YMMV / WarCraft

  • Alternate Character Interpretation: Plenty of them among the Lore Fans.
  • Best Level Ever: Twilight of the Gods, the last level in Warcraft III is an absolutely massive forty-five minute Hold the Line mission where after eight years the Alliance and Horde finally work together to stop Archimonde as he juggernauts his way through everyone's bases with almost no effort. His forces are unlimited and it is very difficult just holding them off long enough, but it is extremely satisfying to win.
  • Breather Level:
    • Warcraft I
      • The final human level in the original game is much easier than the one before it, if you researched the water elemental before getting to it. You start this level with a decent number of troops, including a mage who can pop an elemental as often as he needs to to fend off the worst the orcs have to offer. All it boils down to is keeping them off your back until you get an army of summoners and send a horrifying number of elementals at them. This is especially noticeable compared to the orcs final level, who can't heal, can be outranged by archers, and have to deal with invisibility spam, basically guaranteeing the death of your starting summoner and any peons unlucky enough to be targeted, making elementals much harder to defend against.
    • Warcraft II
      • In the Beyond the Dark Portal expansion, the sixth human mission, "The Fall of Auchindoun", is a level that can be beaten fairly easily in the first couple of minutes. Despite going up against four orc factions here, you're only tasked to destroy the Orange base, and yet, you're provided a large enough army to just attack it right off the bat, and return to the Circle-of-Power with Turalyon and Danath after the destruction of the Orange base.
    • Warcraft III
      • If you feel particularly terrible for killing and slaughtering the (mostly good and heroic) Humans of Lordaeron and High Elves of Quel'Thalas (as you control Arthas as the Villain Protagonist at this point) in the first five stages of the Undead Campaign in Reign of Chaos, then you might feel better in the sixth stage, "Blackrock and Roll, too!", since it is an Evil Versus Evil stage where your enemy is the Blackrock Clan, a villainous faction of the Orcs who continue to worship demons and don't join Thrall's Horde. The next two stages after this have you fight against heroic Humans again, however.
  • Cliché Storm: Every line that doesn't contain a proper noun, you've heard in some other fantasy work. This is particularly noticeable in Reign of Chaos.
  • Complete Monster: See here.
  • Crowning Music of Awesome:
    • The four factions' themes.
    • And speaking of the third game again, the sung part at the end of The Frozen Throne ending cinematic. No wonder it was reused (with a different voice and lyrics) in WoW: Wrath of the Lich King.
    • Warcraft III (and subsequently World of Warcraft) has so overshadowed the original 2 games that it's easy to overlook the fact that Warcraft II had one of the finest and most memorable soundtracks in RTS history. It's still used to this day in Hearthstone (during the matchmaker spinner) and, in awesomely remixed form, in Heroes of the Storm.
  • Designated Hero: Tyrande Whisperwind could be seen as one since she slaughtered a group of innocent prison Wardens who were just doing their job trying to keep a condemned criminal, Illidan, behind bars. Maiev even calls her out for this in Frozen Throne.
  • Designated Villain / Informed Wrongness: While Illidan did do a lot of amoral things, it's still hard to understand why exactly Malfurion decided he had to be banished for turning himself into a demon, even though all he did after becoming one was, you know, saving the whole Forest. The most probable reason is that Malfurion (and the Night Elf society) possibly held the firm belief about never using evil as a weapon as a law, even if it's decreasing the chance to reach the goal, and Illidan broke it.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Several from the franchise. Some examples that appear in World of Warcraft include;
  • Foe Yay: Between her lamentations about how she feels hollow inside and swearing that Illidan will be hers, Maiev Shadowsong, Illidan's former personal jailor, seriously comes off a lot like a spurned Yandere during her pursuit of him in the events of The Frozen Throne.
  • Game Breaker:
    • In Warcraft:
      • Basic range units. They're cheap, easy to tech up to, and they fire really fast. Their weakness is their lack of armor and low health, but in high enough numbers, even the end game summons will die too quickly to harm more than one or two. Unless your enemy gets a lot of melee units to counter them (something the AI never does), the only real threats to them are catapults and mage spells. And for good measure, archers out break spearmen due to having one more space of range. It's hardly surprising they got nerfed hard in the sequel.
