YMMV / Guild Wars 2

  • Acceptable Religious Targets: Out-of-universe example. Mentioning you believe that Abaddon (who, Word of God confirms is Deader Than Dead) will return, whether it be as an off-hand remark or as part of a theory, is a sure-fire way to get yourself chided at and scolded by the majority of the fanbase for not looking up the fact that he is... well, really dead.
  • Alternate Character Interpretation: Lots, but the big one is probably the Nightmare Court. Cases can be made for Blue and Orange Morality, Necessary Evil, Obliviously Evil, and even For the Evulz. It really comes down to which version of their back story and motivation you believe and the credibility of who's telling it. That being said, they do have some very literal Kick the Dog moments.
  • Angst? What Angst?: Charr characters lose all but one member of their warband — something similar to losing their entire schoolroom class, close friends, warrior compatriots, and not-blood-siblings — by the time they're out of the tutorial, and part-way through the game they've also had to put down an undead version of their previous leader. No matter your character's disposition or text choices, they don't get very glum over it. This is a pretty common trait for the species; NPC Charr get mad or get even, rather than depressed.
    • Human characters of the Street Rat origin don't act as if they care much if Quinn gets killed by Two-Blade Pete, after the initial rage wears off anyway.
    • After experiencing the horrors of being killed and a terrifyingly sad afterlife, the Commander doesn't seem too shaken up by the fact they actually died. In fact, they seem willing to die again for the greater good, despite the fact that they might get just flung back into the Domain of the Lost if they died one more time, and this time might just stay there for good. It's pretty likely that someone would definitely develop some sort of trauma from such an ocassion, the Commander shakes it off quite fine.
  • Anti-Climax Boss: For such a hyped up Big Bad, the fight against Zhaitan is an incredibly impersonal battle where you never get to face him directly, the final phase of the encounter having the players bombard him from afar with artillery while he spews poison breath attacks and undead dragon tentacles all over the ship. While initial bugs in the encounter that prevented him from attacking were fixed you still never feel very invested in the battle. Although to be fair, the idea of "facing Zhaitan directly" is borderline absurd because he's the size of a small mountain.
    • Some world bosses are just too limited in their scope to be any threat to any reasonably cautious force of players. The Shatterer was a particularly Egregious example, since almost every player just congregated on a small hill on the right side of his head and bombarded him with stuff until he died, because he could neither move nor turn his head to attack that area. Others, like the Fire Elemental that appears in the Thaumanova Reactor in Metrica Province, are more dangerous, but not designed to scale to the MASSIVE parties of players that gather to fight them- the Fire Elemental in particular is infamous for having a long and tedious preparation stage that takes over ten minutes (not hard, just long), only to die in 30 seconds or less. Fortunately Anet are slowly working on improving the bosses and have already massively reworked the Shatterer encounter to be a serious challenge again.
  • Awesome Music: With a beautiful soundtrack for the game's original release, Jeremy Soule strikes again! The post-release music has been fantastic as well, with suitably epic instrumentation for your adventure.
    • "Fear Not This Night", a beautiful and uplifting vocal version of the Sylvari Grove's theme.
      • An instrumental version plays in the last part of the final personal story mission, quite fitting and tear jerky since Orr has finally been cured of its corruption. This version plays again, softly, when Trahearne asks for Caladbolg, so that the Commander can kill him. It is utterly heartbreaking.
    • "Raven Speaks", the primary boss theme in the game, played during many encounters with epic world bosses such as the Claw of Jormag and high dramatic points of story missions such as the final battle against Zhaitan, as well as in many of the trailers. A more epic and bombastic piece of music it's hard to imagine, absolutely dripping with high-fantasy grandeur.
    • The remixed 8 bit soundtrack for the Super Adventure Box event is perfect for the quirky game-within-a-game. "Sunny Glade", for instance, is an adorable reprise of Krytan themes you hear in the human regions.
    • Scarlet's last stand in Living World Season 1 was blessed with this epic, haunting track: "Battle on the Breachmaker".
    • Ever since Maclaine Diemer has taken up the mantle of being the new main composer of Guild Wars 2, he's getting mostly praised for the tracks he does for the Living Story, with some arguing he stands for a major improvement over the series' previous composer Jeremy Soule. The "Heart of Thorns Main Theme", present in-game during BETA events, is probably the most notable example.
    • Also from Heart of Thorns we have "Attack on Tarir", a multi-part piece which plays in the Auric Bain as players try to expel the Mordrem from Tarir. Bonus points for switching between different instruments based on what phase the fight is in.
    • The raid boss music is top notch, pumping you up for the toughest challenges in the game. Take "Vale Guardian", for instance.
  • Broken Base: The change to the waypoints in the Dungeons. One camp feels that it's a good change, claiming that it makes people improve instead of relying on an exploit. The other camp feels that it's a bad change, claiming that casual players will be left out of dungeon runs as a result.
    • There has also been a great deal of argument within the fanbase with regard to the changes from Guild Wars to Guild Wars 2, particularly skill and combat system. Some feel it's good that things have been simplified and streamlined without the complexity of Guild Wars's massive number of skills. Others argue that combat has been too "dumbed down" because a greatly reduced emphasis on "builds", skills being tied to your weapon, the removal of the dedicated healer, and the change from the more complex Guild Wars system of hexes/enchantments/conditions to simply boons and conditions.
    • The Cutthroat Politics Living Story event was fated to become this by its very nature. It split the fanbase in two, between players voting for Ellen Kiel (a Base-Breaking Character in and of herself) and Evon Gnashblade. Points of contention included which Fractal dungeon people were more interested in (Thaumanova Reactor Explosion or the Fall of Abaddon), and which perk was better (cheaper waypoint costs or Black Lion Keys). No matter what happened, half the player base was going to be unsatisfied.
