troperville

tools

toys


main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Kickstarter Message
TV Tropes is 149% Funded
X
Our Kickstarter campaign has received $74,000 from over 2,000 backers! TV Tropes 2.0 is coming. There is no stopping it now. We have 4 days left. At $75K we can also develop an API and at $100K the tropes web series will be produced. View the project here and discuss here.
View Kickstarter Project
Self Deprecation: Western Animation
  • In The Lion King, when Zazu is asked by Scar to sing a more upbeat song while imprisoned, Zazu sings the first few words of "It's A Small World", to which Scar vehemently shouts, "No! No! Anything but that!" In the Broadway stage version, Zazu instead sings "Be Our Guest", and gets the same reaction from Scar. This doubles as a Mythology Gag, since Beauty and the Beast the first Disney animated film that became a musical and paved the way for Lion King to come on Broadway. When Beauty and the Beast closed, it got replaced with "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious."
  • Avatar: The Last Airbender takes a few shots at itself in "The Ember Island Players", where the Gaang goes to see play done in tremendous detail about everything that happened to them since Aang's awakening. In an early episode ("The Great Divide"), the group stopped at a canyon and wound up trying to resolve the differences between two feuding clans. Many fans felt it was the worst episode in the series. In the play when the actors playing them spot the canyon they point out its existence... and then decide not to stop and just keep going. Also, during the scene based on "The Drill", much of the audience is visibly bored. The Gaang acts as the Audience Surrogate for both the audience and the Ember Island Players.
  • The Simpsons: Matt Groening has occasionally taken shots at himself, including having his Life in Hell comics have coffee deflected onto them from a superior comic, showing himself willing to sign anything at a comic convention, and having Homer insult his work being in an art gallery.
    • His appearance in The Simpsons Game takes it even further: it is revealed even he doesn't know whether his name is pronounced "Groan-ing" or "Grain-ing"; he introduces himself as "animation's greatest luminary" only for Bart and Homer to blurt out "Seth Mac Farlane?", and he is a level boss that Simpsons have to fight. Once he's defeated, the family chide him for milking their franchise.
    • The Comic Book Guy is also lightly based on Groening; specifically how he believed he would be perceived by fans.
    • And at the start of The Movie, we have Homer chastising viewers for watching in a cinema something they could watch for free at home.
    • In the Meta-episode, The Simpsons 138th Episode Spectacular, an impromptu interview with Mr. Groening has the camera barge into his office, to find an old, shriveled man with one eye doing tequila shots, who promply picks up a gun and shoots the cameraman.
    "Groening": GIT OUTTA MAH OFFICE! *BANG* *BANG*
    • From the same episode:
    Troy McClure: Yes, the Simpsons have come a lot way since an old alcoholic made humans out of his rabbit characters to pay off his gambling debts.
    • Another Clip Show episode also has the song "They'll Never Stop the Simpsons" (to the tune of "We Didn't Start the Fire") in which the line "Have no fears, we've got stories for years" is presented as Blatant Lies. A similar joke occurs in "Behind the Laughter", which ends with Homer concluding that the plot of the episode being filmed ("I can't believe we won another contest!" "The Simpsons are going to Delaware!") indicates that this will be the last season. (And yes, they did use that dialogue the following season in "Simpsons Tall Tales".)
    • In the episode written by and guest starring Ricky Gervais, Gervais takes a swipe at himself, as Homer dismisses his schtick as "You take forever to say nothing!"
    • The series frequently makes fun of the fact it's animated overseas in Korea. Once they recruited Banksy to help them.
    • Rupert Murdoch appears as himself in "Sunday, Cruddy Sunday" and refers to himself as "the billionaire tyrant." He also sends his goons after Homer and the others for breaking into his sky box.
    • Lisa says someone is still a loser despite getting a job, due to the job in question being a writer.
    • In Sideshow Bob's Last Gleaming Bob laments "My crusade against television has come to an end so formulaic it could have spewed from the power-book of the laziest Hollywood hack!" Also in that episode, Sideshow Bob's rant against TV is interrupted by Rupert Murdoch who's angry because he owns 61% of the network being insulted. He's one of Bob's inmates in prison.
