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Comic Book: The Multiversity
You think this is just a trope page, but it's bait. You're bait for them. You!
Grant Morrison's 2014 limited series exploring the post-New 52 DC Comics multiverse. It comprises a two-issue framing story, a set of issues each taking place on a different Earth, and a guidebook to the multiverse.

The overarching story sees the rise of a threat to all reality, the demonic destroyers known as the Gentry, and the formation of the Justice League of the Multiverse in response, with the individual Earths' stories being self-contained, akin to the structure of Morrison's Seven Soldiers.

Morrison's provided a map giving an overview of all the multiversal realms and the Monitors' "Shift Ships", plus a version focusing specifically on the Orrery of Worlds and the 52 Earths. DC have put up an interactive guide to the 52, adding information on the Earths as the series progresses.


  • Adaptation Expansion: Morrison is featuring an ongoing theme of presenting Batman counterparts on each Earth who were all inspired by something besides a bat, as a reference to a short story by Martin Pasko from Batman #256. Morrison seeks to pose the question of how far the character can be stretched before they're no longer Batman.
  • A Day in the Limelight: This is basically the Multiverse's day in the limelight, and what makes this even more significant is that so far, the main DC Universe (Earth-0) and its heroes are not going to be the saviors as they were in every other Multiverse-related catastrophe. The main fighting force is comprised of heroes from different Earths, and so far none of them have been forced to measure up to their Earth-0 counterparts.
  • All Myths Are True: Well, the DCU basically assumes this anyway, but the map of the Multiverse puts it up front, with Dream (the home of the Endless), Heaven, New Genesis, Skyland (the home of the various pantheons), Nightmare, Hell, Apokolips and the Underworld (also known as the Phantom Zone) all co-existing in the Sphere of the Gods. On another level, many of the Earths have heroes that are fictional in each other's worlds.
  • All There in the Manual: The multiverse guidebook contains both information on the multiverse and a Multiversity story.
  • Alternate Company Equivalent / Captain Ersatz:
  • Alternate Self: Being what it is, features a number of these, including Earth-4's versions of the Charlton heroes, Earth-5's versions of the Marvel Family, Earth-10's Kal-L, Earth-23's Kalel, etc.
  • Alternate Universe:
    • The Earths that get their own individual issues are:
      • Earth-4, where the Charlton Comics characters - The Question, Blue Beetle, Captain Atom, etc. - are the heroes of a Watchmen-influenced world.
      • Earth-5, the world of Captain Marvel and the Marvel Family.
      • Earth-10, a world where Kal-L was found by the Nazis, and grew up to become Overman. With the help of retro-engineered Kryptonian technology - and, when he was old enough, Overman himself - the Nazis won World War II. In guilt over the Nazis' atrocities, Overman turned his Earth into a pseudo-utopia; the last English-speaking rebels, Uncle Sam and the Freedom Fighters, fight Overman's Justice League.
      • Earth-16, with the children of the main DC universe's heroes and villains - Chris Kent as Superman's son, Damian Wayne as Batman's son, etc. - plus DC's '90s supers.
      • Earth-20, a pulp-style world featuring Doc Fate and the Society of Super-Heroes, who include Abin Sur's Green Lantern, Immortal Man, the Mighty Atom, Lady Blackhawk, and occasionally the Bat-Man.
      • Earth-33, a.k.a. Earth-Prime, which is basically our world, with the reader being its latest superhero.
    • Other Earths mentioned by Morrison, or set to play some part, include:
      • Earth-6, the world now home to the stories from Just Imagine Stan Lee Creating The DC Universe.
      • Earth-7 is already destroyed upon the arrival of Nix Uotan, but appears to have been a Marvel pastiche like Earth-8, below. However, pastiches of DC characters can be seen among the dead, so it's likely this Earth was a mix-up in homage to the many DC and Marvel crossover stories.
      • Earth-8, a Marvel Comics pastiche, for example featuring the Retaliators and the G-Men.
      • Earth-11, which includes female versions of the main DCU's heroes and villains, and male versions of its heroines and villainesses.
