YMMV: Fantastic Four

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    The comics 

YMMV for The Comics

  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Sure, Reed is normally portrayed as brilliant and somewhat arrogant (more so after Civil War), but read these pages to see the Hidden Depths to the character. Doubles as a Heartwarming Moment and Tear Jerker.
      • In brief: Reed is just a humble scientist who couldn't care less about being famous or admired. His quest to turn his best friends into revered superheroes was all just penance for robbing them of the chance to live normal lives, because he knew they would have been exploited and used as lab experiments if they didn't have the public's love on their side.
    • Alternatively, Reed is a Villain with Good Publicity and the only reason he has yet to Take Over the World it is because Doctor Doom keeps distracting him.
  • Damsel Scrappy: In the early "Invisible Girl" years of the first run, Sue was much more of a liability with her limited power set, and constantly exhibited poor judgment or absent-mindedness (as Seanbaby points out, not only did she constantly forget whether or not she was invisible, but actually walked into traffic on more than one occasion); in an effort by multiple writers to make amends for this, her power levels and competency have increased exponentially over the years, to the point where she's become by far the strongest member of the team.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Dr. Doom is an incredibly popular villain, which can lead to dissonance between exactly how evil and villainous he is and exactly how evil and villainous his fans think he is.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
  • Fashion-Victim Villain:
    • Some people think Wizard looks somewhat silly with his odd shaped helmet and pink spandex costume.
    • Trapster when he was called Paste Pot Pete seemed to fit the bill, back then he looked like a rather sloppy Mad Artist (with a beret, giant bow tie and goofy mustache) rather then a fearsome super villain. Some of his later costumes were an improvement.
  • Ho Yay:
    • There's an alternate universe where Reed married Johnny. Nuff said.
    • Johnny and Spider-Man have some epic bromance moments, including (but not limited to) Peter joking that Johnny got him pregnant.
    • To say nothing of Doom's obsession with Reed (there are LOTS of disturbing fanfics about the two) and Ben's sometimes heartwarmingly (and awkwardly) close relationships with both Reed and Johnny.
  • Jerkass Woobie: Thing started out as one, constantly lamenting about his appearance and picking fights with Johnny at every given opportunity, going so far as to threaten throwing a car at him. This tension reached the ultimate breaking point when, Johnny, after a massive argument with Ben, temporarily quit the FF, of which Ben couldn't have been more happy. Even when his relationship with Alicia began, it was constantly riddled with Wangst over the fact that Alicia preferred The Thing over Ben.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Doctor Doom is a perfect example in the Marvel Universe. Through a lethal combination of magic, technological prowess, and manipulative brilliance he's been their definitive supervillain (and THE definitive supervillain), and the Big Bad of more crisis crossovers than can conveniently be counted. When a Norse God and the Devil both consider you a Worthy Opponent you qualify in a major way.
  • Mary Suetopia: Latveria, Depending on the Writer, in which case Dr. Doom's reign is depicted to be unrealistically benevolent.
  • Memetic Mutation:
  • Moral Event Horizon:
  • Name's the Same: Nathanial Richards shares a name with Kang the Conqueror. They're different characters, though it's strongly implied the man who would become Kang was not only his direct descendant, but was inspired by the time-traveling ventures of his namesake who created the very utopia he grew disenchanted with, making him something of a Legacy Character.
  • Never Live It Down:
    • Has any writer ever let Namor forget he used to have a crush on Sue?
      • Namor still has a crush on Sue. Sue will never live down the fact that she used to crush on him, too.
    • A lot Reed's early characterization was quite sexist. Add that with the panel of Richard slapping Sue. It Makes Sense in Context note , but it along with the aforementioned Namor having a crush on Sue, is often joking used as proof the Namor would make a better husband.
    • Trapster was originally named Paste Pot Pete before he changed his name to Trapster, a fact that many heroes and villains have mocked him for.
    • Reed's siding with Iron Man's pro-reg faction during Civil War. Especially since unlike Iron Man, he's faced zero repercussions for it thus far.
  • Nightmare Fuel: The Puppet Master is a creepy enough villain to start with by his powers alone, but he's even more nightmarish when he was drawn by Jack Kirby. Kirby draws him looking like a sentient ventriloquist dummy, bearing a smile that makes The Joker look tame.
  • Seinfeld Is Unfunny: It's hard to believe how much this comic actually played with Superhero tropes at the time it originally debuted, and in the 1990s, it makes the Fantastic Four look flat out tame in comparison. For starters, we had a superhero with a somewhat monstrous appearance (The Thing), the fact that the team actually spent a lot of their time fighting with each other, and that they didn't even use secret identities. Now after seeing way more Team angst and more deformed superheroes, the Fantatsic Four looks almost safe in comparison.
  • Squick: Reed and Sue's first meeting being Love at First Sight... when she was twelve. Matt Fraction has since retconned this version of their first meeting out of existence. It was actually one-sided on Sue's part making it more of a Precocious Crush to the college-age Reed. It's only when Sue matured by the time they met again for the fateful rocketship journey that Reed took an interest.
  • Tear Jerker:
    • The Last Stand of Johnny Storm.
    • Ben grieving for him afterward. Never has a fight between Thing and Hulk been more heartbreaking.
  • Toy Ship: Val and Bentley are a popular pairing, particular because they both act as Token Evil Teammates. Hell, it's not as if it's not essentially encouraged (Val actually says she'll kiss Bently when she's old enough, and Bentley actually says "I think I love you").
  • Values Dissonance: The early issues suffer from this even more than most other big comics of the '60s, with Reed especially coming off as a sexist asshole.
  • Villain Sue: Mark Millar's controversial character "the Marquis of Death" may be a straight example or a subversion, depending on how you look at it. He was a Diabolus ex Nihilo more powerful than Galactus who claimed to be the man behind Dr. Doom, at whom he got pissed for becoming a Noble Demon rather than the Card-Carrying Villain he wanted him to be. He effortlessly Mind Rapes and kills Doom, then declares himself Doom's successor. The subversion comes a few issues later when Doom comes back, reveals the Marquis didn't kill him properly, and blows him to Hell. Even with that considered, it's still generally thought of as a terrible story.
  • The Woobie: Ben Grimm, mutated into the monstrous-looking Thing, but also one of the most respected and beloved superheroes in the Marvel universe. Word of God has stated that The Thing is the most beloved superhero in the entire Marvel Universe. This makes him analogous to Nightwing of DC Comics.