    • In "Guess Who's Coming to Criticize Dinner?":
    Lisa: Wow, my first published article! Although someone else's name is on it...
    Homer: Welcome to the humiliating world of professional writing!
    • The opening subtitle of "Simpsorama" reads: "A show out of ideas teams up with a show out of episodes."
  • South Park:
    • "Cartoon Wars", a two episode-long Take That toward Family Guy, takes a couple jabs at itself when a stranger drops Kyle off to save Family Guy, "I know the show is just joke after joke with no structure, but I kinda like that. At least it's not all preachy and up its own ass with messages, you know?"
    • Then Family Guy DID become preachy and up its own ass with messages. Either that's a "Funny Aneurysm" Moment or Hilarious in Hindsight.
    • In the episode where Stan and Kenny go to Mel Gibson to get their money back for The Passion of the Christ, Stan says "This is just like when we got our money back for BASEketball," a film starring Matt Stone and Trey Parker.
    • An in-universe example: Several times Cartman actually helps out with the jokes directed toward him, saying a large structure compared to his ass is nowhere close to rivaling him. That might be due to Cartman Comically Missing the Point combined with his massive ego.
    • In the episode where Randy is going for the "Biggest Crap" Record along with a few jabs at Bono they would occasionally flash the words "Emmy Award Winning Series" on the bottom of the screen during the moments where the episode was reaching absurd levels of stupidity.
    • The Movie features the kids going to see in-universe TV show Terrence And Philip's own The Movie. At the end they complain about the film's lame animation, and then have an especially badly-animated walk away from the theater.
    • The season 16 episode "Raising the Bar" features this dialogue:
    Kyle: How did shamelessness get to this? Did it start with fat people on scooters or did the bar get lowered way before that? And then I started thinking that maybe it was us. I don't know, but maybe somehow we lowered the bar... a long time ago and now we're just sitting in the stink of it all.
    • In fact, the show's tongue-in-cheek opening disclaimer, which it has had from the start, could count:
    Disclaimer: All characters and events in this show-–even those based on real people–-are entirely fictional. All celebrity voices are impersonated.....poorly. The following program contains coarse language and due to its content it should not be viewed by anyone.
    • In "A Very Crappy Christmas", after the boys recreated the 1995 "Spirit of Christmas" and showed it to the town:
    Mayor: "Kids, that cartoon was fabulous. How would you like to have your own show and make 100 more of them?"
    Stan: "Are you kidding? I think we'd rather stab ourselves in the head."
    • ''Terrance and Philip" mocks their potty humor and jokes.
    • Black Friday:
    Cartman:"You know what pre-ordering means? It means committing to pay for something that some asshole from Colorado hasn't even finished making."
  • In an episode of Ultimate Spider-Man, Hawkeye points out how incredibly stupid it is that Spider-Man uses a Spider-Cycle when he can already get anywhere he needs to by using his webs.
  • Find a Drawn Together episode in seasons 2 and 3 that doesn't do this. Try.
  • Tiny Toon Adventures frequently takes shots at its own writers. In addition to all the examples listed on Who Writes This Crap?!, there are the lyrics for the theme song to the Wonderful Life Christmas special: "Our writers aren't gifted!/The story has been lifted..."
  • Animaniacs is fond of this, and have one in the opening credits:
    The writers flipped, we have no script
    Why bother to rehearse?
    • The debut episode of Freakazoid! has a similar zinger as they do a theme for the show using the Animaniacs melody:
    It's Freakazoid and friends
    It's what your dentist recommends
    To patients who chew gum
    This show is really dumb
    It's Freakazoid and friends
  • Family Guy
    • Quagmire is starting to become this, pointing the flaws and many things disliked by the fans. It reached its peak in a Take That, Scrappy! at Brian, of all people.
