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Sliding Scale of Continuity
Continuity is handled very differently between different works: some of them take it very seriously, others really, really don't; some works need you to have been watching from the beginning while others just let you hop in and enjoy an individual story at any point in the series, that will usually be contained within a single installment.

Realizing where a work falls on the Sliding Scale of Continuity is often essential to being able to enjoy a series for what it is. In many cases, series on the lower side of the continuity scale often rely on a recurring structure or at least a consistent tone and mood - when deciding whether or not to watch an episode, a viewer will have some idea of what to expect beforehand. High-continuity series are usually expected to offer the viewer a sense of change or progress between installments, in terms of both characters and plot. This allows for more complex and detailed storytelling, spanning multiple chapters, at the cost of requiring more involved viewing. A lot of popular works attempt to combine the best of both worlds: offering self-contained episodes with something extra for those who take the time to watch all of it, or offering "progress" between seasons.

From the production side of things, works closer to the episodic end of the scale are also much easier to coordinate between writers, and handle a change in episode count or order better. In television, their appeal to networks is that can attract casual viewership, and easily increase viewership at any point along the series' run. On the other hand, works leaning towards continuity may find it easier to maintain a more devoted viewership once they catch on.

What this scale measures is: if you knew nothing of the series but the very basic premise and then happened to catch some random episodes in arbitrary order, how difficult is it going to be to understand and follow what's going on, and how much will you miss, compared to if you watched it in order from the beginning?

The answer doesn't have to be static within a series. When a work starts low on the scale and progresses upwards over time, that's Continuity Creep. Then, in many shows, especially those with a Half-Arc Season, the answer is different depending on which episode you're watching. If the shift is very pronounced, you can list it under both levels; otherwise, just put it where most episodes go and note the variance.

See also Season Fluidity.


The Sliding Scale of Continuity is as follows:

    open/close all folders 

    Level 0: Non-Linear Installments 
The different installments of the series are only nominally the same work; every new installment concerns different characters, or possibly the 'same' characters but in an Alternate Universe, such that the stories are explicitly disconnected and obviously not meant to be part of a continuity of any sort. Within any given installment, it can be assumed that every other installment either never happened or is at least completely irrelevant to the current one. What they share to make them a series is usually thematic, world or (for video games) gameplay elements, with possible minor recurring creatures, objects, etc. Non-Linear Sequel is the specific trope for this. If done to an entire series you've got a Thematic Series. In some cases, the rights-holders use the already-popular name that they own for marketing reasons, regardless of whether or not an installment fits in with previous ones in the series.

Examples:

Anime & Manga
  • Ghost in the Shell is split up into multiple alternate and equally separate continuities. The original manga, by which all the animated versions are based around; the Mamoru Oshii movies, which are condensed retellings of the manga with a bit of artistic license thrown in; Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex, the TV series that only loosely recreates and references scenes from the manga while telling a story all it's own; and finally Ghost in the Shell: Arise, which serves as a prequel of sorts to the whole franchise- even to the original manga- but still remains as a completely disconnected continuity in itself. Each version all contain the same characters and their own interpretations of them there-in.

Film — Live-Action

Live-Action TV
  • The seasons of Blackadder in relation to each other are this, the only similarities being the basic premise of "Blackadder surrounded by idiots" (and not even that considering the first season). However, the episodes within a season can be from levels 1-2.
  • Genre Anthology shows:

Video Games
  • The Final Fantasy series. A couple of games had sequels or spin-offs; the others are each their own reality with their own characters, their own plot, their own setting... However, they share various nods to one another such as similar monsters, summons, chocobos, and characters named Cid.
  • Neptunia: The second game takes place in an Alternate Universe from the first and Victory involves the protagonist and her sister from the second game Trapped In Another Alternate Universe. Despite having the same characters, the games taking place in AU versions of the same world and with AU versions of the cast make this a level 0.
  • Each entry in the Escape Velocity series takes place in a completely different continuity from the others. EV Classic and EV Nova are tangentially connected because a Negative Space Wedgie kicked two Atinoda Kestrels from the Classic universe into Nova, but it's more of an Easter Egg than anything else and doesn't affect the plot.


    Level 1: Negative Continuity 
Continuity? What's that?

Sure, the episodes are clearly related, sharing characters and a basic setup... but ultimately, watching it out of order makes more sense than in order if anything. The show may cheerfully contradict itself and if something seems to have changed by the end of the episode, you can bet the next one pretended it never happened anyway, so it's hardly a loss if that's not the next one you watch. Usually done in comedy. When there actually is continuity of some sort, that very fact is probably a gag in itself. See the Negative Continuity page.