    • The announcement that the first expansion wouldn't be increasing the level cap, a rarity for an MMO, caused a lot of split opinions. Those in favor of it saying that it will help them create better, balanced content by not having to worry about re-weighing stats to accommodate increased levels as well as the new class, specialization system and new status effects. Those against feel that, as a whole, an MMO needs to increase levels with expansion-level content to prevent stagnation, and that the newly announced specialization system isn't going to make anywhere near the impact it needs to.
    • Related to the Heart of Thorns Expansion, any time a new weapon for Elite Specializations is revealed, you can expect many heated arguments for or against the weapon that's been given to each class. The most heated arguments so far are the Guardian's Dragonhunter (Longbow) and the Elementalist's Tempest (Warhorn). The Elementalist receiving a warhorn was especially exacerbated by leaked information datamined months earlier that had strongly hinted at them receiving a sword instead and had heightened many players' anticipation of getting a sword for their Elementalists. When the reveal confirmed that it was actually going to be a warhorn, those same players became VERY vocal about their disappointment.
    • Inevitably, the deaths of Eir Stegalkin and Trahearne. With the former, between people who believe it was an inevitable end to a character whose story was pretty much wrapped up anyway, and those who found it cliched or a case of fridging. With the latter, between those who considered Trahearne a scrappy or were glad to see him go, and those who were actually part of his fan base (or just considered it poor writing).
    • Mordremoth's design during the mindscape battle, leading to some debate as to whether it is actually what the dragon looks like, or simply a convenient avatar.
  • Cliché Storm: The trailers. Cool visuals, cool screenshots, "Now is the time! Claim your destiny! Forge your legend!".
    • The banner ads that went up when prepurchases started continue this fine tradition, with such catchy phrases as "Lead the Rebellion," "These are dangerous days to be different..." and "Rise Up!" none of which seem to have anything to do with the game.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome: Despite their irritating targeting mechanics, grenades are far and away the dominant choice among damage-dealing Engineers.
  • Demonic Spiders:
    • Risen Plaguebearers. From a distance, they can hit you with some devastating spells that cause a lot of damage and stack several bleeding conditions onto you. They can and will kill you and your allies really quickly and often come in large groups in personal story missions.
    • Also Risen Putrifiers. Wanna run away from a big group of the Risen because you're wounded? Too bad, the Putrifier will just pull you over to it in hugging distance even if you're far away from it and make it even more likely for you to get killed.
    • Almost anything Risen will be this for someone.
    • Inquest Mega Blasters are surprisingly deadly for their size. They can shoot- nay, spam energy balls that will follow you even when you dodge, and take off a huge chunk of your health. Thankfully, they only appear in the Crucible of Eternity.
    • Karka, especially the veteran ones. Normally veteran enemies are Goddamned Bats at worst, but Karka are a special kind. The Young Karka have an annoying ranged attack that cripples you, with the Veteran variant even having a knock-down rush (very problematic as Karka appear in swarms, so you're pretty much vulnerable from other Karka while downed). The Veteran Karka (the big, adult ones) have many knockdown effects, can lay hatchlings that explode and give you conditions, leave acid pools, and for some odd reason can EVADE your attacks most of the time. And what's worse? They have two phases of health - one with armor and one with broken armor! They also always have buffs in them, like Regeneration and Might, but one in particular is annoying to players - Retaliation!
      • Special mention to the Karka Hive Defender, the Champion enemy you need to defeat to reclaim the Camp Karka settlement. Not only does it have the usual Veteran Karka annoyances (stomps, lays eggs of kamikaze Karka Hatchlings, and spits acid), it magnifies them. The stomp will immediately down the player since it hits twice and it hits hard. It always moves erratically all over the settlement and trying to hit it can become a chore because it frequently leaps to an area that can only be reached by walking through a small opening, blocking most ranged attacks. It frequently spams Retaliation. And it recovers a full health bar in its second, weakened armor state. This thing is potentially more dangerous than the Legendary Karka Queen.
    • The Heart of Maguuma (the region added in Heart of Thorns) is an entire subcontinent of Demonic Spiders. Creatures that would be Demonic Spiders everywhere else barely qualify as Goddamned Bats there. Of particular note are Mordrem Guard Snipers (do massive ranged damage, leave painful ground damage fields that last a long time and stealth when you try to focus-fire them down), Coztic or Mordrem Bladedancers (have a stun-and-kill melee combo that tends to oneshot glass cannon types as well as a stealth ability), Shadowleapers (very rapid, powerful ranged attacks, evades ranged attacks, has an evading attack, and can leave a persisting poison pool which poisons and damages you - pretty annoying if they are cornered and you are meleeing them and they leave a poison pool on their spot) and Shadowscales (teleport around madly and drop smoke fields that make them invulnerable as long as they're sitting in them). Particularly annoying in Veteran, Elite or (for the terminally masochistic) Champion varieties.
    • As of Living Story 3, the restless spirits and bloodstone-infected White Mantle. Besides being a pain to kill (especially the clerics and mesmers), they have a ridiculously high respawn rate and will chase you further than most enemies. If you get caught by more than one to begin with, it's easy to find yourself overwhelmed.
    • Jade Constructs. They fight in packs, they have both ranged and AOE attacks, they have a stupid high hit count, they are nearly impossible to stun, and they are relentless. Unless you can summon minions/allies or go after them in a group, kiss yourself goodbye and be prepared to trek across the isle again.
    • And the cousins of above, the Jade Armor variants in Ember Bay. Not only are they all in Veteran rank, but they have have a mandatory invulnerability phase that you MUST stun them out of by breaking their defiance bar. They also have an unnaturally high aggression range and have mobility-impeding attacks. Oh and they come in groups too.
  • Ear Worm: The Dragon Bash song is excessively catchy.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Tybalt Leftpaw is quite adored. Maybe because its so rare to find an Adorkable Charr.
