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Video Game / Crash Bandicoot 2: N-Tranced

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Crash Bandicoot 2: N-Tranced is the second portable installment in the Crash Bandicoot series and the official sequel to Crash Bandicoot: The Huge Adventure. Like it's predecessor, it was developed by Vicarious Visions for the Game Boy Advance, and was the second in their trilogy of Crash platformers for the system.
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Having finally lost patience with Cortex's failures following his previous mishap with the Planetary Minimizer, Uka Uka decides this time to turn to Dr. Nefarious Tropy. The master of time already has a plan in the works, having enlisted N. Trance, the master of hypnotism from the fifth dimension. The duo abduct the three bandicoots and brainwash them to do their evil bidding. A misdirect with Tropy's vortex leads Crash to escape however, leaving him to fight and rescue his possessed friends...and another mysterious associate.

Basically a Mission-Pack Sequel, to The Huge Adventure, reviews tended to be positive for N-Tranced, despite being perceived by many critics as being more of the same with no major gameplay innovation beyond the isometric atlasphere bonus stages (originally seen in Crash Bandicoot: The Wrath of Cortex.)

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Followed by Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage, which maintained the same gameplay in a Spyro the Dragon crossover, albeit with more mini-games.


Tropes Used In This Game:

  • Absentee Actor: The only Crash game in the entire series where Cortex does not appear in the story, though he still completes his perfect run by appearing in level cameos and multiplayer mode. N. Gin, Tiny and Dingodile only appear via similar means.
  • A Day in the Limelight: For N. Tropy, who steals the role of antagonist from Cortex, and Fake Crash, who finally gets plot importance instead of being a joke character.
  • "Arabian Nights" Days: The Arabian levels, which first showed up in Warped, make a reappearance.
  • Badass in Distress: Crash is spared from N. Tropy's vortex after Aku Aku uses his magic to pull him out. In turn, Crash has to rescue Coco and Crunch from brainwashing.
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  • Brainwashed and Crazy: N. Trance's key shtick. He brainwashes Coco, Crunch and Fake Crash to do his and Tropy's bidding.
  • Build Like an Egyptian: The Egyptian levels return from Warped.
  • The Bus Came Back: After not appearing in the first GBA game, Tropy returns and replaces Cortex as the main antagonist.
  • Cliffhanger: The game ends with Uka Uka, frustrated at Cortex and Tropy's failures, declaring that he will face Crash himself next time. Sadly, a sequel was never developed.
  • Continuity Nod: When Crunch is defeated and rescued from his hypnosis by Crash, he mentions that this is the second time he's been brainwashed. This refers to his debut appearance, when he was evil at first.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: N. Trance is the final boss you'll face if you didn't find all the gem shards.
  • Earn Your Fun: The game's multiplayer mode hosts an impressive number of levels and characters to choose from. You have to unlock all of them in single player mode however.
  • Evil Genius: Coco, expectedly, attacks you in an advanced battle mech after becoming Brainwashed and Crazy.
  • Hazy Feel Turn: Fake Crash was already a somewhat ambiguous character. After being captured by N. Trance, he attacks Crash. Following his defeat he helps him defeat N. Trance and even obliges in taking a photo of the bandicoots after their victory.
  • Instant Flight: Just Add Spinning!: The upgrade Death Tornado Spin lets Crash glide around if he does multiple spins in the air, just like in Warped.
  • Lethal Lava Land: The volcano levels, overlaping with Jungle Japes.
  • Marathon Level: Any box gem. Normal Crash games have second gems hidden away on a side path that is usually not relevant to the box gem (with some exceptions). This game requires you to go down the gem shard pathways in order to get the remaining boxes. So, very often, you don't just have to go down the route to get the shard, but get back without dying and make it back to a checkpoint to get the box gem.
  • Mirror Match: Fake Crash. 2 player races also pit two versions of Crash against each other.
  • Mission-Pack Sequel: Uses the same engine and graphics as The Huge Adventure (which itself is essentially a 2D rehash of Warped), albeit with new levels, a couple different gameplay modes and multiplayer options.
  • Never My Fault: N. Tropy angrily blames N. Trance when they discover they brainwashed the wrong Crash, despite him being mistakenly sent through his vortex. N. Trance is more than willing to call him out on this.
  • Nintendo Hard: The latter parts of the game are pretty unforgiving, especially the gem shard pathway, comprised of three advanced levels and a very enduring face off with N. Tropy.
  • Once More, with Clarity!: To devise a plan for conquering the universe, N. Tropy uses his powers of time to peer into the future. He sees an image of himself standing together with the Bandicoots, and interprets this as the Bandicoots joining the side of evil, which leads him to summon N. Trance to initiate the game's plot. After N. Tropy is defeated, the Bandicoots take a picture with a captured N. Tropy to celebrate their victory - the same picture that N. Tropy had seen in his vision.
  • Promoted to Playable: You take control of Crunch for the first time in the series via the game's Atlasphere stages. (Poor Crash only gets one Atlasphere stage, as opposed to his stages from The Wrath of Cortex.) Coco is also promoted back to playable after being a NPC in The Huge Adventure, while nearly everyone is playable in the multiplayer Atlasphere mode.
  • Put on a Bus: All previous villains other than Uka Uka and N. Tropy are not present besides cameo and multiplayer appearances. Tropy's own bus ride in the previous game is the direct reason that Uka Uka replaces Cortex with him.
  • Recycled Soundtrack: As with The Huge Adventure, the game remixes a fair amount of tunes from Warped.
  • Signpost Tutorial: In the first "tutorial" stage, you'll find "hint squares" that will teach you how you do things.
  • Slide Attack: The upgrade you get after beating Crunch will let you do a much faster and longer-reaching sliding attack. It's hard to control, however.
  • Space Zone: Coco's levels are mostly this. She has to outrun an incoming fireball.
  • Sphere Factor: The Atlasphere levels, taken from The Wrath of Cortex where the player character rolls around inside a ball. Crash only gets one stage while Crunch gets two stages. Multiplayer sports a battle mode for the function with practically every cast member playable.
  • Spring Jump: One of Crash's unlockable moves is a Rocket Jump, which propels Crash much higher than a standard or even Double Jump, albeit at the cost of forward momentum. Naturally this has to be used cautiously so as not to collide into vertical obstacles.
  • Sprint Shoes: An upgrade you get after beating N. Trance. Just like in Warped, it helps you in the Time Trial runs.
  • True Final Boss: N. Tropy is the true antagonist and can only be fought by beating three Nintendo Hard levels which are only unlocked if all gem shards have been collected.
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