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Double Standard: Rape, Sci-Fi
If a sexual encounter occurs where the consent of one or more of the parties is coerced via a fictional plot device such as Mind Control, shapeshifter impersonation, a Love Potion or aliens, it is often treated much less seriously than if it were something classified as rape in real-life like a date rape drug or straight-up brainwashing. In many cases, it isn't even acknowledged as any kind of violation or morally dubious action, and only the audience notices something wrong.

This can happen if the science-fictional element is just treated as Applied Phlebotinum to serve a specific role in the story like if the writer wants to portray a Chaste Hero hooking up without creating an Out-of-Character Moment, but fails to do a full exploration of all its implications. The audience might only realize the character was essentially raped via Fridge Logic.

Can frequently occur in variants of Aliens Made Them Do It and the Bed Trick. Fridge Logic points out that Love Potions that lead to sex may fall under this. Compare Getting Smilies Painted on Your Soul for manipulation that can be used in this way. Contrast Safe, Sane and Consensual as well as Free-Love Future and Ethical Slut. See also Double Standard: Rape, Divine on Mortal.

Examples

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    Anime & Manga 
  • Tenchi Forever is awfully sympathetic to a woman whose lonely soul just couldn't help remembering her lost love... by making his grandson Tenchi think he's married to her.
  • Averted in Mahou Sensei Negima! Although a Love Potion incident early on is played for laughs, later arcs mention the rather severe problems that could arise from a magical uncontrollable love. Indeed, it is stated several times that even temporary Love Potions are actually illegal in Magical society, probably due to how effective a date rape drug they would be.
  • For the same reason Love Potions are illegal in the magical society of Zero no Tsukaima.

    Comic Books 
  • Issue 200 of The Avengers: The rape of Ms. Marvel, which involved limbo-stranded villain Marcus kidnapping her and using Mind Control to create a fantasy romance world to seduce and impregnate Carol Danvers with himself, erase her memory and send her back with a phantom pregnancy that led to Marcus being "reborn" and aged to adulthood, and Carol falling in love with him and going back to Limbo with him, all of which the Avengers were cool with. It wasn't originally intended or perceived as squicky until much later, and Chris Claremont wrote an Author's Saving Throw of Carol returning from Limbo and calling out the Avengers for not helping her. These days it has been inverted to the point that the incident can't be referred to without calling it a rape or a violation. This was very much glossed over in the decade that followed.
    • Grant Morrison used a rather comparable procedure in his Jean Grey/Scott Summers/Emma Frost triangle in New X-Men, where unethical abuse of therapists' privileges and telepathy first set up a psychic adulterous affair and a Phoenix-powered telepathic shove from Jean officially invested Scott and Emma as common-law husband and wife.
    • Another problematic case was during Brand New Day, when Spider-Man and the Black Cat decided to have anonymous sex. This was preconditioned on the fact that thanks to the "Blind Spot", a techno-magic spell of forgetting enacted by Doctor Strange, Iron Man and Mr. Fantastic at Spidey's request, the Black Cat had forgotten that she knew Spider-Man's secret identity (which meant that her memories of more than twenty years' worth of continuity were seriously re-edited). She even made it clear that she would not have entered an affair with Spider-Man if she knew who he really was because she wanted to avoid the emotional involvement. But could this wish not to find out who she was sleeping with be considered truly consensual if one of the effects of the Blind Spot was to make people care about remembering that they once knew who Spider-Man was in his civilian identity but now no longer did?
  • Played with in She-Hulk where Starfox is tried for rape, being accused by a married woman who came onto and had sex with him while under the influence of his psychic hormones. He is also accused of doing this to She-Hulk although it turns out he didn't. Prior to this storyline, there's not much sign that he actually uses pheromones like that and it was eventually resolved by having a reveal that Thanos had brain-damaged him so that he lost conscious control of his powers, but that he never consciously used his powers that way on anyone who wasn't already looking for a casual sex partner.
  • Teen Titans:
    • When Raven's powers were fully unlocked, she started subconsciously pulling Dick Grayson into shared dreams of them getting it on, except that Dick was with Starfire and he'd wake up from these dreams with the Catapult Nightmare. It was quasi-averted in the sense that Raven wasn't fully aware Dick didn't share her feelings and horrified when she found out what she was doing to him.
    • Mirage arrived in the series by knocking Kory out and impersonating her so she could have Dick as her boyfriend, sex included. She was never called to account for this, even when she taunted Dick over not recognizing her in front of his teammates.
  • In an issue of Spider-Man, the Chameleon pretends to be Peter Parker and has sex with Peter's roommate. The writer acknowledged it was a violation but didn't consider it "rape" and the resulting Internet Backlash lead the writer to hastily Retcon it into "they were just making out" but it still left a bad taste in the fans' mouths.
  • Accusations of this has been leveled at Superior Spider-Man: Issue 22, where Dr. Otto Octavius in Peter Parker's body has sex with Anna Marconi. Initially he broke up with Mary Jane because continuing Peter's relationship would eventually become rape by deceit, but the author insists that's not the case now because Anna didn't know Peter before the switcheroo happened.