    • Marjory Delaqua gained a quick following after her animated introduction (complete with Private Eye Monologue) was played during the Dragon Bash event.
    • Evon Gnashblade became popular for being a shady, greedy but Affably Evil charr, especially among people who found the perks of voting for him during the Cutthroat Politics event to be better than Ellen Kiel's.
    • Hobo-Tron, a Golem NPC at Divinity Reach, has gotten a lot of fan adoration and appreciation due to its humorous dialouge between many other NPCs, its cute appearance, and i's Chew Toy/Butt-Monkey/The Woobie status. Some speculated that Hobo-Tron is Job-O-Tron from the May 2013 Southsun event. This is confirmed by Word of God himself. Hobo-Tron has since become Ho-Ho-Tron (for the Wintersday festivities), Heal-O-Tron (as a support unit during the siege of Lion's Arch) and finally, Hero-Tron for the stripes it has managed to earn there.
  • Fantastic Racism: The Commander really hates the Undead (even if (s)he is a Necromancer), acting with outrage that Elonians are okay with Joko raising their family members into sentient undead that can continue living with their families (far from all Awakened become soldiers). Apparently getting out of Underworld is okay for Commander only. Probably justified by his/her experiences in Orr.
  • Fridge Logic:
    • During the penultimate Personal Story mission, the Eye of Zhaitan taunts you by telling you that your lost order mentor (Forgal/Sieran/Tybalt) is "waiting for you under the dragon (i.e. Zhaitan)'s wings". For Forgal and Tybalt, sure, this makes sense, but the fact that Sieran's entire race cannot be corrupted into Risen - which both the Player Character (as Commander of the force fighting Zhaitan) and the dragon itself (having tried and failed to corrupt Sylvari corpses) would know by that point - makes this claim a bit of a stretch in her case.
  • Fridge Horror: This may hit you when you go into Hoelbrak's main building. In the center of it, you see a massive triangular blue object around five or six times the height of a Norn (So around 50 feet). Then you're informed that it's a TOOTH. JORMAG'S TOOTH. Now start thinking of the size of the creature it came from...
    • According to the official GW 2-Wiki it is estimated that Zhaitan's model (a fellow Eldritch Abomination) is aproximately 500 meters (1640 feet) long. It could be estimated, that Jormag is somewhere in the same tier.
    • Kralkatorrik could actually be seen in Guild Wars 1. He was half-buried in the Dalada Uplands, with part of his spine protruding from the ground. Where could you see him most easily? On your goddamn MAP!note  And in final mission of Path of Fire you can Kralkatorrik itself. Jormag seems kinda small now...
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: At the end of the core story, after the Pact has finally destroyed Zhaitan and proven that the Elder Dragons are not indestructible, there is massive rejoicing with everyone talking about how they're "one down, five to go", discussing which one to go after next, and swearing oaths that one day all the Elder Dragons will be destroyed and the people of Tyria will be able to live in peace forever. Fast forward to chapter 5 of the Living World Season 3 and Taimi reveals that the Elder Dragons are Cosmic Keystones and if any more are destroyed (after you've already destroyed Mordremoth as well) then the entire world will probably be annihilated. Not only have all your efforts towards destroying the Elder Dragons been All for Nothing, but the climax of the chapter actually forces you to stop the mad god Balthazar from destroying Primordus and Jormag.
    • Another moment in this same chapter is when Taimi calls in to check in with the commander about their temperature level while they are rescuing the druid spirits in exchange for a fire-resistant shield of protection so they can face Balthazar int he volcano. They have a hilarious exchange about the Commander possibly hallucinating and hearing voices, but if your character is a Sylvari and so soon after the events of Heart of Thorns it might a little too soon to start hearing voices and seeing delusions again, especially since Mordremoth was messing up their head the entire story.
  • Goddamn Bats: The Krait. They haunt the most spacious watery places on the map. More often than not, you'll have to fight them underwater, which limits what skills you can use. It's impossible to move through their territory without attracting attention, and they can come at you from just about any angle. Worse, players seldom actually stay in their areas for long, so don't expect much backup when dealing with them or their Dynamic Events (on the plus side, Krait slaying sigils might be the only useful racial targeting upgrade, and on the underwater weapons that don't see much use elsewhere). The Risen are another example for most of the game, being extremely annoying but not particularly difficult to defeat. Then you reach Orr and they become Demonic Spiders instead...
    • Wolves. They go down easily enough and don't really cause a lot of damage...but they have a move that allows them to summon another wolf that you have to kill. And they often hunt in packs. If you don't take them out quickly enough, then you might yourself stuck fighting several of the beasts at a time before you can finally take a breath. Fortunately, summoned wolves cannot summon others.
    • Barracudas combine the aggravating qualities of Krait - water, so limited skills, rarely-used weapon skills, little backup, all around you, hard to avoid attention - and wolves - summoning others, usually found in groups. Plus they inflict Bleed. Fortunately they are the easiest of the three to take down.
    • Anything that can frequently knock you down, stun you or daze you. You're unable to do jack while the enemies beat you up.
    • Imps. They vary in elemental mastery (Fire Imp, Shadow Imp, etc.) but all are equally annoying. They can inflict major damage that causes a condition, they have a long projectile range, and they move fast.
    • Pocket Raptors in Maguuma are weak individually, but there's usually 8-10 clustered up together. If you're not actively fighting them and they notice you, prepare to get taken down. Especially if you don't have any ranged or AOE attacks.
    • Half the Crystal Desert bestiary. Most of them see you from farther away than you would be used to from other maps and tend to attack if you're already fighting something. Plus they have a bunch of annoying abilities, like blind, torment and stun. Special awards go to Scarabs and Sand Lions though. The first ones notice you from really far away, spit poison, and in melee create a constantly blinding sandstorm that turns a fight against otherwise weak monster into long tedious ordeal. And if you fighting just one scarab, consider yourself lucky, there are normally several close nearby. Sand Lions hunt in packs, each lion has a knockdown pounce attack, so good luck running away, and they like to surround themselves with sandstorms that not only blind melee attackers, but also block ranged ones. To say they are annoying would be an understatement.