    • In Warcraft II:
      • An Ogre-Mage's Bloodlust is an absolute nightmare to go up against; tripling the damage of any unit that is given the buff. While orc vs orc matches pits the Game Breaker against each other, the Paladin equivalent for humans only receive an inefficient healing spell, and an exorcism spell that only affects Death Knights and its Skeleton minions...which are two, rarely used, undead units for the orc side (this spell isn't even usable in human vs human match-ups!). Needless to say, orcs are considered to have a huge advantage in land battles, and that doesn't even include the fact that the Ogre-Mage has a deadly landmine spell to coincide with Bloodlust.
      • A group of human Mages are considered broken in the hands of a skilled player for one, simple, reason; the ability to Polymorph an army. And this isn't like the Polymorth we know today which usually turns people into sheep for 30 seconds before changing back...no...these people are gone for good.
    • In III:
      • High-level heros can often handle maps by himself, especially if you've been giving all the stat upgrades to one guy. The Undead campaign in Frozen Throne gives a game breaking duet in Arthas and Anub'arak, provided you give Arthas intelligence and mana regeneration items and you give Anub'arak strength and armor boosting items. Combined with the Crypt Lord's ultimate spell, this makes the final mission, otherwise That One Level, surprisingly easy, as Anub'arak alone can tank Illidan's attacks, with Arthas healing or damaging Illidan with Death Coil (The rest of your army can assault Kael and Vashj's bases). This was even more significant in early versions of Frozen Throne, due to a Good Bad Bug mentioned below.
      • Frozen Throne's Orc campaign gives you a new Game Breaker every time you kill a new monster. Here, have a shield that boosts stats while setting enemies on fire, or a hat that shoots lightning, or a stick that summons reinforcements while making your allies go faster, or a free Chain Lightning spell, or a healing item that amounts to a fountain of health following you around... The biggest one, however, comes in chapter 2, where the shop at your main base sells relatively cheap Necklaces of Spell Immunity. Slap these on your entire party, and the rest of the campaign becomes a complete cakewalk.
  • Gameplay Derailment: It's very easy to abuse the AI of enemy peasants/peons throughout Warcraft II. The reason being that if you damage a structure, but leave it burning in the red, it will cause the AI to immediately send their workers to try to fix the structure. Then, if you constantly kill the workers that the AI attempts to send, it will cause them to keep sending their remaining workers, as well as the newly created ones, directly to the structure that is in the red for needed repair. Eventually, the enemy faction will use up all their gold on making workers, and leaves the AI as sitting ducks to get steamrolled with no means of being able to reinforce themselves.
  • Goddamned Bats: Due to its playstyle, Frozen Throne's bonus campaign has a few of these:
    • Centaurs, mainly because you end up fighting so damn many of them. Particular standouts include Firecallers, who can deal a fair bit of damage with Flame Strike, and Deathcallers, who can revive other centaurs.
    • Harpy Storm-hags cast Sleep to put your heroes out of action and Curse to make them miss half their attacks. They're not dangerous by any stretch of the imagination, but fighting them gets tedious very quickly.
  • Good Bad Bugs:
    • For the seventh mission of the Orc campaign, "The Oracle," Thrall comes across a trap set by Jaina's sorceresses where a group of sheep suddenly become footmen, and attack Thrall's group. However, due to a few broken triggers, some of the sheep will spawn as Neutral footmen that will just stand there, and not do anything; making an already easy trap to defeat an absolute joke.
    • The second mission of the Blood Elf campaign, "A Dark Covenant," has a broken script regarding three Doom Guards that are supposed to destroy the left most Observatory on the map so that the player could no longer have vision of the undead bases. Instead, the Doom Guards walk up to it, but then immediately walk back to the undead base without destroying it; allowing for the player to continue having vision of almost the entire map.
    • The final Frozen Throne mission for the Scourge campaign, "A Symphony of Frost and Flame," has a bug where it is possible to break the AI for Illidan's faction to the point of only continuously sending the Illidan hero unit out to try to capture the Obelisks he doesn't control. Not an entire Naga army with Illidan mixed in; JUST Illidan.
    • During "Old Hatreds" for the Frozen Throne bonus campaign, your hero group can enter a Bonus Dungeon, the Magistrates Temple, in search for extra loot. Some of the enemies you fight here are powerful Infernals. However, if you leave the Temple, then come back in, the Infernals will, for some reason, all be gone from the level; making for an almost empty path to reach the Final Boss of the dungeon.