      • Earth-17, described as a Halloween world where magic and science co-exist, home to the Atomic Knight and Superdemon.
      • Earth-18, a Western-style world featuring the Justice Riders, who ride on Steam Punk horses.
      • Earth-19, a world currently in the era of Victorian England.
      • Earth-23, home of President Superman, where the world's greatest heroes are black (which can mean that they're black in the main DCU, as with Steel and Vixen; that a black holder of the legacy in the main DCU is Earth-23's primary holder, as seems to be the case with Green Lantern; that they're black versions of the hero, as with Superman; or that they're completely unique).
      • Earth-26, an Alternate Tooniverse where Captain Carrot and His Amazing Zoo Crew! reside.
      • Earth-31, a world home to Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns.
      • Earth-36, a world home to a team called Justice 9, whose Superman (Optiman) was killed by Superdoomsday in Action Comics #9.
      • Earth-39, a world based off the works of artist Wally Wood that supposedly has no superheroes.
      • Earth-40, apparently a Mirror Universe to Earth-20, featuring Lady Shiva, Vandal Savage, Sinestro, Blockbuster, and Doctor Felix Faust.
      • Earth-41, home to Spore and Dino-Cop.
      • Earth-42, home to imp-like versions of the Justice League known as the Li'l Leaguers.
      • Earth-43, which has a Vampire League and is home to the Batman Vampire Elseworlds trilogy.
      • Earth-44, an Earth home to a robotic version of the Justice League.
      • Earth-45, an Earth where Superman as a concept became perverted and corrupted by mass marketing and turned into the hyper-edgy Superdoomsday, whom later went on a homicidal rampage killing the Supermen of other Earths before being stopped by the Superman of Earth-0 in Grant Morrisons Action Comics.
      • Earth-47, described as a world where The Sixties never ended.
      • Earth-48, the new home to Lady Quark and Lord Volt.
      • Earth-51, the world of Jack Kirby's DC creations.
    • The guidebook is set to cover 45 of the Earths, leaving 7 over for other writers to develop: 14, 24, 25, 27, 28, 46 and 49.
  • Animal Superheroes: Sees the return of Captain Carrot, who last appeared in Final Crisis.
  • Antagonistic Offspring: Mastermen's Overman, the adopted son of Adolf Hitler.
  • Back from the Dead: Lord Volt had been killed in the first Crisis and stayed dead ever since. It seems that death had been undone at some point.
  • Bald Woman: Alexis Luthor in Earth-16.
  • Being Tortured Makes You Evil: Nix Uotan. Heavily implied for the Gentry.
  • Beware the Silly Ones: Captain Carrot, as bizarrely amusing as he may seem, is no slouch when it comes to heroics or combat. This became apparent in the very first issue, when he nonchalantly shrugged off an attack from Earth-8's Behemoth (an Expy of the freaking Hulk), then proceeded to knock him flat on his ass with one punch. You don't argue with Cartoon Physics.
  • Big Bad Duumvirate: The Gentry.
  • Bland-Name Product: The stories of Earth-7 and Earth-8 are published in other universes by Major Comics.
  • Body Horror: The Fantastic Four expies of Earth-7 are incredibly grotesque, due to their world's corruption by the Gentry.
  • The Bus Came Back: Five years after Final Crisis, Nix Uotan is finally back. Harbinger and Lady Quark also return, after vanishing post-Flashpoint, although Lady Quark had apparently been a prisoner of A.R.G.U.S. in the Vibe book.
    • The 90s version of Doctor Fate, Jared Stevens, appears on the variant cover to The Society of Super-Heroes.
  • Call Back: Morrison's map of the Multiverse includes Wonderworld, a dimension that was featured in his JLA run. News articles have also mentioned that some of his characters from Animal Man would appear on one Earth.
    • He revisits some concepts he introduced in Final Crisis, such as President Superman and Earth-23, and Overman and Earth-10, and some he introduced in Action Comics, like the mention of Superdoomsday, and Optiman's allies Red Racer and Flashlight.
    • Earth-10's Batman is called Leatherwing, which was also the name of a pirate version of Batman.
