Sequel Episode

An episode in a series that serves as a sequel to a previous episode. Different from a Multi-Part Episode, in that there may be several episodes (if not several years) between the first episode and the one that picks up the plot again.

To qualify, it's not enough to simply have an object, setting, or character from one episode appear in another, otherwise any series with a Rogues Gallery would consist almost entirely of Sequel Episode. If Cop Show has the Main Characters arrest a thief and recover some stolen jewels in one episode, and a later episode has the thief break out of prison and cause some more havoc, that's just a One-Shot Character moving up to Recurring Character status. If, on the other hand, a later episode has the cops discover that the stolen jewels they recovered were actually fakes, and they have to interrogate the thief to find out where she hid the real jewels, that is a Sequel Episode; the plot resolved in an earlier episode is reopened and explored again in a new episode.

Obviously this only applies to series where standalone episodes occur somewhat regularly. If the whole show is one long Story Arc, there's not enough separating the plot of one episode from another to make labelling it a "sequel" meaningful. However, if a series has multiple story arcs, it is possible for a later Story Arc to be a sequel to an earlier one. A show with half arc seasons can also have these based on the stand-alones.note  Compare Myth Arc, which can be seen as a series of these in an otherwise episodic show.

Often uses Cross-Referenced Titles. Related to Continuity Nod, Call-Back, and Plot Archaeology


Examples:

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    Anime and Manga 
  • Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex actually categorizes its first-season episodes as "Stand Alone" episodes and "Complex" episodes, of which the former are Exactly What It Says on the Tin, and the latter are a handful of Sequel Episodes around one major Story Arc.
  • In Kirby: Right Back at Ya!, various episodes get this treatment, but special notability goes to "The School Scam" and "Teacher's Threat" (sequels to "eNeMeE Elementary"), which are actually titled "Demon Teacher 2" and "Demon Teacher 3" in Japan.
  • In the middle of the Johto Arc of the Pokémon Anime, the episode where Brock meets up with Suzie and her friend Zhane at a breeders' competition counts as it recalls a few points about breeding mentioned in Suzie's original appearance in Kanto and has Brock give back the Vulpix he got from her in said Kanto episode.

    Comic Books 
  • One of the most popular Iron Man stories was Armor Wars in the 80s. Subsequently there have been two sequels to the arc, Armor Wars II (in the 90s) and Armor Wars III (in 2012).
  • Roger Stern's Spider-Man story, "Nothing Can Stop the Juggernaut" from the early 80s was followed up by 2009's "Something Can Stop the Juggernaut". And to make it even better, the sequel was written by Stern as well!
  • Don Rosa wrote several stories in the Disney Ducks Comic Universe that serve as sequels to stories by Carl Barks (Rosa was a big fan of Carl's works growing up). "The Money Pit" is a sequel to "The Trouble With Dimes", "Return to Plain Awful" is a sequel to "Lost in the Andes", and so on.
  • Noob: In Comic 5, Sparadrap turns out be a Genius Ditz at fluxball, the Fictional Sport that has been added to the setting of the fictional MMORPG everyone is playing. This results in the titular guild winning a tournament of the sport that has been organized to promote the new activity. Starting Comic 6, the story turns into its own retelling of the franchise's Myth Arc, in which fluxball plays absolutely no role. In Comic 12, which happens during a time period other media of the franchise skipped over, the Noob guild goes to Japan to participate in an international fluxball tournament due to technically being the top team in France after the events of Comic 5.

    Comic Strip 
  • FoxTrot did a months-long story where Jason and Marcus goes to a summer camp, with Eileen and her new friend Phoebe. Several years later, they did a follow-up where Phoebe visits their city.
  • One Retail story ended with Cooper getting Keith Sanzen arrested. Years later, Keith returned as an inventory supervisor, still bitter over his arrest.
  • The Calvin and Hobbes storyline with the duplicator had a sequel where Calvin perfected the device (he added a literal Morality Dial).

    Literature 
  • The Redwall series currently consists of several vaguely related stories that take place in the same universe. However, there are a few cases of Direct Sequels. Mattimeo was sequel to the Original book; Mossflower has a sequel in Legend of Luke and a prequel in Martin the Warrior, and The Bellmaker is a direct sequel to Mariel of Redwall.
  • Spock's World reopens the events of "Amok Time" as the motive for the Big Bad.
  • Inverted in Agatha Christie's novels Murder on the Orient Express (published 1934), Murder in Mesopotamia (published 1936) and Death on the Nile (published 1937), all of which take place on the holiday that Poirot takes in the Near East. The inversion is due to the fact that the stories are prequels to each other, for in Poirot's chronology, he goes down the Nile, visits Mesopotamia, and then travels on the Orient Express, the events occurring in reverse publishing order.
  • Frequently happens with Black Library stories, where authors often revisit plot threads from earlier books, often with many years and various different books passing between. This tends to happen a lot between Horus Heresy and "present day" stories, such as Titanicus, which continues the story of the stolen book from Mechanicum, though taken place thousands of years later (while also being a spinoff of the Gaunt's Ghosts series that explains why the Titan legion that was supposed to back the eponymous team up in one of the earlier books couldn't make it).