    Film 
  • In the early Sandra Bullock film Love Potion No 9 Bullock and her platonic male friend get access to a potion that, when sprayed into someone's mouth, alters their voice to make them much more attractive to the opposite sex. Apparently the fact that it doesn't directly affect the target dodges the rape bullet in the minds of the filmmakers, since the guy uses it to have sex with an entire sorority (among other women).
  • In X2: X-Men United, Mystique attempts to do this to Wolverine by shifting to look like Jean. She's on top of him and they're shedding clothes before he realizes who she truly is. Plays on All Men Are Perverts when she proceeds to turn herself into Storm and Rogue, suggesting one of them might be what he "really wants". It's not quite so bad in the novelization, when Wolverine knows it's Mystique the entire time but chooses to play along for a while.

    Literature 
  • In the Anita Blake series, there's a scene between Anita and Micah that is not supposed to be rape. Even though she said, "No," several times, and Micah didn't stop. Anita and Micah are destined mates because of the ardeur, which gets this sort of treatment regularly, due to forcing Anita and whoever's close to have sex, occasionally forcing rape on both parties. This scene was so controversial, in fact, that it was slightly rewritten for the paperback release.
  • The Formics, colloquially known as "Buggers" in Ender’s Game, are revealed near the end to have a rather Squicky reproductive process, due to their Bizarre Alien Biology. According to the last queen's memories, soon after the new queen hatches, the older queen sends a number of her specially prepared males (glorified drones) to the birthing chamber, where each of them penetrates the young queen and then promptly dies, "shuddering in ecstasy." From a human point of view, that sounds almost exactly like a little girl being gang-raped. This is arguably justified, however, by the fact that these are not humans, and sex does not have anything like the same social significance to the Hive Mind in control of each of their civilizations that it does to us; moreover, this truly is the only way they can reproduce.
    • Further questions of consent are raised in the sequels, when it is revealed that not all of the male drones are born mindless; some have to be telepathically "broken" before they can enter the hive mind. The main character says something along the lines of it being a moral question to deal with after another generation or two of coexistence and learning about one another as a species, but one wonders if he would have been so cavalier if it had been a more humanoid species (such as the mammalian piggies) that systematically Mind Raped and then literally raped every male born with free will.
  • In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, this is referenced but ultimately averted with the use of Love Potions:
    • Initially, Fred and George sell love potions legally and their use is treated as funny by the story when another female student tries to give Harry one, though Ron accidentally ingests it so the reader never finds out how far things would have gone if she had been successful.
    • Then it's deconstructed when Merope, Voldemort's mother, forces Tom Riddle Sr. into their relationship via a Love Potion, which Dumbedore theorizes was a preferred alternative to the unforgivable Imperius Curse to reinforce the delusion that Tom Sr. was really in love with her. And the only moral problem with this is that she's having sex with a muggle... Or so it seems, at first. However, this way of looking at the morality of her actions turn out to be limited to the views of Death Eaters and similar pure-blood advocates. Tom Sr. acts with utter revulsion once the potion wears off, and Dumbledore refers to what Merope did as enslavement by magical means. The reader is left with an impression that Voldemort's refusing to see his mother as a rapist (instead blaming his father for abandoning his son after Merope stopped giving him the potion, thinking he'd stay for the sake of their baby) is a big part of why he became so hateful toward muggles.
    • Also referenced when Molly mentions that she brewed a love potion during her school years. This is a major source of Alternate Character Interpretation for her in fanfic.
  • Averted in the Sword of Truth series. The glamour spell, the series' equivalent of this, is seen by characters as tantamount to rape. Sorceresses who use it are either executed or expelled from the Palace of the Prophets (the Palace has a spell which slows down aging to about 10%, so there is little difference between the two for the exiles).
  • In Dragonriders of Pern, whenever dragons mate, their respective riders are irresistibly compelled to do the same. The first book even has F'lar considering that if their dragons weren't involved, his relationship with Lessa would have to be considered rape. Since it was written in 1968, there's major Values Dissonance going on (and that's not even getting into how much he slaps her and shakes her around to show his concern about her putting herself in harm's way).
  • Generally averted in The Dresden Files, where just about all forms of supernaturally coercing sex are considered bad mojo, whether it is shapeshifting, faerie glamours, or the White Court's mental whammy. Mortals using mind control to coerce sex gets the death penalty from the White Council, though this falls under the general blanket Laws of Magic, one of which states that using magic to control minds is illegal. Love Potions technically do not count under the Laws, as the recipe used involves creating a strong aphrodisiac instead of outright mind control. Later in the series, the revelation that Luccio was only in a relationship with Harry due to being mind-controlled into doing so by the Black Council is treated as disturbing for both of them.
  • The Codex Alera series, also by Jim Butcher, makes an effort to avoid this but there are still instances where people are coerced into having sex why having their arousal manipulated with Earthcrafting.
