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Literature: The Lightbringer Series
by Miguel Coimbra
The Lightbringer Series is an unfinished series of dark fantasy books by Brent Weeks, author of The Night Angel Trilogy.

The Lightbringer Series is set in a different world than the Night Angel Trilogy, this world known as ''The Seven Satrapies". The main character of the story is a young boy named Kip, an orphan from a backwater village in a war-torn country who is suddenly thrust in an increasingly dangerous series of events, upon learning that his father is actually the Prism, which is a widely famous and powerful religious leader, considered to be an Emperor of the entire world.

Like Brent Week's other series, this one introduces a cast of fascinating and unique characters and a world that, while not as dark or gritty as the Night Angel Trilogy, still paints a unique picture of a fantasy world.

So far, the series consists of:
  • The Black Prism (2010)
  • The Blinding Knife (2012)
  • The Broken Eye (forthcoming 2014)
  • The Blood Mirror (forthcoming)

Interestingly the author was worried about the series, which was planned as a trilogy, becoming four books so he named it "The Lightbringer Series" in order to avoid Trilogy Creep.

Not to be confused with ''The Lightbringer Trilogy" by Oliver Johnson - an older, entirely different, fantasy trilogy that consists of "The Forging of the Shadows", "The Nations of the Night" and "The Last Star at Dawn".

These books contain examples of:

  • Above the Influence: Kip wins Teia in a card game but refuses to take advantage of her, knowing that she is only claiming to be okay with it because he is her master and she doesn't want him to punish her. Not that he would of course.
  • Abusive Parents: Kip's mother, of the emotional and neglectful kind. Andross Guile of the ambitious, ruthless, controlling and domineering kind.
  • Action Girl: Karris, Liv, Teia, any female Blackguard and many female drafters.
  • Anti-Hero: Gavin, definitely—he genuinely wants to do good by his empire, but that doesn't mean he's not manipulative and ruthless at it. Most of the other protagonists have shades of this as well.
  • Armor-Piercing Slap: Karris does this to Gavin the fake when she learns that he cheated on her while they where engaged and, as a result, has a bastard. Who isn't actually his but the real Gavin's. When she later finds out Dazen's (the real one's) deception, she does it again.
  • Badass: They're everywhere: Gavin, Ironfist, Karris, Corvan, even Kip and Liv have their badass moments.
  • Big Bad: The Color Prince, Lord Omnichrome, most likely. May be part of a Big Bad Duumvirate with Andross Guile—the exact relationship between the two is still unclear, though they're pretty clearly working together on some level.
  • Becoming the Mask: Gavin
  • Body Horror: What happens to Drafters when their halo breaks.
    • Worst part: They voluntarily do it to themselves. As in "replacing eyelids with blue glass" and "implanting solidified heat into the palms of their hands."
  • Brought Down to Normal: Gavin at the end of the second book. After being stabbed by the Marrow Sucker, he is rendered incapable of drafting and becomes completely colorblind.
  • Cain and Abel: Gavin and Dazen. The series plays a great deal with which is which.
  • Chekhov's Gun: The gift Lina gave to Kip, specifically the case it was in.
  • Color-Coded Wizardry: Called Luxin. Where the different colors not only determine what kind of magic the drafter has but his/her personality as well. To a degree anyway.
  • The Chessmaster: The White and Gavin the fake one both have hints of this. The Color Prince and Andross Guile have more than shades.
  • Dark Messiah: The Color Prince
  • The Dark Side: Technically the multicolored side. Basically what happens when Drafters overdose and go insane
  • Dark-Skinned Redhead: Gavin. Both of them.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Everyone. Gavin, Karris, Ironfist and the White probably take the cake, though.
  • Disc One Final Boss: Garadul. The Color Prince pretends to be his Dragon but was actually setting him up to become a martyr.
  • Distressed Damsel: Karris is implied to be this before she joined the Black Guard, and later when she gets captured by Garadul's army.
    • Subverted in that while several people are trying to save Karris it isn't until Ironfist causes an explosion that allows Karris to escape in the confusion, that she's freed.
  • Dying as Yourself: When a drafter breaks their halo, they tend to collapse for a moment before the madness takes them. A nearby friend will consider it their duty to kill them before they've had a chance to turn.
    • Drafters who know that they are close to breaking the halo can choose to refuse drafting at all in order to preserve their sanity. Those that do not feel they can restrain themselves can be 'Freed' where they will be killed while still themselves.
  • Early-Installment Weirdness: Minor example. The Big Bad has several titles, and in the first book, the narration mostly refers to him by one of them, Lord Omnichrome, but the second mostly uses another, the Color Prince.
  • Energy Absorption: Obsidian, when in perfect darkness and through an entrance to the body, can seep away luxin from a drafter when touched to the drafter's skin.
  • Evil Counterpart: The Color Prince to Gavin. Zymun to Kip.
  • Evil Twin: Dazen, to Gavin.
    • Subverted because Gavin is actually Dazen and Dazen is actually Gavin. And Double Subverted in that Gavin—the real Gavin—is an insecure, vengeful, self-centred Jerkass while Dazen—the fake Gavin—is a well-meaning Anti-Hero (who happens to be a Manipulative Bastard) and The Atoner for the terrible things he and his side did during the war.
  • Fantasy Gun Control: Mix and Match Trooper. Armies use cannons, pistols, rifles and at least one blunderbuss. The Big Bad's Weapon of Choice is essentially a primitive sniper rifle.
    • They've recently invented flintlocks and have used more primitive hand cannons in the past. Of course, some drafters just make magic bullets with extreme accuracy.
  • Fictional Colour: Paryl, which is hard to draft and extremely weak. There are also other "invisible" colours mentioned, but never discussed further as they are considered blasphemous.
  • Galley Slave: Gavin ends the second book as one of these.
  • A God Am I: The Prism supposedly has unlimited ability to draft luxin of any color.
    • Also, the Color Prince, Lord Omnichrome.
  • Guile Hero: Gavin the fake.. Obviously doubles as a Meaningful Name.
  • Face-Heel Turn: Liv joins Lord Omnichrome after being persuaded that the Chromeria is corrupt.
  • Hard Light: Pretty much all of the magic in the books is this, complete with 'sub-red' for heat.
  • Heel-Face Turn: Subverted since Corvan isn't actually going to the other side but his leader Dazen, is impersonating their leader Gavin.
  • I Have You Now, My Pretty: King Garadul to Karris.
  • In the Blood: All the Guiles have the ability to see weakness. It's not a supernatural thing, but they all can just instinctively tell how to push other people to break them or make them cave into their demands if it's at all possible.
  • Jerk Ass: How people saw Gavin the real one before the war "changed" him.
