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Fridge: Fire Emblem Awakening
Fridge Logic
  • The marriage and inheritance system at work: Chrom is a descendant of the Exalted One and carries a special mark of Naga. Emmeryn also has one, Lissa does not have one, but her son Owain does, to her delight. On the other side of the fence, Validar, the evil wizard attempting to resurrect Grima, carries Grima's blood. The Avatar is the son/daughter of Validar and as it turns out, the perfect host for Grima because of centuries of genetic manipulation by Grima's followers. By extension, the Avatar also has Grima's blood. A Female Avatar marrying Chrom, or a Male Avatar marrying Lucina will wind up producing a Morgan (and Lucina, if you married Chrom) with blood from both Naga AND Grima. But despite that fact, there is little mention of Morgan's role in the story in the event you do marry one of them.
    • If you're wondering why Morgan or any one of the Avatar's children is incapable of becoming Grima's vessel, the simple answer is Grima's blood in them is no longer pure. Remember, the Grimleal spent generations just to breed the perfect person to become Grima where they most likely only pair up the purebloods together to conceive a child in each generation until a perfect pureblood is born. The Avatar marrying Chrom or Lucina for example would only produce a child that's no longer pure of Grima's blood, but also is tainted with the blood of the Exalted One making him or her incapable of becoming Grima.
    • Also: Morgan's amnesia is suspiciously similar to the Avatar's, with the only difference being that the former remembers all the time they spent with the latter (i.e. all the time s/he spent with Grima's human form). It's possible that Grima did try to possess Morgan in some other timeline, but failed because of Morgan's mixed heritage, leaving her with only memories connected to Grima, or by proxy, the Avatar.
    • This brings up another bit of Fridge Logic. Characters inherit hair color from their fathers. Emmeryn and Lissa are blonde. Chrom...isn't. Are we sure it's Lissa who has to worry about legitimacy?
      • Except for female Morgan, who inherits her mother's hairstyle instead. Chrom's mother could have always had blue hair.
      • Chalk it up to Gameplay and Story Segregation. Technically, unless you want to get into genetics, there should be nothing stopping any of the children from inheriting either of their parent's hair colors; it's just that all of them besides Lucina and female!Morgan are tied to their mothers, and the hair color thing is just a token means of differentiating them based on their fathers without altering more important parts of their character (personality, build, class, etc.). Lucina always looks the same regardless of her mother because of plot reasons (it would be much harder to pass as Marth with pink hair, for instance, and you see her several times before determining her mother), and female!Morgan gets her mother's hair color because male!Avatar will always be her father, so the differentiation has to come from her mother instead. Chrom's parents, however, are set in stone and never show on screen, so whether he looks like Emmeryn and Lissa or not doesn't really matter.
      • Actually, consider this - Chrom and Lissa's parents are not seen in the story. For all we know, one of them has Blonde hair, and one has blue hair. It could have been either one - maybe their father.
      • Or maybe Chrom just has recessive Fire Emblem Protagonist genes (which more often than not come with blue hair), and both his parents have blond hair.
      • I'm calling this one. It also would explain why Chrom's side of the family can wield Falchion while Lissa's (and presumably Emmeryn's) can't. Though if it's recessive, why does it tend to override everyone else's hair color?
      • Because you need blue hair and have your default class be Lord in order to use Falchion.
  • Shipping Lissa x Donnel is possible. The S Support has Donnel worrying about bringing Lissa down in the world, being a peasant farmer-turned-soldier. In most historical societies where this was allowed, he wouldn't be bringing her position down, she'd bring his up, being the husband of the Ylissean princess (the closest Real Life equivalent is the Chinese fmǎ, which roughly translates as Prince Consort). It would be funny to see his reaction to this knowledge.
    • Their paired epilogue has them going back to Donnel's village together. Either things are different in Ylisse when it comes to royalty marrying peasants, or she wanted to go with him. Considering that Chrom can marry the female Avatar or Olivia and apparently bring them up, it may be closer to the latter.
      • On Lissa's endings all of Lissa's possible endings save those where she marries someone connected to Ylisse's military has her either traveling the world or going off with her husband to wherever they originate from so it is likely she could chose to bring them up to royal status but chose to live on the same status as her spouse.
  • More Fridge Tear Jerker, but: What happens to the child characters after the end of the game, when the Bad Future is prevented? Assume that this version of time travel preserves proximate causes, namely the presence of Lucina and the other children of the cast, and everything they did with their parents, so they aren't simply Ret Gone. That seems like a happy ending, but it becomes a Bittersweet Ending when you realize that the children must stay away from their families to prevent interfering with their own lives or even births. The best Lucina's troupe can hope for in such a case is the knowledge that their families are safe and hopefully happy.
    • Well, as is seen in the endings, the children characters do just that, and go on to live their own lives in the epilogue if they survive the game, no Ret Gone happening. However, supports with their parents show that they love them just as much as their yet-to-be-born selves, and there's always a place for them if they want to stay. In fact, Noire's solo ending involves staying with her family half to develop a real relationship with Tharja, half to make sure the cycle won't start again.
    • In Severa's solo ending she apparently visits her family once every year to yell at them. It's Severa, though, so whatever...
    • Lucina definitely doesn't have to worry about preventing her own birth, given that Chrom identifies Future!Lucina as definitely his daughter by comparing to her Mark of Naga to baby Present!Lucina's. Any of the kids born after the future!kid met the parents is gonna be a different person mentally if not genetically, if only because seeing how your parenting turned out will change things. The only way around that would be some sort of destiny bullshit, unlikely given the Screw Destiny themes of the game.
  • A Severa fathered by the male Avatar is angry with Cordelia for abandoning her "only" daughter, a Yarne fathered by the male Avatar is terrified of being the Last of His Kind, and a Nah fathered by the male Avatar mentions having been lonely due to her foster family never accepting her. What, is Morgan chopped liver now?
    • Morgan's solo ending raises the possibility they come from a different future than the others, so it's possible there is no Morgan in the bad future.
      • But Morgan still has sibling supports and her sibling clearly remembers her.
      • Except we don't know what happened to Morgan in the future. If she was, in fact, from a different future, (and this is the Fridge Horror here) then she died in one future, abandoned, alone, as the last human alive against her own father, the Fell Dragon. So the her/him from the different timeline survived instead.
    • Morgan is the boss of the first two Future of Despair chapters. Clearly, the Morgan in the bad future is Daddy's Little Villain and left their sibling behind.
      • The Future Past chapters are supposed to be yet another Bad Future, though. That version of the Morgans may not apply to the Morgan you recruit.
  • Owain's support with his father reveals that said father sacrificed himself to protect his son. Which kind of doesn't work if said father is the Avatar, for obvious reasons.
    • Owain didn't actually see him die, so it's possible that in Owain's timeline, the Avatar came to his senses after being forced to kill Chrom, and then was captured later by the Grimleal and turned into Grima. Still contradicts what Grima himself says later on, but not by as much.
      • Furthermore, in his supports with a Male Avatar as his father, he actually says that he was "gravely injured" rather than killed, and that he never saw him again.
  • The Shepherds must have a very loose policy on fraternization in the barracks. Think about it: female units don't die to prevent a child-related Time Paradox, but the male counterpart who fathers their children can. Conception has to happen at some point, but if they did didn't survive to a time of peace...
    • Well, in the bad future no one survived to a time of peace. Grima was awakened and the war went on until all of the parents were dead, so even in the bad timeline conception occurred in the middle of the war. Even if that were not the case, what would you expect? That married couples live in the same camp and just not get any for the months or even years that the war might last? I seriously doubt that a few thousand Risen are enough to overshadow humans' (and Taguels' and Maneketes') most basic animal instincts.
    • Plus, the Shepherds aren't exactly very formal in the first place, so I doubt they'd forbid the couples from being together.
  • Who is the rightful heir to Ylisse's throne? After all, The time traveling Lucina is undeniably the oldest descendant in direct line from the Exalt, and her A support with her mother makes it clear that she is considered a true child of them, even if she is from an alternate timeline. It would be unfair to deny her the right to a kingdom that is not only hers by birthright, but also is saved as a direct consequence of her actions (No adult Lucina, no advice from the future, Basilio dies, the emblem is stolen and apocalypse all around) yet it would also be unfair to deny it to baby Lucina, which has as much of a birthright and is the descendant of the Exalt of this timeline.
    • Lucina's solo ending had her disappear, so presumably she gives up her stake to the throne. Her sibling and Owain probably do this also, considering all the kids go do their own thing after the war.
    • Adult Lucina is 20 years younger (by birth date) than her father Chrom.
  • How is Lucina always the first born child out of everyone in the second generation? If one married Chrom later in the game (or paired him with Olivia) but previously had married a pair of characters earlier on and killed the father, wouldn't Lucina at the least be the second born? Since the father would be dead before Chrom married (or possibly even met) his wife, that would mean that the first child would have had to be born before Lucina to exist. It's not like the child's father could've come from the future either, since all first-generation characters were killed in it.
