YMMV / Animal Crossing

The Games

  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • The Terrible Secret of Animal Crossing turns the fluffy slice-of-life sim game into Nightmare Fuel.
    • And it's neither the only one nor anything but the tip of the iceberg. Rather... large numbers of people like to enjoy doing this, often in that direction. To name just one case: Tom Nook: Friendly shopkeeper or iron-pawed savvy mercantilist and slum lord? He has near-complete control of the economy with the only place to sell save for some very specific exceptions and the dominant supplier of resources outside of nature itself. Particularly after he upgrades his shop thanks to YOUR upgrades to your house. Which he does even without your consent. Which is to mention the fact that the first thing he does when you enter the town is to shack you up with an undignified shack which you must pay him for without your prior knowledge or consent. In effect, he is using you for involuntary indentured servitude. And he effectively runs the economic system. Which has led to an even further ACI that he is in fact a very BENEVOLENT Slum Lord since he never actually forces you to PAY the money you owe him. And that's one of the better known and more apparent examples in the fandom and nowhere near the worst. See Dark Fic for more info. Tom Nook as evil slumlord is probably the most common alternative character interpretation in any game ever.
    • Due to the way Nook forces you to upgrade your house, he's commonly interpreted as an evil, greedy, money-hungry businessman who keeps you in indentured servitude to him. Or a mafia boss. NGC Magazine in particular liked to interpret Nook as one of the most evil megalomaniacs in all of gaming, who held the player in his thrall purely For the Evulz.
    • The "mafia boss Nook" thing is entirely averted by New Leaf, though: In this one he only sells home upgrades and exterior designs, and after a few upgrades will not force you to upgrade at all and will instead wait for you to ask him for an upgrade. He also never makes you work for him at any point (the tutorial instead comes from Isabelle and is optional). His nephews run the store in his absence, but they're not even the the primary you sell stuff to now — you sell it to Re-Tail; while you can sell to them, they pay less than Re-Tail, and the game tells you this.
    • Nook does charge approximately half a million bells for each upgrade and New Leaf is the only game where you do not get your house immediately; instead you have to give him a down payment of 10,000 bells for him to build a house (though this is admittedly very easy to do on your first day with all the ways you can get money in this game). It makes him come off as very money-hungry.
    • Kapp'n will sometimes flirt with female player characters during the boat ride in the first game, which paints him as a bit of a creep. He does it again in New Leaf, however the game also introduces Kapp'n's wife Leilani and daughter Leila, which makes his flirting come off as a bit sleazy and unfaithful. He doesn't really flirt that heavily though; he's much more likely to sing about his family now.
    • Resetti. Does he genuinely care about the player and yell at them so that they don't make mistakes in real life and try to "reset" them, or is he a sadistic grump that loves scaring children and finds that playing a game a way he doesn't like a good enough excuse to yell at them? While Don says it's the former, it's possible Resetti is just giving an excuse. New Leaf definitely makes it look like the former. Some have even suggested that Mr. Resetti is the most heroic character in the series because his job is to protect the entire Animal Crossing universe from paradoxical destruction.
    • Dr. Shrunk is often interpreted as a depressed loser who's possibly in an abusive relationship, due to his jokes about his Awful Wedded Life and general exploits as a Butt-Monkey.
    • Chrissy and Francine, two rabbit villagers that can potentially move in to your town. Due to their design, the fandom likes to think that they're actually humans dressed up in bunny hoods. It doesn't help that there's a Bunny Hood that you can purchase and wear as well.
    • The player characters themselves are subject to this, due to the Memetic Psychopath interpretation they received from their appearance in Super Smash Bros. for Wii U and 3DS.
  • Author's Saving Throw: While a great game, New Leaf had a few issues. However, the Welcome amiibo update manages to fix a number of them:
    • The new amiibo functionality allows you to summon whichever villager or character you have a card or figure of and they might even move into your town. This will even override the 16-villager cycle so a recently lost villager can come back immediately. Already have 10 villagers? The amiibo villager can even kick out a less desirable villager and replace them.
    • Villagers now take ten days to move out as opposed to the previous five, giving players more time to convince a beloved villager to not move— this also makes it harder to miss the warning.
    • A number of items that are either extremely hard to obtain or flat out impossible (due to either being exclusive to one region or a DLC item) are now easily available from RV campers. There's even a slew of brand new items from Happy Home Designer.
    • The Secret Storeroom is an upgrade you can order from Nook's Homes, where you're given massive closet space to store items. Up to 360 additional items, in fact, so it's great for people who have hoarded rare items. The upgrade also comes with an additional feature: Once you've received it, Lottie will appear and teach you how to move furniture with ease using Happy Home Designer's touch screen function.
    • Timmy and Tommy no longer ask to explain how to use the wrapping paper, which many people were relieved to see.
    • Once you have acquired all of the Balloon furniture at least once, balloon presents work like they did in older games, instead of just containing Balloon furniture.
    • You can put televisions and other similar furniture on tables now, and you can interact with furniture in your general vicinity while sitting down.
    • You can also sit on rocks now. Not very important, but kind of neat.
    • You can shake trees while holding certain tools. This is not only convenient, but it turns bees from a feared random encounter to simple bell fodder, since not having to waste time pulling out the net means you can catch them before they start moving.
    • Even if you don't have any amiibo, the campgrounds serve an important purpose: Every day, a new NPC visits in a trailer, with all the items they have in it being purchasable with MEOW Coupons. Holiday-exclusive NPCs have trailers decorated with items from their special set, meaning that normally obnoxious sets like Festivale can be gotten easily by shelling out coupons, and you don't have to wait months or time travel to get them.
    • Villagers no longer build their houses on top of custom designs, allowing players to lay down designs to more easily control where villagers will build their houses.
  • Awesome Music:
    • In general, a large majority of songs throughout the series are very pleasant on the ears, largely due to Animal Crossing being intended as a more relaxed kind of game.
    • K.K. Slider makes some pretty awesome tunes such as "K.K. Metal" and "DJ K.K.", but "K.K. Cruisin'" (particularly the "aircheck" version) and "Go, K.K. Rider" are just plain epic. The Super Smash Bros. Brawl remix takes the greatness of the last of these and turns it Up to Eleven. Many of the serene, walking-around themes from the original game also qualify.
    • The opening theme, as well as the songs that describe the time of day (those songs change per hour), and most of the songs by K.K. Slider. This one is particularly catchy, and WILL get stuck in your head.
    • The 7 PM music for New Leaf is a beautiful track with melancholy piano undertones. But it also falls under Nightmare Fuel.
    • The 1 AM music for New Leaf is incredibly calm and soothing, inviting the player to relax after a day of hard work.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Mr. Resetti. Some people actually reset to see what he has to say, others hate him for his attitude and for wasting their time, especially if they didn't reset on purpose.
    • Both the "Smug" and "Uchi" personalities get this in New Leaf. Some find them both to be great new additions to the series, while some find the "Smug" villagers to be obnoxious and/or creepy. Others find the "Uchi" villagers to be annoying and/or ugly.
    • All villagers are potentially this, due to their personalities and appearances. However, out of all of the current villagers, Pietro is easily one of the most polarizing in the series, due to his clown-like appearance. Half of the fans love him and find his design charming, while the other half hates him due to the negative connotations surrounding clowns. It does not help that he's a Smug villager either.
    • Labelle irks many fans for being a Long-Lost Relative to Mabel and Sable. Some felt she was unneeded while others find that she adds an interesting dynamic to the story or at least like her design.
    • Isabelle is one of the most debated characters in the franchise. She has quickly become the Series Mascot, but whether she deserves it is a base breaker. Either she's a cute and adorable newcomer or she's annoying moe bait taking the spotlight from "better" characters.
  • Breather Boss: More like Breather Beetle. The cyclommatus stag is a reasonably common beetle on the island and is much easier to catch than its fellow beetles, thanks to the fact that it doesn't fly away when you walk towards it at maximum speed. Despite this, it's still worth around 8,000 bells, making it an excellent source of currency.
  • Broken Base:
    • Time traveling, or "TT" for short, where you change the in-game date in order to reach certain events. Some people don't want to wait a long time for new items and features, and others say time traveling goes against the spirit of the game. For what it's worth, the games consider time traveling to be a form of cheating and will punish you if you make it too obvious.
