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Prefers Rocks to Pillows

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Sam Wilson: Your bed, it's too soft. When I was over there, I slept on the ground and used rocks for pillows, like a caveman. Now I'm home, lying in my bed, and it's like—
Steve Rogers: Lying on a marshmallow. I feel like I'm gonna sink right to the floor.
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There are many things a man returning to civilization can look forward to, the warm food, their family being by their side again, air conditioning and centralized heating, not to mention the simple comfort in feeling safe. But there's always one thing that never sits right with them.

Their bed. It's too soft. No good for a man used to sleeping in a hard bunk or hole in the ground. It just doesn't feel right.

This trope is a common way of emphasizing a character's rugged, austere life, and how they don't fit in with the life of comfort and even luxury they find themselves in. Typically seen in outdoorsmen, soldiers, and poor/homeless characters.

Can result in An Odd Place to Sleep. Related to No Place for a Warrior and Stranger in a Familiar Land.


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Examples:

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    Anime & Manga 
  • Appleseed has Deunan, rescued by Olympus's ESWAT from a ruined city, finding it difficult to sleep in a bed after so long on the battlefield. She ends up curling up on the floor, with a gun, with the bed's pillows arranged so if anybody sneaks into her room to try to kill her, they will think she's on the bed.
  • In Claymore, the eponymous warriors are trained to sleep in a sitting position with their sword planted for support. On the occasions when a real bed is offered, they find themselves unable to get comfortable. As Teresa began to soften up while caring for Clare, she found herself able to fall asleep in a bed while cuddling with the child.
  • The bounty hunter Nadie from El Cazador de la Bruja prefers to fall asleep while sitting in a chair if she can help it, mainly because it allows her to open fire before even waking up.

    Comic Books 
  • The Sandman has a story where a woodsman staying in an inn can't get used to the soft bed, and so sleeps on the floor. This saves his life when the innkeeper tries to kill him in the night.
  • In The Blue Lotus, the great fakir Ramacharma puts on a show in which he leaps on broken glass, sticks knives through his body and spins upside down on top of a nail. Tintin then offers him a seat to read his fortune, but he leaps up in pain when he rests his seat on a cushion. He then claps an attendant to bring him something his "sensitive skin" will sit better on, which turns out to be a stool made out of spikes.

    Films — Live-Action 
  • In Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Captain America bonds with a modern-day war veteran over how impossible it is to go back to sleep on pillows after spending years sleeping on the ground.
  • In Crocodile Dundee, after arriving in New York, Mick sleeps on a blanket on the floor at the posh hotel.
  • In Tropic Thunder, author and veteran Four Leaf Tayback sleeps on the beach, claiming, "Beds give me nightmares." As we learn later he's not a real veteran, this is presumably him trying too hard.
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    Literature 
  • King Nicholas in Airman is a former soldier, and he's said to sleep on the window seat in his chambers because the bed is too soft.
  • Ciaphas Cain finds it hard to sleep in overly cushioned beds (using said beds for vigorous exercise is a different matter).
  • In Circle of Magic, Briar is a street boy who grew up among gangs of thieves. He has great difficulty adjusting to civilian life, including sleeping on a proper bed. His solution is to pull the sheets off the bed and sleep on the ground.
  • Lords and Ladies plays with this trope in the case of King Verence of Lancre, who used to sleep outside the king's door as the court jester. Even as king he finds it a difficult habit to break.
  • In Red Rising, after passing/surviving the Institute in the first book, which involves roughing it as part of a Deadly Game of capture-the-flag, Darrow and his love interest, Mustang, comiserate in the second book how back in civilization they find themselves often sleeping on the floor because large, comfortable beds don't feel right to them.

    Live-Action TV 
  • In Homeland, Brody, who has been held prisoner by Islamist militants in Afghanistan for years, sleeps on the floor next to his wife's bed when he gets home. He claims this, but there's also an implication that he is trying to discourage her from trying to have sex with him.
  • Agent Fox Mulder from The X-Files is both an insomniac and a workaholic, so on the rare occasion when we do see him sleep, he prefers a hard couch to a proper bed. In the one episode where he buys a water bed, it starts to leak immediately and he gets rid of it by the next one.
  • Invoked by Captain Picard from Star Trek: The Next Generation when he finds himself a guest aboard a Klingon cruiser. His quarters are decent though Spartan. It's also pointed out that Klingeons do not sleep on soft pads, rather their beds are essentially a shelf. In a show of bravado, Picard smacks his shelf and replies, "Good! I like a firm bed." His difficulty in napping on that shelf belies that bluster.
  • In a more realistic and depressing example, in the second season of This Is Us, Randall and Beth adopt a foster daughter who is implied to have experienced a lot of abuse in addition to a generally precarious existence. In one episode, where she is about to sneak out of the house in the middle of the night, she's convinced to stay by Randall and Beth's children, but opts to sleep in a wooden chair rather than a bed, which she finds too soft.
  • The Punisher (2017): Lewis Wilson, a PTSD-afflicted soldier in Curtis Hoyle's PTSD support group, makes clear he is falling apart when he digs a pit in his backyard to sleep in, even when Curtis points out it's freezing in the middle of November. This is enough of a red flag that Curtis warns Billy Russo to not hire Lewis to work for Anvil.
    • Amy from the second series is also seen to sleep under the bed, though in her case it is more like searching a haven to protect her from the fear from the past as well as recent events.

    Webcomics 
  • In My Life At War Betsy-Ray gets a chance to sleep in a real bed after months on cots manufactured by the lowest bidder or shaped polymer slabs, and after some tossing and turning ends up throwing some pillows and a blanket on the floor.

    Western Animation 
  • The Legend of Zelda: In the pilot, Link was talking to himself, reminiscing about the days when he was outside, adventuring, sleeping in mud, and how he actually preferred that over sleeping in a bed.
  • She-Ra and the Princesses of Power: Adora, having spent a good portion of her formative years in spartan barracks with other cadets, has a very hard time adjusting to sleeping alone in her luxurious new chambers at Bright Moon in general and the massive feather bed in particular. Upon learning this, Bow and Glimmer not only set up a sleepover but requisition a utilitarian bunk to replace their new friend's bed with.
  • Subverted by Bubbles in The Powerpuff Girls Movie when the girls exile themselves on a lone asteroid in space:
    Bubbles: I DON'T WANNA SLEEP ON A ROCK!!! (cries pitifully)

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