    • This is better suited for Headscratchers, but this is an easy one. Couples that married before the time skip simply refrained from having a baby for 2 years. It's not at all uncommon for couples to wait several years before deciding they are prepared and ready to bring a child into the world. I do not believe it is possible for a child to be made recruitable should the father die before the point the children become available. If they are available regardless, it is simply a developer oversight.
    • Also, you kind of have to be trying for this to happen, since this would have to be fairly early. Chrom has to be married by Chapter 11 - a bit less than half way through the game, and before the two-year Time Skip, even if things are getting a bit harder at this point. Given that Lucina is the only one we actually see as a baby, and the other parents imply / straight up say their kids haven't been born yet, it's pretty safe to say that any of the dads dying is just non-canon.
    • Remember, this is an alternate timeline. The war went differently, and people died during different times. All the game needs is for two people to be married, and killing off the father would only mean that he's dead in this timeline, not the one where the kids are from.
  • If the Avatar is close enough to being Grima for him/her killing Grima to count as Grima being killed by it's own power to meet the conditions for Grima to die permanently, why isn't the opposite true? Shouldn't Grima killing another part of itself kill it?
    • Simple answer: Grima never kills the Avatar, he simply sends them back to the pocket dimension seen in the final chapter and absorbs them. Thus, game over.
    • That, or the explanation is similar to how Voldemort is defeated. The mark of Grima disappears from Robin's hand, so the Grima-related parts of Robin's heritage were killed off, but not technically Robin him/herself.
  • Why is 'Marth's' Falchion stronger than Chrom's? It can heal, has higher might, etc.
    • When you get further in the game Chrom's Falchion has its power awoken and it becomes even stronger than "Marth's" Parallel Falchion. So obviously "Marth's" was simply awoken by a weaker divine being before they returned to the past.
    • Actually, it's simpler than that. In the Future Past DLC, Lucina says that in her timeline (the original one), at least one of the gemstones that make up the Fire Emblem was destroyed, making it impossible to complete the Awakening. That may not have stopped her from at least trying to perform the Awakening before going back in time, which may have given her some (but not all) of the Falchion's latent power.
  • How did Plegia fund the war against Ylisse and Ferox? After all, Chrom's father led a was against it about fifteen years before the game, and by that time both Ylisse and Plegia were in ruins. It's explicitly stated that Plegia is rich and Chrom even asks them for ships, aid, fund, etc. before going to war with Valm.
    • Despite the horrible image Plegia gives off, it's very possible for Plegia to be a well-off country. It borders the sea, so naturally it must be the hub of foreign exchange with Valm. With the right resources and Willing Suspension of Disbelief on the player's part, it's not impossible for Plegia to get back on its feet in 15 years. Plus Validar's priorities was funding the end of the world, not being stingy with money. They may have given Ylisse EVERYTHING they had left.
      • It's also highly likely that some parts are rich and others aren't. As said above, zones that border the sea often tend to be atop of the economic chain due to being easier to trade with — take a look at Hong Kong or Shanghai, i.e. Validar likely focused on building/getting resources from these better-off zones and didn't super care about the rest.
  • How does anyone know Kellam in his Supports (DLCs, etc.)? The Shepherds know him, but what about people recruited afterwards? They can't see him, but they recognize him.
    • Well, it's not so much that Kellam is a ghost or something, he's just difficult to notice. I'm sure Chrom at least had the new recruit formally introduced to everyone, and Kellam eagerly introduced himself hoping they won't forget him.
  • If Priam's philosophy is that weapons should only be wielded by the one who forged it (he says this in his supports with a Male Avatar among other things), then why is he carrying the Ragnell when you fight and recruit him? It was originally used by Ike before it was passed on to him, and it's never even said who originally forged it. While it's possible that he reforged it considering the in-game model of the Ragnell is obviously very damaged and battered, this detail is never brought up in his supports.

Fridge Horror
    In General 
  • Morgan when a Child Character is his/her mother/father... Seems well enough, until you think about it... The Children are ALL fleeing a definite Bad Future. You just married one of said time travelers and oh, you seemingly have secured the fate of the world, right? Well... why did you just meet your son/daughter, who is fleeing the same disaster? /shudder The fact that the game doesn't answer any of that, and Morgan's supports are generic, does not help.
    • This is explained by the fact that the children are not only from the Bad Future, but also from an Alternate Universe. So in one AU, MU did indeed father/mother his/her children before getting possessed by Grima.
      • That only explains Morgan's existence. MU had his/her children before Getting Possessed by Grima. However, when Mark is say, the daughter of Lucina... the cycle had to have happened again— at least one time where Lucina went back to Set Right What Once Went Wrong, fell in love with MU, but MU STILL got Possessed by Grima, Killed Chrom, and set forth the Bad Future AGAIN.
      • Considering that it is possible for Morgan's other parent to be anyone from the children generation, the only time they would be around the same age as Robin to fall in love and have a baby Morgan would be when they work together as shepherds. Or Robin could have waited for one of his/her comrade's children to grow up and fall in love with them. Which is not so great either. Either way, this pairing leads credence to the possibility that Morgan might come from the game's newly created future.
      • This issue may be answered with future DLC, which presumably involves Krom's army traveling to the Bad Future timeline and saving that universe, allowing everyone from both realities to live happily ever after.
    • Morgan has amnesia, and their solo-ending brings up the possibility that they didn't come from the same future as the other kids. Maybe the Morgan the player recruits didn't come from a bad future and they just don't remember it?
    • On the other hand, all of the other child characters (except Owain) are orphans, so when they went back in time, they left no family behind. We don't know if that's true for Morgan, so if their future wasn't that bad, then there's probably another version of the Avatar and his/her spouse out there whose child mysteriously vanished one day and never came back.
  • The world map of Awakening is clearly the same world as the Akaneia games, which leads to a few moments of Fridge Horror. Mainly, Plegia's territory consists of what used to be Macedon, Dolhr, Grust... and Altea. Worse, the two areas you visit closest to Altea are a desert and a barren wasteland. Sure 2000 years have passed since Marth's time, but something horrible must have happened to his former homeland at some point. Good thing he moved to Akaneia palace!
  • Having Chrom put Grima to sleep instead of having the Avatar kill him doesn't actually solve the problem. It's just kicking the can further down the road for somebody else to deal with.
    • Maybe not even somebody else, if the above theory of Morgan coming from a second Bad Future is true.
    • However, since Grima requires a vessel and everyone involved in the Grimleal breeding program is dead, Grima may be effectively sealed permanently, depending on who the Avatar marries and if there are enough others with Grima blood. For instance, if the Avatar married Tiki, than Morgan is Naga's granddaughter and much worse than useless in any attempt to create a vessel.
      • On the other hand, even such children still have potential, if you are familiar with the events of Geneology of the Holy War. Remember what the Lopt tribe acheived in having Prince Julius bred. Who says they won't go to such extremes to strain out the pure Grima blood?
  • The horde of Grimleal members who gathered at the Dragon's Table to welcome Grima's resurrection probably all ended up as dragon chow. That might not give one pause at first, given that they were cheering on the return of an Eldritch Abomination, but remember that the Grimleal was a cult, and its members may not have necessarily joined or stayed in it willingly (Robin was apparently the fourth generation born into it on his/her paternal side).
    • Male Avatar's supports with Gangrel confirms that many people join the Grimleal due to tough times as its unfortunately the only religion available in Plegia.
    • What really makes this Fridge Horror is that some dialogue from Frederick and Lissa implies that the Grimleal who the Shepherds saw going to the Dragon's Table were at least partially possessed, since they were all talking gibberish. Plus, we don't know exactly how long the Grimleal breeding program has been going on, just that it's been at least five generations.
  • The present timeline children's lives are going to turn into psychological nightmares. You know how sometimes it's hard for siblings of successful people to live in their shadow? Now imagine living in the shadow of yourself. Bad Future Lucina saved the world, how is baby Lucina ever gonna live up to that in a world of peace? That's gonna wreck her self-esteem to pieces, and we're talking of one of the better balanced children. Future Brady already has a dismal sense of self-worth, imagine baby Brady, already predisposed to self-depreciation, having a veteran in the most important war of the millennium to compare himself to, or baby Severa struggling now not only for the approval of her mother but also with her future self, an accomplished fighter.
    • This could be mitigated somewhat since most Future children go off on their own separate journeys. If they really wanted to spare their present selves the trouble of a shadow to live up to, they can easily adopt pseudonyms and pretend to be new people. This might be hard to apply to certain kids, like (unpaired) Noire, who explicitly stay with their family though.
    • Then there's the weddings, imagine if Future Severa gets married to Future Inigo, baby Severa and baby Inigo will grow up knowing each other and seeing themselves married, wouldn't they feel pressured to get together themselves when the time comes? Would that push them together or drive them apart in an attempt to declare individuality? And if they do get together, would their children be identical to the ones from their future selves? If they don't get together, wouldn't they feel like they're denying life to the present version of that offspring? And let's not even get started on a future child marrying the Avatar, or even worse, a third generation Morgan marrying a second generation character . I see a whole new spectrum of psychological and emotional issues just waiting to happen...no seriously don't; a horribly tangled mess is DESTINED to ensue and severe mind-fucking awaits situations like this so don't even try to look deeper into this. You will be confused and Fridge Horrored shitless.