    • Duplication, known as "duping", which is railed against because it makes rarer items more common, thus forcing down the overinflated prices in the online trading markets—and also removes some of the challenge of obtaining rare items. There's also concerns that duping may corrupt your save file if you do it too much, but so far there haven't been any reliable reports of that happening.
    • Fans are torn whether the Animalese was better in the original titles or in the post-GameCube ones.
    • Villager trading. New Leaf has a mechanic where, the day before a villager moves out (when they are "in boxes"), a friend can visit your town and convince the villager to move into their town. Some people online take advantage of this by charging Bells or trading rare items or even other villagers to let people claim their villager. Proponents of the practice consider it essentially the same as trading items online—a way to add depth to a simple game. While relatively few players engage in villager trading, many of those who do are extremely devoted to it; some people have multiple copies of the game or even multiple 3DS systems just in order to have "cycle towns" to trade more often (and hence earn more money). Some people think that villager trading defeats the purpose of the game; others are creeped out by the idea of buying and selling villagers, especially for the exorbitantly high prices—up into tens of millions of Bells—for the most popular villagers (particularly vehement opponents call it "villager trafficking"). This isn't helped by the fact that many villager traders use time traveling (another controversial mechanic) in order to make deals and transactions more quickly and easily. There's a even a Subreddit dedicated to this practice on Reddit
    • Is it fun to try and please the HHA, getting the highest possible scores and best prizes, or are they merely stifling creativity?
    • Are Gyroids fun to use along with your stereo for expressing your musical talents, or only useful for money and buttering up villagers for easy Villager Pictures?
    • Happy Home Designer and amiibo Festival are either fun diversions from the core series or boring Filler until the next Animal Crossing core series game comes out. amiibo Festival has been getting a lot of flak from the trailer looking like the long-awaited Wii U Animal Crossing game, until the screen pans out to reveal board game tiles. That's right, it's another Nintendo Party Game.
    • While the new addition in Welcome amiibo where Villagers take 10 days to move out of town has been mostly well received, some players find it annoying since it now takes much longer for an undesired villager to leave.
  • Character Tiers: No, really. The tiers are based solely on popularity (since there isn't really anything else to base them on) and can be safely ignored by anyone who doesn't engage in villager trading. Unsurprisingly, the top-tier villagers also tend to be the cutest, and the low-tier villagers are often ugly.
  • Counterpart Comparison: A few people have noted that a few of the characters and premises of Animal Crossing: New Leaf are similar to Parks and Recreation, as seen here.
  • Contested Sequel:
    • Wild World to the GameCube titles gets a lot of polarized views within the fandom. It introduced many things but at the same thing changed a lot.
    • Even more so, City Folk to Wild World. A common complaint for City Folk was that it was basically just a console version of Wild World. People that prefer it however say that it improved upon it in many respects and that actual holidays being added back in made the game much more appealing.
  • Critical Research Failure:
    • The museum in New Leaf claims that birds are descended from Pteranodon. They're actually descended from small theropod dinosaurs. In fact, by the time Pteranodon were around, birds had already developed into a large and diverse group. This is especially jarring considering Archaeopteryx is in the game.
    • In City Folk Blathers claims Apatosaurus lived in swamps and lakes to support its immense body weight, a theory that was disproven in the 1960s.
  • Demonic Spiders:
    • Tarantulas and scorpions. If they get you, they'll knock you out and force you back to your house, so they're tough to catch.
    • Tarantulas and scorpions are actual enemies in the Desert Island Escape mini-game. They are also joined by the snakes and their cousins the toxic snakes, Which can poison your character.
  • Doing It for the Art: In-universe, Happy Home Designer is this for the player. There is only a small criteria you have to fill when designing rooms. Other than that, you can do anything you want even if it doesn't fit the theme. No matter what you do, the villagers love it regardless.
  • Ear Worm:
    • Almost every song in the game is this, especially the first game's title theme; it's even catchier in the e+ version!
    • The Town Hall theme; the Brawl version is just as bad, if not worse.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Quite a few of the potential villagers who could live in your town. It really depends on their personality and how cute or cool they look though:
    • Lazy villagers are particularly popular due to their very friendly and amicable personalities. Some examples include Stitches the cub (who resembles a patchwork teddy bear), Lucky the mummy dog, Zucker the octopus, Drago (an alligator who resembles an Eastern dragon), Filbert the squirrel, Bob the cat (who is believed to be the first villager ever created), and Beau and Erik (deer).
    • Although Smug villagers tend to be hit or miss depending on designs, a few are popular enough to be wanted. The biggest example is Marshal the squirrel, but others include Kyle the wolf, Shep the sheepdog, Jacques the bird, O'Hare the rabbit, and Julian the horse (who looks like a unicorn), and Lopez and Zell (deer).
    • Similarly, most Uchi villagers are not particularly wanted, but some are well liked enough. Examples of these include Fuchsia and Deirdre (both deer), Mira the rabbit, Cherry the dog, Phoebe the ostrich (who looks like a phoenix), and Muffy the sheep.
    • Some of the more popular normal villagers include Fauna (deer), Marina (the only female octopus), Merengue (rhino whose head resembles a strawberry shortcake), Maple (bear cub), Molly (duck), Flurry (hamster), Goldie and Daisy (dogs), Poppy (squirrel), Skye (wolf with the same colors as the sky), Tia and Margie (the former is an elephant that resembles a teapot and the later had a role in the Animal Crossing movie.), Coco (rabbit whose head resembles a Gyroid), and Kiki, Mitzi and Lolly (cats).
    • Cranky villagers are generally not well liked due to having rough personalities in general, but a few manage to stand out: Apollo the eagle (who even had a role in the movie), Rolf the white tiger, Octavian the octopus, Bruce the deer, Kabuki the cat, Static the squirrel, Roscoe the horse, and Chief, Fang, Wolfgang, and Lobo (wolves).
    • Snooty villagers are usually seen as hard to get along with due to being well, snooty, but quite a few are highly desired. Ankha the Egyptian-themed cat, Diana the deer, Willow the sheep, Freya and Whitney (both wolves with the latter even having a role in the movie), and Francine the rabbit are just a few.
    • Popular peppy villagers include Rosie and Tangy (both cats with the former even having a role in the movie and the latter whose head resembles an orange), Cookie the dog, Ruby, Chrissy, Bunnie, Bonbon and Dotty (Rabbits), Flora the ostrich (who looks like a flamingo), Sprinkle the penguin, and Peanut the squirrel.
    • Popular jock villagers include Rudy and Kid Cat (both cats with the latter being designed as a superhero), Bam the deer, Snake and Genji (rabbits), Hamlet the hamster, Ribbot the robot frog.
    • As far as species are concerned, some are more popular then others. Familiar animals such as wolves, cats, rabbits, dogs, deer, sheep, bears (both cubs and regular), hamsters, frogs, and squirrels are popular enough that players will try to fill their town with nothing but these species. Deer appear to be the most wanted since every single deer villager appears somewhere on the list.
    • Octopuses are also popular because there are only four of them in the entire series (Marina (Normal), Zucker (Lazy), Octavian (Cranky), and Inkwell (Jock)).
    • Of the new villagers that are able to move in via the Welcome amiibo update, one of the ones most people are looking forward to having is Ketchup (a duck with a tomato for a head).note  The Sanrio characters are also pretty popular, but of that group, Etoile the sheep seems to be the most loved. And of the Crossover characters, W. Link is easily the most popular.
  • Even Better Sequel: A nice amount of praise is being given to New Leaf in comparison to City Folk, complimenting features like the town customization and online aspects.
  • Fridge Horror: A good number of villagers are named after products made from the species they are, both edible and non-edible:
    • Elmer the horse. Glue used to be made from horses. Granted, Elmer's glue is made from synthetic materials, but that doesn't make it any less dark.
    • Similarly, the N64/GCN games had an alligator named Boots.
    • Many games have Angus the bull. He even has pictures of flames on his vest, which looks like it's leather....
    • Rasher the pig is named for a rasher, as in a thin slice of bacon. Pancetti is another pig named after a pork product (Pancetta, an Italian bacon).