    • The variant cover to the Society of Super-Heroes issue featured the Batman-esque version of John Constantine called Hellblazer. Morrison created this version in an issue of Doom Patrol, in a dreamworld that had more superheroic versions of the Vertigo-related characters. This world was seen in again in the third Books of Magic annual.
  • Canon Immigrant: Alexis Luthor was originally a descendant of Lex Luthor from the Legion of Super Heroes cartoon series. On Earth-16 she's Luthor's daughter.
  • Cartoon Physics: Captain Carrot invokes this in a fight with a Hulk Expy on Earth-8, a fight he won by the way. Being squashed flat doesn't do anything to him, because he can just pop back up again.
  • Comic Book Fantasy Casting: Teasers for The Just, a one-shot about legacy heroes with no evil left to fight show an Arrowette with a scantily-clad, shorthaired look very much like Miley Cyrus.
  • Comic Books Are Real: A key concept, according to Morrison: each Earth has comics featuring characters from other Earths, through which the heroes can keep informed about what's going on elsewhere. For example, Mastermen begins with Adolf Hitler reading Action Comics while using the toilet.
  • Composite Character: The Super-Sons in The Just are Chris Kent and Damian Wayne, rather than Clark Kent Jr. and Bruce Wayne Jr. as it was Pre-Crisis.
    • Spore seems to be a cross between Spawn and Swamp Thing.
    • Superdemon is what happens when you take the concept of Superman and add Etrigan into it.
  • Continuity Reboot: For Earths 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 16, 17, 26, 33, 40 and 43, none of which are their original incarnations - whether that's because of a retool, renumbering from the original Pre-Crisis multiverse, or replacing a different universe with the same number.
    • Earth-4 was created and destroyed in Crisis on Infinite Earths, and, coming pre-Watchmen, didn't have any influence from it.
    • Earth-5's Pre-Crisis analog, Earth-S, was destroyed in the Crisis.
    • Earth-6's Pre-Crisis analog was a world where America lost the Revolutionary War and a royal family of superheroes protected the Earth. Its sole survivor was Lady Quark.
    • Earth-8's Pre-Crisis analog was a world home to the heroes who debuted after the first Crisis. After 52 it was designed as a parody of the Ultimate Marvel line of comics and a revision to the Champions of Angor and Extremists. The world still seems to be Marvel-based, but with a team called the Retaliators instead of the Justifiers, for example. The Extremists still exists though.
    • Earth-10's Pre-Crisis analog, Earth-X, was a world where the Nazis won and the Freedom Fighters were La Résistance, but had no Justice League. It was destroyed in the Crisis. When it was restored in 52 it featured a Nazi version of the Justice League, which hadn't been done before. Conflicting portrayals in Countdown to Final Crisis had a standard generic Nazi League and an America covered in concentration camps. In Countdown Arena a Nazi version of the Ray was chosen as a contestant by Monarch, and it was mentioned the current fuhrer was a woman. Morrison disregarded most of this and reestablished his own version of Earth-10 in Final Crisis.
    • Earth-16 was classified as the universe home to the Young Justice cartoon, although Morrison has stated he's working on a way that incorporates the TV show with his interpretation of this particular Earth.
    • Earth-17 before the Crisis was a world where all superheroes were created by the government, until Overman (Superman) contracted an STD, went insane, and destroyed everything. As part of the 52 Earths, Earth-17 was recreated as a world home to the Atomic Knights, although Morrison has tried expanding on this Earth by describing it as a mix between science and magic, with a version of Etrigan as that world's Superman.
    • Earth-26 was designated Earth-C Pre-Crisis.
    • The post-Infinite Crisis Earth-33 was originally a magic-based world home to the League of Shamans, but since that was seen in Countdown to Final Crisis naturally it's been ignored just as everything else from that series was. Earth-33 is now the superhero-less "real world", formerly called Earth-Prime.
    • Earth-40, once a pulp Spy Fiction world home to "The Justice Files", has been retooled as a Mirror Universe to Earth 20, which appears to have taken up its mantle.