    • Is there any reason why the parents can't name their kids someone else? I mean, Lucina is set in stone, but what's stopping them from naming their kids something other than what their future selves are? I mean, names are part of one's sense of self, and having a different name sets the kids apart from their future selves.
    • Not to mention, this "theory" stinks of trying to make the actually remarkably strong despite all the crap they went through future children into poor little broken woobies who to project mommy/daddy-like feelings on. Video Game Caring Potential has its limits, you know.
  • Priam, Ike's descendant, has a philosophy scarily similar to Ashnard's...
    • So do the Feroxi's...
  • In the Akaneia games, there was a high population of Manakete subspecies living in the Dolhr region. By Awakening, that continent has become Plegia...they were possibly driven to extinction seeing what Plegia is now...
    • Worse, considering that only three female Divine Manaketes are the only ones seen in Awakening other than Grima who is an evil male Manakete, it's quite possible some religious genocide was committed and only the female Divine Manaketes were spared; considering that Naga is a Divine Manakete too (and currently a female at that), it's natural that the female Divine Manaketes would be seen as holy.
      • Even worse here: If what Panne said about the Laguz is true, combine that with the above and it's possible that every non-human creature barring the female Divine Manaketes and actual animals were wiped out in some purge, and if you think about it, who else started a religious purge? Chrom's Father who tried to wipe out the Plegians and Lekain of Fire Emblem Tellius who committed the Serene Forest Massacre. Considering how they are overzealous and religious fanatics, it's completely plausible that Chrom's Father is the one who wiped out the Laguz, Taguel, and the other Manaketes...
  • In the Bad Future (and it's even worse counterpart "The Future Past"), humanity has been overrun/wiped out by Risen and Grima. The thing is, the future kids and Naga only explicitly mention Ylisse (and Valm by extension). This is natural as the game focuses purely on those two continents. But they are not the only continents to get hit with this with something like Grima free and about. That means that the entire world has gone to hell.
  • Meta-example: according to recent interviews, Awakening could have been the last Fire Emblem game if it didn't sell well enough. Fortunately it seems like this Bad Future will be averted, but the fact that the developers said nothing about this until now?
    • Another example. Marth and Roy weren't originally intended to be released in Non-Japanese versions of Super Smash Bros. Melee. Their inclusion in overseas releases brought up a large awareness of the Fire Emblem Series which hasn't been released overseas up until that point, as well as the popularity of the series skyrocketing to absurd degrees. The Fire Emblem series was so popular that when Fire Emblem Awakening became available for American fans, sales in America alone almost hit the mark that the developers were aiming for. Think about this for a second: if Marth and Roy had not made it overseas, the series most likely would remain obscure to anyone not Japanese, the series would still remain exclusive to Japan, Ike would probably not make it overseas in Super Smash Bros. Brawl making Fire Emblem even more popular, and if Shadow Dragon and New Mystery of the Emblem are any indication, Fire Emblem Awakening would have been the last game, or even worse the series could have ended prematurely. Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones was largely unpopular due to its rather easy difficulty, Fire Emblem Tellius was unpopular in Japan for largely vague reasons, and the Fire Emblem Akaneia remakes sold poorly for being nearly exact to the originals (which are considered inferior) and New Mystery didn't even make it overseas. Fire Emblem may have ended with either one of the remakes, Tellius, or the Sacred Stones.
    • Someone has theorized that Intelligent Systems may have deliberately designed part of the story to mirror their plight.
  • Sumia has some serious self-esteem issues, due to her tendency to trip over absolutely nothing. That's pretty sad already, and then you remember Sumia has a very limited number of possible husbands compared to the other women, and she also has a really low support-pool compared to the other first generation characters (she has the lowest amount of supports out of all main story characters barring Say'ri and those to follow). It may be a bit of a stretch, but her apparent lack of attractiveness can't be good for her already obvious self-loathing and klutziness, and put together this most likely the reason she lacks a good choice of husbands and friends in general. If this is true... Poor, POOR Sumia.
  • Considering how the Grimleal aren't always in it by choice, and how the Avatar's mother runs away with him/her to get them away from the cult, it's entirely possible that the mother was forced into the Grimleal and then to give birth to the Avatar.
  • Chapter 11: Mad King Gangrel. After Emm's sacrifice, many of Gangrel's soldiers are deserting, meaning that the ones left for you to battle against are most likely being forced to fight against their will. The problem? The objective of the map is not "Defeat boss", but "Rout the enemy". In other words, you have no choice but to massacre the innocent soldiers who wanted nothing to do with the war, even if you beat Gangrel first so they no longer have any reason to fight you.
    • Jossed. They're stated to be fanatically loyal to Gangrel (which is extremely surprising). If they didn't want to fight for him, then you'd likely have to fight Gangrel all by himself.
      • Not that surprising when we consider Gangrel's backstory as a Self-Made Man who rose from the slums of Plegia to the throne. It's likely that they admired how he reached the top despite all odds against him.

    Unnerving Implications 
  • In their B support, Maribelle asks Lon'qu if he would like her to take him to (and I quote) "an establishment where a pack of lovely ladies wait on you". After quickly declining, Lon'qu pauses for a good second to mull over what she just said and asks her how she would even know of such a place, after which she light-heartedly chides him for trying to pry into her secrets. Now, what does "an establishment where a pack of lovely ladies wait on you" sound like? A brothel, which is a whore house. This heavily implies that Maribelle is (quite possibly) a prostitute. Lon'qu is rightfully disturbed...and while it can be argued with good point that she may not be a prostitute and that she is simply interested with how lower caste societies work, why the holy hell would she even suggest such a thing so casually to someone who is deathly terrified of women? Has she done this sort of thing before with someone else?
    • Just because she knows about a brothel doesn't mean that she actually goes there. Compare the amount of people who know about brothels and the people who actually go there.
    • Do you really think, Maribelle of all people would be a prostitute?
    • Besides, the description that Maribelle uses much more fits the idea of a hostess club/cabaret
  • Panne's B Support with the Avatar raises the possibility that all the Laguz from Tellius may be dead by the time of Awakening...
    • Hopefully not all - Henry mentions in an event tile that he once saw a man transform into a raven. However, if what Panne's saying is true, there may not be as many Laguz as there used to be. Imagine how much worse their relations with Beorc/Humans must be at this point.
      • However, considering that Panne is the one saying it, she may just be throwing out assumptions based on what happened to the Taguel and nothing serious probably happened to the Laguz.
      • Panne is a Taguel right? You know, the shapeshifters who transform with stones who aren't dragons? Now remember why the dragons had to seal their power in dragonstones in the first place? They were weakening and their own power was driving them mad (which is what happened to all the Earth Dragons barring Medeus and Loptyr). Panne never outright stated that she met Laguz, but she references them when she said that there were others like her (cat wearers, bird wearers, etc.), meaning others who transformed, possibly using stones. Henry himself said he saw a man transform into a raven, but how he did is never mentioned. And if the theory about the Laguz evolving into the Taguel is true, then the Laguz suffered a fate similar to the Manaketes. Manaketes were called such AFTER they assumed human forms, and before that they were simply called dragons. Worse, Panne said her kind were enslaved by humans, just like the Laguz-no wonder Taguel had to start sealing their power into stones! Seems the peace established between the laguz and the beorc crumbled into dust sometime after the ones who helped accomplish it were long dead. Ouch.
  • As much as the Male Avatar wants to deny it, Walhart makes a surprisingly good point about how war works and how better off the future would be if the entire world was under one rule as how it was with his ancestor Alm. People can and will die, whether they be allies or enemies, and he tries to convince the Avatar to join him and rule the world together with him. Even though he was only trying to test his convictions, he has made some spot on points about how what he was doing was just in it's own way. And seeing as to what the future is (one in which Walhart was stopped), maybe he should have just had his way...
    • Except when visiting houses during the chapters against Walhart's army, many villagers talk about how ruthless he is and how willing he is to slaughter innocent people with very little provocation (which is why they give you items as help). Whether or not he makes valid points about how the world should be, it's all being said as flimsy justification for ruining the lives of a lot of people so he could conquer.
  • Aversa turns out to have Fake Memories given to her by Validar so that she can serve him, and just like the other spotpass former villains before her we never find this out or anything remotely sympathetic about her until her recruitment chapter. Now Validar has never shown any sympathetic traits throughout the entire time he was alive as with the other major villains before him, but considering what kind of organization the Grimleal is, it's safe to say that he might have undergone similar events; even worse, he himself outright states that he's a failed Grima vessel which undoubtedly means mental manipulation and he and the vast majority of Grimleal cannot seem to grasp the concept of good...Considering that he's an expy of Gharnef who was corrupted by Imhullu leading to his wickedness and Nergal who ended up losing his memories for diving into Dark Magic too much, it's safe to say that he probably wasn't always this way...all the more reason to stop the Grimleal.