  • Game-Breaker:
    • Item codes in the GameCube game were meant to be specific to the person/town combination you "sent" an item to, but the whole code system became broken once codes that worked for everyone were discovered and posted online. Just about every item in the game has such a code, including a number of items that couldn't normally be traded through codes. One code even exists for 30,000 bells. Need 90,000 bells to pay off Nook? Just enter the code threenote  times and you're done!
      • Want an even MORE profitable code? Possibly the most profitable one in the game? Look no further than the 100 turnips code. Just check the day's turnip prices and when Nook is offering a high price, enter the code and sell the turnips for enough bells to easily cleave off a large chunk of your house payment.
    • The Island in New Leaf. If you go there between 8 PM and 8 AM, you can find lots of beetles, which sell for 6-12k on palm trees at a nice rate, assuming you destroy the other kinds of trees as well as the flowers. You can also find plenty of fish that sell for 8-15k per fish. It only costs 1k for a round trip there (you can bring 40 things back each time) and you can get there as early as day 4. Additionally, you can save and continue to reset the ocean's fish to farm sharks on the mainland, assuming you get your hands on a rod (this doesn't work on the island, as saving isn't allowed there). You can also get nearly unlimited amounts of exotic fruit, which can be carried in bushels so that you can fit nine in a single pocket slot from the tours which have absolutely no penalty for not actually doing the intended mission.
    • The Bell Boom ordinance in New Leaf increases buying and selling prices are by 20%. On paper, this sounds fine. In practice, two things make this incredibly useful. First and most importantly, prices for items increase by 20% but not prices for mortgages or public works projects, which will probably take up over 90% of your cash. Second is the fact that there is a limited amount you can actually buy each day, but you can sell as much as you please. Combine this with the above-listed island, which gives you even more money than before, and you can pay off any of your mortgages or town projects in a single day and likely have enough cash to buy out the entire shopping street while you're at it, all with less than three hours of bug catching.
      For an added bonus, you can choose to sell the beetles to a Lazy villager camping in your town when they play a game with you for ridiculously high amounts of bells. While playing the campers' games to set the prices of your items is usually a Luck-Based Mission and would make it eventually impractical in the long run to sell your items to them as you could get ripped off most of the time if you fail the game; the games you play with Lazy villager is actually not a Luck-Based Mission and with some critical thinking, one can narrow their answers down to guarantee a 100% chance for a much higher selling price than what Re-Tail would normally offer them for. An hour worth of hunting beetles and sharks at the island would net you around a whopping 2.5 million bells from Lazy campers! The only downsides are that campers only occasionally appear for a given day, and they decide when they want to buy something from you, so you might have to scroll through a ton of text to actually sell anything to them.
    • The online features of post-Wild World games allow you to catch any bug/fish in the game (except tarantulas and scorpions) by traveling between different time/date setups and give or receive almost any item in the game. All that waiting patiently goes out the window!
    • "Time traveling" allows players to access items or events that are limited to a certain time of the year/day, though it contributes to a Broken Base.
    • Perfect fruit. Using the type of fruit that's native to your town, plant tons of perfect fruit trees, harvest and store as many stacks as you can in your locker, go to the town of a friend with a different native fruit, where they'll sell for more, even more if you're lucky and that particular perfect fruit is a special item that day at their Re-Tail.
    • Desert Island Escape: Some animals have some extremely useful abilities which is very helpful in gaining high scores.
      • Cats. They have a fantastic 4 movement and a respectable 2 hunger, but what really makes them this is their ability. Cats automatically move to a tile that has fish when they're next to them, and have a 50% chance of catching some if you don't have a fishing rod. If you do have a fishing rod, you will always get at least two fish, up to a maximum of seven! No other character can catch fish without a rod, and even then, they have the same chances of catching something as a cat does bare-pawed. For bonus points, cats moving to a fish tile doesn't cost any movement!
      • Similarly, there are bears and cubs. While cats are great at fishing, the bears and cubs are excellent at obtaining honey. They automatically detect any nearby honey and that also counts as a free movement. Without a net, they have a 75% chance of getting honey (the last 25% percent results in getting stung), but with one, all risk is eliminated (effectively turning a hazard into a food source). It also helps that they're also good fighters just in case you wander into a space with an enemy.
      • Dogs and chickens are extremely useful in detecting items, food and even raft parts, which takes the guesswork out of which spaces have what.
      • Animals with the Hearty Traveler ability (mainly horses and ostriches) can move a whooping 6 spaces at a time, and they only cost 1 hunger. The biggest drawback is that they can't clear fog (which means they can blunder into a bad space easily). This can be mitigated by heading to a platform.
      • Animals (mainly birds) with the Flight ability can bypass obstacles like mountains and lakes with ease. While the movement says its only 2, they cover as much ground as a character with 6 movement.
      • The Swimmer ability (possessed by penguins and frogs). While they only move 3 spaces on land, it is doubled to 6 in water and provides great shortcuts to areas that are blocked by hazards or obstacles.
      • The Hunter ability turns defeated enemies into medicine and food. With a few wins, you won't have to worry about dangers like toxic snakes or scorpions. Especially if you have a slingshot.
      • What about bulls? They have the Headlong Charge ability, which is seriously broken because it automatically defeats enemies and obtains five of fruit or honey, which is a lot more than you'd normally get.
    • Wisp in the "Welcome amiibo" update. Sure, the cards and figurines to use him cost money, but with them, Wisp becomes a villager ordering service that can let you retrieve old villagers whenever desired and break the 16 cycle, and you're able to evict undesirable villagers in the chosen one's stead. He can also summon exclusive characters to the campground, who have unique items in their campers and can be invited to move in as well!
  • Genius Bonus:
    • For most of the villagers and characters, it's fairly obvious what animal they are. Most of them are pretty well-known critters. And then... there's Dr. Shrunk. How many people know what he is without looking it up? He's an axolotl, a kind of salamander well known for its six frilly gills—which it keeps all its life. You might also recognize them as the animal that inspired the Pokémon Mudkip and Wooper.
    • In New Leaf Redd's counterfeit art pieces now have something different from the genuine article. Therefore, if you know the actual piece the item is based on, you'll be able to get the real paintings and sculptures with minimal effort, and the challenge will become waiting for him to come to town with the painting(s) you need.
    • At the beginning of the month of September, salmon start showing up where the river meets the ocean. Then halfway through the month, they move up into the river as a reference to their spawn cycle.
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • More like Goddamned Bass. In the original versions (with the exception of the N64 version, where the coelacanth is the only ocean fish), there were very few fish you could catch in the sea, and nine times out of ten, you'd pull in a worthless Sea Bass. In the later games, they became less common when there were more ocean fish to catch, but it still lampshades their annoyance: Whenever your character catches one, (s)he says: "Not again!" (in Wild World and City Folk) or "What, you again?!" (in New Leaf, except for the first time catching one, which has the text "See? A bass!").
    • Horse mackerels even more so. They're just as common as sea bass, and worth even less.
    • Mosquitoes. They're common, they're cheap, they're tiny, they make a really annoying sound, they're attracted to the player character instead of flying away like other flying insects, and they bite. Their bites don't cause any major problems normally aside from merely being mildly annoying, but if you're fishing and waiting for the fish to bite and you get bit by a mosquito, tough luck, because the player character automatically reels in his or her line when bitten, so the fish is lost if it isn't reeled in beforehand. Luckily, this doesn't seem to be the case in New Leaf.
    • Mole crickets, if only because of how ridiculously hard it is to find them. Unlike other bugs, you can only get them via digging, and your only clue that one's around is an annoyingly loud droning sound that plays whenever you're near one. But even then, it will likely take you up to ten minutes until you find the exact space in the area where digging a hole nets you the cricket, all while that damn droning sound is constantly playing in your ear. In addition, in Wild World you had to hope that it doesn't escape while you get your net out, as whatever is happening onscreen doesn't stop when you pause, unlike in the previous game, and Wild World doesn't give you the ability to switch between tools without opening the menu, unlike later games.
    • The jellyfish in New Leaf. Like the bees, they follow you (and temporarily stun you if they make contact) but unlike the bees, they cannot be caught and exist purely to annoy you.