  • Loophole Abuse: This is actively encouraged by the Blackguards during testing as fighting smarter means you're more likely to survive and since there aren't that many Blackguards to begin with it's a bit of a priority. A notable example is when Kip and Teia hire a courier to deliver their money to them so they don't have to fight an entire gauntlet of thugs after being publicly and loudly given eight danars. They're called on it and Ironfist points out that if you're charged with protecting a VIP underhandedness is preferable to having to run the gauntlet.
  • Luke, I Am Your Father: Gavin claims to be this to Kip.
    • Subverted because Gavin isn't really Gavin. He's Dazen.
  • Magic A Is Magic A: Luxin and Drafting are given very specific and defined functions and rules.
  • Meaningful Name: Gavin Guile, for crying out loud. More like the whole Guile family, really.
  • Our Wights Are Different: Very different indeed.
  • Perfectly Arranged Marriage: Not so much arranged as rather done for political reasons, but Corvan Danavis and The Third Eye are certainly very happy with each other.
  • Polar Opposite Twins: Gavin the fake actually spends some time lamenting over the fact when he realizes how much he has to change to successfully impersonate his brother. His mother helps.
  • Rape as Backstory: Kip's mother, Lina was by Kip's father. Which is where things get complicated seeing as Kip's uncle is impersonating Kip's father.
  • Scary Black Man: Ironfist
    • Tremblefist, to a lesser extend
  • Retired Badass: Corvan Davanis. At least at first.
  • Secret Keeper: Gavin's mother and Corvan Danavis are this about the fact that Dazen switched places with Gavin during the Prisms' War
  • Shout-Out: The card game Nine Kings (and perhaps Corvan Danavis' name) is an awesome one to The Chronicles of Amber.
  • Slave Liberation: Happens a few times in The Blinding Knife where Gavin frees his slave because he is marrying Karris and fears she will get jealous considering the particular kind of service Marissa offered. Then Gavin's mother's will contains instructions for her personal slave to be freed. Finally it's subverted when Teia specifically asks Kip not to free her so that they can split the money that owners get when their slaves make it into the Blackguard. Of course she only does this after he makes it clear he has no intention of taking advantage of her, and because getting into the Blackguard means you are freed from slavery.
  • Tailor-Made Prison: It's Dazen's (the false one's) goal to escape one of these constructed by his brother. The prison is covered in blue luxin and the food he's given is dyed blue, which for a drafter promotes calmness and is meant to keep him sedated. There's a crisscrossing pattern of luxin in the floor that goes down several feet and blocks his drafting abilities if he tries to dig through. Dazen gets around this by slowly carving out a depression in the wall over sixteen years using his fingernails and then covering the depression with a mixture made of his hair, skin, body oils and sweat. Then he urinates on the bowl and uses light that leaked in during Dazen's (the real one's) visits so that the bowl turns yellow enough for him to see. He drafts a small amount of yellow luxin, turns it into the light needed to draft, and then seeps out the heat from the fever in his body to create a spark, which burns the bowl and manages to break through the wall. The hole leads to an obsidian-lined tunnel. Obsidian, when in perfect darkness and through an entrance in the body, seeps luxin away from a drafter so as he crawls through the tunnel, the cuts created by the sharp obsidian on his body allow it to drain away his left-over luxin. The tunnel leads to a similar green room and it turns out that there are seven rooms, one for each colour and presumably connected with their own obsidian-lined tunnels.
    • Of course, none of these precautions are moot when the real Dazen kills him, upon realizing even the possibility of his brother escaping is too much of a threat.
  • This Loser Is You: Kip
  • Trilogy Creep: Averted. The official title of the series is The Lightbringer Series, because he didn't want to be called out for calling it a trilogy if he ended up going to a fourth book.
    • Which he has now decided to do.
  • UST: Between Gavin and Karris until book 2, where they finally marry.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: The Color Prince... maybe. He tells two versions of his motivation, one (for his followers in general) that he's liberating the Seven Satrapies from the tyranny of a corrupt Chromeria, and one (to Liv) that he only cares about power (and that deep down, so does everyone else). It's unclear at this point which, if either, is his actual motivation.
  • Wham Line: "I am Dazen Guile, and I stole your life."
  • Wicked Cultured: The Color Prince
  • With Great Power Comes Great Insanity: There's a limit to how much you can draft in your lifetime, and going over that limit or "breaking the halo", drives you mad and you become a Color Wight.
    • Except Prisms, who don't halo at all.
      • And The Colour Prince seems surprisingly rational.
    • As of the second book: It is heavily implied that the teachings of the Chromeria emphasize the insanity aspects, and many wights go mad out of paranoia. However, a wight is a potential host for the gods of the luxin itself (the Blights), and a Blight induces madness and a lack of control in ALL nearby drafters of the associated color.

Leaf by NiggleFantasy LiteratureThe Light Princess
Light and Dark: The Awakening of the Mage KnightLiterature of the 2010sThe Lion Hunters

alternative title(s): The Lightbringer Trilogy
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