plenty of issues about if certain voice actors are up to the task. This even caused some criticism of James Spader for doing the voice and mocap in the Avengers film.
    • Being in a MAX series meant that Jessica Jones had a limited crossover with the Marvel universe, since Marvel did not want their mainstream characters showing up very often in such an edgy, provocative series. In order to free her from that restriction, Bendis toned her down significantly when she was brought over to The Avengers. Many fans of Alias were less-than-pleased with this change.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Darkhawk got his powers from space pirates. Meanwhile, Nova is a space cop. Both of these characters have known each other for years and were on the New Warriors but nothing came of this potential conflict.
    • In the early aughts, he struggled with preventing the armor from taking over his personality and turning him into either a Knight Templar or a Blood Knight, but when The Loners failed to become an ongoing series, this conflict was hastily wrapped up with him somehow learning to make peace with the armor.
  • Ugly Cute: Thanos early in his childhood in the Thanos Rising arc.
  • Unpopular Popular Character:
    • Fans consider Ultron one of the greatest villains in the Marvel Universe. In-universe, he's one of the most hated characters precisely because of how sociopathic and ruthless he is.
    • Although he's come to be seen as something of a loser in the supervillain commmunity, the Shocker nonetheless has a sizable fan following. Ironically enough, it's his lack of a Freudian Excuse or obsessive vendetta with Spider-Man that make him stand out among Spidey's enemies. And as this profile shows, Shocker's actually defeated Spider-Man more times than you might think.
    • Mary Jane is this to the executive, as an inversion to Creator's Pet. The fans love her while the higher-ups would willing to ruin the franchise to get rid of her three times. One thinks they would learn from the reception of the first two.
  • Vindicated by History: The 2003 Rawhide Kid series was, at the time, lambasted for its offensive depiction of Rawhide's sexuality by using stereotype, innuendo, and Camp Gay characterisation to implicit his sexuality. When discussed now though, its seen as quite entertaining among online gay communities. Largely this is due to a change in the view of how gay characters 'should' be depicted; at the time, much of the gay community was trying to push away from the flamboyant image to be more accepted by hetero-normative folk, but nowdays there's more of a push to accept queerness in all its forms. Rawhide's campiness is seen as endearing and fun, and the fact he's also a One-Man Army more than makes up for any 'harm' caused by his campiness.
  • Wangst:
    • In contrast to the Jerkass Woobie listing above, a lot of people who otherwise enjoy Thanos hate when writers try to play him as sympathetic. The Mad Titan can be a credible villain, but he never does anything the least bit redeeming, so writers' attempts to make you feel sorry for him because he sabotages his own plans and can't get Death to fall in love with him fall pretty flat.
    • The Silver Surfer and Spider-Man slip into this when badly written.
  • What Do You Mean, It Wasn't Made on Drugs?: Those still unfamiliar with Starlin's work on Thanos may have noticed by reading this page that his Thanos stories tend to have surreal, psychedelic imagery. That's because it's no secret that Starlin used to be involved in the New Age movement in the 60's, and was inspired by Steve Ditko's surreal artwork in Doctor Strange's comics.
  • "Weird Al" Effect: Thanos was an Expy for Darkseid, but thanks to the MCU beating DC to the punch, Thanos has become the most widely known and popular cinematic version of the Galactic Conqueror Evil Overlord archetype, to the point that some have seen the DCEU's attempt to bring in the New Gods as Follow the Leader, and in the end, Warner Bros. executives threw in the towel by missing a chance to show Darkseid before Infinity War by making him The Ghost in Justice League (which was fixed a little too late in 2021 with Zack Snyder's Justice League, though enough people have knowledge of Darkseid to not call him a "Thanos ripoff", not to mention the two characters' depictions and goals being distinct enough from each other).
  • What Measure Is a Non-Badass?: Borders on out-of-universe Overshadowed by Awesome; due to not being one of the most well-known Avengers, and not appearing in the MCU until the second season of Agents of SHIELD, Mockingbird is a very obscure character, and its not helped by the fact that Marvel have rarely given her much of a solo push independent of Hawkeye. As such, as well-received as she has been, there's been a Vocal Minority of MCU fans who've quickly dismissed her on the grounds she's not Black Widow, and couldn't possibly be as good as Natasha for the simple fact she wasn't introduced with her.
  • The Woobie:
    • Dr. Hank Pym. Jesus Christ, the shit this dude has been put through. First wife, dead. Second wife, dead. His robot son? Genocidal killing machine. The only robot son that wasn't genocidal? Killed by his genocidal brother. Best friend, Bill Foster, murdered. Other best friend, Scott Lang, was dead for a time and barely talks to him anymore. Just about anyone he ever cared about has wound up dead. He's had at least four documented mental break downs and all of his inventions have been turned to criminal use, tarnishing his scientific legacy. And all of this was before he was merged with the aforementioned killing machine, launched into space, and forgotten about. It doth suck to be Hank Pym.
    • Jessica Drew has a record of not having luck in love; and then spent about 2 years getting caught and imprisoned by the Skrull until the epilogue of Secret Invasion, and when she returns, almost everyone hates her, thinking that she's still the Skrull Queen that impersonated her.