    • Early versions of Frozen Throne had a bug in the Undead campaign in which, whenever Anub'arak leveled up, his base armor would be increased by the bonus armor he had. Coupled with Spiked Carapace and the huge amount of good armor and strength items that can be found in the campaign, this makes Anub'arak ungodly tough by the final mission, with an armor stat of 47 if done right. At that point, the only thing that does anything resembling noticeable damage is Illidan's Mana Burn.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Remember when Arthas said "What trickery is this!? Mal'Ganis! I don't know how you survived..." and later, after encountering Muradin's dwarves, "Doesn't anyone stay dead anymore?" It's funnier to think about it after some characters are Back from the Dead in World of Warcraft :Muradin and Mal'Ganis themselves, Kael'Thas...
    • The Leeroy Jenkins meme that was born in World of Warcraft makes the third Orc mission even funnier. Grom Hellscream was Leeroying it out for years before Leeroy Jenkins.
    • The closing line of the original game's intro, "Welcome to the World of Warcraft", was nothing short of prophetic. Fast forward to November 2004...
    • In Night Elf campaign in The Frozen Throne, Maiev described Scourge-conquered Lordaeron as "the forsaken place". Later in Undead campaign, Sylvanas took over Lordaeron from the Scourge and christened herself and her people "The Forsaken".
  • It Was His Sled: The RTS games in the franchise are considered to be quite old nowadays, so some of what may have been interesting plot developments back in the day have become well-known within, and outside, the Warcraft fanbase. Especially since many of these story moments were used as the foundation to set up World of Warcraft, and its later expansions.
    • For Warcraft I
      • Blackhand gets ousted as Warchief.
    • For Warcraft II
      • Gul'dan betrays the Horde, and dies at the Tomb of Sargeras.
      • The city of Alterac betrays the Alliance, and gets destroyed soon after.
      • Lothar dies.
    • For Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos
      • Arthas turns evil, and kills his father, King Terenas.
      • Uther dies.
      • The Human Kingdom of Lordaeron, and the High Elf Kingdom of Quel'thalas, get destroyed by the Scourge.
      • Thrall moves the orcs to Kalimdor, and establishes the current day Horde alongside the Darkspear Trolls and Mulgore Tauren.
      • Grom dies.
      • Illidan is released from prison, and becomes a demon after claiming the Skull of Gul'dan.
      • Archimonde dies after failing to consume the World Tree.
    • For Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne
      • Prince Kael moves his Blood Elf faction to Outland.
      • Sylvanas and Varimathras take control of Lordaeron to establish their undead Forsaken faction.
      • Arthas becomes the Lich King.
      • Thrall's Horde claims a home for themselves in Kalimdor, naming the territory Durotar.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Ner'zhul - just ask Archimonde and Tichondrius.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Arthas massacring Stratholme so the city does not fall to the Undead is one In-Universe, but highly contentious amongst the players, with lots of arguments resulting over the finer details (the fact that the Plague can not be cured vs. the morality of the Mercy Kill, how quickly he leaps to this idea, etc).
      • Hiring mercenaries to help him burn the ships so his rebellious soldiers cannot flee Northrend and escape his obsessive quest to find and destroy the source of the undead, then telling the men that the "foul beasts" had done it all, is a lot less contentious of one.
      • Wandering off into the wilderness after claiming Frostmourne and leaving his former soldiers to die would probably be one if he wasn't already having his mind stolen by Ner'Zhul.
    • Ner'Zhul himself crossed it after Warcraft 2, when he abandons the Horde for himself, opening countless portals across Draenor in an attempt to escape to new worlds, which ends up tearing the orc homeworld apart (and unintentionally sending him straight into Kil'Jaeden and a Fate Worse Than Death).
  • More Popular Spin-off: World of Warcraft.
  • Narm Charm: The writing in Warcraft games and books comes across to many fans as cheesy, but many of them enjoy the series specifically because of that.
  • Never Live It Down:
    • No matter what Thrall does from here on out, a vast majority of people won't forgive him for being shoehorned everywhere throughout Cataclysm.
  • Sidetracked by the Gold Saucer: In the Warcraft 3 campaign, going off the main path to complete the Side Quest, or buffing up your heroes by finding items and stat-tomes can be describes as this for players.
  • Sturgeon's Law: The enclosed "World Editor" allows a creative player to create their own scenarios and maps for the game with a great deal of customization options. Unfortunately, many of them suck or are knockoffs or endless rehashings of the same type of map. Or all three. However, some of them are very well done. See: Defense of the Ancients: All-Stars, The Chosen Ones, and To The Bitter End.