Examples:

Comic Books

Live-Action TV
  • Flight of the Conchords' second season had several episodes end with the guys having, say, lost all their furniture, or fallen below zero on Murray's friendship graph, with the next merrily restoring the status quo without so much as a mention. The first season, however, is level 2-3, making it an example of inverted Continuity Creep.
  • Saturday Night Live alternates between level 0 and level 1, with some recurring sketches and characters.

Western Animation
  • Drawn Together, as exemplified by the fact it is the subject of the page quote for Negative Continuity.
  • Dexter's Laboratory often ends episodes with the destruction of the laboratory and the like. All you need to know for each episode is that he's Dexter and has a laboratory.
  • Aqua Teen Hunger Force often ends with characters being maimed or killed, the main characters' house being destroyed, etc.
  • The Simpsons: The reset button is often applied offscreen (such as one episode ending with the entire family except Lisa in jail) and characters fail to recognize each other despite all the adventures they've had together. However, there are also occasional Continuity Nods and Lisa did permanently become a vegetarian.


    Level 2: Status Quo 
Here Status Quo Is God. While there is an established canon and different episodes or installments will usually try not to contradict one another, there will be no, or next to no, changes in the setting that aren't reset before the end of the episode. There may be Continuity Nods, but if you haven't seen what is being referenced, they might as well just be Noodle Incidents. The basic situation at the beginning of an episode in season seven will probably be exactly (or almost exactly) the same as the situation at the beginning of an episode in season two, so that it makes little difference in what order you watch them.

Examples:

Comic Books
  • A great many superheroes of The Golden Age of Comic Books tended towards this trope, especially the B-list characters who often had little in the way of supporting characters or recurring villains. An Aquaman or Green Arrow story of the early 40s might be almost identical to one published nearly two decades later.

Literature
  • The Sherlock Holmes stories can be read in any order (with a very few notable exceptions like The Final Problem and The Empty House). And after the first few stories, they aren't all set in the order they were written in, anyway. Conan Doyle deliberately wrote them like this so that readers would not quit following the series just because they had missed a story or two.

Live-Action TV
  • As it says on that page, Saved by the Bell was the king of the Status Quo Is God trope.
  • Most KidComs, in general, are at this level. While they might occasionally have a brief story arc (and by "brief" I mean "the occasional two-parter"), they usually depict the exact same characters in the exact same situations from season to season. TGIF sitcoms are at the high end of this level, since they at least chronicle their main characters growing up and make whatever adjustments are necessary to the status quo to reflect this.
  • Seinfeld is a good example of a grown-up sitcom that's at this level.
  • Star Trek: The Original Series adhered to this level of continuity well enough that with a scant few exceptions you can watch the series in any order and it generally makes perfect sense.

Video Games
  • The main series Pokémon games mix this with level 0. There is continuity in the world, with references to events from previous games and some recurring characters, but every new game starts with you being a new rookie trainer in a new region fighting a new evil team, and knowing where the recurring characters came from is more a bonus than anything else.

Western Animation


    Level 3: Subtle Continuity 
There may be developing minor subplots or Character Arcs, the status quo may gradually change over time, and prior events may be casually referenced, but major changes generally don't happen. If you watch a season two episode and then a season five one, you may think, "Wait, when did they get together?" or "Whoa, Alice and Bob moved?", but chances are if you then watch a later season five episode you'd never know you skipped seven episodes in between, and the plots of the individual episodes you watch will always be resolved by the end.

Examples:

Anime & Manga
  • The second season of Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex diverges from the Type 4 setting that the first season fell into. Episodes are split up into "Individual", "Dividual", and "Dual" episodes. While the first two may seem like completely stand-alone episodes that have nothing to do with anything in particular, each episode focuses on at least some minor detail that will build up to a more important role later on as the story unfolds. Individual episodes focus on the rising tensions with the Asian refugees in Japan practically being treated as 2nd class citizens. Dual episodes focus on the Government's involvement with the refugee situation (and the Big Bad's manipulation of everything behind the scenes), and Dividual episodes focus on the members of Section 9 and how they get involved in all of it.

Comic Books
  • Superman is a Level 3 in at least The Silver Age of Comic Books — while Mort Weisinger was the editor, his supporting cast, Rogues Gallery, and mythology were slowly built upon, without readers requiring to have read any previous stories most of the time. Supergirl (also edited by Weisinger) followed this model but often moved into Level 4 as she was more likely to be involved in two or three part stories.