    • Earth-43, a universe home to the Batman Vampire trilogy, was originally called Earth-1191 in the first Multiverse before the Crisis.
  • Crapsaccharine World: How Overman views the utopia he built on Earth-10, disliking the fact that it was built on the brutal deaths of so many.
  • Cross Through: The threat of the Gentry will be felt throughout the books, which can still be enjoyed individually.
  • Dark Age of Supernames: The members of The Gentry have such colorful monikers as Dame Merciless, Hellmachine, Lord Broken, Demogorgunn and...Intellectron.
  • Deconstructor Fleet: The Gentry are this personified. They actually try to deconstruct Earth-7's Thunderer to death like they did with the rest of his universe.
  • Development Gag: Earth-4 is basically Watchmen as originally intended—that is, with Charlton Comics characters instead of ersatzes.
  • Eldritch Abomination: The Gentry is an entire supervillain team/pantheon of these.
  • Everything's Better with Monkeys: Nix Uotan is assisted by Mr. Stubbs, a buccaneer monkey.
  • Evil Counterpart: As a Mirror Universe to Earth-20, Earth-40 demonstrates its own explicitly.
    • Vandal Savage as compared to the Immortal Man, with the meteorite used to create their respective powers being used as the first murder weapon or made into a hallowed holy relic respectively.
    • Felix Faust as compared to Doc Fate, in terms of magical prowess.
    • Lady Shiva as compared to the Blackhawks, as highly proficient female fighters, albeit with her focusing more on swordplay rather than her good counterparts' gunplay.
    • Blockbuster as compared to the Mighty Atom, in terms of Force And Finesse.
    • Sinestro and Parallax as compared to Abin Sur's Green Lantern, with opposing powers of fear versus willpower.
  • Evil Knockoff: Sivana attempts to steal the power of Shazam by...creating a technological version of the Rock of Eternity that is twice the size of the original.
  • Expy: Morrison designed an Aboriginal version of The Mighty Thor called the Thunderer. This character and his group seem to be a nod to Mike Friedrich's Wandjina and the Champions of Angor, pastiches of Marvel Comics' Avengers. They get something of an updated appearance as "The Retaliators" when President Superman and the team arrive on Earth-8, one dimension shy of Thunderer's homeworld of Earth-7, indicating this world is connected to it in some way. The Fantastic Four and Dr. Doom receive similar treatment, becoming Earth-8's Future Family and Lord Havok respectively.
  • Face-Heel Turn: The chief antagonist of the series is a former "cosmic defender."
  • The Fourth Wall Will Not Protect You: The first issue is filled with narration boxes desperately telling the reader to abandon this book. Ultra Comics, the Real World Episode of the series, has its hero warning potential readers that their universe will be endangered if this magazine is read.
    • Thunderer claims that The Gentry are "pitiless ones from behind the Invisible Rainbow". Given how he uses rainbows to refer to other universes, there's the implication that the fourth wall is incapable of protecting the comic book characters from The Gentry.
  • Franchise Zombie: In-universe, the Gentry use the power of the Anti-Death Equation to keep Nix Uotan alive so they can corrupt him, a likely allusion to companies refusing to let go of concepts they can squeeze profit out of.
  • Fun with Acronyms: The Society of Super-Heroes, aka SOS.
  • Gender Flip: Earth-11 is a whole world of this in regards to the main DCU.
  • Guardian of the Multiverse: Nix Uotan's role, with his fellow Monitors gone.
  • Heel Realization: As put by Morrison in one article, Overman spent years working for Adolf Hitler, then one day he realized "Oh crap it's Hitler!"
  • Hemisphere Bias: Earth-23's core concept is that most superheroes are black. The picture of it in the Orrery of Worlds is centered on Africa.
  • Hero Antagonist: Uncle Sam and the Freedom Fighters will be this in The Master Men.
  • It's All About Me: Earth-16 is a world where the children of superheroes and supervillains are celebrity darlings since there's no more crime to fight (to the point where the contemporary Justice League roster has done nothing but battle reenactments). The solicits refer to this world as "Earth-Me."
  • Lady of War: Aquawoman.