  • That One Level:
    • Tides of Darkness
      • Level 10 of the human campaign "The Prisoners" isn't that difficult of a mission, but it's an extremely annoying one due to the length the player has to go to bring the Alterac prisoners to the player's White base. To explain, the player has to build a base to make a naval army while fighting off attacks from a Blue Horde base, and then make landfall at a Red Horde outpost. After clearing out the Red Horde outpost, the player has to then make another shipyard to make transports that will then have to traverse a river that goes obnoxiously long around the bottom half of the map covered by Red cannon towers to finally reach the area where the Alterac prisoners are being held. And it doesn't even end with the transports reaching the prisoners. The player than has to backtrack to bring the prisoners all the way back to the Circle-of-Power in the player's starting base.
      • The final human mission "The Dark Portal" suffers from a nasty Difficulty Spike that puts the mission in a league of its own compared to the rest of the Warcraft II levels. The toughest part of the mission is actually the initial set-up of the level where you must gather up your starting army to make landfall on an Ogre-Mage village, and build up your base from there. In addition, you're constantly attacked by dragons from another orc factionnote . The kicker that makes this even more of a pain is that because you have a large army, and no initial food reserves, you spend the first 20 or so minutes building up farms with just the six workers you're given as you're unable to build any more peasants to speed up your economy gain...unless you start axing off units from your army, such as the footmen and knights, that you deem useless.
    • Beyond the Dark Portal in general might as well be known as That One Game. Compared to original Warcraft II, the expansion ups the AI difficulty greatly to the point that the enemy factions will become highly aggressive as the campaign levels go on. For added difficulty, some of these levels have the player fighting as many as 3 to 4 factions at once that if you don't manage to take out one or two factions early, it will be extremely painful later on.
    • Reign of Chaos: The game is not too frustrating on Normal difficulty, but Hard mode makes many of the levels harder than most Blizzard fans may be used to. A full-clear on Hard Mode unlocks a special ending after the Night Elf campaign.
      • It is possible, throughout the game, to play most levels by simply sitting in your base (turtling) until you have gained all tech levels and upgrades, and then go around to most other bases and either wipe them out, or beat them down building by building. The very last level, however, totally invalidates this approach, forcing players who have been playing the entire game by turtling to learn a whole new way of playing on one of the toughest levels in the game. This also applies to the multiplayer AI, who will Curb Stomp you with their high-level heroes before you can blink if you try the single-player turtling approach.
      • March of The Scourge (Hard): The enemy applies considerable pressure, attacking with a much stronger army and siege weapons to makes your towers unable to Hold the Line on their own, and they send a lich hero to "death and decay" your towers and nuke your army for good measure. Base expansion and multi-tasking skills are suddenly required in a campaign that has not been too difficult up until this point. There's also an optional Side Quest that is almost impossible to complete as you would need to take a small army out with your Paladin hero to take out a Meat Wagon escort, but in the meantime, those units you sent out would be extremely helpful if they had just stayed at the base for the primary Hold the Line mission.
      • Into The Realm Eternal (Hard) An early Undead mission, the prime reason for it's frustration is that you have three units available to you. Ghouls, necromancers, and the meat wagon siege weapon. The limited troop types means that a balanced force is impossible, and there is only on strategy available to you; the Zerg Rush. And even by Zerg Rush standards your troops suck. Ghouls are fragile and don't deal all that much damage, meat wagons are slow and fragile, and so are necromancers. Their ability to Animate Dead is vital early on, but the computer knows that the troops they summon will fall apart after a while, and doesn't bother to attack them until all the things that matter are dead. And when the priests start to show up in large numbers their dispel magic spell can wipe out swathes of animated skeletons in seconds, as well as buffing their troops and healing them through ghouls' attacks. Unlike the other examples in here, it's not a difficult mission, but you will hate it, possibly more than the other mentioned missions.
      • The Last Undead mission, Under the burning Sky on Hard: It is considered by some to be the hardest in the game. It is a Hold the Line mission where you have to defend squishy wizard, Kel' Thuzad for 30 minutes until he summons the local Archdemon. There are three ways to get to them, one of which is defended by your base and the other two, which hold a spirit tower each. Your opponents? 3 human bases with their full arsenal. The last few minutes are particularly terrifying as your opponents proceed to dump their full arsenal into you.