Literature
  • The first three Harry Potter books' storylines don't directly depend on the stories of the previous books; they each explain basic premises like the wizarding world, Voldemort, Harry's backstory, etc., Harry continues to live at the Dursleys', go to Hogwarts every year, have friends named Ron and Hermione, etc., and the actual events of the first two books don't matter by the third. The rest of the series, well...
  • A Series of Unfortunate Events is much the same as Harry Potter, with the first four books or so being mostly independent, starting off with the Baudelaires being adopted by a new guardian and carefully explaining who the characters are to potential new readers, but later on the continuity creeps and the reader starts to need to have read the previous books to make sense of all this stuff about VFD and Beatrice and so on.
  • The Land of Oz hovers between 2 and 3 on the scale, mostly because Baum was burned out on the series, and grinding them out ahead of the bill collectors by demand of his publisher. There are some elements that carry over (like Ozma taking the throne in the second book, Dorothy moving to Oz by the 6th book, the magic belt), but most books are standalone and many elements can contradict one another, especially after Baum started phoning it in.

Live-Action TV
  • Sitcoms that aren't level 2 tend to be this, e.g. How I Met Your Mother and Friends.
  • Forensic Dramas, Monster of the Week shows and other basically episodic, plot-based genres with no Myth Arcs also usually fall here.
  • Firefly's episodes can pretty much stand on their own in a mostly arbitrary order, though this may largely be because it never got the chance to go anywhere with the hinted Myth Arc.
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation generally operated at this level. Most episodes focused on the Enterprise and its crew discovering new planets and alien species, and solving the problem presented in each episode. However, a few of the episodes build up Fore Shadowing elements that culminate in a bigger story arc later on and some characters received promotions.
  • Criminal Minds falls here. Although story arcs are present from time to time and it has seen main characters get replaced, any differences between the episodes tend to be mostly cosmetic- the vast majority of episodes are simply the Case Of The Week where the storyline is introduced and wrapped up in the same episode, with arcs operating mostly in the background.

Video Games
  • The Ace Attorney games have a stronger (level 4) continuity between cases within each game, but are this with respect to one another, featuring the same characters (bar Apollo Justice) and explaining things like spirit mediums at the beginning of each game but otherwise having independent stories and not depending on the player knowing the previous games.
  • Left 4 Dead is level 0 without DLC. Each level is completely stand alone as far as the game leads you to believe. With the release of the DLC, it jumps to level 3 as we find out that the survivors ended up transitioning from one area to the next. Left 4 Dead 2 is pretty firmly level 3, with the start of the next area being a direct result of what happened at the end of the last. For example: fueling up a race car to escape from a zombie infested mall only results in them abandoning the car when they reach blocked traffic, thus having to travel through a dilapidated carnival on foot.
  • The Legend of Zelda. The games tend to be standalone but there are three timelines that diverge at Ocarina of Time. Yet the games only get a Continuity Nod or Mythology Gag at best and can be played with any knowledge of the other games.

Western Animation


    Level 4: Arc-Based Episodic 
These works do divide into episodes or installments with each (usually) introducing and resolving its own mini-plot, but there is a continuous ongoing storyline going on in the background. While most episodes may be enjoyed individually, any watching out of order will probably leave you wondering where characters who died three seasons ago are, or why they're suddenly having dinner with the guy they had sworn to defeat in the last episode you watched, or who the hell this new villain they're talking about is, even if you can follow the actual plot of the episode. Shows often try to combat the resulting Continuity Lockout — with varying degrees of success — with Previously On recap openings. See also Story Arc.

Examples:

Anime & Manga
  • One interesting example is Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex, which explicitly identifies each episode as either "Stand Alone" (episodic) or "Complex" (part of the series arc). The episodic ones rarely contain any reference to other episodes.

Film — Live-Action

Literature
  • The Dresden Files slides quickly from level 3 to here as the books become less "investigating a case" and more "investigating something deeply connected to just about everything else while dozens of old characters reappear and stuff that happened five books ago suddenly turns out to be vitally important," though there is still a plot with its own resolution in each book.
  • Most of the Discworld books are level 4.
  • The Ciaphas Cain novels are a fusion of this and Anachronic Order, numbered thematically rather than chronologically. The first trilogy tells the story of how Cain became attached to the Valhallan 597th Regiment and their early campaigns. The second covers much more ground time-wise but is tangentially related to the shadowlight, a mysterious pre-humanity artifact discovered on Perlia. "Echoes of the Tomb" and The Emperor's Finest cover his time as Imperial Guard liaison to the Reclaimers chapter of the Adeptus Astartes, and shed light on a Noodle Incident repeatedly alluded to in previous books and why Cain is so terrified of necrons.