    Live-Action TV 
  • According to Jim has the season 6 episode The Grill II, which is a sequel to the season 4 episode The Grill.
  • Angel has several examples.
    • In season 3 episode 2 "That Vision Thing", a prisoner is freed from another dimension by Angel, who then returns 4 episodes later to cause havoc.
    • Faith's return in season 4 may be considered this to her appearance in season 1, "Five By Five" and "Sanctuary ".
    • "The Price" from the third season shows the consequences to the gang's actions in " Forgiving", 2 episodes before.
  • Bones's Gravedigger: first appearance in the 2nd season, caught in the fourth, put on trial in the fifth.
  • Buffy the Vampire Slayer:
    • In the episode "The Wish" the vengeance demon Anyanka creates an Alternate Universe where vampires rule Sunnydale. By the end of the episode The 'Verse is returned to normal and Anyanka is left powerless. Later that season, the episode "Doppelgangland" was driven by Anyanka's attempts to regain her powers, and maybe warp reality back into a vampire run hellhole while she's at it.
    • "I Was Made To Love You", an episode about Warren's robot girlfriend running amok in Sunnydale, ended with Spike getting him to build another robot. The payoff came in "Intervention" which involved Spike's newly-built Buffy-bot on the loose in Sunnydale.
  • Community: "Advanced Dungeons and Dragons" from Season 2 had a follow-up "Advanced Advanced Dungeons and Dragons" in Season 5. Abed notes that sequel episodes often lead to the downfall of overly-proud creators, which gives him the resolve to do it so he can prove his superiority to them.
  • Criminal Minds has Outfoxed, where the UNSUB is a copycat of a killer who first appeared in The Fox.
  • CSI did this with 'The Execution of Catherine Willows' and its sequel 'What's Eating Gilbert Grissom?" which aired a few seasons later. Both focused on the 'Blue Paint Killer', who was actually a pair of killers, though only in the end of the second ep was the whole setup explained.
    • Also, there was storyline with the Creepy Child girl suspect in 'The Unsual Suspect' and 'Goodbye and Good Luck'
    • CSI likes doing this with their serial killer cases...Paul Millander's storyline was spread over at least two seasons, with months of eps between them. Only the Miniature Killer's storyline episodes were relatively close together.
  • CSI: NY had a similar thing with Shane Casey, seemingly ending his case in season 3, then having him escape and start another arc in season 6.
  • Doctor Who:
  • In Enemy at the Door, the first-season episode "The Jerrybag" (in which a woman gets pregnant to a German soldier and has to decide whether to keep the baby after he's reassigned and killed in action) was followed up in the second-season episode "The Right Blood" (in which the soldier's family learns about the boy and tries to convince her to give him over to them).
  • In The Flash (1990), the episodes "The Trickster" and "Trial of the Trickster" were several episodes apart but they were combined into one two-part "movie" for VHS release.
  • In The Flash (2014), "King Shark" is a sequel to a minor plot in "The Fury of Firestorm", this time focusing on the titular villain, whose initial appearance lasted only about a minute.
  • Friends : "TOW the Embryos" and "TOW All the Haste" about Rachel & Monica and Joey & Chandler switching apartments. They both even start the same, with Rachel being rudely awakened in the morning.
  • Hercules: The Legendary Journeys has done this a number of times. For example, there was the episode 'King For A Day', where Iolaus has to impersonate a missing king. A season or two later came 'Long Live The King', where Iolaus has to impersonate the king again.
  • The Haunting Hour has Season 4's "Dead Bodies", which picks up from the end of Season 1's "The Dead Body."
  • How I Met Your Mother: First there was "Slap Bet" where Marshall won the right to slap Barney in the face five times, as hard as he can, at any moment he chooses. Next season, we got the episode "Slapsgiving", where Marshall decides to dole out one of his slaps on Thanksgiving Day and spends the whole episode putting Barney through a Paranoia Gambit. Two more years pass, and finally "Slapsgiving 2: Revenge of the Slap" arrives: it's Thanksgiving again and Marshall decides to let Ted and Robin slap Barney in his place, and, once more, Barney spends the whole episode tortured by the knowledge of what's to come.
    • The first season Halloween Episode "The Slutty Pumpkin" establishes how Ted once met a girl in a pumpkin costume at a Halloween party who he had amazing chemistry with, but lost her number and has spent every Halloween since hoping to find her again. He finally meets her for real in the seventh season episode "The Slutty Pumpkin Returns".
  • iCarly: iThink They Kissed, where Carly finds out that Sam and Freddie shared a First Kiss is the Sequel Episode to iKiss where the First Kiss occurred.
    • "iPsycho" and "iStill Psycho" (and the Sam & Cat episode "#SuperPsycho").
  • It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia:
    • "Gun Fever 2: Still Hot" (season 9) is a sequel to "Gun Fever" (season 1).
    • "The Gang Makes Lethal Weapon 6" (season 9) is a sequel to "Dee Reynolds: Shaping America's Youth" (season 6).
    • "The Nightman Cometh" (season 4) expands on a plot point from "Sweet Dee is Dating a Retarded Person" (season 2).
    • The plot of "The Gang Finds a Dead Guy" (season 1) gets continued in "Pop-Pop: the Final Solution" (season 8).
    • "The World Series Defense" (season 5) and "The Gang Gets Stranded in the Woods" (season 6) both deal with the Gang's fondness for the Philadelphia Phillies and Mac's Celeb Crush on Chase Utley.
    • "The Gang Gives Back" (season 2) is a sequel to "The Gang Goes Jihad", which precedes it by a couple of episodes.
  • Law & Order brought back its Not-O-J-Simpson character when "If I did it" was news. Keep in mind the character was from many seasons ago. Two other examples:
    • "Coma" featured comedian Larry Miller as a nightclub owner whose first wife died under mysterious circumstances. He was the prime suspect until a junkie came forward and confessed to the crime. The last scene of that episode was the cops viewing a videotape where the junkie was shown to have performed at the suspect's nightclub. Two years later (in an episode called "Encore"), Miller's character returns after his second wife is murdered. He looks like he's able to evade justice again, but this time his would be third wife is revealed to have helped screw up the investigation. The cops get her to cooperate by reminding her of what happened to the suspect's first two wives.
    • The first season episode "Indifference", is based on the Joel Steinberg case. In that episode, not-Steinberg was convicted and sent to jail. Around the time the real Steinberg was released (a decade and a half later), the episode "Fixed" had the not-Steinberg character be released from jail, only to be gunned down and become the victim of the story.
  • In Legends of Tomorrow, the season 2 episode "Outlaw Country" is a sequel to the season 1 episode "The Magnificent Eight", as the Legends return to the Old West and once again work with Jonah Hex.
  • Merlin has three Lancelot-centric episodes (though he appeared in a couple more) that encompass his Character Arc: Lancelot, Lancelot and Guinevere and Lancelot du Lac, making him the only character to have three episodes named after him.
  • Modern Family's second-season Valentine's Day Episode, "Bixby's Back", is a sequel to the first season's "My Funky Valentine", at least as it applies to Claire and Phil.
  • Psych:
  • The fifth-season Quantum Leap episode "Deliver Us From Evil" is a sequel to the second-season episode "Jimmy": Sam leaps into Jimmy LaMotta a second time, a couple years after his first leap, and finds that the happy future he should have caused is failing to occur (thanks to an Evil Counterpart whose goal is to Make Wrong What Once Went Right). This episode gets its own sequel later that season when the evil leaper returns in "Return of the Evil Leaper".
  • Red Dwarf has the Series VI episode "Emohawk: Polymorph II", which is a sequel to the Series III episode "Polymorph". The three-part special "Back to Earth" also acts as a sequel to the Series V episode "Back To Reality".
  • Scrubs: Some of the episodes are titled "His/Her/Their Story" (the usual episodes are titled as "My ___") with Roman Numerals used to indicate which part it is. These episodes focus on characters other than JD.
  • Stargate SG-1 has what amounts to a prequel episode: "2010" is set entirely in a Bad Future, with the future versions of SG-1 working to send back a warning. The episode ends when they succeed, then a season later in "2001" the events referenced as history in 2010 start happening and they have to decypher the Note to Self to avert it.
  • Star Trek features several of these, spanning multiple series:
  • Supernatural:
  • Ultra Series:
    • Ultra Q did two episodes in which a Monster of the Week returns with a vengeance. They featured Peguila and Garamon respectively, with the latter's return episode revealing the alien invaders who had originally sent the first Garamon to attack Earth.
    • The sixteenth episode of Ultraman was one for its second episode, as the Baltans turn out to have survived Ultraman's destruction of their spaceship and they seek revenge.
    • In Ultraman Tiga, the episode "Requiem to Darkness", in which Horii's friend Ryunosuke transforms himself into the monster Evolu using alien cells, got a sequel towards the end of the show called "Goodbye to Darkness", where an escaped lab monkey mutated by the same cells into a new creature called Metamorga (naming pattern, anyone?) appears, while also grappling with some of the leftover issues from the previous episode, notably Ryunosuke's girlfriend Sayaka and her feelings for Horii.
    • Ultraman Dyna did a sequel to the above-mentioned Tiga episodes called "The Light and Shadow of Youth", which also served as a sequel to a Dyna episode called "Battle! Monster Island!" (which had a mad scientist and his mutant monster Neosaurus), as the mad scientist's apprentice perfects the alien cells to create super-soldier clones and eventually turn himself into the monster Zomborg.
    • Ultraman Max did one to Ultraseven's "The Targeted Town" called "The Untargeted Town", in which the alien Metron turns out to have survived his encounter with Seven and has restarted his Hate Plague schemes with cellphone signals instead of cigarettes. The episodes even have the same director!
      • There was also "A Different World", which serves as a sequel to the Multi-Part Episode that had Red King and Pygmon/Pigmon and the episode "A Bright World", as the alien Shama returns from the latter episode to destroy DASH and Ultraman Max with a device that summons a new Red King from a parallel universe where it was never destroyed, but accidentally brings in Pygmon too.
    • Ultraman Mebius' "The Monster Master's Legacy" follows up an episode of Return of Ultraman called "The Boy and the Monster Master" by featuring the son of the benevolent alien Mates (murdered in an incident of Fantastic Racism) coming to Earth to avenge his father's death.
    • Ultraman Orb's "The Girl with the Blue Ribbon" sees the SSP and Gai discover that their one-off alien foe Maddock from "A Heart That Won't Flee" has somehow reincarnated himself in the body of an amnesiac teenage girl and has also resurrected his monster Hyper Zetton Deathscythe.
  • The Wonder Years: The fifth season premiered with "The Lake", where Kevin meets a girl named Cara while on vacation at the lake. The season ended with "Back to the Lake", where Kevin returns to the location specifically to reunite with Cara.
  • The X-Files:
    • A first season episode "Tooms" was a sequel to an episode earlier in the season, "Squeeze", one of the few they did like that. In the first ep they caught the Monster of the Week and in the later ep he was released from psychiatric ward. It's pretty damn hard to prosecute a supernatural crime...
    • The episode "Irresistible" had the sequel "Orison". They featured a creepy serial killer obsessed with dead women and Agent Scully. In "Orison", he escapes from prison and tries to find Scully.
    • "Pusher" had the sequel "Kitsunegari". "Pusher" is considered a brilliant episode with a great antagonist for Mulder. "Kitsunegari" is disappointing as he inexplicably became helpful and his previously-not-mentioned twin sister has the same paranormal abilities (which he gained because of his untreated brain tumour).

