Follow TV Tropes

Following

Western Animation / Wolves, Witches and Giants

Go To

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wolves_witches_and_giants.jpg
Advertisement:

A collection of stories featuring the wolf, witch, and the giant as the main antagonists of each story, all told in a Fractured Fairy Tale way narrated by the late Spike Milligan. Made by the creators of Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids.

Needs Wiki Magic Love.


Wolves, Witches, Giants and Tropes:

  • Abusive Parents: In certain stories, the Witch is mostly this, especially in "Diamonds and Toads" to the step daughter.
  • Ambiguously Gay: King Pig in the story segment, Sweet & Sour.
  • Anachronism Stew: Though the series is usually set in Medieval Times, there are noticeable modern objects all around the place. (Ex. The wolf having a blue sports car).
  • Antagonist Title
  • Bald of Evil: The witch whenever her hat and wig are blown off.
  • Barefoot Cartoon Animal: Most females, especially the wolf's mother and wife, are this.
  • Advertisement:
  • The Big Bad Wolf
  • Black Comedy: One of the staples of the show.
  • Catchphrase: Each villain has one of these.
    Wolf: This is going to take some thought.
    Witch: (whenever she casts a spell) Cauliflower, pastry, treacle and jam, The wickedest witch in the world who I am! Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!!
    Giant: Fe-Fi-Fo-Fum!
    Fox: Oi! Outfoxed again!
    Giant: (Whenever he is defeated) You'll be hearing from my solicitor!
    Wolf: (Whenever he's defeated) I'll get you for this one day! You'll see!
  • Bowdlerization: In "Rapunzel", the prince doesn't get his eyes scratched out by brambles - instead, he shuts his eyes and refuses to open them again until he finds Rapunzel.
  • Clip Show: In the adaption of The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing, as both the wolf (in sheep disguise) and fox both wait to strike the sheep, the two watch TV of their past exploits, including a new one featuring the Gingerbread Man where the fox outsmarts the gingerbread man.
  • Advertisement:
  • Cunning Like a Fox: The fox whenever he appears.
  • Death by Adaptation: The chicken who lays the golden eggs in the segment, Jack and the Beanstalk gets eaten for supper when it refuses to lay golden eggs for Jack and his mother.
  • Depending on the Writer
  • Downer Ending: The Little Mermaid, ironically even more than the original story due to Bowdlerization - since the religious references have been removed, the mermaid simply turns to sea foam after speaking to the prince, while the prince wanders the beach hearing her voice in the waves.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Before he became a character in his own right starting in the adaption of "The Wolf and the Fox", the crafty fox makes a brief appearance in the adaption of Rapunzel where he escapes the fox hunters.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Both the fox and the wolf within Babes in the Woods are willing to kill or eat, but in this story, they both take sympathy for the infant twins and later set them both up for adoption.
  • Fairy Tale Free-for-All: The show casts the wolf, the witch, and the giant as recurring villains in various fairy tale stories, and similar heroic characters will often use the same character as well (eg. The Brave Little Tailor and Sleeping Beauty share a princess.)
  • For the Evulz: In the show's take on Beauty and the Beast, the witch's motivation for body-swapping the prince and the wolf was that she was bored with watching snooker on the television.
  • Half-Dressed Cartoon Animal: The fox, male goats, and the 2 female goat kids seem to be this.
  • Heavy Sleeper: The wolf in the story of The Wolf and the 7 Kids had this when he swallowed the six kids whole. The fox (during the episode The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing) even lampshades this when he mentions about the mother goat cutting his belly open.
  • Karma Houdini: The fox gets away with stealing food while leaving his wolf partner to end up suffering as shown in "The Wolf and the Fox".
  • Lemony Narrator: Spike Milligan's trademark snark is on full display during his narration duties.
  • Irish Accent: The crafty fox is shown to display a thick Irish accent.
  • Once an Episode: If one episode focuses on one villain, the other 2 make minor cameos in parts of the episode.
  • Recurring Character: The series makes note that the characters for each role is reused for each story. (Ex: The princess for both The Brave Little Taylor and Sleeping Beauty is the same one.)
  • Spared by the Adaptation: Oddly, a few have been spared from death. For example: in the adaption of Babes in the Woods, neither one dies in this one. Instead, they are given to a Vicar and his wife for adoption.
  • Those Two Bad Guys: Since the second season, the Wolf and Fox have been partnered up in some of the stories they appear in.
  • Villainous Glutton: The wolf is this and more or less to the extent, the Giant and Fox.
  • Villain Protagonist: Sometimes, each villain gets its own episode and even then, sometimes Laser-Guided Karma can hit the wolf, witch, and/or giant.
  • Wicked Witch

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report