Live-Action TV
  • Most of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, though it started to edge towards level 5 as the series went on.
  • The X-Files would have about a fifty-fifty shot between standalone "monster of the week" episodes and heavy-duty Myth Arc. The Myth Arc eps sometimes cranked the scale all the way up to five, while monster of the week episodes were a 2.
  • Blake's 7 always had the ongoing struggle against the tolatarian Federation, but whether it was the forground concern or subordinate to the current crisis depends on the episode.
  • Supernatural tends to do this in later seasons, as compared to the level 3 of the earlier ones. As it recaps all plot points relevant to the episode right before the episode, it's in no real danger of becoming level 5.
  • Doctor Who post-2005. Pre-2005 DW is more a hybrid of level 4 and level 3, with 4-6 episode story arcs that have a strict continuity in themselves but overall have virtually no connection to each other. The only difference a casual viewer would notice between a season 10 story and a season 20 story is the new lead actor.
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and the series that followed it, Voyager and Enterprise, wavered between this and level 3, but their use of longer-running arcs (compared to previous series) bumps them up the scale.
  • Stargate SG-1 and Stargate Atlantis follow this model. Each show has multi-season Myth Arcs but the individual episodes are pretty self-contained, and they usually have a Previously On segment in the continuity-heavy episodes.
  • USA Network's summer series are noted for this:
    • Burn Notice: With the arc being the titular burn notice and Michel Westen's attempts to get back into proper intelligence work. It gets much more arc-heavy starting in Season 5.
    • Royal Pains: With the arc being Hank working out his family issues and growing his business.
    • Suits: With the arcs being Mike Ross' dubious past in the legal profession coming back to bite him, and the constant intrigue among partners (and Louis Litt) at Pearson Hardman.
  • 'Allo 'Allo! is a rare sitcom to reach this level; each episode began with the lead character summarising the ongoing events of the miniarc so far and the background arc of the painting(s) and British airmen ran through the whole series.
  • The West Wing has two or three major arcs per season, but segments of the arc are usually wrapped up within episodes with some exceptions. Being as it's a show about politics, things from the past often affect the present. Each episode starts with a Previously On.

Roleplay
  • Destroy The Godmodder is this. You can jump in as you like, but certain events are oftentimes confusing if you don't really know exactly what's going on. There were many complaints about this during the Homestuck Invasion, as many players had issues with having no idea what was going on because of how many references there were to Homestuck at the stime.

Video Games
  • The Dragon Age series is notably more lax about its continuity than its sister series Mass Effect: while there are definitely several enduring Myth Arcs, each installment so far (including supplemental novels and comic mini-series) is a largely self-contained story that happens to push one or more overarching plots along. This is helped by the fact that individual installments usually focus on different (albeit often overlapping) main characters and are set in different parts of the world at different times; also, an occasional retcon by the writers prevents the established canon from being too reliable.
  • Pokémon Gold and Silver is possibly the only Pokemon game which carries on with the major events from 'Pokemon Red Blue And Yellow''. The Johto Pokedex is considered as an extention of the Kanto Pokedex, you have to stop Team Rocket from returning to its former glory, and the Pokemon League is the same Indigo Plateau. Most, if not all, characters from Kanto returns, including the previous game's protagonist, who is now the true Pokemon Champion. And many of them have moved on with their lives. The only reason this isn't Level 5 is due to having to start with a new protagonist.
  • Post-Continuity Reboot, Super Robot Wars Original Generation. The fact each major installment (including the Gaiden Game sequel) have a dedicated, episodic name ("Divine Wars", "The Inspector", "Unified Wisdom" and "Gaia Saviour") proves it's better to play them in successive order than to skip one. The Spin-Off Endless Frontier duology and Another Century's Episode: R, although occurring in Alternate Universes, take elements directly from main continuity, though are not necessary to fully enjoy Original Generation. However, they provide details as to why some characters are temporarily missing in main installments and extend the Mythology Gag prevalent in the continuity.
  • King's Quest lands here, with the games themselves being standalone, but characters frequently reference past adventures, and the plotlines sometimes lead into one another, like the events of King's Quest V being set into motion over events in King's Quest III (the Big Bad of that game takes revenge for his brother being turned into a cat), and the events of King's Quest VI built on events in King's Quest V with many references to King's Quest III in dialogue and flavor text. There's also an incriminating letter in King's Quest VI that hints that at least three of the previous villains may have been working together. It can get up to a 5 if you get your hands on a Fan Remake or Fan Sequel like AGDInteractive's remakes of KQII and KQIII or The Silver Lining.
  • Space Quest, like its "brother" King's Quest has games that stand alone mostly, but later entries reference the hell out of previous ones. Even if Roger is always busted back down to mopping floors, there's always some hint of his previous adventures that comes up when playing. In Space Quest 6, this is referenced by showing Roger with a collection of inventory items from previous games. Space Quest 4 spoofs this with Time Travel by having Roger go to his future (The Latex Babes of Estros), where he gets in trouble for something he technically hasn't done yet, and the first game where the bar owner complains about the slot machine Roger broke. Space Quest 4's plot was kicked off by a Virtual Ghost Vohaul wanting revenge over Roger killing him off in Space Quest II, and much of the subplot in Space Quest 5 (in addition to why Beatrice getting killed means Nonstandard Game Over for Roger) has to do with events in Space Quest 4.