  • In Hush, Hush, Patch does a number of things to Nora, including possessing her body and putting words and images in her head. These incidents range from being played for laughs to being romantic moments, even though Nora usually is disturbed or upset by them.
  • In the Anna Strong Chronicles, the eponymous heroine gets raped by a vampire, who mind controls her into compliance. When she recalls the incident, she argues that because she was a willing participant (even though, you know, mind control) it couldn't have been rape.
  • In House of Night, it's established that it's immensely pleasurable for both parties when a vampire drinks a human's blood. Early on, Zoey accidentally drinks Heath's blood, establishing a spiritual bond between them. There are several ensuing cases where Heath demands that Zoey drink his blood, even though she repeatedly tells him that she hates doing it and is disgusted by the fact that she finds blood tasty. Heath's arguments come across as very disturbing (for example, telling Zoey she really does want to do it and thus should), and he always wears down Zoey's will by cutting himself and letting her be intoxicated by the smell of his blood. These interactions are treated by Zoey as inconveniences, even though they are disturbingly similar to date rape via drugging. It also goes both ways, since Heath clearly is addicted to the pleasure of having her drink his blood, and continues to cut himself to get her to do so. The text does try to specify the difference between Zoey and Heath's relationship and the undead vampires forcibly drinking his blood later (which he describes as creepy and not like her drinking from him at all), but those situations still come across as pretty unsettling.
    • This comes across in quite a few backstory relationships between humans and vampires, since the bite of a vampire tends to have a drug-like effect on humans, making it questionable exactly how consensual their long-term relationships with vampires are. For example, in the second and third books, it's mentioned in passing that Bram Stoker became obsessed with a female vampire after she drank his blood, and went insane when she left him to devote herself to her work as High Priestess, writing Dracula in revenge. Zoey's mother, upon hearing this, comments that the whole thing sounds horrible, while Zoey yells at her for being intolerant of what apparently was treated as a perfectly healthy romance.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Stargate Atlantis:
    • "Irresistible", where a man who gets what he wants using pheromones — and has six wives as a result — is treated far too nicely by the team, and the episode itself is mostly a comedy.
      • The pheromones were affecting the team as well. After it's all been sorted, they dump him back on his original planet. The people there were furious about it.
    • This is actually tricky: where do you draw the line between influencing and controlling? Would you call having sex with someone after putting on cologne, rape? This would depend on whether the women felt differently later?
    • In "Duet", a female marine ends up sharing McKay's body by accident. After they argue a bit about who's in charge, she simply takes over after he falls asleep, takes his body for a run, then showers and sleeps naked. Later she wrests control from him to force him to kiss his girlfriend (which he'd been too shy to do), and then to kiss Dr. Beckett against the man's will. She did all this without ever asking McKay's permission, and while ignoring his protests. Again, it's a comedy episode and we're supposed to side with the woman during all of this.
    • To be fair, both McKay and the therapist call the marine on it.
  • Barnabas Collins on Dark Shadows (original series) nearly controlled Maggie Evans into thinking she was Josette and marrying him. The story doesn't treat him as an attempted rapist at all. Especially strange since the series at the time those events were occurring treated Barnabas as a very bad individual. The creators explicitly wanted Barnabas to be the most evil monster they could get onto network television. Then he proved frighteningly popular with female viewers, and the creators had the character undergo extreme Spikeification to turn him from a Big Bad into a anti-hero. This involved a metric ton of ignoring previous events.
    • The curse was briefly reversed, which somehow caused his victims to forget what he'd done to them.
  • Buffy the Vampire Slayer
    • Deconstructed when the nerd villains "The Trio" honestly don't see the ethical implications of their plan to brainwash women into sex slaves, until the girl they victimized spells it out for them and one of them murders her as she tries to escape, providing the Moral Event Horizon for what had been played as Harmless Villains.
    • Played it straight, however, when it overlaps with Double Standard: Rape, Female on Male. For instance, consider Faith in Buffy's body having sex with Riley and compare it to, say, Warren raping Katrina using mind control.
    • Played straight again by Willow having sex with Tara after erasing Tara's memory of having an argument.
      • That's more of an aversion, as Tara makes it clear that it crosses the line, and breaks up with Willow over it (she does give her one more chance, but Willow again tries to tamper with her memories, and she leaves for good).
  • The episode "Unexpected" of Star Trek: Enterprise. Tucker becomes pregnant when an alien tricks him into activity which would be the alien equivalent of sex, impregnating him. Played for humor because of the male pregnancy, and the fact that Tucker didn't give meaningful consent is ignored. Of course, the female alien would have had no reason to suspect that Tucker's consent to sex didn't include an understanding of the consequences, as that was just normal to her. So, if you have sex with someone not your species, without having made a study of the risks this might entails (extensive biology classes), you've consented to unknown risks. The alien is very apologetic when she finds out, and didn't think impregnation was a possibility at all. It still doesn't excuse the fact that Tucker was made fun of by the crew of the Enterprise and a crew of Klingons over it.