  • Guide Dang It!: Good luck getting some of the crafting skills, particularly Chef, up to 400 without a guide. A lot of the components needed to make the higher level items are just so rare, obscure, and hard to find that figuring out all the recipes can be nearly impossible. And not everything can be bought from the Trading Post.
    • Finding all the jumping puzzles in the game. While some are located near their namesake waypoints (eg. The Sector Zuhl jumping puzzle is located in, believe it or not, Sector Zuhl.) others are VERY well hidden in the world. And in at least one case, a jumping puzzle is not located in its namesake cave, but instead on some rocks outside and around the side of the cave.
    • Reaching some of the Vistas can cause this as well. Most of the time, it's fairly obvious where to go, but some require platforming from a starting point a great distance from the Vista marker itself, and may even require traversing terrain that's difficult to tell from the sections you can't actually climb.
  • Growing the Beard:
    • Season 2 of the Living Story has so far been considerably better received by the fanbase than Season 1. There's a clearer plotline to follow with the new dragon, as well as some decent attempts to hearken back to some of Guild Wars' original lore (The Krytan Locket that purports to show the true heir of Kryta, the ghosts of Ascalon getting a revisit in the Dragon's Reach: Part 1), which was mostly discarded during Season 1.
    • Path of Fire storyline and first Season 5 chapter have been praised for awesome dynamic storyline with incredibly epic showdowns and engaging characters.
  • "Holy Shit!" Quotient: This trailer for the Living Story Season 2, Episode 3. It starts off quite unassuming and quiet, showing scenes of the Mordrem encroaching across Tyria, a few frames with Eir and Braham... and then we're suddenly treated to a small scene showing Rytlock attempting to break the Foefire's curse with Sohothin. The trailer didn't actually show if he succeeded or not, but even before the actual release, that part of the trailer had already set the lore section of the community on fire with speculation and excitement.
  • Internet Backdraft: The addition of mount skins onto the Gem Store has left much of the player base in an uproar due to the fact that there are no skins attainable by playing the game in the most conventional sense and because the skins attained from the license item is totally random.
  • Like You Would Really Do It: Played straight AND subverted in the very same moment. The reaction to Rytlock's attempt to lift the curse of Ascalon. Players who doubted its success cited the unreasonably large development effort that would be required to redo all the outdoor Ascalon zones to remove ghosts. Naturally, he failed... and disappeared into the Mists in the process, ridding the charr players of their racial ambassador/hero for a very long time.
    • Averted with attack on Lion's Arch. The city was completely destroyed, rebuilt and very little of the original remains.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Watch the ledges. Explanation 
    • You heard Krast. HOLD THE LINE! Explanation 
    • NO NO NO! WE SHOULD GO TO THE ARMORY! Explanation 
    • "CITIZENS!" Explanation 
    • I can run faster than a centaur! Explanation 
    • f Explanation 
      • Greed kills. Explanation 
    • If Mordremoth could attack the Mother Tree in the Grove, it can attack anywhere. Explanation 
    • "Wow. That's quality armor." "THANKS" "THANKS" "THANKS" Explanation 
    • "Excuse me, do you know anything about a lost city located somewhere in the Riverlands?" Explanation 
      • "How do you lose a city?" Explanation 
    • PRAISE JOKO!Explanation 
  • Moral Event Horizon: The playerbase has generally agreed that Palawa Joko crossed this in the Living World episode Daybreak, with his attempt to kill Taimi by sealing her inside Scruffy 2.0 and setting it to suffocate her slowly. Good luck finding a player who don't want Joko's head on a pike after this mission.
  • Most Annoying Sound:
    • The assorted battle cries of the Risen, such as "Everyone, come!" and "Death...good!" You're going to hear those a lot in Orr.
    • "Your weakness makes me laugh!". Said by the Son of Svanir Shaman, boss of the Snowblind fractal, every time he finishes using his deadly icicle rain attack. Which you will be hearing a lot considering that he has a lot of health and uses said attack every 30 seconds or so.
    • "Prove the sun shines through you. Face me as another form!" said by Xolotl every time she transforms players. It wouldn't be too bad... if you didn't hear that damn sound across the whole map, and she didn't use the transform attack whenever nobody is fighting her. It's even worse if nobody is taking care of her, meaning that if you're going to Caledon Forest, you will inevitably hear that sound over and over and over...
    • Male Sylvari make a reasonable, pained groan whenever they are crippled, which for the most part sounds acceptably genuine. When female Sylvari are crippled, they let out a horrible, 5-second long, overly-dramatic scream which might be better reserved for a "yodeler-skinned-alive-and-dragged-through-salt" condition, instead one which is merely an inconvenience to your mobility. It's not even narm- just unsettling and annoying.
    • The Thaumanova Reactor in Metrica Province is filled with Asura researchers. They've got an extremely annoying cough that they do frequently. If you're trying to find and charge the Matrix Cube Key, and/or do the event leading up to the Fire Elemental, you're going to hear it a lot.
    • There is a single merchant NPC in The Silverwastes, i.e. there's a single place where you go to sell your junk, sigils, sort out your inventory and dismantle looted items. Right next to the merchant is a Sylvari who keeps spouting the same two lines every 30 seconds in a rather melodramatic manner. Average time to spend at the merchant post-Vinewrath is at least 10 minutes. For people running Silverwastes on regular basis, the sound of "I cannot let fear poison my heart!" tends to trigger a killing habit or two.
    Wyld Hunt Valiant: "If Mordremoth could attack the Mother Tree in the Grove, it can attack anywhere."