    • In the GameCube game, Peppy Villagers could STEAL YOUR RARE ITEMS FOR NO REASON, and there was nothing you could do about it except reset. Cranky and Normal villagers were potentially this too, due to Cranky villagers being MUCH nastier and Normals going to bed at the rather early time of 9:00 PM. Thankfully, all of these problems were fixed in later versions.
    • If you're playing Wild World, City Folk, or New Leaf in the winter, prepare for armies of nothing but pond smelt.
    • Wharf roaches. They're a pain in the ass to catch, hardly worth anything, and on the island they will reduce the chances of rare beetles spawning.
    • Ocean Sunfish can be this when hunting for sharks. They have a fin shadow like the other sharks, but they're only worth a measly 4,000 bells in comparison to the other sharks, which range from 8,000 to 15,000.
  • Good Bad Bugs: New Leaf has the option to save and continue at any time. This is helpful if you're being chased by bees, since they will disappear after the game is reloaded. It's an easy way to get rid of them without having to catch them or enter a building.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • In one of his lectures if the player resets in Wild World, Resetti mentions that he will "go a few rounds" with his cousin, "Vicious Vole Vinnie", if the player keeps it up. Several years down the road a particular Internet comedian created a joke game called Vinnie Vole's Existential Nightmare.
    • Occasionally in New Leaf, a villager with the "Uchi" personality who's moving out will mention that she is going to participate in turf wars. Two years later, from many of the same developers, we get a game all about them. With the "Welcome amiibo" update bringing Callie and Marie-cosplaying villagers as well as another villager based on Inklings in general, the hindsight has come full circle.
    • Towards the climax of The Terrible Secret of Animal Crossing, the protagonist learns that his and all the other towns are on a secluded island, and in one of the Multiple Endings he decides to build a raft to escape from it. Perhaps that's where Nintendo got the idea for the Desert Island Escape minigame?
  • Ho Yay:
    • The characters with the Lazy personality and the characters with the Jock personality usually end up as friends. Really. Close. Friends. In Wild World, they sometimes end up having a conversation with the lazy character complimenting the jock character with such compliments as "And those dimples you get when you smile are dreamy too". The conversation ends with both of them skipping away. Very. Happily.
    • This happens with the "grumpy" and "lazy" personalities as well. Specifically a conversation with the "lazy" requesting the "grumpy" to breathe on him.
    • New Leaf introduced two new personalities, Smug and Uchi. Smug villagers have been known to wax poetically about romantic themes, even to male players, and as a result many players think of them as Ambiguously Bi. As for Uchi characters, if a female player talks to them frequently in a short period of time, they'll comment on how they're "even popular with the girls today" and that they're not used to that.
    • For added fun, listen in on a Smug villager interacting with another Smug villager. You'll get conversations from them smelling each other and complimenting each other's scent to them worrying about public gossip about their relationship with each other.
    • In Happy Home Designer, the aforementioned Francine appears to really like Chrissy, as she requests her home to be a shrine for her. It doubles as Incest Yay Shipping as according to the Japanese City Folk website, the two are sisters.
  • Inferred Holocaust: Before "Big Sister" personality villagers tell you that they're thinking of moving, they may let you know that it's because she heard that her destination's having turf wars, and she wants to go there because slinging dirt around sounds like fun. If you don't like her and encourage her to move, you're probably sending her to her grave. However, this is jossed by the fact that villagers that have moved out occasionally reappear on Main Street, and may even move back in after the "16-Villager Cycle".
  • It's Easy, so It Sucks: A common complaint for Happy Home Designer is that decorating has no challenge as you're given a very generous minimal standard for each job and with the removal of the real-time system from past Animal Crossing games, there are no deadlines to anything in-game. You play the game at your pace.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks: City Folk got this reaction from fans and critics alike for being pretty much Wild World on the Wii apart from a few additions and grass deterioration. Fortunately, New Leaf was better received.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Resetti just can't catch a break. His job is incredibly stressful and has negative effects on his life and health, he gets genuinely upset and angry when your player doesn't listen to his advice, which he gives because he cares, and in New Leaf the Reset Surveillance Center closes, putting him out of a job, which he is very distraught about. Is it any wonder why he's so grouchy all the time?
    • Phyllis. She may come off as a Jerkass with some of her scathing comments made to the player character. However, you can't help but feel sorry for her when villagers in Wild World say that they saw her crying from dealing with the failed relationship with Pete and her sister, Pelly.
  • Junk Rare:
    • Many items can qualify, especially if it's something you don't really want in your house, or never wear, but you can't get rid of it because it can't be found in stores or is only available on a single day of the year or a single playthrough with the character.
    • The one furniture series that exemplifies this is the Sloppy Series (or Messy Series in European versions). All the furniture in that series looks unkempt or broken, but they all happen to be exceedingly rare (it isn't sold in stores and is only available if a villager puts it up for sale at Re-tail or appears in the police station's lost and found, which only happens once in a blue moon). Players are willing to pay millions of bells for a whole set.
    • The Cardboard set (which is a set of furniture that appear to be made up of cardboard boxes) is also extremely rare. They actually work well with the Sloppy series.
  • Memetic Molester:
    • Kapp'n in the early games, due to his flirting with female players who are presumably kids.
    • Smug villagers, because of the fact that they hit on female villagers.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Remixing popular songs with K.K. Slider's soundfont has gotten pretty popular on YouTube.
    • Due to New Leaf being released right before E3, many have joked that it was released on that day to distract people from the conference.
    • Ever since the Villager was announced to be a new character in Super Smash Bros. for 3DS/Wii U at E3, people have been making him into a Memetic Badass (and sometimes even worse), saying things like "No one is safe from him and his ax."
  • Misblamed:
    • There are fans who feel New Leaf is a step down from the GameCube games in terms of writing and characterization. Rover's dialogue at the start of both games are often compared for those arguments. The issue is, it's not the series decreasing in quality. The GameCube localization is just less of a direct translation compared to New Leaf's. The latter's Rover dialogue is truer to the Japanese text. Some irony can be found here in the fact that the Woolseyism-rich localization of the GameCube Animal Crossing is regarded as superior to the more faithful translation of New Leaf during an era where liberal translations and localizations are increasingly scrutinized.
    • amiibo Festival gets a lot of hate from people who presumed it prevented a true Animal Crossing game from appearing on Wii U. In reality, the reason there is no Wii U installment in the series is because the Animal Crossing developers worked on Splatoon for the Wii U after the release of Animal Crossing: New Leaf for the Nintendo 3DS.
  • Moe:
    • Isabelle is already pretty much this in Japan (given the amount of Japanese fanart that turns up if you search her on Google Images). And the epidemic is spreading worldwide.
    • Katie, due to being a Cute Kitten.
    • Celeste. In some of the games, you can even tell her she's cute.
  • Most Annoying Sound:
    • Mosquitoes make a really grating buzzing noise.
    • Fleas make a rather annoying "boing". So annoying in fact, that you might catch them less to help your neighbors and more to make it stop.
    • The ridiculously common cicadas during the summer. Unless you play during the night hours, be prepared to hear a lot of constant buzzing and clicking sounds, which, unsurprisingly, is similar to a lot of places in real life. It's not uncommon to end up casually walking and all of a sudden hearing "MEEEEEEEEEEEEEE MEE MEEE MEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE... MEEEEEEEEEEEEEE, MEE MEEE MEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE..." until you shoo them off or catch them.
    • The droning of a mole cricket in autumn and winter. It doesn't help that it's ridiculously hard to actually locate which square you have to dig to find them.
    • In Wild World, Resetti got a particularly grating remix of his theme due to the lower sound quality of the DS. Thankfully, this was replaced with the GameCube version from City Folk onward.
    • To many players who hunt beetles on the island for a profit, the sound of a beetle flying away. Especially if it's coming from a Horned Hercules or a Golden Stag, the two most valuable bugs in the game, which both scare incredibly easily.