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation
    • In the episode "The Child", Counselor Troi is impregnated by an alien, and she gives birth to him. Troi later insists on carrying it to term, and once he's born he reveals that he only did it to explore human existence, and he may not have realized the implications of what it was doing.
    • In episode "The Host", a Trill (at that time implied to have all personality in the "parasite" part rather than a shared consciousness) who was having a sexual relationship with Doctor Crusher temporarily takes possession of Riker's body (with consent) to continue diplomatic negotiations. Doctor Crusher has trouble reconciling her romantic feelings for the Trill-personality with Riker's body — but the issue of whether Riker would consent to her having sex with his body is never even mentioned.
    • In the episode "First Contact," a doctor on the planet Riker is trapped on offers to help him escape on the condition that they have sex, because she's "always wanted to make love to an alien." Played for Laughs.
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine:
    • It turns out that Benjamin Sisko owes his existence to this trope. A Prophet possessed a woman named Sarah and has her marry Joseph Sisko for the sole purpose of giving birth to the Prophets' Emissary—Ben. However, Sarah ran from New Orleans to Australia without a word once the Prophet left (and then died in a shuttle accident), so this was clearly not a consensual event. Sisko displays his usual irritation over the Prophets' meddling, but not much more than usual. The Prophet then uses Sarah's appearance and acts as a motherly figure.
    • At first played straight when Sisko sleeps with Mirror!Jazdia while impersonating Mirror!Sisko, then called out after a delay of several episodes. Mirror!Jadzia says if he ever touches her again... (holding a large knife to Sisko's face) "Get the point?"
  • Supernatural:
    • Narrowly averted, probably by Author's Saving Throw, when Sam is implied to have had sex with Ruby, a demon — but it has been established that demons possess the bodies of living people, so Sam would be a rapist. Fan backlash was immediate and soon a flashback scene was written showing that Sam refused to have sex with Ruby until she explained that her body had just flatlined in the hospital when she took it over and there was nobody else in it... which of course has Unfortunate Implications in itself. If the body is technically dead, and Sam has sex with it, doesn't that mean...
    • In the episode "The French Mistake" where Sam and Dean get sent to the real world and it is implied that Sam gets intimate with his actor's wife. The Reality Subtext makes this merely amusing, but purely from an in-story perspective, Sam is a rapist.
    • The episodes "Wishful Thinking" and "Trial and Error" both have a man making a woman fall in love with him with magic (a magic coin and a Deal with the Devil. In both cases, the word "rape" isn't mentioned, and the situation's only treated as "How did this guy ended up with that girl?" The episode "Season 7, Time for a Wedding!" has a gender-flipped version of the same situation, with Becky basically drugging Sam into falling in love with her. When it starts to wear off on him, she knocks him out, takes his pants off, and ties him to the bed (but insists that she didn't "consummate" their "marriage" yet). It's Played for Laughs and also used to show how much of a loser Becky is... in the exact same season where it is repeatedly implied that he was raped by Lucifer in Hell and is slowly going insane from the memory of it. This show has issues.
  • In Torchwood, Owen uses a love perfume to make a woman go from disgusted by him saying he just wanted her for sex, to gagging for him, and when her boyfriend shows up enraged, Owen appears to use it again to get himself a threesome. This example of Date Rape is never commented on again in the show.
    • It's not directly commented on again, but Owen apparently undergoes a complete Heel-Face Turn on the issue of rape when he is put into the mind of a rape victim two episodes later, and he is not depicted using the love perfume again.
    • The fact that he sprays it on himself may blur the issue fractionally. If it's just a cologne that makes him smell fantastic, it's not rape. (The suddenness of their desire for him suggests otherwise, though.)
  • Jack's story in the Doctor Who episode "The Doctor Dances" about waking up in bed with the jailers who were supposed to execute him after he got blindingly drunk as part of his Last Meal and blacked out is a bit iffy, too, even if he seems to view it as a pleasant memory. One can only hope they helped him escape before he propositioned them, and it wasn't about them taking advantage of their prisoner's desperate situation and drugged state.
    • It is Jack Harkness we’re talking about, though.
    • In "The Doctor's Daughter", the Doctor's distress over having his genetic code nonconsensually stolen to produce an Opposite-Sex Clone who calls him "Dad" is put down by Donna to being "Dad Shock", which is one thing except that the story seems to agree with her and think the Doctor should be more comfortable with the idea of being forced to father a child.
  • Alternate Olivia in Fringe having sex with Peter. Rape by fraud. No-one is really okay with this except Walternate, so it's more of a subversion. Olivia apologizes to Peter for not thinking about how it affected him, and Broyles is reluctant to let Peter and Olivia read Fauxlivia's files because of "what they've been through".
  • Subverted in Battlestar Galactica, where a female humanoid robot is viciously abused and gang-raped by several human crew members of the ship she had previously served on while disguised as a human. When other humans from another ship discover that a rape of another humanoid robot was about to occur, they attack her would-be rapists, killing one of them. This leads to serious arguments between characters on the morality (or even possibility) of raping a machine.