    Music 
  • Iron Maiden had the tale of Charlotte the Harlot chronicled in 4 songs from 1980 to 1992: "Charlotte the Harlot" (Iron Maiden, 1980), "22 Acacia Avenue" (The Number of the Beast, 1982), "Hooks in You" (No Prayer For the Dying, 1990), and "From here to Eternity" (Fear of the Dark, 1992).
  • Metallica with "The Unforgiven" on their self-titled album in 1991, and then "The Unforgiven II" on the album Reload in 1997, and finally "The Unforgiven III" on the album Death Magnetic in 2008.
  • Megadeth had the fan favorite song "Hangar 18" on their 1990 album, Rust in Peace. In 2001, they released a sequel song, "Return to Hanger" on the album The World Needs a Hero.
  • Manowar had a unique case of prequel episode (song), with "Metal Warriors (Brothers of Metal Pt. 2)" released in 1992 on their Triumph of Steel album, and the "Brothers of Metal Pt. 1" released in 1996 on their Louder Than Hell album.
  • Overkill have: "Overkill", "Overkill II (The Nightmare Continues)", "Overkill III (Under The Influence)", "Overkill IV (E.Vil N.ever D.ies)" and "Overkill V (The Brand)". Confusingly, they covered the Motörhead song "Overkill" as well (the source of the band's name, and a completely different song).
  • Queensr˙che broke through with their 1988 Concept Album, Opertaion: Mindcrime. They made a sequel album in 2006, Operation: Mindcrime II and performed both albums back-to-back while on tour that year, chronicled on the DVD, Mindcrime At The Moore.
  • He Is Legend's first album included the track "The Seduction" which was followed by "Dixie Wolf (the Seduction of...)" in their second album. They also had one of "China White" parts 1, 2, and 3 in each of their three albums.

