troperville

tools

toys


main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Versus Title
Now that's what I call Black and White Morality. Or not.

When you are creating a work in which two clearly distinct entities are in conflict or compete against each other, a common way to name your work is to identify the two entities and insert a word or symbol indicating the conflict.

These most frequently take the form of X Versus Y (or X vs Y). Titles of this form were particularly common for older B Movies, and is now something of a Dead Horse Trope within that field, though often used straight in homages. They continue to be frequently used in names of episodes of Western Animations and Live-Action TV shows.

Another variant, replacing "Versus" with a simple X, as in Alice X Bob, is particularly common in Video Games developed in Japan. Where it is a crossover, it may take the form of X Meets Y, although these are relatively rare.

May involve an Ultimate Showdown of Ultimate Destiny or Cool Versus Awesome. Where both entities are antagonists, this may be an Antagonist Title. Similar to The Noun and the Noun and Name and Name. Often mirrors Character Name and the Noun Phrase.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

     Anime and Manga 

     Comic Books  

     Fan Fiction  

     Film  

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

  • All in the Family episodes "Edith Versus the Bank" and "Edith Versus the Energy Crisis".
  • Buffalo Bill episode "Buffalo Bill Versus the Kremlin".
  • Chuck uses this as its Idiosyncratic Episode Naming.
  • CSI: Crime Scene Investigation episode "Grissom Versus the Volcano".
  • Curb Your Enthusiasm episode "Larry vs. Michael J. Fox"
  • Deadliest Warrior uses this as its Idiosyncratic Episode Naming.
  • Good Vs Evil (originally known as G vs E).
  • Reality Show Hogan Knows Best episode "Hogan Versus City Hall".
  • Leave It to Beaver episode "The State Versus Beaver".
  • Mama's Family episode "Harper Versus Harper".
  • Man v. Food.
  • Man vs. Wild.
  • Melissa And Joey episode "Joe Versus the Reunion".
  • Parenthood episode "Man Versus Possum".
  • Private Benjamin episode "Ross Versus the Robot".
  • Smart Guy episode "T.J. versus the Machine".
  • Common in Toei's Toku crossover film series:
    • The Super Sentai "Vs. Series" featuring two teams together. However, it's rare for the "vs." to actually mean that the teams end up fighting each other; more often they become allies immediately.
    • Kamen Rider's Movie Wars series always start their titles with "Kamen Rider X Kamen Rider [X] & [Y]", though like with its Sentai counterpart Kamen Rider [X] and Kamen Rider [Y] tend to work together rather than fight each other.
    • And then there's the multi-franchise Superhero Taisen series, which like with Movie Wars starts its titles with a form of "[X] X [Y]": the first was "Kamen Rider X Super Sentai", the second was "Kamen Rider X Super Sentai X Space Sheriff", and the third is "Heisei Rider X Showa Rider" (referring to the two subdivisions of the Kamen Rider franchise). In these cases, though, the various sides do fight each other.
  • Survivor: Fans vs. Favorites (twice), Heroes vs. Villains and Blood vs. Water.
  • The Beverly Hillbillies episode "Granny Versus the Weather Bureau".
  • The Many Loves Of Dobie Gillis episode "Dobie Versus the Machine".
  • Zorro (1957) episode "Zorro Versus Cupid".
  • After OLN (Outdoor Life Network) and before NBC Sports Network, it was Versus. (See NetworkDecay.Total Abandonment for more.)
  • Wizards of Waverly Place: Alex vs. Alex

     Music  

     Video Games  

    Web Comics 

    Web Originals 

    Western Animation 

    Real Life 

  • It is standard in civil court cases in many western countries to be named in the form Plaintiff v. Defendant.
    • Do keep in mind when both sides of the v. are the same (such as a family feud), it's not a Mirror Match. (Well, usually not. There have indeed been cases where people have sued themselves, e.g. Lodi v. Lodi (1985) 173 Cal.App.3d 628.)
    • Partially averted in Commonwealth countries, where the v. is read as and.

     This Very Wiki  

Verbing NounyTitle TropesWord Salad Title
This Is Gonna SuckImageSource/Newspaper ComicsTom the Dancing Bug

random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
46883
28