  • One for the otherwise lighthearted Golden Gaffe grinding DLC, but Henry mentions wanting to raise an army of Risen in some of his supports. All of the Risen which appear in the Golden Gaffe utilize his base classes (Dark Mage, Thief, Barbarian) and each one's unique promotions. (Sorceror, Trickster, and Berserker respectively.) Considering some of the previous products of Dark magic in his other supports, it's possible Otherworld Henry's attempts backfired. And it would be in character for him to steal from himself or even Walhart. But it makes you wonder where Henry disappeared to if the Risen are indeed his...
    • Infinite Regalia. If you take all non-child, non-Avatar First Generation units (Including the "Spotpass Six") you're left with...Thirty Six, the same number of Deadlords on this map. The children characters note something odd about the Deadlords—them reminding them of their parents, one of them having the Brand of the Exalt, and you see Severa's opponent crying. The Thirty Six Deadlords are possibly the characters of Awakening from the Bad Future. And despite the Paladin saying that they do not feel emotion, Severa's opponent was crying just by seeing Severa... that's a clear lie. And Owain's quote cranks up the Fridge Horror by pointing out that their opponent has branded their weapon. The Japanese version implies that it's his father while the English version implies that it's him. This is especially jarring if you remember that three of the classes they has access to are present and that he is virtually the only character in-universe who cares about naming their weapons especially with strange symbols such as an interrobang and a dipthong . This may be mitigated somewhat when you learn that not all First Generation Characters' classes show up as any Deadlord if we're going strictly by class and sex such as Panne and Flavia, but that only leaves room for more potential candidates since it's not clear when or where you are.
      • Tiki's dialogue upon encountering one of the Deadlords implies that they may have been Marth. She never said whether they died in peace or not....and worse, if Marth is in there and if the theory of the Future Past Deadlords is true, what other past game protagonists could've been converted into them?
  • In the Future Past world, there are two Morgans, of both genders, and the game doesn't tell you what their names are. Why did you only find and recruit one Morgan? Why would only one of them go back in time? Morgan's twin brother or sister might still be wandering around with amnesia because you never found him/her, and Morgan doesn't remember him/her.
    • Here's something else to think about relating to Morgan (both of them). This may be more Wild Mass Guess, but it deserves a mention here. If time-travel works anything similar to Pokemon Mystery Dungeon Explorers of Time/Darkness/Sky, what if Grima attacked the Morgan that tried to run or both? He did chase Lucina and the other Future Children into the past to prevent them from altering history just like Darkrai did (so it wouldn't be a stretch to say he tried to assault them while time-travelling), and Darkrai attacked the protagonist of that game causing them to lose their memories. What if that's how Morgan/the Morgans lost their memories except for those connected to Grima (and by proxy the Avatar)? This would also explain why none of the kids knew of Grima coming to the past. The Morgans/recruitable Morgan were/was probably the last people/person to bail after everyone else and Grima must have found out about time-travel as a result, leading him to chase the kids through time and space attacking the disloyal Morgan(s). It would also explain why the unrecruitable Morgan didn't/couldn't come to the Present Past if they are not present there; they're probably trapped in the Future Past all alone with no way out and surrounded by a complete and utter Death World. Suddenly Time-Space jumping doesn't seem so cool anymore...
  • Some people have vouched that Emmeryn intentionally walked off of the cliff knowing that she would not die from the fall. What if she was wrong about that? If that was ever the case, she would have surely killed herself dead, and if the afterlife is anything like in Christianity, she would have burned up in hell afterwards because suicide is a one-way ticket straight there...
  • It's not hard to imagine that Plegia is Fire Emblem Awakening's Grado. Given what they do in their respective games, the utter mess they both go through and the implications of Grado's fate in the ending of The Sacred Stones, chances are Plegia's going to end up just like it...and if the earthquake that destroyed Grado truly was divine retribution, chances are Plegia will be destroyed if the heavens are none too merciful...
    • Given that the reason Plegia exists today was because it was formed by Grimleal during the Schism (whose goal was to revive Grima), Plegia probably had it coming the moment it was formed.
    • No one can help being born whichever nationality, so there are many innocent Plegians. In fact, it's even implied that most Plegians treat the Grimleal like a normal religion...

Fridge Brilliance
  • Why is the Avatar so powerful? Well, he/she was specifically bred to be Grima's host, so it makes sense that they'd try to make him/her "perfect."
  • Why is Tiki a bit underwhelming once she's recruited? Think about it from a training standpoint. She's been asleep for a very long, long, long time. Her skills and strength have atrophied over time because of disuse!
  • Why did the pegasus freak out so badly, aside from the fact that it was injured? In the Fire Emblem series, males simply can't approach or ride pegasi (Think of the myths about unicorns only being able to approach women.) This is also why Henry switches bodies with Sumia to ride hers, instead of simply asking her for permission.
    • That however does not explain why there were MALE Pegasus Knights (albeit enemies) in the third Fire Emblem game. This would suggest that classes that are supposedly sex restricted may actually have an EXTREMELY low number of opposite sex members (like the Mercenary class for example) considering some of the specifics of certain classes which often include certain attire; imagine the fans reactions upon seeing a female Berserker or a male Dancer. Hercules himself had a Pegasus, so why can't the guys get one? They're not unicorns.
    • Well, obviously there are instances where males can approach and even ride pegasi for short periods of time, or else Sumia's rescue of Chrom wouldn't have been possible. I think it may have more to do with the weight of the rider than their gender, persay. You could theoretically train a very scrawny young man to be a pegasus knight, but he'd have to be very careful with his diet and exercize in order to stay light enough to not strain the pegasus during combat. And given that regular horses are almost as fast and can carry much heavier loads, training male pegasus riders might just be more trouble than it's worth.
  • Donnel's rapid academic development in his supports makes perfect sense when you take his "Aptitude" trait into account - not only does it speed up his combat development, but his academics and other mundane abilities as well. It also helps explain how his traps constantly manage to outwit trained soldiers... And Panne.
  • Why does Donnel wear a Bucket Helmet? All the villager NPCs in battle have Bucket Helmets, so it would make sense for a villager PC to also have one.
    • There's an in-universe reason as well: Donnel has very Messy Hair and wears the bucket as a way of hiding it.
      • That, however, does not explain why he is one of the few characters who wears their class-based headgear/anything resembling it (and in every class he has access to). It's not that Helmets Are Hardly Heroic; the headgear would actually complete some of the characters' looks (Fredrick had a sketch of a unique Great Knight helmet that looked boss compared to the Mooks'), but my guess is that it's to show who the character is and make them stand out from the generic headgear-wearing enemies; that however is not hard to do with or without headgear when your entire cast of characters either wear armor/clothes with unique design flairs, sport unique colors to differentiate them from the standard Mooks, or have defined facial features with non-standard hair. Plus in a logical sense they would be more safe with them on. My guess is so they don't have to come up with different headgear for the characters for each class. They DO have loads of classes.
  • When Chrom confronts Gangrel about the Plegian bandits that have been going around terrorizing Ylissian citizens, Gangrel simply points out that all that means is that Ylisse has a bandit problem, not that Plegia is invading them. In fact, Gangrel makes a pretty strong point about why he (and well, Plegia) shouldn't really be held responsible...they're bandits. Gangrel can't be held responsible for Plegian bandits leaving and attacking Ylisse - for all Ylisse knows, they're criminals within Plegia.
    • And being the trickster he is, he probably sent the bandits to drag Maribelle across the border so he can claim they invaded them. He'd have to answer if the army did it...but if outlaws did it...You gotta give that guy some credit, despite being as Ax-Crazy and Caligulesque as he is.
    • It's debatable as to whether or not that's really "Fridge" worthy, since if we operate on the assumption that Maribelle was telling the truth (and we have no reason not to) that's exactly what the game says he did anyways, with none of this assumption business on our part.
  • Many of the SpotPass teams contain references to the team's leader based on its composition. While some reference specific characters that they associate with, others just represent the specialization of their country. Others are fairly random or just generic soldiers that are similar to them.
    • Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon
      • Pr. Marth's team is a reference to his team in chapter 1, including Wrys. There are 3 Paladins, one with Strength +2, one with Speed +2, and one with MUCH lower stats compared to the other characters in the team with skills from the Tactician tree. An obvious nod to Cain, Abel, and Jagen, who is also the tactician in Mystery and New Mystery.
      • Minerva's team contains three pegasi among the other fliers in it. The pegasus trio Est, Catria, and Palla served Minerva.
    • Fire Emblem: New Mystery of the Emblem
      • Legion's team is him and 9 additional berserkers with the exact same stats, equipment, and skills. In the boss fight against him in New Mystery, he creates endless clones of himself until he is defeated.
      • Hardin's team contains 2 Bow Knight and 2 Paladins amongst 4 knights. They have the same class as the Wolfguards, namely Wolf, Sedgar, Vyland, and Roshe.
    • Fire Emblem: Genealogy of the Holy War
      • Sigurd's team is based on the same team that he led in the first chapter of the game, 4 Palladin, one wielding Gae Bolg(Quan), two representing Noish and Alec, one wielding the Brave Lance(Finn), a Valkyrie(Ethlyn), a General(Arden), a Great Knighy(Lex) and a Dark Knight(Azel).
      • Raquesis's team is based off the three Palladins that protected her in chapter 3 of Genealogy.