  • Narm Charm: Starting in New Leaf, snowmen slowly melt day by day, and you can see the puddles they create. Think about this for a second. In this light-hearted video game made by a light-hearted company, it actually shows a character slowly dying; which is actually pretty gruesome compared to everything else you see in the game. Not to mention that other than the line "Well, please do stop by tomorrow... if I haven't melted away yet", they can also say "Do come again! I shall be waiting right here, weather permitting!" (note the exclamation mark used in the last sentence). It's as if the snowman knows he's going to die, but tells to player to pass it off as No Big Deal.
  • Painful Rhyme: One of Kapp'n's songs in New Leaf-
    Kapp'n: Oh, cucumber, you're not a pewcumber...
  • Paranoia Fuel:
    • The concept of the Happy Room Academy. A group of people who enter your house, and evaluate your fashion sense every day. No problem, right? Well, you never see them. At all. Ever. Even if you stayed in your house all day, every day of the week.
    • In 3.x, you can visit their headquarters, and it's revealed that they have keys. Lots of keys. Thousands of 'em.
    • It's also worth noting that 3.x lampshades this in some of the conversations with the villagers, where you find them worrying about just that.
    • How about this: Nook can do the HRA several better. By building up both his shop and your house, sometimes by more than its pre-existing size. OVERNIGHT. Without you noticing ANYTHING even if you are in that given location or even fall asleep there. Even if you wait for him in your house all night, he never shows up and your house never changes. 6 AM comes. You wait 5 more minutes just to be sure. Seeing that he still hasn't come, you leave the house. As soon as you step out of your house, bam! Screen cuts to the town hall making an announcement, then the game forces you to save whether you want to or not, and when you regain control, 30 seconds have passed and your house's renovation is done! Nook is not only a ninja, he's also The Flash and Superman rolled into one! This is lampshaded in Super Smash Bros. for 3DS/Wii U, in which Villager's Final Smash is summoning Nook, Timmy, and Tommy who build a house around the opponent within seconds.
    • Can it get worse? Yes, yes it can. How? Two words: the Resettis. They are so thorough they even break the fourth wall itself to punish those who reset without saving and quitting. Double in City Folk and New Leaf, where you can see their HQ and how they work.
    • Summer nights. Don't walk around without your bug net out, or else the tarantulas and scorpions will come for you.
    • Ever shake a tree? Lots of stuff can come from them. Bells, furniture, even some rare bugs like spiders! Wanna know what else comes from trees? There will always be five trees each day that have beehives in them, and you will never know which one will leave you with a swollen eye. That said, prepared players with a good sense of timing can make a fair amount of bells catching these bees when they show up. Or if they're lucky, they may make it home or the nearest occupied house before the bees get to them. And with New Leaf, quickly hitting Start and then choosing to save will cause the bees to disappear, and its Welcome amiibo update allows you to shake trees when you're already holding a net, which makes them much easier to catch.
    • Blanca is a case of this in New Leaf. Taking a level in badass, she went from The Faceless to Voluntary Shapeshifting, and has a whole minigame centered around impersonating your neighbors throughout April Fools day and you must tell them apart.
    • In New Leaf, villagers will sometimes unexpectedly knock on your door and visit, calling from the outside. Not so bad if you're in the living room, but it can definitely make a player jump if they're in another room and then suddenly, BAM they hear the doors knocking and a villager's theme play.
    • When you've hit the limit on how many villagers can live in your town, there's that looming shadow that one of your favorite villagers is planning to move away. It's effectively random and the only way to prevent it is to regularly check up on your town on a regular basis.
  • Periphery Demographic: It's arguably Nintendo's most "kid-friendly" series, but many adults and teens play them.
  • Player Punch: Whenever a beloved villager moves out of town and you miss the chance to stop them. Once you've become close, it can feel like a real-life friend leaving, even though no villager is technically different from another of their type.
  • Popular with Furries:
    • Animal Crossing is one of Nintendo's most popular IPs with furries (along with Pokémon and Star Fox). It's full of cute Funny Animal characters after all.
    • Sable and especially Isabelle stand out among most characters when it comes to their furry fandoms.
  • Take That, Scrappy!: For another game series. The fortune that can be exchanged for an Arwing reads: "Your friends need you. They always need you. They will never stop."
  • Replacement Scrappy: Due to difficulties getting holidays from different countries to work in a game featuring online, Wild World replaced most of the real-world holidays with fake ones like "Yay Day". Most fans consider them boring and unappealing compared to the holidays in other games.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: Tom Nook in New Leaf. While he still has more than a few haters, his new portrayal come New Leaf has made some fans finally warm up to him. Not to mention, he looks awfully cute in his sweater vest and puffy yellow jacket. And then there's his backstory revealed once you get close enough to him and the Able Sisters, which quickly turn him from The Scrappy into The Woobie.
  • The Scrappy:
    • Resetti, for some. If the game is turned off without saving, he pops out of the ground to yell at you for not playing the way he wants it to be played. If you keep it up, his rants get longer and longer, making resetting a pain. Especially in Wild World and City Folk, where you can't prevent him from showing up.note  It's especially grating if the player is forced to reset due to matters beyond their control (e.g., you caught a griefer of a visitor trying to brick your village and had to reset to keep the bricking from becoming permanent as well as to boot him/her out, or worse, you actually experienced a bug that crashed the game). Luckily, in New Leaf Resetti preemptively asks you why you reset your game, and he'll only lecture you if you say that you intentionally reset (the other two options just prompt a quick reminder, e.g., "charge your batteries").
    • Even worse is Gracie, the rude giraffe that will berate your sense of style simply because it doesn't match hers (his in the Japanese version). The GameCube "mini-game" in which you had to mash the A button in order to wash her car made it even worse, as most of the time, you would only get common clothing you could get anywhere else. Although trying to get her to set up shop in New Leaf can still verge on Guide Dang It! territory, her car never shows up in any capacity. To say how bad the car washing minigame is, it's possible to fail using a turbo controller.
    • The snowmen in the GCN game, especially if you don't make them correctly, in which they would chastise you. See That One Sidequest. New Leaf fixed this with the Snow family being quite friendly, even if you don't make them correctly.
    • Pavé in New Leaf is not well liked among the fandom for often being obnoxious and berating the player for not dancing even if the player uses the Shrunk Funk Shuffle, as well as his minigame not being very fun.
    • Villager-wise, smug villagers tend to get the most hate because of perceived "creepy" lines, and it doesn't help if they're seen as ugly by the players. In terms of villager trading (see Character Tiers above), if it's to be believed, Quillson is one of the most (if not the most) hated characters in the game; whereas players are paying tens of million bells to have their dream villagers in town, Quillson is a character who people are paying to not have in their town; sometimes up to 100k bells, if just to get rid of him. Apparently he's a common villager to move in, since there's more than one story of people paying to get rid of him. Marshal, on the other hand....
    • Introduced in Wild World is Lyle, an annoying insurance salesman who would relentlessly try to get players to buy insurance from him on Saturdays. His insurance wasn't even worth the money since it only occasionally covers bee stings, falls and forged paintings for a pitiful amount of money. Thankfully, he lost his job as an insurance salesman in City Folk and forced to work at the Happy Room Academy.
    • Katie isn't very well liked due to her annoying sidequest, which requires you to head to another person's town. Her crybaby personality, slow walking speed, and high frequency of showing up make her case worse.
    • Just about any villager in New Leaf has the capacity to become a Scrappy to someone if they dare build their house in undesirable places, such as over roads, trees or gardens, or directly in front of the player's house. Doubly so if the villager is one of the more unpopular ones as listed above. Fortunately, Welcome amiibo prevents villagers from building their houses on patterns, so, with patience, villager locations can be mapped out with the right pattern-laying.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • The grass-wearing system in City Folk. The game will keep track of where you walk on and wear down the grass accordingly. Aside from looking unsightly, it can affect other things, like the availability of certain bugs, and rolling snowballs. Additionally, there is no way to mitigate the effect apart from avoiding those paths and waiting a long time for the grass to re-grow. It's hated so much that people were willing to hack their save files to reverse the effect. Thankfully, grass wears down more slowly and re-grows more quickly in New Leaf. The Cutting Room Floor explains it perfectly:
      It also introduced the mechanic of grass deterioration, causing your well-loved town to slowly change into a barren wasteland.