  • While Damon on Vampire Diaries often has consensual sex, he's also shown mind-whammying girls (especially Caroline) into it, drinking their blood, and then making them forget it. Including a group of college girls, in a scene meant to highlight his own angst.
    • In the second season he starts "dating" Andie, heavily and repeatedly compelling her and feeding on her. One time she goes off-script when he's in a bad mood he attacks and threatens her, so even you ignore all the supernatural aspects he's a Domestic Abuser. No one appears to care about all this in the slightest. And when she dies, the show has the audacity to play it as a source of angst for him, despite her obviously being every bit as much his own victim as Stefan's. This guy is one third of the show's main love triangle.
  • Averted in the short-lived Century City. One episode deals with a nanotech drug that allows a person to "ride" someone else's experiences. As the person introduced to the drug was a man about to have relations with his girlfriend, the girlfriend later brings charges of rape against the third partner, as she certainly didn't consent to him getting involved.
  • In True Blood, Tommy becomes a "Skin Walker" (shapeshifter than can shift into other people) early in season 5. He uses this power to have sex with Sam's girlfriend. This is treated pretty seriously... for about an episode. No one ever mentions the word "rape" and all is forgiven shortly afterwards.
  • Bizarro on Smallville pretending to be Clark and having sex with Lana. Lead to an awkward moment, but wasn't really treated as a rape.
    • Probably because Bizarro couldn't have been less subtle about not being Clark if he'd murdered puppies in front of her and painted a ten foot fence with "I'm not really Clark" a hundred times using their blood. Given that she'd previously picked up on the relatively mild influence of red kryptonite in seconds, it's implied, and later outright stated that she pretty much knew it wasn't him and was just fine with this as part of her series 5 transition to full-on evil.
  • In a "Freaky Friday" Flip episode of Farscape, it's to be expected that characters will effectively see each others' bodies when they change clothes. Both Aeryn and John, who have a degree of Ship Tease throughout the series, who have swapped minds, are implied to take advantage of the situation to explore their new bodies, and while both are disgusted the R word never raises its head.
    • This is subverted when Grayza uses her pheromones to seduce and take advantage of Crichton. It is played VERY seriously and contributes heavily to her villain status. John actually refers to it as rape (though obliquely) during Grayza's Villainous Breakdown later in the season.
  • Dollhouse deals heavily with this trope, as the show’s premise deals with brainwashed women and men, called “dolls”, who can be implanted with customized personalities and skill-sets and are often used as sex companions for clients. Episode 6 hangs a lampshade on the issue with two storylines: one about a handler/bodyguard revealed to be raping his doll in her "blank slate” mode and asking if it's any different from when a doll is on assignment and their personality thinks they're in love with the client. The other storyline depicts a sympathetic client, a grieving widower who uses the doll to recreate a touching romantic moment with his late wife but who is still considered evil for sleeping with the doll. The dolls are all volunteers who knew what they were signing up for, but it's still rape in the sense that a programmed personality doesn't realize their feelings and desires for their partner are all manufactured.
    • The deconstruction gets even stickier when another regular client who sleeps with a male doll is revealed to be one of the female higher-ups running the Dollhouse, but “breaks up” with the doll because she feels so guilty about it.
    • Then there’s the subplot with Topher and Dr. Claire Saunders—when she discovers she’s really a doll implanted with her predecessor’s memories, Claire confronts Topher with the accusation that he designed her to want to sleep with him even though she hates him.
    • Its also implied that at least one of them did not sign up willingly.
  • Somewhat averted on Alphas: when Nina "pushes" her ex-boyfriend into leaving his wife, it's depicted as a despicable act, and when she forces Rachel to kiss her, even though she knows that it's going to overwhelm Rachel, she's not forgiven for several episodes.
  • Thoroughly averted in the Stargate SG-1 episode "Hathor", where the Goa'uld Queen Hathor rapes a brainwashed Daniel in order to get DNA to prevent immune rejection of her offspring. After everything's sorted out, everyone, including Daniel, is visibly disgusted. So were the writers, who considered "Hathor" the worst episode in the series: in later episodes the characters refuse to talk about the episode's events, and that aspect of Goa'uld reproduction was quietly retconned away. Likewise, several months prior to "Secrets" Apophis impregnates the host of his queen Amaunet, which happens to be Daniel's wife Sha're who was kidnapped in the pilot. Kudos to Daniel for being horrified at what was done to her but completely unwilling to reject her.
  • Mostly Averted in Earth: Final Conflict with the case of Liam "Kincaid" (More accurately, Liam Beckett-Sandoval). the Kimera H'Gel was seeking a way to reproduce, but most human women couldn't handle the experience. So, he overpowers Ron Sandoval (a human altered by the Taelons), takes his form, then overpowers Sibohan Beckett, another Taelon-altered human. Liam is concieved from the incident, but Sandoval remembers nothing of it, and Beckett had her memory wiped shortly after Liam's birth in Resistance headquarters. Liam is fully aware he is a Child by Rape, though, and won't acknowledge his Kimera heritage any more than absolutely necessary.
    • Unfortunately played straight in the form of Lili being captured by the Jaridians, and having an affair with one disguised as a human soldier. Stockholm Syndrome is implied to be a factor.