      • Julius's team contains Julius himself, wielding Goetia, + a General, a Bow Knight, a Warrior, a Sniper, a Paladin, a Sage, a Swordmaster, a Valkyrie, and an Assassin, all wielding either legendary Jugdral weapons, or a Brave weapon, (Sage being the exception) and possessing stats similiar to Julius. All of these classes have been used for one each of the Awakening Deadlords (missing only Lepus, Anguilla, and Gallus, a War Cleric, a Dark Knight, and a Sorcerer respectively) who either wielded a Brave weapon, or a legendary weapon (with some exceptions, like Sage). The Fridge Brilliance comes from the fact that Julius was the first enemy seen to actually deploy the Deadlords in their debut game. Goetia could be because the Loptyr Tome doesn't exist in this game, and Goetia is the closest to it that the players can get their hands on. The fact that all of the "Deadlords" wield exactly the same weapons as the Awakening Deadlords did in Chapter 22 means this is deliberate on the developers' part.
    • Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade
      • Sophia's team has a few Dark Mages (her own class), plus two Berserkers (Maggie and Rose), and a bunch of Barbarians. These are the enemies that appeared on the map where you first recruited her.
    • Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword
      • Nino's SpotPass team is mostly filled with promoted units, except for Nino, who is a mage. Nino joined you at a very low level near the end of the game she came from. By the time you're strong enough to beat her team, she'll join you at a low level again. The Hero, Swordmaster, and Assassin could represent Linus, Lloyd, and Jaffar respectively.
      • Serra's team contains a Mage, Knight and Thief, the classes of her three potential husbands: Erk, Oswin and Matthew.
      • Lyn's team consists of two Paladins, a Falcon Knight, a Sniper, a Warrior, a Bow Knight, a Trickster, a War Monk, and a General. These are essentially the promoted classes of Lyn's Legion, namely: Kent, Sain, Florina, Will, Dorcas, Rath, Matthew, Lucius, and Wallace. The team is even arranged in order of recruitment.
      • Hector's Team consists of a General (Oswin) a Trickster (Matthew) and two Pegasi (Florina with Galeforce—same as Lyn's- and Farina with Astra)
      • Eliwood's Team is two Paladins (Marcus and Lowen), two Warriors (Dorcas-with counter same as Lyn's- and Bartre with Zeal), two Generals (Hector and Oswin with the same abilities and items from Hector's team), a Cleric (Serra), a Trickster (Matthew), and a Swordsmaster (Guy). Recruitment order in his story mode for the strange exception of Rebecca who could've been represented by a Sniper.
      • Nergal's team are the members of the Black Fang. A Bow Knight (Uhai) a Sage (Ephidel) a Warrior (Brendan Reed) a General (Darin) and then the Four Fangs, a Valkyrie (Ursula), an Assassin (Jaffar) a Swordsmaster (Linus) and a Hero (Lloyd), Alternatively, the Sage and Assassin could be Kenneth (despite normally being a Bishop) and Jerme, representing the first part of that game's final chapter.
    • Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones
      • Eirika's team is a Paladin (Seth), a Cavalier (Franz), a Knight (Gilliam), a Pegasus Knight (Vanessa), and a Priest (Moulder), the first characters you recruit in her game.
      • Innes comes with a lot of Pegasi. Frelia was known for them.
      • Marisa comes with a lot of mercenaries (as she was part of a mercenary group) and one Hero (representing Gerik, the leader of that group).
      • The L'Arachel SpotPass team has her joined by nothing but a Berserker and a Trickster, namely Dozla and Rennac!
    • Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance
      • Mist's team has a Cavalier (Oscar), a Fighter (Boyd), an archer (Rolf), and a mage (Soren).
      • Lucia has generic soldiers but one Sage (Bastian).
      • Geoffrey's team is generic but they have the same classes as the generic soldiers he had with him when he was first introduced.
      • Ike's team a male Paladin (Oscar), a Warrior (Boyd), a War Monk (Rhys), two Snipers (Shinon and Rolf), a General (Gatrie), a Sage (Soren), an Assassin (Volke), and a Pegasus Knight (Marcia).
      • One that's a particular Genius Bonus: on any difficulty higher than Normal, all of Ashnard's troops have maxed Strength, referencing his Social Darwinist philosophy. Even on Lunatic, his is one of the only teams where everyone shares a maxed stat, meaning this has to have been deliberate.
    • Lyn's DLC chapter makes these references explicit: They don't just reference those characters; they are those characters, name, portrait, and all. They still look like generic units in combat, though...
  • War Monks and Clerics wield axes. During the actual crusades, monks were forbidden from using bladed weapons, and therefore many used maces and other blunt weaponry instead. Maces are typically not a weapon type in Fire Emblem, so the developers chose the next best thing.
    • Though this does beg the question why Libra didn't come wielding a hammer. While keeping the entire blunt weapon idea was impossible, making a blunt weapon his first one would have served the point very well.
  • Why does Anna have less support conversations than the other characters? The only characters she can support with are the Avatar and Tiki. The Avatar system was previously used in New Mystery of the Emblem, while Tiki appeared in the first/eleventh and third/twelfth games. In other words, the only characters Anna can support with, are characters who have appeared multiple times throughout the series like her.
  • At the beginning of the game, in the Premonition, the entire field (excluding the part Chrom and the Avatar are fighting Validar in) seems to be blackened out by the barrier Validar has put up. And yet, when you fight him for real in chapter 23, The rest of the field is no longer obscured. Considering the fact that the Fire Emblem has at least one fake gemstone in it, it would make sense that the barrier isn't strong enough to obscure the rest of the field.
  • The use of "dastard" could actually be a Shout-Out to the Fire Emblem Jugdral translation and the memetic line "Alvis you dastard!"
    • "Dastard" note  is an actual word.
      • Also, the official FE translations have been using "dastard" far earlier than Awakening. If anything, they probably could have used a more profound word than "Dastard", but the "Alvis you Dastard" line could have influenced the decision to use that one.
  • Some of the Second Seal reclassing options may seem filler or out of the blue for the character in question, but some do make sense after learning of their background:
    • Why does Henry, a magic user, have Barbarian/Berserker as a reclass option? Because he's Ax-Crazy, geddit? (And the bad pun fits his character)
      • But Wait, There's More! Henry's supports with Ricken and the second Drama CD state that he had an Odd Friendship with Mustafa aka the boss of Chapter 10, who treated him like a second son of sorts. What was Mustafa's class? Berserker. It's not unlikely that Henry wanted to honor one of the people who treated him well in the Plegian military.
      • His other class option is Thief, which incidentally makes his class set the same as Gangrel's. Given that Henry used to be one his soldiers, it's unlikely to be a coincidence.
    • Why does the Wyvern Rider Cherche have the Troubadour and Cleric lines? She was originally training to be a cleric before she met Minerva. And she tamed minerva via, among other things, repeteadly whacking her with her staff.
    • Lon'qu is able to reclass as a Thief or a Wyvern Rider, the latter of which is pretty odd. However, he's originally from the western continent of Valm, where wyverns are much more common and raised for battle. The Thief line makes even more sense when you learned he grew up in the slums of Chon'sin.
    • Every character from Valm can reclass into Wyvern Rider: Virion, Cherche, Say'ri, Walhart and Yen'fay. Lon'qu also can, being one of only two pieces of evidence he might be from Chon'sin originally. The other is the apostrophes in his name and the name of his childhood friend Ke'ri.
    • One of Gregor's reclassing options is a Barbarian. In one of his supports, Lon'qu mentions that he once competed with Basilio for the title of West-Khan, but he was no match. Perhaps he learned something losing to a Warrior like Basilio and wants become as strong as him.
    • Olivia tells Lon'qu in their support that Basilio (who is like a father to her) talks often about him. In her efforts to be more useful to Basilio apart from being a dancer, having the option to reclass into a Myrmidon like Lon'qu seems like a good way to do it. Her growth rates are even similar to his!
      • This also makes it rather appropriate how Olivia uses swords even as a Dancer.
    • With how unnoticeable Kellam is, the Thief line being available to him is hilariously appropriate. He reveals that he was the most selfish among his siblings growing up, which also makes it fitting. Going unnoticed seems a weird trait for a knight, a class that is designed to stand in the way and draw fire from squishier units. But his reclassing options are Thief, a class renowned for their ability to sneak around (and, as an Assassin, gains the skill Pass at Lv. 15 which allows you to run right past enemy units) and Priest, a healer class which cannot attack and cannot take much punishment, whose top priority aside of healing is avoiding enemy attacks...
    • Ricken looks up to Chrom and sees him as a brother. His reclass options, as strange as they are for a Mage, are the Archer and Cavalier lines...which are the same as Chrom's.
    • Similarly, Sumia and Cordelia are childhood friends despite their opposite personalities. This is also reflected in their reclass options: the kind and gentle Sumia can be made a Priest (healer) or a Knight (strongly defensive unit), while the straightforward Cordelia can become a Dark Mage (offensive magic) or a Mercenary (balanced swordsman/woman).