    • The legendary bow "The Dreamer" has been known to get players kicked from instance groups and guild events. It shoots rainbow-hued unicorns instead of ordinary arrows. A bit silly, but that's not the reason it inspires a white-hot rage in many players...it's the way each and every one of those unicorn arrows is accompanied by a loud neighing sound. Stand next to a Dreamer wielder and that repeated neighing is all you'll hear until the fight is over.
    • Free citizens of Amnoon, your council needs you...
    • "Do you have what it takes to be my sous-chef, Outlander?"
  • Player Punch: A lot of these can happen during the course of the Personal Story, though the most notable happens during The Battle of Claw Island. Not only do you lose the fight, but your Order mentor (Lightbringer Tybalt, Magister Sieran, or Warmaster Forgal) who you fought alongside for the past 20 levels, dies to cover your escape.
    • Another *huge* one happens in Path of Fire, borderlining on Gut Punch, probably the harshest one in Guild Wars 2 so far. It's a given that player characters have some heavy duty Plot Armor and that they will never fail. Sure there will be some losses in battles storywise here and there, but the player would never die, they're the main character after all! Well... In Path of Fire, you as the Commander get ambushed and boxed in by Balthazar, where you fight a Curb-Stomp Battle that's impossible to win. Despite your best efforts to whittle down Balthazar's health, he shrugs it off and ends up fatally wounding you, toying with your life as you struggle to survive for a few more precious seconds. You might think, hey, something is going to come save me at just the right time right? Cue Aurene flying in and it looks like you might be saved after all!...But you weren't. In fact, the exact opposite happens. Aurene fails to save you and you get to watch in quiet shock as Balthazar captures Aurene and blasts you in a face with a fireball, before you finally succumb to your grievous wounds and the fire. The dark, empty screen as you realize that you actually died and then respawning as a ghost really sells it. However, the Plot Armor is thick enough for you to come back to life, but just the fact that you died was a real shocker to many.
  • Relationship Writing Fumble: If you followed the relationship between Braham and Rox in Living World Season 1, (see Ship Tease on the main page) you'd think for sure they were being positioned as the game's first Interspecies Romance. Instead Word of God states that they're Just Friends... which doesn't explain why they hit so many romantic couple tropes in Season 1.
  • The Scrappy: A vocal part of the fandom does not like Trahearne due to him being perceived as taking over the role of the hero in the personal story, with the player relegated to being just his second-in-command. He doubles as a Replacement Scrappy since he replaces your Order mentor, who dies shortly beforehand.
    • Ellen Kiel is getting this treatment within the fandom in a similar way that Trahearne is getting: boring character and taking credit from major Living Story events in Southsun Cove and hunting down Mai Trin, leader of the Aetherblades.
    • Scarlet Briar has gotten a lot of flak for being a flat and badly written Saturday morning cartoon style villain who is unbelievably smarter than Asuras. The only thing that the fandom can agree is good about her is her voice, which sadly doesn't redeem a Scrappy.
    • Kormir has been one since Guild Wars, much like Trahearne was, but fairly worse. The very fact that she abandons the mortals to presumably prevent a bad confrontation with Balthazar makes her seem like a coward trying to avoid responsibility.
    • Braham has started to become this, especially after Living World Season 3 and enhanced in Living World Season 4, especially for his unwarranted hatred against the Commander, the player character. Many find his attitude edgy, selfish and annoying and his accusations again the Commander, who doesn't even attempt to defend themselves, bad character writing. Even a majority of the fandom are looking forward to knocking him in the head or even killing him.
  • The Woobie: Despite the sometimes silly nature of the game and the fun that can be had, there is more than a fair share of suffering as well.
    • The (Pact) Commander really does go through a ton of terrible unavoidable tragedies, awful deaths, and suffer from broken friendships, not the mention the often unwarranted guilt from past decisions they've made, yet they shoulder it on quietly. They never really let anyone know how they really feel, except in a passing comment at small moments. They help everyone else feel better, sometimes at their own expense, but no one really stops to listen out their worries at all. Instead they face their troubles as they come and doesn't seem to outwardly show it.
      • This gets doubled in the Hearts of Thorns storyline if the commander is a Sylvari. Their slow descent to falling under Mordremoth's influence is Nightmare Fuel at best, but they always insist that they are 'fine' to their comrades, only hinting that the call might have been becoming too much for them in a conversation with Canach.
      • Gets tripled again in Path of Fire, where the commander actually dies in an agonizing battle against Balthazar. They wake up in a dark and depressing land, having become a Lost Spirit due to the brutal nature of their death. They may have managed to cheat death by using the Eater of Souls's power to return to life, but they have to live with the fear that if they fail, their being would just cease to be. Also, how's the fact that they just experienced the worst possible death and afterlife?
  • That One Achievement: There are a number of infuriatingly difficult and time-consuming achievements in the game, but one of the most irritating is Leave It To Me, from the Heart of Thorns mission 'City of Hope'. As one of three trials you have to pass to prove yourself worthy of becoming the champion of Glint's last egg (the Challenge of Leadership), you get transformed into a cute little bunny and put in a room filled with roaming Mordrem Wolves, a Mordrem Alpha, and seven Vigil soldiers who start out downed. What you're supposed to do is sneak around the room using the bunny form's ability to stealth and play dead to avoid the attentions of the Mordrem, each of which can kill you in only a handful of hits and are all but immune to your puny headbutt attack, reviving the Vigil soldiers to do the fighting for you until you have enough to kill the Alpha. To get the achievement, you have to skip the 'reviving allies' part and headbutt the Alpha to death yourself! It's physically impossible to isolate the Alpha into a 1v1 fight while the wolves remain alive because of their patrol routes and aggro radius, and while your headbutt dodges attacks while you're executing it, it does puny damage, has a distressingly-long cooldown considering it's your ONLY damage ability, and has an extremely wonky hitbox. The Alpha is the only enemy that doesn't regenerate health whenever you die and respawn, so what you're supposed to do is run up to it, do a tiny amount of damage to it, die, respawn, repeat, over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over again until you finally wear it down and kill it a process that can take up to an hour of boring grinding. There are a few tricks you can use to make it easiernote  but it's still considered one of the worst and most annoying achievements in the game.
