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Literature / Subete ga F ni Naru

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Nishinosono: Doctor, will I be able to see you again?
Magata: If I don't lose an interest in you... when everything becomes F.

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/subete_ga_f_ni_naru_novel_cover.jpg
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Subete ga F ni Naru: The Perfect Insider is a mystery novel with Hard Science Fiction elements by MORI Hiroshi. Since its initial publishing in 1996, it has since received critical acclaim won a multitude of awards and has been graced with numerous adaptations, including a J-drama in 2014 and an anime adaptation a year after by A-1 Pictures.

The plot deals with Sōhei Saikawa, a member of the Saikawa Research Lab. He goes on a vacation held by the lab, and Moe Nishinosono, the daughter of his mentor, joins the group on their vacation despite not being a part of the lab. There, the two end up finding a corpse. The two work together to solve the mysteries of what becomes a serial murder case.


  • Absent-Minded Professor: Saikawa has shades of this, notably being completely oblivious to Moe's increasingly unsubtle advances on him or his numerous eccentricities.
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  • Arc Number: 15. It's F in hexadecimal, which ties in into the Pun-Based Title, and Dr. Magata was 15 when she killed her parents.
  • Arc Words: Everything Becomes F.
  • Blue and Orange Morality: Magata's view of humanity and reality itself can be surmised as this.
  • Conspicuous CG: In the anime, pretty much everything robotic, like Michiru or the P1s, as well as miscellaneous things like water or smoke.
  • Creepy Monotone: Magata's speech patterns.
  • Cute Machines: Michiru in the anime is built to slightly resemble a teddy bear, resulting in this trope.
  • Does Not Like Spam:
    Saikawa: There are three things in this world I simply cannot eat. Red bean jam, roasted soy flour and...
    Nishinosono: Watermelon.
  • Locked Room Mystery: Magata's murder is perplexing to the characters because there is no way in or out of the room.
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  • May–December Romance: Magata and her uncle. She was 13 while her uncle was a middle-aged man when they started having sex.
  • Mohs Scale of Science Fiction Hardness: There are some light science fiction elements in the story, mostly dealing with anything in Magata's laboratory. However, they're not particularly outlandish and they seem a lot more mundane and plausible now than when the novel was originally published in 1996.
  • Oblivious to Love: Saikawa, increasingly so as the series progresses.
  • Pun-Based Title/Genius Bonus: The title (and Arc Words) of the title is something of an elaborate programming pun. FFFF, or 65,535, is the largest value that can be held by an unsigned two-byte integer, and Dr. Magata exploited this to create a deliberate bug in Red Magic's time-keeping modules, resulting in a missing piece of video recording that could have shown her escaping from the laboratory.
  • The Reveal: Shiki Magata was not the murder victim, she was the murderer. The corpse that sets off the mystery is not Shiki, it was her daughter.
  • Rotoscoping: In the opening.
  • Seinfeldian Conversation: Plenty of them.
  • Smart People Build Robots: Dr. Magata's Michiru, a small, cute robot whose purpose is to lock and unlock doors.
  • Speech-Centric Work: Most of the runtime is taken up by dialogue, either relevant to the plot or completely Seinfeldian.
  • Spoiled Sweet: Moe, true to her name.
  • Surprisingly Good English: The conversation between Saikawa and Shiki's sister, who still had her Japanese accent despite having lived in America for years. She is actually Shiki in disguise, which explains the accent.
  • Title Drop: For at least the Everything Becomes F part, during the opening conversation. The anime, however, cut it down and the first one is when they find a note saying "Everything Becomes F" in Dr. Magata's computer.

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