      • Also of note with Cordelia's reclass options is the fact that she can use every weapon type in the game. She gets lances as a Pegasus Knight, Swords as a Mercenary, and tomes (including dark tomes) as a sorcerer. after promoting she rounds out with axes (Hero), bows (Bow Knight) and staves (Falcoknight). pretty fitting that someone hailed as a genius can use every weapon in the game (that's not class-locked).
    • Donnel's reclassing options are the fighter and mercenary classes, both of which allow him to become a hero. Pretty fitting for an underdog with fast stats growth. Donnel is your typical anime protagonist, going from zero to hero.
    • Nowi's reclassing is the same as Tiki's (Mage and Wyvern Rider), expliciting the former being the latter's Junior Counterpart. Plus, reclassing either Nowi or Tiki as a Wyvern Rider lets you have a dragon... who is riding another dragon.
    • Speaking of people who can reclass into Wyvern Riders: both Frederick and Sully have access to that class, despite neither of them having a connection to Valm (unlike Lon'qu, Virion, Say'ri, Cherche, and Yen'fay), any affinity for dragons (Nowi and Tiki are dragons themselves, and Panne can communicate with other animals), or any other flight-based classes (Aversa). I couldn't understand why those two even had that class...until I remembered that they both have supports with Virion, who is from the continent of Valm, with its large wyvern population. (And the Virion/Sully pairing is even fairly popular) It's a sort of Fridge Funny to imagine that Virion just up and decided to teach a couple of his friends how to ride dragons one fine day.
  • Why is it that the Bad Future is averted, despite Emmeryn dying? It's because she never really died, because the assassination attempt failed, [[spoiler:and she only sustained memory loss (albeit very severe loss) from her fall. So although Marth was slightly correct, the bad future wasn't really that close as they thought.
  • Some players have complained that Gangrel and Walhart are dealt with too quickly after they give the player and protagonists reason to want them dead. Well, naturally! Once they cross that horizon, there's nothing that can reasonably stop Chrom and the Avatar's Roaring Rampage of Revenge, so the plot doesn't bother trying to shoehorn sidetracks into the main plot. Fortunately, it isn't too blatant about it, else it would be a chore to read through.
  • Leif Sword has the ability Despoil, as a reference to his game's capture mechanic and how it's used to get items.
  • Smash Bretheren 3 takes place at the Dragon's Gate from Blazing Sword, which is essentially Elibe's version of the Outrealm Gate (though it was much more plot-important at the time). If any of the old games' maps were to be remade for a battle between the champions of different realms, it would be the Dragon's Gate.
  • Some of the DLC's characters classes are references to their history.
    • Ephraim being a great knight? He was mentored by Duessel, Grado's Great Knight General on top of having growths well suited for it.
    • Leif being a trickster? Reference to his game's capture mechanic and how it's used to get items, same thing as with the sword named after him. The Staff may reference his love interest, Nana, a user of staffs.
      • Also the first arc in his own game is him breaking out of a prison.
      • In addition, the trickster's weapon range is identical to the female version of his starting class in FE 4, and it's one of the best classes for using magic swords, such as Leaf's famous Light Sword.
    • Roy being a Mercenary? Sword using Lord that never got promoted to something with Armor or Horses and possibly the fact his promotion was highly ineffectual. hence why he's a unpromoted class. His Spotpast class is Hero, a promoted version.
    • Eirika being a Bride? Perhaps referencing all the shared supports she had in her game, several of them ending in marriage. (Seth, Forde, Innes and Saleh in the romantic way; Tana and Ephraim in the platonic/ ship teasey one). Her spotpass class, Myrmidon, references both her growths in the game and how Myrmidon is the class that fits the closest to Eirika's unpromoted Lord one.
    • Katarina being a Grandmaster is a reference to what she said at the beginning of FE 12 (New Mystery): that she'd be a tactician of the group. If she's recruited as Spot-Pass character, she's a Sage instead - the same Class she has when she's re-recruited into Marth's group!
    • Seliph being a Swordmaster could be explained as he was raised in Issach, whose rulers favor the class. And his Big Brother Mentor and future King of Isaach Shannan is a swordmaster as well, and might have been his martial arts teacher as well.
    • Lyn is a Swordmaster by both her classes and growths being akin to the class.
    • Celica being a Sage? A reference to her more magic leaning class from Gaiden, Priest/Princess.
    • Ike's classes in his game were virtually identical to the Hero class. He also first appears as a Hero in Radiant Dawn.
    • Elincia's original class (Queen) was an enhanced Falcon Knight class.
    • Micaiah's Dark Mage class is a odd exception as her classes in the game dealt with light magic. Only sign is that she serves a "dark god"... however, Micaiah would probably be a Bishop in any of the other games, but Awakening doesn't have Light magic anymore and the classes that would have had it now use axes instead. That, and the above-mentioned "dark god" bit, means the closest class to hers is now Dark Mage. Plus, in Radiant Dawn she has "Darkness Affinity".
    • Some Spotpass characters have this as well: A lot of the characters with unique classes get the generic class that their unique class was an Expy of (Hardin, Julius, Raydrik, Zephiel, Nergal, Ashnard, Sanaki, etc.) or get classes within the promotion trees of the class that their class was an Expy of (Lyon, Sephiran, etc.). Arvis meanwhile is a Sorcerer because Sorcerer is one of the few classes to have good stats all around on top of a good Magic stat (especially in Defense and Resistance), and thus serves as a stand-in for Arvis' Emperor class (where he had good defense, but used magic, instead of the Sword, Lance, or Axe that's the usual norm for Emperor-type classes).
  • Every single one of the second-generation characters is a Cloudcuckoolander at best and half-insane at worst. Why are they all messed up, in different ways? Because all the the second-generation characters grew up in a war-torn zombie apocalypse hellscape where their parents were brutally murdered and any day could be their last. All of the second-generation characters have severe PTSD and manifest it in different ways! To wit:
    • Lucina is incredibly stern and serious, and her smiles look bittersweet. Her entire character revolves around defying the future she's been forced to live, and she can't let herself relax or laugh or anything until it's been averted.
    • Owain's Large Ham tendencies are mostly an act to keep the others and himself motivated. He's obsessed with weaponry because that's how he keeps himself alive. He's never forgiven himself for his father's death.
    • Inigo, like Owain, plays up his Casanova tendencies to keep morale and good cheer up among the group. Like his mother, he tries to revitalize his friends and keep them going. He wants to prevent everyone he's with from just lying down and dying from despair.
    • Cynthia's so happy-go-lucky in the past because it's just so much better. The zombie apocalypse isn't as imminent, and she just wants to marvel at everything that's been denied her in the future, and enjoy it all as much as she can, while she can. Remember that scene in World War Z where Sergeant Avalon breaks down over a turtle because of how rare they've become? Also, if she's Lucina's sister then Lucina probably sheltered her as best she could. Which would be not well.
    • Severa's got the impossible (to her) task of living up to her mother's deeds—and if her mom got killed, what chance does she possibly have? She's got some serious self-esteem issues.
    • Brady's self-esteem issues are even worse than Severa's. He's got no combat skills to his name and is probably convinced that of the second-gen characters, he'll be the first to go.
    • Noire is...Noire. Submissive and pessimistic until she completely snaps. And yet still willing to help those around her, as shown in her supports with Yarne where she vows to protect him.
    • Kjelle trains constantly and is always in her armor because she absolutely positively cannot let her guard down. Ever.
    • Laurent's obsessed with detail because who knows when one tiny overlooked thing—an untreated sprain, a dwindling arrow supply, footprints in the snow, can mean the difference between life and death. It haunts him and becomes his obsession. Even more so, due to a "small detail" aka the problems of time travelling... he landed in the past three years before the others.
    • Gerome's a lonely soul, pushing away everyone out of his own hurt and abandonment issues and resigned to his fate. Or at least he's trying to convince himself to be resigned to his fate. He wears his mask to hide the sadness he feels from losing his parents.
    • Yarne is flat-out terrified of being killed like his family (and probably siblings if Taguel breed like actual rabbits). He doesn't want to become extinct and just plain wants to stay alive.
    • Nah was forced to grow up at a very young age and forced to act more mature than she really is in an attempt to be accepted by humans like her foster family. Her childlike nature really only comes out in her romantic supports, where her lack of social skills and her terror of being alone again is pretty apparent. (Which also might explain Nah's very aggressive and Out of Character reaction to Inigo - since he's a known womanizer, she likely snapped at the mere idea of being cheated on and kinda, uh, lost it.)
    • Morgan's got amnesia and many not even come from the same timeline (though personally I think so since any sibling supports mention that they remember Morgan), so s/he doesn't apply here.
      • According to the Future of Despair DLC though, they have it just as bad, or even worse than the other children. Their devotion to their Avatar parent is twisted into denial of their his/her "death" by Grima's possession, thus serving Grima in place of him/her. They are both paranoid and unshakably loyal, a frightening take on their clever and affectionate nature in the actual storyline.
      • Though Morgan's amnesia can still factor into this idea, as male Morgan does mention in a couple supports that his amnesia is specifically why he manages to stay so cheerful. He doesn't remember how bad things were before, so of course he's so energetic all the time!
  • The reason why Lon'qu lost to Marth so easily? It's because, during their battle, Lon'qu somehow realized that "he" was actually a woman.