  • That One Boss:
    • The Fire Elemental in Metrica Province used to be this, setting people on fire, spawning embers like mad and generally being a pest, until the World Boss overhaul in 2014. Now it's lucky if it dies as much as 30 seconds from spawning.
    • Rozgar the Forge in the Citadel of Flame main quest is easily the hardest boss, due to the fact that he starts out with a greatsword and two floating greatsword adds. All three of them can use a whirlwind attack that is fast, covers a large area, hits multiple times, and can do up to 1500-4000+ damage PER HIT. Fortunately, he stops using this once he loses 1/4 of his health and becomes a Goddamned Boss with Teleport Spam once his health drops to 1/4.
    • Kudu's second golem in Sorrow's Embrace can come off as a nasty surprise if the players doesn't have a lot of weapon skills that doesn't inflict conditions. The reason? It consumes its conditions to heal itself, forcing the party to rely on raw damage to defeat it, and screwing over players whose auto attacks inflict conditions. Oh, and the golem really enjoy shooting fireballs all over the place that will target and burn you for large damage, and will likely down you if you are standing too close to another player. And just to make it even worse, in one of Sorrow's Embrace's explorable paths, you have to fight both the golem and THE OTHER TWO GOLEMS, AT THE SAME TIME.
    • Do we even need to talk about Giganticus "Motherfucking" Lupicus? Present in every single explorable path for Arah, extending the length of that dungeon by an extra thirty minutes to an hour due to his ridiculous amount of health (split into three phases) and super-high damage that guarantees the imminent death of Glass Cannon players and forces you to actually use your dodge rolls prudently. It's arguably the highest-skill-requirement boss of the game at the point of writing. And some are badass enough to take on him solo.
    • Simin is pretty much the reason hardly anyone will form a group for the Seers' path in Arah's explorable mode. Her schtick is that she can turn invisible and the only way to make her appear again is to bring enough sparks to the statue of Dwayna. While she's invisible, she's completely invulnerable and regenerates her health. She can regenerate to full health if you don't cancel her invisibility fast enough! She can also petrify people and the only way to cure that is to toss tears at the afflicted players. In order to win this fight, everyone has to know what they’re doing, everyone has to be well-coordinated, and most of all, everyone has to be a Glass Cannon. Otherwise, Simin will regenerate more health than the team can take down. Worse, the fight is notoriously buggy and the sparks have some odd pathfinding issues, making it all the more easy for Simin to fully regenerate.
    • The very first boss that will make a group of new characters cry tears of bitterness is "The Lovers", a Mesmer and Elementalist pair is Ascalon Catacombs. They must be kept away from one another or they'll regenerate health faster than you can possibly damage them, making crowd control coordination an absolute must, while also dealing with the Elementalist's damage and the Mesmer's debuffs simultaneously. It may not look so hard on paper, but getting a new group to coordinate enough for it is near-impossible without huge repair fees and lots of frustration. As soon as you discover what the nearby rocks are for, however, the pair gets separated quite easily.
    • Turmaine, the last boss in the Seraph route of the Caudecus' Manor explorable mode, can be this. He puts down many areas of conditions which can overlay, capable of downing people if they don't dodge or cure themselves in time. Then, he has a plague form which makes him invulnerable AND deals three separate stacking/intensifying conditions at the same time AND has "super-speed". Oh, did anyone mention his plague form just feels painfully long and merely prolongs an already fairly frustrating level in itself?
    • Ulgoth the Modniir in Harathi Hinterlands used to be a pain not due to being arduously difficult, but because having a very short spawning/kill window, where the events needed to lure him out stretched out through most of his available spawning time, leaving simply not enough time to down him. That, however, has also since been remedied, and he is now one of the easiest and most rewarding (4 guaranteed champions that drop loot, huge amount of centaurs that drop craft item bags) bosses out there.
    • Then there's the Queen's Gauntlet, which seems to have been deliberately made of this. It would be easier to list the number of matches that aren't frustrating. Most of Tier 3 is a hair-ripping experience, and a number of the achievements for it are often the result of a combination of persistence, trial and error, and luck. Special mention goes to Liadri the Concealing Dark, a boss that can take dozens if not hundreds of protracted attempts to beat. Players seem to agree that possessing the miniature that's awarded for beating her is an outstanding sign of your dedication and skill. For the truly masochistic, there's also the gambit system...
      • Liadri's fight deserves extra mention, since it was a knife's edge between a win or a loss. The fight involved two phases, the first of which had Liadri, who was invincible, tossing out projectiles from the center while dark clones of her walked towards your character. You had to kite those clones towards pools of light, forming pickups which you tossed at Liadri. After 3 hits with the pickups, the second phase starts and she starts chasing you with her obscenely powerful whip while the number of clones spawn faster. By the way, as soon as one of those clones makes physical contact with you, it's an instant kill. There's also a periodic AoE that covers a quarter of the circular stage that also causes instant death, and the AoE doubles to form an hourglass shape in the second phase. Shining orbs will occasionally spawn and pull your character - sometimes saving you from the instant-kill attacks, but more often dragging you into one of them. The fight progresses as a frantic mix of kiting Liadri and her clones, timing dodges for the instant kill attacks, and trying to deal enough damage to win the fight before the timer expires. Many failures were the result of a clone spawning a bit too close to your character, or running out of dodges to avoid the next AoE.