    Webcomics 
  • Sluggy Freelance gave us the horror movie spoof "KITTEN", and naturally it couldn't parody horror movies without parodying the inevitable sequels; hence, "KITTEN II".
  • Dragon City does this from time to time with story arcs. There was at least one story arc that have about four or five story arcs that were sequels of it and of each other since the latter ones were consequences of the first story arc.
  • Jix, which is by the same person who created Dragon City, also does this from time to time, but possibly not as extensively as Dragon City.
  • The "Sister II" arc of El Goonish Shive is rather predictably a sequel to the much earlier "Sister" arc. The initial "Sister" arc dealt with the events surrounding Ellen's creation via the Dewitchery Diamond, and the start of her journey to become her own person separate from Elliot who's memories she shared. The sequel primarily dealt with the fallout, such as the wizard who made the diamond, and swore to destroy any "abominations" created by it, and the fact that touching the diamond in the first place had a slightly greater effect on both Elliot and Ellen than anyone realized at the time.

    Web Original 

    Western Animation 
  • In Futurama the episode "The Cryonic Woman" is essentially a sequel to the pilot episode (showing how far Fry's come, reminding us of what his life was like before he was frozen and showing how someone might suffer for being a Fish out of Water in his situation). They even pointed this out in the DVD commentary.
    • During the episode "Parasites Lost", among the many changes to himself via a beneficial worm infestation in his body, Fry gains the ability to play a holophonor (it is said that not many people in the whole universe can play it, and the few that could can't play it well), cementing his relationship with Leela. However, to find out whether or not she loves the real him, Fry induces a Pygmalion Snap Back by driving the worms out of his body. He tries playing the holophonor again, and as expected, he lost both his talent and his seduction over Leela. The episode ends with Fry practicing on the holophonor, but this is not revisited until "The Devil's Hands Are Idle Playthings", a Series Fauxnale centering on Fry's ability to play the holophonor.
  • Adventure Time has a lot of episodes that are continuations of others.
    • "Return to the Nightosphere"/"Daddy's Little Monster" for "It Came From the Nightosphere".
    • "Crystals Have Power" for "Tree Trunks".
    • "Too Young" for "Mortal Recoil". "You Made Me" for "Too Young". "All Your Fault" for "You Made Me".
    • "Incendium" for "Too Young". Any episode with a fire-related pun as the title will feature Flame Princess, as "Hot to the Touch" and "Burning Low" both follow "Incendium".
    • "The Creeps" for "Mystery Train", and "The Vault" for "The Creeps".
    • "From Bad to Worse" for "Slumber Party Panic".
    • "Beautopia" for "Susan Strong"
    • "In Your Footsteps" for "Mortal Recoil".
    • "The Lich" and "Finn the Human"/"Jake the Dog" for "In Your Footsteps".
    • "Jake the Dad" for "Lady and Peebles".
    • "King Worm" for "Evicted!".
    • "I Remember You" for "Holly Jolly Secrets," and even more directly, "Simon and Marcy" for "I Remember You."
    • The "Lemonhope" two parter for "Too Old".
    • "James II" for "James".
    • "The Pit" for "Play Date".
    • ""Wake Up"/"Escape from the Citadel" for "Billy's Bucket List"
    • "The Tower" for "Wake Up"/"Escape from the Citadel"
    • "Breezy" for "The Tower"
    • "Is That You" for "Wake Up"/"Escape from the Citadel"
  • Kim Possible:
    • The second season episode "Return to Wannaweep" is a sequel to the first season ep "Sink or Swim", in which Gill, a mutated former camper "buddy" of Ron's wreaks havoc. In the sequel episode, Wannaweep has been re-opened, and Gill has returned to his human form.
    • In the fourth season, "Oh No, Yono!" follows up on the introduction of Hana, Ron's adoptive baby sister in "Big Bother", with plotlines set up in the "Big Bother" coming to fruition in "Oh No, Yono!".
    • The events of the Grand Finale "Graduation" are triggered by Warmonga (and her mate Warhok) returning to Earth to get revenge on Kim and Drakken for defeating and making a fool of Warmonga in "Mad Dogs and Aliens".
  • The Angry Beavers, the episodes "Up All Night" and "Up All Night 2: Up All Day. The Reckoning". The first one concerns the beavers trying to stay up until morning, and eventually staying up until The Future. In the second one, they get back via a Deus ex Machina and decide to go to sleep, eventually falling asleep for so long that they wake up in The Future again. Also, the "Muscular Beaver" episode managed to have four Numbered Sequels.
  • South Park:
  • Recess: "The Big Prank" is about T.J. attempting to pull a prank on King Bob so he can officially earn the latter's former title of "Prankster Prince". "The Madness of King Bob" has Bob, jealous of T.J. getting more admiration for his pranks than he did when he held the title, abandon his post so he can pull a prank on T.J.
  • The Powerpuff Girls:
    • "Supper Villain" is an episode about a neighbor of the Powerpuff Girls who decides to become a supervillain when they visit his house. "Just Deserts" sees his family joining him.
    • "Monkey See, Doggy Two" is about Mojo Jojo trying to redo his plan from "Monkey See, Doggy Do" more successfully.
    • "Aspirations" has Sedusa trying to restore her power after having her Prehensile Hair cut at the end of "Something's a Ms.".
  • Teen Titans:
    • In the season 1 episode "Masks", Robin creates the supervillain persona of Red X, with which he tries to deceive both his enemies and friends. In the Season 3 episode "X", a thief steals the supersuit Robin used and assumes said identity, with Robin dwelling over his previous actions.
    • The Story Arc of the second season surrounded Terra, which ended with her turning to stone from using her powers to save the city. After the fifth and final seasons resolved its own story arc, the very last episode, "Things Change", picks Terra's story back up when Beast Boy finds a girl who appears to be her, but with no memory of being so.