  • Last of His Kind: Nix Uotan is the last of the Monitors. Thunderer is the last survivor of Earth-7.
  • Let's You and Him Fight: The Multiversity team and the Retaliators come to blows after a bewildered Thunderer knocks out his Earth-8 counterpart.
  • Laughing Mad: Lord Broken.
  • Magnum Opus: invoked From this MTV Geek interview:
    Morrison also promises a guidebook to the Multiverse will accompany the series, which he calls his magnum opus.
  • Meaningful Name: Mr. Stubbs appears to take his name from a chimpanzee in Toby Tyler; or, Ten Weeks with a Circus, a Victorian novel concerning the difference between the glamour of the circus as seen from outside, and the reality of it as seen from the inside.
  • Mind Screw: Grant Morrison is writing. This is a given.
  • Monochrome Casting: Heavily, heavily averted for a superhero comic. One review pointed out that the first line of dialogue by a straight white guy is about two-thirds of the way into the first issue.
  • The Multiverse: Set in the post-New 52 multiverse, featuring characters from all across its expanse, and the creation of its Justice League.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: This is Overman's primary characterization, as he's the Superman of a world where the Nazis took over the world, and he feels horrible knowing the utopia he built was founded on the crimes of Adolf Hitler.
  • Oh Crap: The wizard Shazam gets a rather darkly funny instance of this when he realizes that he's being overshadowed by Sivana's mechanical Rock of Eternity.
  • Our Presidents Are Different:
    • Kalel/Calvin Ellis, the Superman of Earth-23, is a black Kryptonian, and in his secret identity as Calvin, President of the USA.
    • Earth-4's president is assassinated by Peacemaker at the beginning of the Earth-4 story.
  • Poorly Disguised Pilot: Morrison's said the idea was for each Multiversity story to basically be the #1 issue for a different team on a different world.
  • Punny Name: Earth-8's American CrUSAder.
  • Race Lift: According to one interview, Earth-10's Freedom Fighters will represent ethnic, sexual, and religious minorities targeted by the Nazi Party. The Ray is homosexual, Doll Man is a Jehovah's Witness, Phantom Lady is Romani, and Black Condor is going to be African.
    • The new version of the Thunderer is Aboriginal. And of course the Justice League of Earth-23 consists of black versions of the mainstream DCU heroes.
    • Doc Fate, the Doctor Fate of Earth-20, is a black gunslinger.
  • Royals Who Actually Do Something: Aquawoman, the queen of Atlantis from Earth-11, as well as Lady Quark and Lord Volt.
  • Shout-Out:
  • Shmuck Bait: Ultra Comics. Its cover has the eponymous Ultra warning the reader that only they can save the universe and themselves by not reading this comic.
  • Straight Gay: Red Racer, the Flash of Earth-36, who is apparently in a relationship with his world's Green Lantern, Flashlight.
  • Symbolism: Of particular note with the Earths on the multiverse map. Earth-10, based on Earth-X, has a red 'X' on it; Earth-11, a Gender Flip of Earth-0, is upside-down relative to the other Earths; Earth-43, home of the Vampire League, is a blood-red shade; Earth-26, an Alternate Tooniverse, has a face; and so on.
  • Take That: The most distinguishing feature of Earth-8, based on Marvel Comics, on the interactive map is that its heroes "fight with each other as much as they fight the bad guys". Notably, the Behemoth (its version of the Incredible Hulk) transforms into a raging, giant, blue baby instead of a jade titan when aggravated.
  • Tragic Hero: Overman, or he may count as a Tragic Villain depending on your point of view. He began as a Nazi Superman, but he's actually incredibly guilt-ridden over what he did in their name, and realizes the world he created needs to be destroyed.
  • Ultimate Universe: The aim of Thunderworld is to be this in regards to Shazam.
    • Earth-7 was this to the Major Comics characters of Earth-8.
  • Universe Compendium: Or "Multiverse Compendium", rather.
  • X Meets Y: President Superman has been described by Grant Morrison as "Obama meets Muhammad Ali." Spore is what happens when Swamp Thing and Spawn are combined into one.

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