    • The promotional manga confirms this. During their duel, Lon'qu bumped headfirst into "Marth's" chest.
      • Interestingly enough, Lon'qu is revealed to be able to suppress his fear of women during battle. However, it is entirely possible that he lost not just because his opponent was a woman, but because he was fighting a woman. He apparently reveals that he is afraid of getting close to women because he's afraid of them getting hurt like it happened to Ke'ri, who died in an Heroic Sacrifice to protect him - so once he realised his opponent was female, the effect was a sort-of Logic Bomb in his mind. So, it's not for the reason that you'd expect.
  • In regards to how Grima comes off as such a Generic Doomsday Villain even compared to Medeus, what about that? Well think about it, it was established in the Archaneia games that the Earth Dragons besides Medeus degenerated and attacked humanity. Later in Mystery of the Emblem and it's remake, Medeus claims in his death speech that if the Binding Shield is broken, the Earth Dragons would return. Now let's look at Grima, the dragon has dozens of eyes on his/her/it's body, was said in the Knights of Iris book to be descended from the Earth Dragons, and the shield and altar where the Earth Dragons were sealed have different functions in Awakening. At some point before Awakening, the Earth Dragons fused together into the dragon that is known as Grima, who went and terrorized humanity until being defeated by the efforts of the First Exalt, Naga, and others. Considering how the Earth Dragons were before being sealed, having a dragon who came from a fusion of them be so into attacking humans isn't that surprising.
  • Lon'qu could possibly be Valmese from Chon'sin, since people from Chon'sin have names with apostrophes.
    • It's already been confirmed that Lon'qu grew up in the slums of Chon'sin. He left after the death of his childhood sweetheart Ke'ri.
      • THAT IS NOT CONFIRMED ANYWHERE IN THE GAME SO STOP SAYING THAT. It's entirely possible from his name and whatnot, but NOWHERE is it ever confirmed in the game.
  • If Chrom is most likely to break things, why would the royal family trust him with the Falchion, one of the nation's greatest treasures? Because Chrom can't break it!
  • What does the Carrion Isle shop sell? Why, Reeking Boxes!
  • Why is Gangrel, the king of Plegia, a bizarre class like a Trickster? Because he was originally a lowly slumdog who worked his way into snatching the Plegia crown, promoting from a common thief into quite the trickster, indeed.
  • The Strongest One's Name had it's name changed to Apotheosis in North America, which doesn't make sense until you look it up. Here's the main definition for Apotheosis: the elevation or exaltation of a person to the rank of a god. The name change suddenly makes a lot of sense and becomes far more fitting, considering that the enemies have stats that eclipse even Grima, possibly even on Lunatic+ mode. What's even more, it's stated that the warriors you face there are heroes who became too powerful and eventually ended up there for a challenge. When you look at this from a gameplay point of view, you and the Shepherds are heroes and depending on when you finally decide to go to Castle Apotheosis, you'll most likely have capped out stats and Limit Break equipped, with superior skills equipped on each of your characters. The warriors you face are probably meant to represent some incarnation of the Shepherds who have reached the castle, and considering that the Outrealm gate is a gateway that crosses between time and space, the warriors probably are the Shepherds who decided to stay there.
    • Why is Sacred Stones - the least difficult game in the franchise - the game whose music is used for Apotheosis - the single most difficult challenge in the franchise? Sacred Stones is not just remembered for being ridiculously easy, it's also remembered for having the most Brutal Bonus Level in the series, more specifically the Lagdou Ruins. The overworld music used in Apotheosis (Confront the Past) is also used in Lagdou Ruins as the overworld theme, and the battle theme (The Battle Must be Won) is a boss theme that tells you that you're not even fighting enemies anymore. Some people have taken these as some sort of sign that you ARE in Lagdou Ruins...
  • The first time you hear the game's recruitment theme is when the Avatar is formally introduced to the rest of the Shepherds and officially made a member (whereas before they were just tagging along with Chrom and company). That's right, the whole first part of the game is your very own recruitment scene.
  • The children's birthdays coincide with the original release dates of previous games in the series (aside from Morgan, who has Children's Day instead). But perhaps each child has a specific reason for sharing their birthday with that particular game:
    • Lucina: Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light - She is Marth's descendant and wields his sword, the "blade of light" itself.
    • Yarne: Gaiden - In his paralogue, you have to choose which faction you're fighting against, with neither being preferable. Gaiden has two armies (Alm's and Celica's) that must coexist to win.
    • Severa: Mystery of the Emblem - The game that was caused by Hardin's Unrequited Love for his wife.
      • Her mother's situation with Chrom getting married mirrors Catria's unrequited love for Marth in this game, as Catria says his name in her death quote.
    • Cynthia: Genealogy of the Holy War - Her mother's favorite book, localized in English as "Ribald Tales of the Faith War".
    • Kjelle: BS Fire Emblem - Are you not going to take it seriously just because it's not a "real" Fire Emblem game? Game-chauvinist!
    • Gerome: Thracia 776 - Takes place entirely on the Thracian Peninsula, which is known for its Wyvern Riders.
    • Nah: The Binding Blade - Say, didn't Elibe have that one minor, unimportant skirmish between men and dragons?
      • Roy may be part-manakete himself, like Nah.
    • Laurent: Blazing Sword - He dreams to be able to "sort the truth from the legends." So he naturally gets the prequel in which Athos - the living legend - is still alive. Also, he likes history, so, you know, that. The point is, prequel.
    • Noire: The Sacred Stones - Her alternate self is almost as though she's possessed by a demon... but poor Lyon had similar spasms.
    • Brady: Radiant Dawn - The boss of his Paralogue, Xalbador, is vandalizing a place of worship because he feels that he's been abandoned by the gods. Now, what was the entire plot of Radiant Dawn's endgame about?
    • Inigo: Shadow Dragon - Inigo is the only other child to mention he had the Mark of the exalt if Chrom is his father, Lucina aside. Also, he's a womanizer, and every woman in Archanea wants to wield Marth's Falchion.
    • Owain: Heroes of Light and Shadow - Look at that title and tell me it isn't freaking perfect. Not only that, but he, too, is a descendant of Marth the Hero-King.
      • Also in this game is the first playable character you can name and control as an ally in battle, known as the MU. Owain often names his weapons so that they become not just tools, but his ally in battle.
  • There are some complains about Say'ri and a recruited Yen'fay not being able to support. However, it makes sense: the Yen'fay you recruit is not the one you fought, but the one from the Bad Future. A Yen'fay who couldn't save his younger sister or his kingdom, thus likely believes he's not worthy of Say'ri sisterly affection. He's surely aware that he'll have to say "But Now I Must Go" at some point (and he does, unless her married girl!Avatar), so he doesn't want to emotionally attach himself to the sister of the person whose place he's sorta taking.
  • In Chapter 14, the Avatar's strategy of ramming flaming derelict ships into the Valmese fleet to set them on fire is actually a real-life naval tactic, used perhaps most famously by Sir Francis Drake against the Spanish Armada. Granted, Drake and his crew weren't on the burning ships they sent into the enemy fleet, but hey.
  • Let's take a look at Sumia's tiny pool of prospect boyfriends/husbands. Chrom? He has known her for a long time and she serves under his orders, so he's among those who know first-hand what kind of person she is. Frederick? A serious (generally) and responsible man who takes care of everyone's needs and, in his love confession to her, admits he fell for her while worrying over her clumsiness. Gaius? A guy who has worked in very shady deals for a good part of his life and isn't super happy about it, so he can see beyond appearances (and her failed attempts to help him) rather well, and likely thinks her candid honesty is something quite refreshing. Henry? Someone who used to be shunned and neglected in his past, befriends her when he uses a hex to fix one of her mess-ups, is rather delighted when she theorises about non-bloody uses for his curses, and shares her love of animals. Boy!Avatar? An All-Loving Hero who approaches her shy self, attempts to see the best in everyone and tells her "Be Yourself" so she can "blossom" and develop. It's next to no wonder that this very small group is almost exclusively formed by guys who are very different personality-wise, but still can draw the best out of someone as clumsy, self-deprecating and insecure as Sumia, and then love her for the kind and devoted woman she actually is underneath. It's kinda.. Heartwarming In Hindsight if you think of it.
    • You can apply the same logic to Chrom's small marriage pool, too (Not counting Generic Village Maiden here). Sumia has known him for a while and is a member of the Shepherds, as mentioned above. Sully is also a Shepherd, and her and Chrom's A-support makes it clear that the two of them were friends from childhood. Maribelle is the dearest friend of Chrom's little sister, meaning the two are probably at least passingly familiar with each other through Lissa. So far, three out of five of his potential wives are people he's known in the past. Robin and Chrom formed a bond right from the beginning and are best friends who are usually on the same wavelength (and as mentioned in Sumia's entry, Robin is an All-Loving Hero. Or All Loving Heroine in her case). Olivia is the only odd one of the bunch, but even she makes sense: some of Chrom's other supports show that he can be completely awkward when it comes to relationships and social graces. Who else could sympathize more with this than the perpetually-shy Olivia? (Even more so when you consider that Olivia uses a similar reasoning to tell the also socially-awkward Lon'qu that they belong together).