Western Animation
  • Avatar: The Last Airbender is mostly like this - while the Gaang is always traveling the world to find bending masters to teach Aang and there are plenty of Fillers that belong on level 3, there are pretty steady continuous developments on the villainous side that would be very jarring to anyone who just watched individual episodes here and there.
  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic became this in season 4, having an arc related to opening the box from the season beginning two parter..


    Level 5: Full Lockout 
If you haven't seen the whole series so far, or at least the entirety of the current season, you're screwed. Each installment expects you to have seen every previous installment; though it may make some effort to try to clue you in if you haven't, you will probably be thoroughly confused, and there is no guarantee there will be any sort of resolution to anything by the episode's end; in fact, it's quite likely to end with a Cliffhanger. Often Better on DVD. The specific trope here is Continuity Lockout.

Examples:

Anime & Manga
  • In general, Full Lockout is extremely common in anime. Especially in 13 or 26 episode series as they are devoid of filler and even more so when they are short anime series based on pre-existing material (usually manga).
  • Attack on Titan has lots of Wham Episode worth of character deaths, revelations, and plotwists. You miss one chapter or episode, and the next one has you lost.
  • Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann, especially as it goes on (though the Parallel Works are level 0).

Comics
  • Many Crisis Crossovers assume that not only have you read all the previous and tie in issues of the event but also that you are familiar with events published much further in the past. Fallout from the original Crisis on Infinite Earths affected the DCU from 1986 until the new-52 reboot in 2011.

Live-Action TV
  • ReGenesis, through all its interwoven multiple-episode story and character arcs, is probably impossible to understand episodically despite the lengthy Previously On recaps.
  • Each season of 24 is a continuous real-time story arc.
  • LOST is a frequently cited example of Continuity Lockout because of this.
  • Babylon 5 later on, though the first season or so was more level 4.
  • Damages is level 5, due to the Anachronic Order and following the case instead of a Monster of the Week format.
  • Stargate Universe was heavily arc-based, which had the misfortune to occur at the same time Syfy changed its scheduling strategy to where it would air part of a season, then replace it with another show, then bring the first show back, and so on. The SGU showrunners partly blame the series' cancellation on the resulting confusion driving away viewers.
  • Most of the various AMC dramas:
    • Mad Men: The ongoing story of Don Draper and the firm of Sterling Cooper.
    • Breaking Bad: Or, Two Years In The Life of Walter White. And boy, are they eventful ones.
  • HBO does this too.
  • Raumschiff GameStar: The series swung between level 5 (Full Lockout) in seasons 1, 2, and 4 and level 4 (Arc-based Episodic) in seasons 3 and 5, occasionally tapping into level 3 (Subtle Continuity) at some points in the third and fourth seasons.
  • Once Upon a Time: Same writers as LOST, and same twisted plotlines that can cram several WhamEpisodes inside WhamEpisodes. Sure, they're all fairy tale and literary characters, but that means very little with their love of CompositeCharacters and DecompositeCharacters and at least five MagnificentBastards scheming against one another.

Video Games

Webcomic
  • Sluggy Freelance creator Pete Abrams recently acknowledged the phenomenon at this stage of the comic's lifespan and narrative density. He still tries to link back to details in previous strips, but now that it's become necessary even in filler arcs, it's extremely daunting to new readers.

Series Continuity ErrorContinuity TropesSnap Back
Sliding Scale of BeautyLaws and FormulasSliding Scale of Fourth Wall Hardness
Sliding Scale of Comedy and HorrorSorting Algorithm of TropesSliding Scale of Content Density vs. Width

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