    Music 
  • In the Filk Song "Banned from Argo" by Leslie Fish, in which the crew of the Enterprise get, well, banned from Argo, Nurse Chapel uses an "odd green potion guaranteed to cause Pon Farr" to take advantage of Spock. This is Played for Laughs and treated no more seriously than Scotty and Chekov's drunken parking violation.
    • There's a similar case later in the song, where sentient plants engulf the house of the planetary governor and "then seduced his wife".

    Radio 
  • In Nebulous, Paula, the Professor's Abhorrent Admirer, is revealed in the final punchline of the episode "I, Nebulous" to have given a sensual full-body massage with scented oils to Dr Clench, who had been using the Professor's body at the time. Even after she finds out the truth she seems to still be quite happy with the arrangement and the Professor's discomfort about what Clench was doing with his body is Played for Laughs.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Averted in Genius: The Transgression. Love potions and sexual mind control occupy the same rung on the Karma Meter as the more mundane kind of rape.
  • Averted in GURPS Technomancer. Love potions are treated as a date rape drug.

    Video Games 
  • In the World of Warcraft comics, Katrana Prestor/Onyxia magically enthralls Varian Wrynn and sets herself up as his lover. What he thinks of it after he breaks free is never touched on, though he does get to kill her shortly afterwards, which may have helped. Closure, and all that.
  • In Fallout 3, giving Angela in Rivet City some ant queen pheromones so she can seduce her celibate love interest Diego (with the end result of him getting shotgun-married and kicked out of the priesthood he aspired to) nets you positive karma, meaning it's a good act. Conversely, bringing a crate of the rare Nuka-Cola Quantum to Ronald in Girdershade, so he can impress his neighbour Sierra (who is clearly hooked on the stuff) and entice her into sleeping with him, gives you negative karma. Evidently the latter is treated as bad, bad rape despite the fact that he's not trying to coerce her (he's just trying to impress her enough to want to go along with it voluntarily, and it fails completely because she doesn't understand what he wants and he's not spelling it out for her).
    • The Rivet City case is especially jarring because Diego's firm wish is to be a priest. Convincing a priest to abandon his faith by giving a woman a chemical which makes him unable to act rationally is a good act according to the devs.
  • Fable II has a sidequest in which you can gather the corpse of Lady Grey for someone. Eventually it transpires that he's created a Dr. Frankenstein-like machine to bring her back to life...under a spell that forces her to fall in love with the first person she sees. The "Evil" option has you taking her for yourself, while the "Good" option is to let him have her, implying that reanimating her as a brainwashed corpse and forcing her into a relationship is not at issue.