  • In The Simpsons episode "Viva Ned Flanders", Homer and Ned get married to two floozies while drunk in Las Vegas. The episode ends with Homer and Ned leaving town and their second wives behind. Three seasons later in "Brawl in the Family", the two women reappear, having tracked them to Springfield.
  • Star Trek: The Animated Series had several episodes that were sequels to episodes in Star Trek: The Original Series.
  • The Family Guy episode "Internal Affairs" is a continuation of "Foreign Affairs", both go into Joe and Bonnie's deteriorating relationship.
  • The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes!:
    • The episode "A Day Unlike Any Other" ends with Captain America getting abducted by Skrulls. "Prisoner of War" later shows how Cap escapes them.
    • "Nightmare in Red" has the Incredible Hulk get arrested for false pretenses, and "The Deadliest Man Alive" has his teammates try to free him.
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1987) had a couple. One was "Mr. Nice Guy," which was a sequel to the episode "Leonardo Lightens Up," as both plots involved one of the Turtles being affected by Donatello's personality ray. "Michelangelo meets Bugman," had a sequel that was naturally called, "Michelangelo Meets Bugman Again." "Adventures in Turtle Sitting" was a spiritual sequel to "Back to the Egg," as both had some of the Turtles reduced to five years old which left the one(s) who kept their natural age to look after them (notably, Leonardo was turned into a five-year-old in both). "Menace, Maestro Please," was a sequel to "Name That Toon," and is notable for immediately following the previous episode unlike most cases.
  • Batman: The Animated Series had "His Silicon Soul," which was a direct sequel to the 2-part "Heart of Steel", and "Day Of The Samurai" which was a sequel to the earlier "Night Of The Ninja." When the show became The New Batman Adventures, "Joker's Millions" followed up on a plot point briefly mentioned in the "World's Finest" Crossover with Superman: The Animated Series.
  • Taz-Mania had "Here, Kitty, Kitty, Kitty," and its follow up "Here, Kitty, Kitty, Kitty Part II," which saw an evil housecat owned by Taz's sister Molly try to kill Taz, and every single time Molly saw the two the cat would pretend to be the victim.
  • Rocky and Bullwinkle had the story arcs "Moosylvania" and the series finale "Moosylvania Saved."
  • The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy episode "Skeletons in the Water Closet" ends with Billy's mom going crazy because of Grim. "Grim vs. Mom" has her coming back to settle the score. And then there's the Nigel Planter episodes, and the Secret Snake Club episodes.
  • Arthur: "The Blizzard" (Season 4) features the town pooling their food and coming together to deal with a power outage. A radio broadcaster makes wildly inaccurate forecasts. Much of this happens again during "The Blackout" (Season 12), with Dave Read remembering how bad the forecasts were.
    • Likewise the two episodes that deal with D.W's Snowball.
  • Ren & Stimpy: Adult Party Cartoon has "Fire Dogs 2" which is a sequel to an episode of the original series, though it has little to do with it apart from it starting where the original episode ended.
  • In Mickey Mouse Clubhouse, the episode "Goofy Babysitter" is a followup to "Goofy Baby", except instead of Goofy getting turned into a baby, Mickey and the rest of his friends end up transformed.
  • Mr. Bogus had "Super Bogus Flies Again", as a follow-up episode to "Bogus To The Rescue".
  • On Hong Kong Phooey, there was always something connecting the two 11-minute segments.
  • Justice League had "The Return", a sequel to "Tabula Rasa" and "Ancient History", the sequel to "Shadow of the Hawk".
  • The Transformers was not as continuity-driven as later installments, but it did have a few episodes that connected to each other despite not being a multi-parter. For one impressive example, the "Five Faces of Darkness" five-parter comes directly after the movie. "Thief in the Night" reveals what happened to Trypticon after fighting Metroplex in "Five Faces of Darkness". "Thief in the Night" is used to explain why Octane was banished by the Decepticons in "Starscream's Ghost". The ghost of Starscream would later reappear in both "Ghost in the Machine" and the Beast Wars episode "Possession". Starscream's immortality would later be used to explain Rampage's in "Bad Spark".
  • The Looney Tunes Show has "Best Friends" and "Best Friends Redux".
  • The Smurfs had "Smurfette Unmade" as a sequel for "The Smurfette" and "Dreamy's Pen Pals" as a sequel for "The Astro Smurf".
  • Codename: Kids Next Door: Had plenty over it's run they may have well been Story Arcs.
    • Operation C.A.K.E.D (which were all named with a number at the end, save S.I.X) dealt with the K.N.D confronting the Delightful Children and trying to take their birthday cake away from them Only failing in the the sixth one due to some clever manipulation by the DCfdtL. Likewise the final episode, Operation I.N.T.E.R.V.I.E.W.S, was centered around this.
    • "Operation C.A.B.L.E.-T.V." lead into "Operation E.N.D".
    • "Operation: J.E.W.E.L.S.", "Operation: R.A.B.B.I.T.", "Operation: C.H.O.C.O.L.A.T.E.", and "Operation: L.I.C.O.R.I.C.E." and "Operation: C.A.R.A.M.E.L." detailed the story around Numbuh Five and her arch-rival, Heinrich
    • "Operation: E.N.D", "Operation: T.R.A.I.N.I.N.G." and "Operation: G.R.A.D.U.A.T.E.S." which focused on Numbuh 2's brother, Tommy, training to be a K.N.D agent.
    • "Operation: P.R.E.S.I.D.E.N.T.", and "Operation: S.N.O.W.I.N.G." set up "Operation: E.L.E.C.T.I.O.N.S." Detailing the fiasco with the school president and the consequences that followed.
  • My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic:
  • Teen Titans Go!:
    • "Be Mine" for both "Terra-ized" and "Opposites"; after a Previously On segment, it picks up where "Terra-ized" left off.
    • In "Legs", Raven loses her cloak, and she creates a new superhero identity called Lady Legasus. Two seasons later, "Leg Day" sees the return of Lady Legasus, who helps the other Titans appreciate their legs more and reinvents them as the League of Legs, with Robin as Captain Cankle, Cyborg as Thunder Thighs, Beast Boy as The Calf, and Starfire as the Incredible Quad. The League of Legs make another appearance later in the season with "Arms Race With Legs", in which Lady Legasus must save the day when the rest of the league abuses their leg power.