  • Also, Sumia's Base Breaker nature is easy to put on perspective... Remember, many of the people who play this game are teenagers/young adults, who either are or used to be pretty awkward themselves. Seeing a character who is very clumsy and self-loathing might hit a bit TOO close to home for comfort, and it's even worse with the huge double standards in society about female characters: fictional women must be flawless, always self-reliant and adhering to "traditionally masculine" attitudes, otherwise they aren't "good and worthy enough". It can potentially explain why more self-assured ladies like Sully or female!Avatar are held up as "strong female charas" in the West AND are also used to bash Sumia herself, despite how in-story they're very kind to her (and girl!Avatar actually tries to help Sumia with her issues, just like boy!Avatar does): the members of that specific fandom fringe may attempt to cover up how they see Sumia as a reminder of the kind of persons they either used to be or still are and bash the crap out of her, while latching on "strong female characters" that are the opposite — also in an attempt to forget about their own issues on women as a whole.
  • In Cynthia's paralogue, a bandit by the name of Ruger has been impersonating Chrom, despite apparently looking nothing like him, and despite the fact Chrom is one of the few possible fathers for Cynthia. Looks to be inconceivable — until you realize that bandits tend to re-use portraits. Ruger's portrait is the same as Gecko's, and since they clearly don't look the same in-universe, it's possible that Ruger might actually look a lot more like Chrom.
    • This can be supported by the fact that all the villagers at the beginning of the paralogue immediately mistake Chrom and company for the bandits as well, further implying that Ruger may actually resemble Chrom.
    • Think about this for a good moment. Ruger is a trickster, and tricksters look the closest thing to royalty given their classy outfits, but the characters who are often given the choice to reclass into it are possibly known for thievery or being, well, tricksters. (FFS, Gangrel is a trickster and he is a King). Plus, it's IMPOSSIBLE for someone to look exactly like another unless they are possibly twins, so people mistaking Chrom for Ruger despite the fact that Ruger's portrait is shared Gecko's portrait (as well as Jamil and Ezra) would have made no sense if Ruger didn't look like Chrom at all. Plus, what weapon is Ruger wielding? A Levin Sword that shares the same white and gold color schemes as Falchion (albeit having no red and being a short, jagged sword of all things). No wonder people mistook him for Chrom.
  • In The Future Past 3, as Lucina prepares to strike down Grima, his/her sprite turns from an Enemy Unit to an Other Unit, signifying that in their last moments, the Avatar resumed control.
  • When rescuing Maribelle from Aversa and some bandits, Ricken blasts them with wind magic and Aversa reacts pretty strongly to it. At this point in the game, the player is new to wind magic and probably believes that the spell must have been very powerful due to the scene, but it's no different than the other types of magic, which might make one wonder why Aversa made such a big deal over it. It's not until much later when you see her on the battlefield for the first time that Aversa is revealed to be a Dark Flier, in other words, weak to wind magic. Meaning, even a Child Mage like Ricken could have potentially killed her on the spot.
  • Tharja is from Plegia, a nation that reveres the dark dragon Grima. When recruited you find that she develops an unhealthy obsession with your avatar, who is later revealed as being raised to be the perfect vessel for Grima. And seeing as how she stalks you even if you are female, she may not even be attracted to your character but to Grima itself! Considering that's she's also enamored with THE DARKNESS as she points out in quite a few supports, she's probably not really attracted to the Avatar or Grima, just the DARKNESS inside of them.
    • This theory actually fails to address why Henry, who ALSO is Plegian and with some screws loose (and a Dark Mage like Tharja), does not develop similar patterns towards the Avatar. The case of the also Plegian Gangrel's a bit more understandable, as he plainly states that he isn't a Grima worshipper. Also, Tharja can marry the Male Avatar; making her solely obsessed with the Grima within him would make few sense, as such a deal wouldn't be enough to make her start and sustain a relationship with him. (It could be that she started obsessed with the Grima power coming from the Avatar, but later she came to love his actual person in her own yandere way. Or, if she marries someone else than the Avatar, she keeps at least a part of these sincere but twisted feelings for his/her actual self.)
  • Why do the future kids get their hair dyed when the four most popular are shown in Yukata? Because their hair color is subjective to the player, and the developers made it so that they don't have to make multiple arts for each possible color!
  • The box art shows many of the characters. If you look in the veeeery background, you can see Kellam, inconspicuous as usual and with his head covered up.
    • Also on the Box art are characters like Tharja. She's an enemy in-game, but the box art shows her fighting alongside the other characters. This should tip you off that she's not a one shot character and not to kill her when you come across her.
    • And out of all of Chrom's love interests to be shown, Sumia gets the spot. Makes sense, she is one of the two Implied Love Interests alongside a female Avatar, and all the official artwork that includes the Avatar tries to make them look non-descript as possible to avert using one or another look/body build/etc. over the others. (To the point that the first Drama CD has a male Avatar, but the second has a female Avatar instead... Oh, and the one with guy!Avatar is centered on the days after Chrom's marriage, but carefully hides the identity of the girl he married. She could be the Village Maiden, for all we know and care.)
    • Marth is the only character on the boxart shown going against the direction of Chrom and the other Shepherds. This isn't just highlighting the duel between the two in the beginning, it could also refer to Lucina, who is Chrom's daughter, going back in time to save his life and stop Grima from restoring himself to power.
  • In the cutscene where "Marth" tells Chrom about the plot to kill Emmeryn, "Marth" kills an Assassin. Not just a hired killer, an Assassin of the Assassin class. You can tell by the blades on the arms.
  • It may seem kind of weird for Henry of all people to be the one who can talk to anything alive. But he's really the best kind of person to have that ability. If you could talk to anything alive, including plants... what would you eat? You can't go vegetarian since you know that plants are also sentient, and animals are a no-go. What's left? Rocks? Henry, with his... strange ideas of life and morality, can kill anyone and anything (except for the Shepherds) without feeling guilty, so he won't feeling guilty about eating sentient creatures...
  • Laurent is the only 2nd generation character who has to be recruited from a village instead of the other children who are out in the open. Leave it to the brainy one to come up with the idea that it's safest to find cover to find your party.
    • Double when you remember that Laurent has spent at least two additional years in the past, compared to his friends. He likely knows many places, tricks, social conventions, etc. that the other kids don't.
    • Additionally, it seems as if Laurent was one of the only children to have a job other than warrior, along with Brady. He claims to be a traveling scholar, and would be more welcome in a village than a warrior. There are other factors, such as whether the village needs warriors or if the warrior already saved them, but scholars would generally be harmless when it comes to being a stranger.
    • He also starts off with an Elwind tome when his portrait looks like a red Fire-based tome. The red tome could just be for extra Generation Xerox with his mother. However, Laurent is in a desert where flying units have an advantage. Flying units are weak to Wind magic. If Ricken is his father, he also states he specializes in Wind magic specifically because Ricken encouraged him to become a mage.
  • Owain is often preferred as a mage despite his personality because of his mother's influences. Thinking of the Myrmidon archetypes as typical Badasses it would make sense for Owain to copy them especially with his penchant for theatrics. He's not an expert in combat as he is an expert in pretending to be a badass better suited as a magic user. Also keep in mind he can be considered a Bard of sorts and knowing how Bard classes in past games could promote to Sages...
  • Why does Owain think giving weapons names makes them more powerful? It's because in order to give weapons names, you have to use the game's "Forge" mechanic, which is also used to raise their stats! And the unique weapons that have names tend to be the strongest weapons in the game!
  • In the Hot-Spring Scramble DLC, Yarne's dialogue with Inigo reveals that he's terrified of getting wet since he fears that it will lead to him catching a chill and dying. At first this seems like its just Yarne being his normal self, however this is very much Truth in Television as bathing or submerging a rabbit in water could cause it to catch a chill or go into shock and die very easily.
  • Validar/Fauder having Rightful King/Royal Weapon on Lunatic Mode makes sense and may be a case of Story And Gameplay Integration, considering that he's now the king of a nation founded by the Grimleal itself and with him being the current leader of the sect. Same thing for him having Grima's Truth and Dragonskin/Evil Dragon Scales on hard mode and up once you take into account that he's a failed Grima vessel.
  • It seems odd that in Chrom's potential family, his daughters get Aether and his sons get Rightful King. But what else would you call the only son of the ruler of a nation? Besides prince, I mean.
    • It doesn't explain why Lucina can also get Rightful King. Yeah, she has to earn it on her own, but she can still get it. Also, the Japanese name for the skill translates to "Royal Weapon," which in addition to being gender-neutral doesn't make sense for anyone other than Chrom and Lucina, since they're the only ones who use Falchion on a regular basis.
    • Lucina is the eldest, while her brother (whether Brady, Inigo or Morgan) would be the eldest son. You don't need Falchion to be the king, as Emmeryn can't use it. The Japanese name and the English name don't match up, admittedly.
  • It seems odd that Inigo, son of the speed-based Dancer Olivia would be a Mercenary rather than a Myrmidon. Then you see the acrobatic dodges that Mercenaries and Heroes pull off...

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