    • From the second and third games, counterfeit paintings. Getting all the paintings was difficult ENOUGH when Redd sells the majority of 'em, shows up once a week and has a random assortment of items. In New Leaf the counterfeits have something differentiating them from the real thing, but then that requires you to know the source. In exchange, however, you might find that your neighbors may try to pawn off their counterfeit artwork on you. And since it's only mentioned in dialogue until you pay over 7,000 bells for it, there's no way to tell if it's real or not. Though this is subverted in New Leaf, as villagers will tell you that they don't know if it's real or not when it may be fake. If it's real, you'll be charged more and the villager will be confident it's real.
    • Redd doesn't show up on a fixed day in New Leaf — irritating enough that you need to wait seven days especially after being spoiled by City Folk making him available daily. Worse, there's a possibility that he won't show up for the week at all.
    • Katrina doesn't show up on a fixed day, though in her case it isn't as irritating as you can have her be a part of your town, but even then, you need to have had 20 fortunes read in order to do so.
    • In New Leaf having to pay to dispose of trash and counterfeit art pieces. It's painful enough that you get an inventory-clogging thing (which you may have paid a significant amount of bells for); now you have to let go of some money to be rid of it. This becomes less of an issue if you get your hands on a trash can, allowing you to get rid of it for free.
    • The removal of signposts in New Leaf is generally strongly disliked, due to the chance of a new villager being able to build their house anywhere in your town. This can mean building their new house on top of your roads or cutting down precious fruit trees or shrubs to make way for their house and generally just ruining your landscape. And if the villager moving in is already unpopular among the fandom... well, expect a few angry mayors to try to run them out of town as best as they can. Welcome amiibo fixes the problem in a different way; villagers can't build over patterns laid on the ground.
    • Acquiring Public Works Projects in New Leaf is Luck-Based Mission meets Fake Longevity. In order to get it, you have to wait until a villager "pings" and walks up to you, which is completely random, and they will request one for you to build. What's worse is that it's not guaranteed that they will request one when they "ping"; it's usually going to be about their catchphrase, your nickname, or just a random question that doesn't affect anything! On top of THAT, some Public Works Projects you can only get from villagers of certain personality types! Which can be be irritating when you want a certain project for your town, but don't like the villager type that suggests it. While there is a trick to force pinging (wading in the water for about 2-3 minutes with your pockets filled with untradable stuff), you still have the other randomness factors to deal with.
    • Placing bridge Public Works Projects is very tricky. Like all Public Works Projects, bridges require a certain amount of free space around them, however, this space is unnecessarily big. Is there a villager's house, another project, or even a player's house a few feet across the river? No bridge for you! The kicker? Houses and Public Works Projects can be built in the same distance from a finished bridge! Not to mention that in order for villagers to even suggest bridge projects, you need to have less than three in town. This means that there's going to be a very long period where you need to make do with only two bridges in town.
    • To some, Weeding Day in New Leaf is worthless if you don't play online and aren't willing to shell out a small fortune for an extra 3DS and copy of the game. The consolation prize for going into Weeding Day with no weeds at all are three topiaries if your town is weed free, and even then, you have to wait until the next day if you want to put them in your town or even see what they look like, since Isabelle won't let you do mayoral work on a holiday. Even Chuggaaconroy complained about it, despite using the online services CONSTANTLY. It is possible to get Flower Set furniture on the same day if you have extra player characters on your copy of the game, but only 4 of the 12 pieces are available from doing the event in your own town.
    • Exclusive to Wild World, the 10-minute time limit on certain favors means it is possible to locate a villager in one of the emotional states that precludes interaction and have them REMAIN in that state until after the time limit is up.
    • You find out you have a camper. Turns out the camper is the villager you've been dreaming of having since you started. Already have ten villagers? The game is just mocking you at this point as there is no way around this. Even worse is the fact that it can be possible that a bunch of the villagers you already have are ones you outright despise. This Awkward Zombie lampshades this.
    • In New Leaf, villagers can seemingly threaten to move on a whim. No, you can't decide on who is moving, as the villager who is moving, is randomly generated when the day starts. Similarly, they will only tell you this if they spot you, with their animation looking exactly like how villager would normally want to talk to you. You also have a limited amount to respond to their request before they lose interest and won't talk about it unless they decide to bring it up again when they spot you. This can happen when you're already talking to another villager. If you're already in a conversation with a villager who's feeling particularly rambly at the moment and can't break away in time, then you better hope that they decide to bring it up again, because otherwise you better say your goodbyes to them in the meantime. This exact thing happened to Chuggaaconroy in his LP of the game, with one of his top favorite villagers, too. This can also pop up the second you enter a house, too. When you talk to a villager and they are talking about moving, sometimes choosing the reply that will make them move away will have them change their mind. This is especially annoying when trying to get rid of a villager you want to move out.
    • Letter writing is this, especially prior to New Leaf. Writing ANY letter that had even the slightest spelling/grammar mistake would result in you being yelled at. New Leaf largely fixed this, but added the mechanic of villagers sending letters every day if their friendship with you is really high. On the bright side, they'll often send you presents that you can sell.
    • In Animal Crossing for the GameCube, it was possible for villagers to repaint the roof of your house with no warning. For the record, this was the biggest way you could customize the exterior of your house and this is the only way to change your roof's color other than expanding your house (Wild World onward allow roof changes to be bought). If you had a color you liked, you'd have to just hope that nobody would get the idea to paint your house.
    • Wild World removed the ability to ask for favors. This annoyed many gamers as in order to get requests you need to talk to them repeatedly, and even then it's usually something like "Give this character this letter within x amount of minutes" or "Buy me this shirt". City Folk amended this slightly by replacing them with the delivery/fetch quests from the original game with less wild goose chases, and in New Leaf the time limits are extended quite a bit, with most lasting until 6 a.m.
    • Obtaining furniture from your neighbors can be this. One of them might have a piece of furniture that you would love to get your hands on, and they might let you have if they invite you to their place. Key word being might. A lot of the time, the neighbor won't be willing to part with the item you want. Perhaps they might if you give them a replacement? They'll set it up in your house and still won't give you the original furniture piece that you wanted. The item may very well be lost forever.
    • In New Leaf, sometimes villagers will give you a gift without warning. This can be a problem for those who don't even want any items at the moment. Even worse when there's a Yes/No option, where selecting "No" will have the villager still give you the item, anyway.
  • Self-Fanservice: Fan-art done in the normal Funny Animal style usually averts this. However, humanized interpretations play it straight. Human art of Tom and Sable shave several years off them.
  • Spiritual Adaptation:
    • Some Dutch fans have found the game's characters, setting and aesthetics to be very similar to that of the classic children's puppet TV show De Fabeltjeskrant (better known in the United Kingdom as The Daily Fable).
    • American fans sometimes jokingly compare New Leaf to Parks and Recreation, as it centers around a perky blonde assistant who just wants to improve her town and its beauty.
  • Squick: Finding cockroaches in your house. The only way to get rid of them is to step on all of them. This goes double if you're playing a character who Does Not Like Shoes in New Leaf.
  • Sweet Dreams Fuel:
    • The game itself. Even more so if you play with friends.
    • The movie exceeds this and begins to taste like the 'beetus.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song: K.K. Slider's songs have a few examples of this.
  • Tainted by the Preview: Similar to Metroid Prime: Federation Force, fans of the main series can't seem to get over the disappointing Trailer Spoof done for amiibo Festival, where it looked like it was going to be a new Wii U entry in the series.
  • That One Sidequest:
    • Be prepared to spend anywhere from half an hour to half the bloody day looking for a coelacanth on a rainy/snowy day. Nnngggggrrrrgg....
    • The Snowman furniture series is the hardest one to get because unlike the other three special series (where you can get the whole set and some extras in a few hours), this one can (and likely will) take somewhere between 15 days to three months at a minimum to get the whole thing. Add to this the fact that if the snowman is not perfect you won't get a reward and you have the most annoying sidequest ever.
    • Mushroom furniture is worse. Sure, you don't have to build a snowman, but you have only a single month to get 12 different objects, once per day, with no guarantee that you won't get repeats.