  • Wander over Yonder: "The Gift" for "The Gift 2: The Giftening"—despite the name, the first one is the P.O.V. Sequel that continues slightly past where the first left off.
  • Steven Universe is normally a continuity-heavy series where things that change in one episode are regularly called back to in another, and some episodes' plots are directly derived from earlier ones:
    • The episodes "Steven's Lion", "Lion 2: The Movie", and "Lion 3: Straight to Video" don't actually have much to do with each other as far as their individual plots are concerned, aside from Lion having a major role in each. "Lion 2" and "Lion 3" receive an actual follow-up in "Rose's Scabbard", which revisits certain elements of the previous episodes (in particular, Rose's armory and her Cool Sword). "Lion 4: Alternate Ending" follows up on "Lion 3" in a different way, as Steven reassesses the message from his mother to find some hidden purpose.
    • "House Guest", the first episode of the first season's second half, deals with one of the immediate consequences of "Mirror Gem"/"Ocean Gem", the half-season finale (Greg's broken leg, an injury he suffered in "Ocean Gem").
    • "Open Book" is one to "Rose's Room". Both are set in the eponymous room, and both have a similar plot where Steven has to deal with the room's strange effects.
    • "The Test" kicks off when Steven discovers that the Sea Spire mission from "Cheeseburger Backpack" was a test, which he thinks he failed.
    • The first episode of season 2, "Full Disclosure", picks up directly from the ending of the season 1 finale, "The Return"/"Jail Break", as Steven tries to cope in the aftermath of the latter.
    • "We Need to Talk" is a direct follow-up to "Story for Steven", both Whole Episode Flashbacks centered on Greg and Rose. "Greg the Babysitter" is a third set later still, though the focus is a bit more on Greg specifically.
    • "Coach Steven" centers on Garnet and Amethyst fusing, inspiring anxiety (and a song) from Pearl until their fusion goes out of control and Pearl has to stop her. "Cry for Help" starts with Garnet deciding to fuse with Pearl instead of Amethyst for a similar task, causing Amethyst to experience similar feeling (and also a song), but their fusion goes wrong in a different way.
    • "Super Watermelon Island" is not only a sequel to "Watermelon Steven", it is also part of the resolution of two separate Story Arcs (Malachite and the Cluster/Peridot's redemption.)
    • The plot of "Beach City Drift" is kicked off when Kevin, the guy who harassed Steven and Connie in "Alone Together", reappears, causing them to try to get back at him. In "Kevin Party", he comes back again and invites them to a party, which they use as an opportunity to reconnect when they'd spent the last few episode not speaking to each other.
    • "Monster Buddies" ends with Steven hoping he'll find some way to help a gem monster he befriended. "Monster Reunion" begins with Steven discovering that his healing powers still work, and he partially succeeds in using them for just such a task.
    • In "Historical Friction", the characters put on a play about the founding of Beach City. "Buddy's Book" picks up where the play's story left off. However, it stars the play's Deuteragonist, which makes it more of a Spin-Off Sequel Episode.
    • "Tiger Millionaire" is a Pro Wrestling Episode where Steven discovers Amethyst wrestles as Percussive Therapy, and joins her to have fun together. Several seasons later, "Tiger Philanthropist" shows they were still wrestling, but Amethyst quits suddenly because she feels better about herself, leaving Steven uncertain whether to keep at it or how.
    • In "The New Lars", Steven possesses Lars' body. Everyone likes Lars more for this, and only Sadie gets suspicious, which makes Lars realize no one else really knows him. In "The Good Lars", Lars tries to use baking for a potluck as an opportunity to open up to other people.
  • The My Life as a Teenage Robot episode "Raggedy Android" is about Dr. Wakeman making a suit that could disguise Jenny as a human, but doing such a rushed job that people were far more scared of it than Jenny. "Return of Raggedy Android" centered on a newer version of the Exo-Suit that actually worked and far too well. The latter had a Sequel Hook for another possible Sequel Episode (the Exo-Suit was still alive and took Mr. Mesmer as a new host) which was never resolved on-screen (though Mr. Mesmer was later shown to be fine, implying it was dealt with offscreen)note .
  • Atomic Puppet does this a fair bit.
    • "Atomic Detention" ends with Joey and AP accidentally driving Joey's Apathetic Sadist Teacher Ms. Erlenmeyer into madness and supervillainy, and she ascends a portal into another dimension. It was seemingly forgotten for the next while, until "Erlenmeyer's Revenge", where Ms. Erlenmeyer returns to Joey's school, revealing that she has been transformed into the psychic Queen Mindbender by a malevolent alien entity from the dimension she entered.
    • "Tick'D Off" picks up immediately after "Survival of the Feltest" with Joey, his dad, and AP coming back home from their camping trip, and Joey finding that a tick from the campsite has embedded into his neck and it becomes sentient when Joey and AP power up.
    • "Monster Truck Invasion" sees the return of Zorp, the leader of the aliens from "Pizza Planet", in a new scheme To Serve Man. Then the episode ends with Zorp finding an astronaut chimp, which leads to the plot of "Buck Monkey".
    • "Lacer Takes Over" is a sequel to "These Shoes", as it turns out the malicious A.I. of the Lacer Hypertops has survived the destruction of its body to continue its scheme to lead machinekind in overthrowing humanity and find itself a new body.
  • The Amazing World of Gumball began doing sequel episodes during Season 3 as continuity began to play a larger part in the show:
    • Both "The Burden" and "The Bros" act as sequel episodes to "The Shell", the latter moreso than the former. Each episode, all of which were aired on consecutive weeks, forms part of a loose trilogy about Gumball and Penny's relationship and Darwin's feelings towards it.