    • The event Tequatl Rising revamped Tequatl the Sunless, the dragon champion that spawns in Sparkfly Fen. What had used to be a simple "press autoattack and go for a coffeebreak" world event was changed into a tough fight where 100-120 players have to closely cooperate to deal damage (main zerg), support the zerg from turrets (by removing hardened scales buff from Tequatl and buffing/cleansing the zerg from poison) and protect the turrets from spawning mobs. Doable with organized groups, even those arranged near the last few minutes before his spawn, as long as there are enough players (due to the LFG system and low-population maps being filled up). Some time in 2015 though there was a patch that allowed Tequatl to receive critical hits but made his hitbox smaller, making the fight frustrating and doubly increased the chance of failing. Was thankfully reverted back again a few weeks later.
    • The "Triple Trouble" giant jungle wurms in Bloodtide Coast are a true nightmare for any group of players that doesn't prepare meticulously for the event, to the point where it's only possible for extremely coordinated, professionally led guilds to down it. It pretty much mandatorily requires three separate groups of 40 players to work on the perfect command of three commanders that have to be in direct contact over Team Speak with one another. It's currently the only event that's pretty much exclusively ran by the TTS guilds, because they alone have the level of organization and manpower to down the wurm.
    • Anyone that went for the Belcher's Bluff mini-game achievements know of the extreme annoyance that is Adnul Irongut. For people that don't know, the Belcher's Bluff achievments involves the player facing off against six NPCs, each with signature moves. The match plays out like a drinking game - normal drinks reduces the player's standardized health, but they can also fake a swig, drink water to restore some health (but has a 3-turn cooldown), or belch, causing their opponent to take extra damage if they faked and negating the health restoration of water. Adnul's special move was Critique, which prevented fake swigging for three turns. If your belch or water was on cooldown, this was a death sentence, as you would usually lose all your health after five straight drinks. He also had the nasty habit of using Critque again right after the previous one had worn off. Coupled with an extremely large health pool, the match soon turned into a Luck-Based Mission as the only chance that player had was to predict/guess the turns Adnul would use water and counter with belch, and hope he didn't start spamming Critique. There were some glitches that other players have exploited for easier wins, such as using food/rejuvenation boosters for health regeneration, but they have all been patched.
    • Heart of Thorns has the Vinetooth Prime, which appears at the Eastern segment of the Auric Basin once the pylons have been activated, is an absolute nightmare without exceptional coordination. First off, it has high-damage attacks that mercilessly punish players for grouping together in one place to stack buffs while fighting it. Second, it will periodically try to eat a downed player, giving others an incredibly small time window to break its (considerable) Defiance before it finishes and gets a permanent, stacking damage boost - pulling this off requires almost every player in the arena to equip stunning/dazing/launching abilities and weapons and keep them just for this moment. Finally, its health scales up the more people there are fighting it, and many might come in not realising what's needed for this fight, so the more people there are, the harder it is to kill it in time.
    • The final story boss for Living Story Season 3 chapter "Head of the Snake" is Bloodstone-Crazed Caudecus. When that chapter was newly released, the boss fight was very aggravating. You fight in a cramped circular room with him at the center. He throws so much area-of-effect attacks that push you, and occasionally he will trigger Chaos Magic which you must defend with - with very little window. The Chaos Magic shield you cast was supposed to stun him, but because attacks come out as he gets stunned, you're otherwise knocked away to take the opportunity. It doesn't help that he summons a creature to fight with him as his health goes down - one of which is a Veteran Jade Archer. As mentioned earlier, Veteran Jades are annoying to fight with because of their mandatory invulnerability phase and always crowd-control attacks. A Veteran Jade Archer launches ranged attacks that knock you back in addition to the ones attacking right now. The whole thing was pretty much stressing many players with characters generally at a major disadvantage (apparently Guardians and Necromancers had a slightly easier time). A day after, a patch was released that thankfully toned down the fight - with longer window of opportunity to cast the shield, a wider room, less attacks, and the Veteran Jade Archer replaced with a more manageable enemy.
    • The Eater of Souls in the first chapter of the third Act, The Departing. This boss doesn't do an incredible amount of damage. Actually, it's not that hard to actually tank the damage and do damage, it's it's self-healing that makes it difficult. This guy has the capability to knock you down before sucking the life out of your ghostly corpse and heal itself back to 100%. This wouldn't be so bad, if it wasn't for the fact that this little abomination can use this skill every twenty seconds. It requires precise timing to be able to stun it before it can start siphoning your health. You're better off just running away when it tries to do it, but it takes some time to be able to understand an get used to the rhythm. Your friends in the instance ends up being fodder for the creature's health and they can't even do anything besides giving you mediocre boons. Most folks ended up with a less than amazing revival, when they are brought back to life naked from their armor being rekt in the afterlife.
  • That One Level: The three Orrian zones (Straits of Devastation, Malchor's Leap, and Cursed Shore) are hated by much of the fanbase. The landscape is gloomy and utterly dismal and half of the waypoints can often end up contested if there's not at least a devoted number of players around to defend them. This leaves players stuck having to hike across huge swaths of the map, which are absolutely congested with Demonic Spiders and Goddamn Bats that hit hard and can crowd control you easily.
    • At least one fractal from the Fractals of the Mist dungeon will fall under this although what fractal that is varies based on luck and level.
      • The Underground Facility fractal can be very long, filled with an ever-increasing number of enemies as the players go up in level, and a boss that effectively requires one player to remove themselves from fighting and have the rest running and gunning the boss around a large arena. A patch later on made the trekking of this fractal shorter, and the enemies spawning fewer and less frustrating.
      • The Cliffside fractal is a long-hike up shoddily built scaffolds that are designed to make sure players fall to their death if their attention slips while having one player carrying a hammer that will slowly kill them. That alongside a few spots that require careful planning and execution to advance can make it frustrating. A patch was then added to make the travel less cumbersome by removing the boss fight at the start and altering the AI behavior of the last unsealing section.