    • The Pavé furniture series in New Leaf can only be gained on Festivale (unlike most holiday furniture that you can get all month). To get it you must give Pave three of whichever color feather he asks for (caught by the bug net or trading with villagers). This time-consuming activity gets even worse when you realize that what item you get is completely random.
    • Getting Katie's items in New Leaf. First, you need to have Katie show up in your town (as long as you've connected online, there's a small chance that Katie will appear on a given day). The easy part is guiding her to the train station and have a friend who has their town open. Once you've dropped her off, you'll get a letter from her the next day. You can get one of six items (including her picture), but much like Pavé, the item that you'll get in the mail is random. If you let someone drop off Katie in your town, she'll be ready to leave for another town in three days.
    • How about accumulating 999,999,999 bells for your bank account? It was necessary to get every item in the game (well, without cheating, not counting two NES games in the GameCube game) until New Leaf, which reduced it to 100,000,000, which is still a large amount, but easier to obtain if you repeatedly farm beetles on the island.
    • Good luck getting 1,000 StreetPasses if you don't live in Japan.
    • Getting Gracie-brand clothing in the first game: Think the concept for the Canary Mary button mashing races from Banjo-Tooie, now add to the fact that sometimes no matter how fast you press the A button your character will still not move fast enough to earn one of Gracie's special pieces of clothing, along with taking away the ability to pause in order to rest your thumbs and catch your breath before starting to press the A button quickly as you can again (unlike the button mashing races in Banjo-Tooie) and you've got yourself one of the worst button-mashing mini-games in a Nintendo game, and considering Gracie is one of the visitors that appears at random and you can only have one turn per person who gets on the game try if you fail at getting them you have to wait until she turns up in your town again, it justifies actually getting a turbo controller for those who don't want to go through the hassle of button mashing (even worse for those who actually have played and hated the Banjo-Tooie Canary Mary Cloud Cuckooland races already). Even then, it's possible to fail the minigame with the turbo controller.
    • The paintings wing of the Museum became this in Wild World and City Folk. While you were always at the mercy of whatever random items Redd decided to bring, Wild World introduced counterfeit paintings. There is NO way to tell for sure if a given painting is real or not before purchasing it, the museum will not display them and they only sell for ten bells. This is somewhat alleviated in City Folk, where you can visit Crazy Redd's store every day rather than once in a while. You may still get counterfeits, but as long as you have Bells to burn through you can at least try every week (assuming he has a painting that week). And sometimes characters may lampshade whether the paintings are real. For example, grumpy types may say something like "So, did you hear the scandal about Redd? Turns out he sold a bunch of forged paintings! I guess the lesson here is to watch what you buy, even from a reputable seller like Redd," indicating you probably shouldn't buy what's on the easel. Additionally, New Leaf introduces ways to tell if a piece is counterfeit or not... but only if you happen to know what the original looks like. Even then, he usually sells only one legitimate artwork per visit (since you can only buy one work per day), and there's an annoyingly high chance of finding repeats.
    • In New Leaf, you now have to pay when you want to dispose of counterfeit paintings through Re-Tail. Better get a trash can so you can do it for free.
    • In New Leaf, you're back to waiting for Redd to show up only once a week (and this time, the day of the week is randomized — he will not show up on the same day every week). OK, that's no big deal, until you find out that you're only allowed to buy one art piece per week. Although the mechanics of that part has been nerfed in that forgeries will have some kind of visual imperfection, it will have you yelling Guide Dang It! and playing compare-the-art with GameFAQs before making your move if fine art is not your thing (or if you weren't informed of the nerfing beforehand, which is quite likely, leave you taking potshots in the dark). You also need to wait a whole day to find out for sure if you've made the right purchase. Make a mistake and you're left waiting until the next week to have another shot (in addition to paying Re-Tail a disposal fee if you don't already have a trash can). On top of that, the fact that his spawn schedule, weekly inventory, and real piece are completely random, it isn't unheard of for players that only have about two thirds of their exhibit filled going several months without encountering any new artwork to buy. And worst off, in a case of But Thou Must!, you must have at least one of each type of exhibit donated (and a total of 20 donations) to the museum to get Celeste and subsequently The Roost back. It's definitely a case of That One Sidequest to fans of Celeste and/or Brewster but who hate art-hunting.
    • Getting a ball to a villager in the original games. The balls are notoriously hard to get across rivers and up hills, and can easily fall into bodies of water where they will never get out.
    • Finding fruit for a villager in the GameCube game. Unless you have multiple memory cards, a friend with the fruit, got it from a flying present, or just happen to have a tree for that fruit, it can be impossible to get them. That is, assuming you're not using universal item codes.
    • Finding scorpions and tarantulas in the summer. They're only available late at night, which already limits some players, and to make it worse, they only spawn on clear days, on bare ground; that means no patterns or flowers, the latter of which is a pain in the ass for those with a Beautiful Town ordinance (where there are flowers practically everywhere). Not to mention that they're two of the rarest bugs in the game, and they attack you if you're holding a net (leading to some unpleasant surprises for some players not hunting them), causing you to pass out. And if you try to sneak up on them? They just might vanish into a tree or fall off a cliff or the bank of a river. Many players tear their hair out about finding them, especially when hearing anecdotes of people with more bare ground in their villages catching both of them within a couple of hours. Thinking about trying to find either of them in a friend's town? Nope. Just like the bees, they don't spawn when the town gates are open.
    • Similarly, catching bees. Even with the amount of features introduced in later games to make it an easier endeavour, you still need to have near perfect timing to do so without getting stung. However, with New Leaf's Welcome amiibo update allowing you to shake trees while holding most types of tool (including the net), catching them is trivial if you're prepared with your net out (allowing you to snatch one before the swarm even fully forms).
    • Toy Day in New Leaf. How it works is you impersonate Santa Claus and deliver presents to all of your villagers to help ease Jingle's yearly workload. This wouldn't be too difficult, except...
      • In order to find out what a villager wants for Toy Day, they have to bring it up in a conversation on any day from December 1 to December 23. This happens completely at random, and they'll only describe its color and/or category.
      • There's no guaranteeing that they'll describe one or both of their specifications before Toy Day, meaning that you'll probably have at least one villager who never said what they wanted.
      • Multiple villagers can request gifts within identical specifications in either color or type. This means that you can reach Dec. 24 with multiple requests for something green, or two requests for white furniture.
    • Getting characters' pictures in New Leaf. Villagers will give them to you if you're friendship with them is strong enough, but this tends to happen at random. Either they send it to you in a letter (sometimes if they move out), or they give it to you spontaneously, through one of those see-you-and-go-ding events, meaning that you could potentially have a best friend move out without having ever received a picture from them. Special characters are another story, with the requirements varying from character to character. Overall, the hardest one to get would be Jingle's; the player must deliver every single gift on Toy Day to the correct villager. Given all the issues with Toy Day noted above, it'll probably require high levels of patience to get your hands on that picture.
      • There is however, a single day where getting all the pics of your current villagers is a cinch: April Fool's Day. However, it comes with its own set of Guide Dang Its. On April Fool's Day, Blanca will impersonate a villager and it's up to you to spot the imposter. Unfortunately the only clues that are given to you are their birthdays and favorite sayings (which only appear on... their pictures) or random facts that are never ever brought up at any other time of the year (such as what they want to be, special skills, or number of siblings).
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: While most of the changes New Leaf added to the series were well-received, there were some changes that caused criticism.
    • Blathers not going on tangents for each item you donated. This was done to encourage players to just donate everything they had at once, and there are detailed descriptions for each donation at its exhibit.
    • The removal of "episodes" (special events that added backstory to some of the game's permanent NPCs like Sable). Admittedly, some of them would just be retreading old ground at this point, and the old characters' backstories are referenced sometimes, but it does make some of the new characters like Reese and Cyrus seem underdeveloped compared to the others.
    • In previous games, balloons would contain a random item. In New Leaf, they only contain Balloon furniture, giving players almost no incentive (besides getting badges from Phineas or better slingshots) to shoot them down after they complete the series, besides selling them for some bells. The Welcome amiibo update/expansion reverted this change.