    • "The Nobody" deals with Darwin and Gumball finding out someone is living inside their house. It turns out to be Rob, who they saw floating around in "The Void", but didn't help, and got out on his own. In turn, "The Nemesis" is a sequel to "The Nobody", about Rob trying to take revenge for them abandoning him.
    • "The Man" is about Richard coping with his mother finding a new boyfriend and that his father abandoned him. "The Signature" follows this up as Richard attempts to prevent them getting married, and ends up reuniting with his father. To a minor degree, "The Check" is a sequel to "The Signature", as the episode kicks off when Richard's new stepdad gives his grandkids a gift they start fighting over. "The Outside" follows up "The Signature", being about the Wattersons spending time with Richard's father (and finding out why he left in the first place).
    • "The Pest" deals with the (very minor) fallout from Anais rejecting Billy's friendship in "The Egg".
    • "The Awkwardness" is a sequel to "The Hug", both of which are about the relentlessly awkward meetings between Gumball and someone he doesn't know. "The Cringe" follows this further, as the two attempt to discover why things between them are always so awkward.
    • In "The Nest", the monster that's been kidnapping citizens of Elmore turns out to be the Evil Turtle from "The Puppy".
  • Danger Mouse: "The Hickory Dickory Dock Dilemma" had "The Clock Strikes Back" as its sequel.
  • Occurs twice in Defenders of the Earth:
    • In "A House Divided", Ming turns the Phantom's estranged brother, Kurt (who believes he is the rightful Phantom) into N'Dama the Weather Demon and lures the Phantom and Jedda into a confrontation with him. Kurt/N'Dama reappears in "Family Reunion", where he is still out for revenge. His lust for power ultimately proves to be his undoing and he is Killed Off for Real.
    • In "The Evil of Doctor Dark", Ming turns to the evil magician Doctor Damian Dark (a former Shadow Lord and an old enemy of Mandrake) to seek the three pieces of the Orb of Konos, which has the power to grant immortality. The episode's sequel, "The Return of Doctor Dark", sees the Defenders (along with their friend, Mara), Ming's forces and Dark racing to find the pieces of the Orb; in the end, Dark (like Kurt/N'Dama) is destroyed as a result of his own greed.
  • Bump in the Night featured some episodes that were continuations of older episodes.
    • "It Sang from Beyond the Stars" and "Comfort Schmumfort" are both follow-ups to "Not of This Boy's Room", as they both featured the return of the alien duo Sleemoth and Gloog and alluded to Mr. Bumpy's first encounter with them.
    • "Made in Japan II" serves as a sequel to the episode "Made in Japan" and focuses on the return of Little Robot.
  • Buzz Lightyear of Star Command had an episode called "Strange Invasion", which had Team Lightyear end up on Roswell, a planet inhabited by stereotypical green-skinned and large-headed aliens who mistook them for a threat. The episode had a sequel in "Stranger Invasion", where the heroes returned to Roswell and had to help the inhabitants fight back against the invading forces of Evil Emperor Zurg.
  • The Pound Puppies (1980s) episode "Where Do Puppies Come From?", which had the Pound Puppies help out a dog named Rusty and his pregnant mate Lucy, was given a sequel episode in "Pups on the Loose", which had Rusty and Lucy entrust the Pound Puppies with looking after their new children.
  • ChalkZone had a considerable number of episodes that served as continuations to previous episodes.
    • "Follow the Bouncing Bag" is a sequel to "Hole in the Wall", where Vinnie Raton continues trying to carry out his scheme of discovering ChalkZone and exploiting the place and its inhabitants for profit.
    • "Disarmed Rudy" is a continuation of "Pumpkin Love", as it has Jacko try to get even with Rudy for "stealing" his bride.
    • There were a series of episodes devoted to Snap hosting a show where he has a Zoner sent out to shoot footage of ChalkZone wildlife or snoop on other Zoners. The individual episodes were "Beanie Boys to Men" (where Snap sent Spy Fly to observe the training of Skrawl's minions), "Wild ChalkZone" (where Snap tries to have Push obtain footage of blechy bugs), and "Journey to the Center of the Yeti" (where Snap tried to get Spy Fly to see if there were life forms lurking in the fur of the Yadda Yadda Yeti from "That Thing You Drew").
    • "Killer Breath" and "Doofus Penny's Grand Opening" were both sequels to "The Doofi". The former had Doofus Penny try to help Doofus Rudy create the perfect art model by using an invention to merge baby's breath with the killer bush in hopes of creating a baby bush that will stay still, only to plague ChalkZone with a terror aptly named Killer Breath. The latter had Doofus Penny drag Snap into a tour of her Scientastical Hall of Wondoors.
    • "Reggie the Red" had the episode's main conflict revolve around Reggie Bullnerd finding the piece of red chalk that nearly took over Rudy in "Battle of the Hands".
    • "The Further Adventures of Super Hero Snap" serves as a sequel to "Super Hero Snap" and has Snap help Generic Man recapture the villain Major Brand after she escapes from the secure yet humane correctional facility Generic Man took her to.
    • "Snap vs. BooRat" is a continuation of both Vinnie Raton's episodes and "Indecent Exposure", as it has Vinnie Raton and Terry Bouffant working together after discovering that they're both obsessed with exposing the existence of ChalkZone.
  • Gravity Falls: Season 1 had "The Time Traveler's Pig", in which Mabel and Dipper steal a time traveler's time machine so that they can win a pig and impress Wendy at the same time (each time they try, only one succeeds), inadvertently getting the time traveler, Blendin, fired for losing his time machine to a couple of kids. Season 2 has "Blendin's Game", where a disgraced Blendin challenges the twins to a game of Globnar to win his freedom and a "time wish" in revenge.


http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/SequelEpisode