      • The Swampland fractal. The party needs to carry three wisps to a few trees in a strict time limit (which starts as soon as one wisp is picked up), while there's barely visible traps everywhere that do anything to trip, cripple and slowdown the player, mooks everywhere to force you into combat, and even an invisible legendary mob (Mossman) around to kill you if he sees you (On higher fractal difficulties, the Mossman's axe throws will inflict agony on hits). Oh, and the terrain changes to prevent you from getting a wisp over to the trees so easily. Back when fractals were chosen randomly and were in four stages, people would reroll until they get this as the starting fractal because it is fast and easy to finish, so it was a nightmare for people who didn't like this fractal. What's more the fractal's final boss has been substantially reworked, turning it from a straightforward Damage-Sponge Boss into a much more difficult fight.
      • The Volcanic fractal is rather short but ends with a very frustrating That One Boss that can spell the end of a party if they are not properly prepared and geared for the showdown.
      • The Aquatic Ruins fractal is widely loathed for two reasons : it's set entirely underwater, which means a different gear (problematic for players who didn't think about upgrading their specific underwater gear) and some abilities that become unavailable, meaning that some character builds won't work at all (fortunately, it's quick and easy to switch to different specializations, but still annoying when some of the most powerful builds won't work at all), and one obstacle course section that can be randomly one of two things : a ridiculously easy course that just consists of grabbing items along the way quickly enough with barely any hindrance, and a bastard hard course that turns everyone into powerless dolphins having to navigate among enemies that lock you down and kill you in seconds from a distance unless you use a very clunky and inconsistent ability to lure them elsewhere. The boss at the end of the fractal is a cakewalk in comparison.
    • Tangled Depths is one of the most hated maps in the Heart of Thorns expansion, primarily because of its twisting paths, multi-layered areas, and being a hassle for getting its map completion (more Hero Points that involve Champion fights, Points of Interests and Vista being not where you expect them to be, and being pretty much Chak zone).
    • Spirit Vale, the first raid wing released for Heart of Thorns. All raids are planned to be Nintendo Hard by definition, and it certainly fits the bill. All three bosses have Boss Arena Urgency in the form of an Enrage timer that makes them a lost cause if not killed in time and One-Hit Kill attacks/mechanics that need to be managed carefully in order to avoid a wipe, making for a very challenging experience.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: Any major update to the game's system is going to get accusations of this trope happening. Complaints were particularly vociferous about the September 9, 2014 update, which set up a new "New Player Experience" system intended to make it easier for new players to learn the ins and outs of the game, but received sharp criticism from many veteran players who asserted that starter areas had been "dumbed down", existing content had been removed (including a key part of the "Personal Story"), access to things like skill unlocking had been changed in ways that made it harder for low-level characters to fight, etc.
    • However, some criticism has been taken into account, because Personal Story has since been reinstated to its former order (thus making sense again) and the whole of NPE is continuously getting tweaked and edited one way or another.
    • In a broader sense, the game has little to nothing in common with Guild Wars (which was an extremely unique MMORPG) from a gameplay perspective. The removal of the dual-class system and the 8-skill build system that came with it are often mourned as the biggest losses, although a lot of people like the weapon skill system as well.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: Season 1 of the Living story is heavily criticized for its numerous Plot Holes, Ass Pulls, The Chris Carter Effect (It took fifteen MONTHS to wrap up the Scarlet arc, which everyone knew was going to lead to a dragon), and a big amount of Fridge Logic and failure to adhere to the basic Show, Don't Tell rule. The result was a messy, disjointed story arc revolving around a single plant that manages to acquire high-tech weaponry, amass a giant army, and rain down havoc on Tyria and get away with all of it without explanation. And this happens all while the Dragons continue to wreak havoc on Tyria. Now, can someone please explain why there's a dragon on the logo of the game?
    • After the reveal in Season 3 that "Lazarus" is really Balthazar, the human God of War and doesn't care if he destroys the world by destroying the Elder Dragons, one of the big questions going into Path of Fire was what had caused him to turn his back on mankind and break away from the other gods? Unfortunately, once we finally got the whole story, the answer turned out to be the fairly anticlimactic "because he's a prick who simply doesn't care about anything other than what he wants". Disappointingly shallow.
  • Ugly Cute: The Necromancer profession's Bone Minions look endearingly—and grotesquely—like a cheerful, skinned hybrid between a gerbil and a monkey.
    • Rox's pet devourer, Frostbite. It may be a giant two-tailed scorpion, but its huge eyes are rather charming.
    • This may surprise you, or it may just Squick you out, but the overwhelming majority of the reams of porn that has been drawn of GW2 is Asura-based.
    • Aurene, the second spawn of Glint that hatches in Episode 2 of Season 3.
  • Uncanny Valley: The Asura were given a rehash in between Eye of the North and Guild Wars 2. The results make them look like some kind of cross between a hairless troll doll and a Yordle. And in a more realistically rendered game? The results are less than unsettling...
    • The Sylvari aren't much better; they look very human, but some of their plant features throw them right into this, whether it be growths on their heads or the different analogs for ears, or some of the different colorations over otherwise normal looking faces, they just look off. Then again, this is deliberate on the artists' part - the sylvari mimic the appearance of humans, but are still fundamentally plants that only resemble humans. If you give your salad a coloration that too-strongly mimics human skin, then they can heavily resemble ghouls with certain face styles and body patterns.
      • The Wintersday 2013 patch has introduced new faces in the Total Makeover Kit - 3 for each race/gender. Some of the new sylvari faces lack noses, and have large beady eyes. Comparisons with aliens were made by the community almost immediately. The new asura faces are less uncanny, but feature a rather...bemused expression. Stoned asura as a meme is starting to take off.
    • Sayeh al' Rajihd is a largos, so her body is humanlike, and she wears a face concealing rebreather. So she doesn't look like this trope at first... until you notice through her mask that not only does her eye make no movement at all, but she doesn't blink either. Which may have been a purposeful design choice.
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