      • The "Spirits of Ashenvale" mission of the first orc campaign where you have limited resources and are tasked with harvesting huge amounts of lumber with the worst lumber gatherer in the game. The only gold available for mining is far away from your main base, so you need to raid enemy bases (and the units that are good against buildings are bad against units). Your unit options are limited to some melee units with an inefficient anti-air attack, the worst ranged unit in the game, and the enemy just loves attacking your harvesters with air units, and most damning of all, no way of healing your units. There is a way to get lumber faster, but it involves a ridiculously difficult battle against tough enemies, during which you will take heavy losses, which must be replaced at great cost. And adding insult to injury, the hero you start with is The Berserker, and this entire mission (defending against impregnable bases) goes against everything he stands for. On Hard, the attacks are even more ruthless.
      • The chapter right after that, "Hunter of Shadows," isn't anything too difficult per-say, but its well known to be problematic just to get passed the opening battle where you must survive Cenarius' all-out assault with nothing but your berserker hero, and a few other units that are likely to die off fairly quickly. Its more of a race to get a decently sized force, then to actually win against the assault with the small force you have currently. Once you get past this, the mission does get significantly easier, compensating that Early Game Hell.
    • Frozen Throne
      • "A Dark Covenant", the second Human (Blood Elf) mission, is Frozen Throne's equivalent to Reign of Chaos's "Into the Realm Eternal". You have to destroy a big green Undead base. You start in a fairly healthy position (As well as an unusual fully upgraded tech tree), with your main base in your island and four expansions in the other part of the lake (Close to the Undead base you have to destroy), but they are quickly taken over by orange Undead forces, and since your main base lacks a gold mine, you need to retake an expansion. This part is not difficult, due to the new units you get - the problem is how you have to attack the other bases. From this point onwards, you cannot build human, dwarven or gnomish units, all of which are replaced with elven equivalents... with the exception the Workshop, which cannot be built. This means you cannot build ANY kind of siege unit in this mission (Not even Ballistas, something the High Elves used in Reign of Chaos). You do get a Naga Royal Guard, which while more powerful than your heroes at the time, has Chaos-type damage and has no damage reduction against buildings, as well as Kael's Flame Strike spell to damage buildings, but that's all you have. Oh, and to make you feel angrier at Blizzard... in the Undead campaign, the Blood Elves build Glaive Throwers.
      • The expansion gives us the first undead mission "King Arthas"; especially on Hard mode. Despite having practically unlimited resourcesnote , and three factions to control, the game-play to complete the mission is an absolute freaking nightmare! You have to block off three map exits with each of your three factions in order to not allow a certain number of humans to get by and escape Arthas' slaughter. And while you do that, you gotta destroy 9 outlying villagesnote  that will stop these humans from spawning. To make matters worse, there's a Paladin encampment in the center that not only protects these villages if they are attacked, but acts as a barrier to keep each of your three factions separatednote . To top it off, your forces are vastly limited to 40 between each of your three factions for a total of 40/40/40, and aside from Ghouls, you're restricted to Abominations from Arthas' faction, Necromancers from Kel'thuzard's faction, and Banshees from Sylvannas' faction. Don't be surprised if you find yourself having to resort to cheesing the village structures with Arthas' Animate Dead and Kel'thuzad's Death and Decay.
      • "Dreadlord's Fall" can be somewhat problematic if the player isn't quick enough to take advantage of the sneak attack to deal plenty of damage to Garithos' and Detheroc's bases.note  Leaving too much alive will cause the enemy's starting counterattack once the timer runs out to send everything at the player; which can make for a very difficult 2 on 1 fight. On Hard mode, going on the offensive against two powerful foes becomes even more problematic, because you need practically your entire army to push against one of the enemy factions, but the second enemy faction will then send their attack at your base which is almost impossible to defend against since you'll hardly have anything to defend with other than static defense. It almost makes you want to just let your original base die, and just start over on the ashes of the enemy base that your primary force is attacking.
      • The last mission in the "Sylvanas Windrunner" story arc "A New Power In Lordaeron" can hurt your brain on Hard. What makes it painful is the Undead in the main city at the center is protected by Burning Legion demons as well as Balnazzar himself (A Dreadlord hero on crack). The main army will repeatedly send powerful summons to Garithos's Alliance army to distract you from planning your attack. After demolishing the support camps on the edge of the map, you'll likely attempt to assault the capital with both of your armies, only to see that the Undead army and the Burning Legion support can easily turn your troops to bloody goop. After a few hours of failing, you may then realize that it is best to teleport your Alliance army over to your own Undead one (or vice versa, but don't forget to recruit the dwarves before this) for a steamroller attack, but even this does not make the assault easy.