    • In the episode Road To The Multiverse, Brian's dog tag on his collar in one of the universesnote  has "LIBERAL" on it, making fun of Brian's left-wing viewpoints.
    • An episode included a news anchorman whose name was Chevapravatdumrong, but changed it because no one would allow that name on television. This is a dig at Cherry Chevapravatdumrong, one of the show's producers, whose name appears at the beginning of each episode.
    • The Return of the Jedi special ends with Lois, Meg, and Chris outright insulting MacFarlane, calling him unoriginal, an asshole, and a one-trick pony ("He watched television in the 1980s. We get it.").
    • One episode has them complain about Scrubs and the way it often jumped to imagination cuts, in a drawn out way that makes it very clear that they are also talking about their own tendency to jump-cut to jokes.
    • In the 100th episode special, Seth MacFarlane interviews several people about Family Guy (who don't know who he is). They all say that the show is terrible.
    • The opening to "Valentine's Day in Quahog", which parodies the theatrical trailer for Valentine's Day, includes a text card saying that the episode is another sign of the show's declining quality.
    • Brian goes back in time to Nazi Germany and is disgusted by a piece of Nazi propaganda featuring a horrible caricature of a Jew. The picture of the Jew is identical to Family Guy's recurring Jewish character Mort Goldman.
  • Futurama:
    • The episode "Where No Fan Has Gone Before" has the Star Trek: The Original Series cast performing self-deprecating versions of themselves; with William Shatner playing his repuation for self-importance, as well as his failed attempts at music, to the hilt (say what you like about the guy's acting, he does have a great sense of self-parody).
    Melllvar: Here I've been admiring a bunch of actors while you, a crew of genuine space heroes, risked your lives to save them.
    • in one episode, Fry is promoted to "Executive Delivery Boy". Hermes thens calls it a "Meaningless term, but it helps insecure people feel better about themselves." Cue the Executive Producer credits. Watch this gem here.
    • Also, blurring the lines between this and Biting-the-Hand Humor, at one point Bender refers to the people who cancelled the series as idiots...and the people who brought it back as bigger idiots.
    • In one episode, Bender says of lifting heavy objects in the moon's lower gravity, "You can work and be lazy at the same time. It's like being a voice actor!"
  • The creators of Robot Chicken occasionally insert themselves into sketches, usually for jokes at their own expense, and each season finale ends with the show's cancellation (necessitating the renewal of the series in each subsequent season premier).
  • In an episode of Ed, Edd n Eddy, Edd makes a remark about Ed's "badly drawn fingers". Eddy also once says "Who writes this guy's material?".
  • One episode of The Fairly OddParents had Timmy trying to impress Trixie by winning a movie award. When he finaly does, she still rejects him. When he asks why, she says:
    Trixie: Because, anonymous voice from nobody, you won an award for comedy, and everyone knows that comedy is the lowest form of entertainment. Next to animation.
  • Fanboy and Chum Chum frequently takes jabs at itself for the excessive use of Toilet Humor and puns. An example from "Little Glop of Horrors":
    Fanboy: Hey Kyle! It's pizza day! Come play pizza monkeys with us!
    Kyle: You two are... pizza monkeys? What do you do, throw your poopparoni?
    Fanboy and Chum Chum burst out with laughter
    Kyle (sighing): I'm witty day after day - and this is what they laugh at.
  • Season 2 of Yogi's Treasure Hunt reveled in self-deprecation, parody and self-parody. Most notably in the episode "Yogi's Heroes," where Dick Dastardly and Muttley capture Snooper and Blabber and torture them by making them watch old Dastardly & Muttley cartoons.
    Blabber: Our brains will turn to mush!
  • An episode of Rocky and Bullwinkle dealt with Boris and Natasha's attempts to open a giant trunk, and failing everything else, they opt to bring in an A-bomb. The following exchange:
    Rocky: They said "A-bomb." Do you know what that means, Bullwinkle?
    Bullwinkle: Sure. "A bomb" is what some people call our program.
    Rocky: I didn't think that was very funny.
    Bullwinkle: (looking at us) Neither did they, apparently.