    The Animated Series 

YMMV for The Animated Series

  • Funny Moments: The Frankenstein spoof in "The Silver Surfer and the Coming of Galactus" doesn't have much to do with the plot, but it's funny.
    • Reed's... pleased reaction to Susan still wearing her very sexy Malice costume at the end.
      • More than one Happily Married moment between Sue and Reed crosses into this. The Latin-American Spanish version makes it even funnier thanks to how the VA delivers Reed's lines almost completely seriously.
    • The huge lampshade to Johnny and Crystal's Strangledby The Red String situation. In one episode, Crystal sends out Lockjaw so he can guide Johnny to a prospect meeting spot. They never find it.
  • Growing the Beard: Season two.
  • Recycled Script: Both seasons end with Doctor Doom claiming the power of the Silver Surfer. The second season production team actually did this on purpose. They felt that the first season's take on the classic comic story was poorly handled and deserved a better adaptation.
  • So Bad, It's Good: Johnny's Human Torch rap and Ben/The Thing's "Clobberin' Time" rap.
  • Tear Jerker: The Thing's Disney Death after being beaten senseless by The Hulk in "Nightmare In Green". The Hulk feels guilty for making Alicia cry.
    • In "And a Blind Man Shall Lead Them," the four lose their powers in a nuclear explosion and Ben is overjoyed to be normal again. However, he is forced to reclaim his powers to save the team and Daredevil from Doctor Doom - ruining his plans for a normal life with Alicia. Poor guy even crushes the ring he was going to propose with.
    • Sue and Johnny are reunited with their fugitive father, however it is cut-short when he is killed in a Skrull plot. The team head off to the Skrull homeworld for revenge, and discover the one responsible, Morrat, not only set up a trap for them by having them lose their powers, but wanted to usurp the Skrull Emperor, with his fiancee (and the Emperor's daughter) at his side. It eventually ends with them getting their powers back, and Morrat's treachery exposed. The Emperor's orders Morrat's execution, and his daughter almost takes the bullet for him, but Sue's force field protects her, deflecting the beam to Morrat. The Emperor's daughter grieves over Morrat's dead body, The Emperor decides to end any hostilities with the team for saving his daughter's life, and confirms Morrat killed Sue and Johnny's father. The four realize although they get their revenge, it doesn't make them feel any better.