    Web Comics 
  • This has been stated by Word of God as a big part of the humour in Ghastly's Ghastly Comic. The artist said he's iffy about rape jokes involving realistic situations, but since nobody in real life has ever actually had their life ruined by tentacles, he feels okay joking about it. It helps that the tentacle monsters have human-level intelligence and understand things like consent, so nobody in the comic actually does get raped, outside of fantasy sequences.
    • In at least one comic, it's the woman who is trying to bully the tentacle monster into a sexual encounter.
  • A possible in-universe case occurs in Drowtales, where Snadhya'rune Vel'Sharen has her friend Wiam Val'Jaal'darya get one of her lover Mel'arnach's eggs under false pretenses (Mel was under the impression it was for an experiment, which while technically true was still deceptive), and uses it to make their daughter Kalki without Mel knowing until years later. Of course try telling that to Snadhya's fans, or Mel'arnach for that matter, who seems to realize on some level what Snadhya did but decides to ignore the implications.

    Web Original 
  • Averted in Chakona Space when Malena uses an overdose of pheromones to get her brother (and mate) Garrek to impregnate her. Both are deeply traumatized (Malena because Garrek went feral) and Malena is ostracized to the point where she has to leave her home village. However, she is forgiven fairly quickly because: a, she didn't know that her pheromones would have that kind of effect, b, she became pregnant with triplets, and c, it was discovered that her mother had actually done the same thing to her father and was covering up her shame by kicking her out (also why she didn't know better).
  • The disturbing Israeli short film Sight takes place in a world where people have a computer program called Sight implanted into their eyes that turn every task into a minigame. The story centers around a guy who is a Sight engineer. He goes on a date with a girl and uses a dating app that tells him what to say and do. When the girl realizes this she wants to leave, but he accesses her "profile," reprograms her and says "Let's try this again."


Double Standard: Rape, Male on MaleAdministrivia/No Real Life Examples, Please!Droit du Seigneur
Double Standard: Rape, Male on MaleSexual Harassment and Rape TropesDroit du Seigneur

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