  • Arthur did this quite a few times. One episode was when they wrote a contest and they were watching a parody of themselves. "If they're animals, do they eat garbage for lunch?" Also, "And Now Let's Talk to Some Kids" where they poked fun at the usually choppy segment.
  • In The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy episode "My Fair Mandy", Grim introduces the kids to an underworld makeover artist. Grim then says that she made him what he is today and once looked like a "total nerd". It then cuts to a picture of creator Maxwell Atoms.
    • From the episode where Billy, Mandy, and Grim go to the Sassy Cat Amusement Park:
    Mandy: I agree.
  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic has had characters respond negatively to Pinkie Pie's Once an Episode singing a number of times:
    • The very first song of the series is sung by Pinkie in the second episode, prompting the following exchange:
    Pinkie Pie: When I was a littile filly, and the sun was going dooown...
    Twilight Sparkle: Tell me she's not—
    Pinkie Pie: The darkness and the shadows, they would always make me frooown...
    Rarity: She is.
    • Pinkie Pie's announcement that she's written a song about Zecora in "Bridle Gossip" is immediately preceded by eye-rolling and a weary "Here we go" from Rainbow Dash. After the song finishes, Pinkie is met with an awkward silence and bewildered stares.
    • In "Over a Barrel", after watching Pinkie Pie's song about sharing and caring, Chief Thunderhooves announces that he's found something he and Sheriff Silver Star agree on: "That was the worst performance we've ever seen." An ill-timed reprise of the song later on actually angers Thunderhooves into going through with his attack on Appleloosa.
    • In "Baby Cakes", Pinkie's attempt to cheer up Pound and Pumpkin Cake with her excessively juvenile "Piggy Dance" song actually makes them stare at each other in disgust and start crying all over again.
    • In "A Friend in Deed", Cranky Doodle Donkey is repeatedly annoyed by Pinkie's songs.
    • These are all interesting cases in that they combine not only this trope and Lampshade Hangings, but also Take Thats aimed at earlier incarnations of My Little Pony (especially G3), which were infamous for playing their "girly" tropes so straight that they were borderline-unwatchable for anyone outside the target demographic. The most blatant example isn't a song at all, though; in "Too Many Pinkie Pies", one of the Pinkie Pie clones morphs her face into that of a G3 pony, only to get blasted by Twilight Sparkle and banished back to the Mirror Pool.
      Pinkie Pie: Betcha can't make a face crazier than... THIS!
      • A commercial on The Hub takes the joke a step further by editing in disgusted reactions from Rarity and Fluttershy. Note that the channel is co-owned by Hasbro.
    • My Little Pony Equestria Girls: Rainbow Rocks features a scene where Twilight and the human versions of her friends hold hands and declare "Friendship is magic!", and are then quite shocked when this doesn't actually do anything. The commentary confirms this is a deliberate reference to the number of times the show has resorted to essentially doing this same thing as a Deus ex Machina (including the previous movie).
  • In one episode of Attack of the Killer Tomatoes!, the main protagonists are captured by the villains and forced to watch the original live action film endlessly as torture.
  • The Adventure Time episode "A Glitch is Just a Glitch" opens with Finn doing some crude animation of the Ice King on a computer. He soon becomes impatient with his progress:
    Finn: Man, I don’t have the patience for this animation junk. Whoever does this must have no life whatsoever. *Punches himself in the face* Why did I do that?
  • Beavis And Butthead:
    • The show's first disclaimer said that they are stupid cartoon people completely made up by this Texas guy whom we hardly even know.
    • Additionally, in "Animation Sucks", they both agree that animation sucks after seeing the hundreds of dead people that they drew turn into 2 repeatedly dying people. Plus, said dead people looked just like them. Earlier in the same episode, Van Dreissen goes on a lengthy spiel about the wonders of bringing your ideas to life with animation. During the entire speech, we simply see Beavis and Butthead just sitting there, doing absolutely nothing.

Web OriginalSelf-DeprecationReal Life

random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
37401
44