    • Once a villager suggests adding a police station to the town, the player receives two options: They can get the Classic Police Station, in which Booker works, or the Modern Police Station, in which Copper works. Splitting the two up has not been well received by people, as Copper and Booker have always been a team. You can only hope to see the other by visiting a different town/Dream town. Another thing disliked about this mechanic is that the characters are tied to the respective stations, which some players do not like because they would prefer a station's design, but not the personality of the character that works there. For example, some players may like Booker for his Shrinking Violet Cloudcuckoolander personality, but want the modern police station as it blends into their town's theme. The result is that the player has to make a very difficult decision of either choosing a policeman they do not like, forgoing heir plans for the town's theme altogether, or letting an out-of-theme building stick out like a sore thumb in their town and ruining the aesthetics.
    • Copper and Booker being gatekeepers instead of police officers was this for GCN fans. As mentioned, New Leaf gave them back their roles as police, but tore them apart.
    • Again, the mechanic where Redd and Katrina don't show up on a fixed day each week. It adds Fake Difficulty to several already time-consuming tasks.
    • Hate the Animalese voices in New Leaf and want to mute them like in previous games? Guess what: New Leaf removed the Bebebese and Silence language options, meaning there is no way to get rid of those annoying voices.
    • The exclusion of the players' infamous Nice Hats from Wild World onwards was originally met with some discomfort by fans of the GameCube title. You can still get the hats if you put them on as custom clothing, but it's not the same.
    • Any change to holidays and other events causes this. The decision to remove the region holidays in place of, often times bland, general ones in Wild World was met with backlash. The exclusion of the Sports Fair and Morning Aerobics in games past the original doesn't resonate well with many players either.
    • Many who played the GCN version of Animal Crossing were not pleased that Nintendo removed the NES games in Wild World and onward since Nintendo felt they distracted players from the main game (not to mention how all of these titles are nowadays available through the Virtual Console service), but to a lot of people the NES games in Animal Crossing were a feature that gave them reason to continue playing even during late night hours. However, the Welcome amiibo expansion to New Leaf revives the concept somewhat with the unique minigames that can be accessed with the Wii U and 3DS furniture pieces. However, some fans still wish that actual NES games would come back to the series.
    • Numerous shopkeepers will now get to the point when speaking to you, but the Nooklings are more talkative than anyone else. It's a chore to buy a tool, as Tommy will always ask you if you know how to use it, something Tom Nook would only do once.
    • A common complaint about New Leaf is that everyone is too nice. NPCs are considerably less rude or grumpy than in previous games.
  • Ugly Cute: If an animal isn't classically cute, it's ugly cute. It's a very cute game, is what we're saying.
  • Uncanny Valley:
    • K.K. Slider's model appears to have been designed with his trademark position (seated with one leg crossed and holding his guitar) in mind, so when he stands up to his full height and walks around, as seen in the Roost in New Leaf, it reveals he was given more realistically humanoid proportions, with a bigger torso and limbs and fairly small head, compared to most character models (who normally appear very cartoonish with heads that are equal or bigger than their bodies for some species) to make that position work well.
    • Some of the player faces fall into this, with the most notable ones being these faces, due to their very small eyes and the fact that, unlike other player faces, they look directly in front, making it look like they're staring into your soul.note  This face can be unnerving to some too, but it's not as bad.
      • New Leaf introduced four brand-new types of player faces (three for males, since the fourth new male face was previously a female-exclusive face). Out of all the new faces, these faces garnered the most attention, due to their uncanny resemblance to the Lenny Face.
      • There is a player face that has droopy eyes, and it's available for both genders. The female version looks fine enough. The male version, on the other hand....
  • Unfortunate Implications: While player customization is praised for the most part, if you want your character to have a darker skin tone, you need to resort to tanning, which is a time-consuming and complicated hurdle for many players who want to play a character with a dark skin tone, as seen here and here. You need to be outside for at least an hour a day on a sunny days during the summer months, or go to the island in the GameCube game or New Leaf, and you need to repeat the process for several days to get darker. Also the tan gradually fades after several days so in order to keep the desired tan, you need to do this constantly. In Happy Home Designer however, the option for different skin tones is available from the start.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion:
    • Blanca appears to be wearing a dress a la the female villagers, and "Blanca" is itself the feminine version of the Spanish word for white, such that you might give a girl if you had no sense of humor. However, Blanca is evidently just as much a dude as a similarly named Street Fighter character.
    • Chief, Fang, and Wolfgang wear androgynous clothing and have feminine-looking eyes, meaning, unless you knew their names prior to meeting them, they are easy to mistake for females.
    • Some villagers fall into this due to their species only wearing what seems to be dresses. (They are actually shirts, it's just that they're apparently too long for their bodies. New Leaf would later make the shirts on several species look more like shirts than dresses)
    • Ed and Julian, both horses, look remarkably feminine. Julian's catchphrase is even "glitter".
    • Bob's default outfit is a feminine-looking flower shirt and it can look more like a dress on him than a shirt (The latter is averted in New Leaf, though, where it looks more like a shirt now).
    • Filbert's default outfit in the first three titles was a white dress-like shirt with a pink floral design on it, complete with a ribbon on the chest. Combine that with his bright pink blushing cheeks, and you have a very feminine looking male villager. Averted for him in New Leaf, where his default outfit was changed to a black and white checkerboard shirt.
    • Everything about Pate's design, with the exception of the Blush Stickers, makes her look rather masculine, including the blue color scheme, boyish haircut and huge eyebrows.
  • Viewer Species Confusion:
    • Fans have a hard time telling whether the Able Sisters are porcupines or hedgehogs. (They are hedgehogs, since they have long snouts.)
    • For a long time, people have thought that Lyle was a weasel. Then came a Nintendo Treehouse stream for Happy Home Designer during E3 2015, where it was revealed that his niece is actually a river otter.
  • The Woobie:
    • In City Folk, Lyle the insurance-hawking otter went from the most annoying and despicable character in the game, constantly hounding the player to buy his policies, to a chronically depressed sulker in a job he despises, playing a Stepford Smiler for everyone who walks through the doors. Ouch. He was like that in Wild World as well—try running into him at The Roost to see just how world-weary he is when not in "trying to sell the player insurance" mode.
    • Sable's backstory is just as woobie-tastic, if not more so.
    • After hearing Tom Nook's backstory, portraying him as a poor and idealistic boy broken by the realities of business and a failure to become successful, his best friend and possible love interest Sable being unable to see him as the cheerful child he once was... some just find it impossible to hate him.
    • Any villager can be a woobie when they are feeling sick. Cranky villagers will even tell the player they want to "expire in peace" and are quite shocked when the player offers them medicine. Then we have Lazy Villagers who can be woobies even when they aren't sick. A lot of normally nice villagers (especially Uchi) will be mean to them and cause them to cry Ocular Gushers or just not like them. It's quite obvious these villagers are the youngest villagers mentally (and sometimes physically as well), and seeing a normally happy-go-lucky Lazy villager like Bob or Egbert who is a ball of fun, start crying before you is heart-wrenching.
    • Katie, though her annoyingly slow speed may bug some people.
    • Shrunk is seen as this by some; not only does he have a hard time pursuing his passion in comedy (due to being a terrible comedian), but given the implications that his jokes are true stories, he seems to be quite the Butt-Monkey. His relationship with his wife doesn't seem very happy either.
  • Woolseyism: All over the place. The English translators have said that their goal wasn't to create a fully accurate translation of the games, but to make sure that the English version of the game provides the same experience for an English speaker that the Japanese version provides for a Japanese speaker.

The Anime Movie

  • Accidental Innuendo: Near the end, Ai says "Boys have a nice warmth". Either way you hear it, it sounds sexual.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: Pascal's segment doesn't really make much sense. Don't worry, you won't hear from him ever again.
  • Moe: Margie and Ai are this to some fans of the movie.
  • Shocking Swerve: The aliens that come to the town.
  • Tear Jerker: Margie/Sally moving away, and Ai's desperation in trying to find her. Margie's winter visit, too.
  • Video-Game Movies Suck: Like its source, it's a little light on plot, but it's enjoyable if you just think of it as the Slice of Life tale it is, making this an aversion.
  • The Woobie: Ai is thoroughly woobified throughout much of fall and winter.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/AnimalCrossing