    • The X-Men as a whole are a team of woobies, and the mutant populace by extension. Even the most upbeat and innocent characters like Nightcrawler, Kitty Pryde, and Pixie tend to go through a lot of hardship, while mutants as a whole have faced countless atrocities against them, including legalized enslavement and even state-ordered genocides. Its even worse for civilian mutants as they often don't have powers that are actually useful or even threatening (in some cases, they don't even have 'powers' at all, just physical mutations), but are still targeted for being 'freaks' by thugs and giant killer robots alike. Being a mutant means that you'll forever have a target on your back, but the 'cool powers' aren't a guarantee, and judging by the informed numbers of mutants compared to who we see, its a safe bet to say that most mutants don't have the kind of powers that can protect them from mob violence or giant robots.
    • Daredevil. It's basically fact that he has the worst life out of all of Marvel's heroes.
    • Shocker. One of the nicest guys around (for a supervillain) but nobody likes or respects him, not even his fellow supervillains. Add to that his tendency to get his ass kicked.
    • Awesome Andy, also known as the Mad Thinker's Awesome Android. After many years being the Thinker's goon, he was given freedom and became a worker at She-Hulk's law firm. He fell in love, had his heart broken, tried living a fake romance with Starfox's powers, got his heart broken again, and at the end of it all he simply reset his programming and became the Mad Thinker's goon again. It's hard to not want to hug the big blockhead.
  • WTH, Costuming Department?: Mockingbird's All-New, All-Different Marvel redesign hasn't been well received. It seems to be an attempt to make her look more like a bird, but instead it looks like an awkward attempt at redesigning a Rule 63 Nightwing. Strangely, Bobbi's look in Agents of SHIELD has been reasonably well received (if with a few critics), so you'd think they'd model the design after that. This has faded a bit as the design became more streamlined prior to her ongoing starting, though after that the extent of how well it works depends on the artist.

YMMV for the Animation Block:

  • Animation Age Ghetto: Jeph Loeb has gone on record stating that Ultimate Spider-Man is specifically aimed at children, and Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H. has been described as being Lighter and Softer as well.
  • Complete Monster: See here.
  • Continuity Lockout: Due to all four shows sharing continuity, they have have at least a few episodes that won’t make any sense unless you watched the other shows.
    • Avengers, Assemble! In particular has issues with this as it also takes a number of things from the MCU as Broad Strokes canon, despite the fact that they don’t share the same continuity. This means the show will often forego explaining certain things on the assumption that the audience has seen the movies:
      • A big example is that J.A.R.V.I.S. disappears and is replaced by a new AI named F.R.I.D.A.Y. between Seasons 2 and 3. No explanation is given for this in the show, as it was a fairly significant plot point in Avengers: Age of Ultron. "The Kids Are Alright" establishes that F.R.I.D.A.Y. is the most advanced A.I. Tony created, leading to the implication that this change is the result of a system upgrade.
      • Early on in Season 4, the Wasp complains about the fact that her dad held her back and didn't want her to become a superhero. She's referencing the events of the Ant-Man movie (which like Age of Ultron, does not fit the show's canon), and not anything that ever actually happened in the series. In fact, Hope didn't appear at all prior to the fourth season, yet the show just drops her into the cast with personal baggage and pre-established character relationships.
      • Ultron is introduced in the series without any sort of context to explain him to viewers unfamiliar with the character or Avengers: Age of Ultron; the Avengers just know who he is. Not helped by the show dodging the subject of who built him.
      • The Vision is probably one of the most glaring examples. Unlike the other new Season 3 heroes (who all at least get some sort of token effort to explain who they are), Vision just sort of shows up and the Avengers are already familiar with him. (And yes, his voice actor is the one who previously voiced JARVIS.) The assumption seems to be that most of the kids in the audience have seen Age of Ultron and thus know his origin from there, even though there's absolutely no way that movie could be considered canon with the TV show, as well as the fact that the show and the movie are aimed at two entirely separate age groups.
  • Continuity Snarl: The animated Marvel Universe can sometimes be inconsistent.
    • The first example is how in USM and Avengers, Assemble!, the Guardians of the Galaxy originally shares the designs of their comic counterparts, however Guardians of the Galaxy cartoon would later be established to share the same continuity as the as the previously mentioned shows, doesn’t make sense as their designs and personalities were designed to more closely resemble their MCU counterparts.
    • Season 5 of Avengers, Assemble!, "Black Panther's Quest" is a continuity nightmare. It's still officially listed as taking place after season 4, "Secret Wars," but several characters are missing without explanation. The crossover with Spider-Man features the Spidey of Marvel's Spider-Man and not Ultimate Spider-Man (a change that also carried on into Guardians of the Galaxy)! The changed character designs are also the same as in Spider-Man 2017. When T'Challa meets with Attuma in Atlantis, he's a completely different character from the tyrant in Red Skull's Cabal in the early seasons. It's like the shows just hopped universes between seasons.
  • Fandom Rivalry: Averted. Even Marvel fans of the comics and the movies admit that in general Marvel animation hasn't quite reached the same level as DCAU and its animation spin-offs.
    • Avengers, Assemble!, like USM, has the burden of following a well-received Marvel show, in this case Earth's Mightiest Heroes. Season 1 was decried for too much focus on Tony (And his VA has also gotten mixed reception), a controversial version of Falcon, and female fans were incensed at how Black Widow was pretty much the only female character in Season 1, and even she was absent for several episodes. Season 2 has been seen as an overall improvement, with Widow now in every episode, Falcon getting a new and improved redesign and more focus on the team as a whole.
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