  • That One Sidequest:
    • As mentioned above in That One Level, the Sidequest for March of The Scourge on Hard mode is almost impossible to complete as you would need to take a small army out with your Paladin hero to take out a Meat Wagon escort, even though those units you sent out would be much more useful had they just stayed at the base for the primary Hold the Line mission.
    • For the bonus Frozen Throne campaign, recruiting Chen Stormstout to the group can be somewhat troublesome if you try to complete his Sidequest as early as possible when your heroes are hardly leveled and decked out on items. To explain, the Sidequest that Chen offers Rexxar requires him to collect three items that need to be returned to Chen. Two of such items are incredibly easy to complete as one is just to pick up a Thunderbloom plant at a nearby camp of incredibly weak Murlocs, while the second is to purchase a barrel of Thunderwater from a Horde vendor. However, the third item of the Sidequest is the difficult part; having to fight through an area of thunder phoenixes in order to loot the Thunder Egg from the biggest one. The reason of the difficulty is that you only have Rexxar and Rokhan to fight these phoenixes, and these phoenixes hit incredibly hard with powerful magic-type attacks that not only have area-of-effect damage, but can also burn over time, which will easily leave your heroes' health down in the red after every engagement. Also, they're flying units, so Rexxar's bear, Misha, ends up being useless for this fight if your group has no means to force the phoenixes to the ground. Also, for a bit of added difficulty, there's a large group of Wildkin at the only chokepoint that leads into the home of the thunder phoenixes.
  • Woobie Family: The Windrunners. Parents and brother were killed by the orcs, oldest sister disappeared while exploring a dying world, middle sister was killed and turned undead by the Scourge, grandfather had to fight nephew-turned-undead, and two brothers ended up essentially killing each other.
  • The Woobie
    • Jaina Proudmoore. Forced to watch the love of her life become a Death Knight for the Scourge, who then goes about destroying their home kingdom of Lordaeron. In addition, after creating Theramore Isle for the Lordaeron refugees that sailed to Kalimdor, she's forced to fight against her father, Daelin Proudmoore, in order to keep the peace with Thrall's Horde in tact.
    • Prince Kael'thas Sunstrider. Was not around to defend the High Elven kingdom of Quel'Thalas from being devoured by Prince Arthas' Scourge, and now leads what's left of his people to try to reestablish their once glorious civilization. All while having to deal with their racist Lordaeron Alliance remnants commander, Grand Marshal Garithos. For added insult, Arthas stole Jaina away from him.
  • Woobie Species:
    • The Human Kingdom of Lordaeron gets hit the worst in the Third War. One moment, it's Kel'Thuzad's plague, the next time, it's an undead slaughter led by their kingdom's traitorous Prince Arthas, another time, the Burning Legion's invasion begins here as it journeys to Kalimdor, and then once the Burning Legion is beaten, Arthas returns to Lordaeron to slaughter some more.
    • The High Elves of Qual'Thalas for almost the exact same reason as their Prince. A race that was devastated by Prince Arthas' Scourge when his undead army marched through the elven kingdom, and slaughtered much of the population. Upon renaming themselves Blood Elves in honor of their fallen comrades, many are forced to relocate to Outland after being threatened with execution by Grand Marshal Garithos.
    • Thrall's Orc Horde. One moment, they're locked up in Lordaeron internment camps. The next moment, they're dealing with Mannoroth's blood corruption.
    • The Kalimdor Tauren started off as this being hunted to extinction by the roaming Centaur. However, they finally begin to build a civilization for themselves after the arrival of Thrall's Horde helps them reach the lands of Mulgore. But even then, they still have to deal with the occasional Centaur raid such as their attempt to take the Tauren Chieftain's son, Baine, captive.
    • The Kalimdor Furbolgs. The bear-men race was hit hard by the arrival of the Burning Legion with many of its people becoming corrupted.
    • The Nerubians of Azjol-Nerub. Lost the War of the Spider against the Lich King, which led to many of it's people, and the Crypt Lord King, Anub'arak, to be reanimated as soldiers for the Scourge. Those that survived continue to fight the Scourge in the hopes of one day liberating Azjol-Nerub from the Lich King's undead.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/Warcraft