Scrappy Mechanic / Pokémon

"You know something is dreadfully wrong with this mechanic when it takes this long JUST TO CATCH ONE OF THEM!"

Don't get us wrong, the Pokémon games are highly addictive and generally fun to play. That being said, many of the game mechanics that make the game very complex also tend to become irritating to many people.

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    Started or Originated in Gen I 
  • Wild Pokémon requiring you to send a Pokémon out every single encounter, in situations where you're just going to run from them anyways. Wild Pokémon encounters are the most basic and trademark part of the game (other than trainer battles), but it can get irritating when you're in an area with pesky high-Speed Pokémon that don't let you run, making you wonder "Why did I have to send out my Pokémon in the first place?!" (Except maybe in HeartGold & SoulSilver, when your lead Pokémon walks by your side.)
  • Caves. Unlike the overworld, you're vulnerable to Pokémon encounters in the entire area, not just tall grass. Most of the time you'll run into Goddamn Bats (especially Zubat). Better have Repel ready!
  • Safari Zones. They force you to catch rare and hard-to-catch Pokémon with just Safari Balls (which have the same catch rate as Great Balls), bait, and rocks (or mud). Shiny Pokémon in Safari Zones deserve special mention. They're already incredibly rare, and now they have a chance of running away... WONDERFUL.
    • Special mention goes out to Heart Gold and Soul Silver's Safari Zone. Unlike the original games, this remakes feature a Safari Zone that is annoying but for entirely different reasons. This Safari Zone is customizable and adding different environments and different features to those environments changes what Pokémon can be caught in those games (this game also boasts the largest variety that can be found in any Safari Zone). These features also "level up" so they may attract other species. Unfortunately, getting Pokémon like Riolu or Gible to appear here requires waiting. Lots of waiting. In order to get Gible to appear in your Safari Zone, you'll need add a certain number of plants and rocks to your rocky beach and wait up to 200 days with that configuration in order for the trees and rocks to level up enough so Gible can just appear.
    • In Black/White and Sun/Moon, they didn't bother with one. (Unless you count the Wildlife Preserve, but it doesn't operate like the other Safari Zones. You can use regular balls.)
    • X/Y replaces the Safari Zone with the Friend Safari. You choose a person from your system's Friends List and gain access to an enclosure with tall grass containing two (or three, if the friend has beaten the Elite Four) Pokémon of a specific type based on their Friend Code, all set at level 30, and you fight them like a normal wild encounter. Not only are many of the Pokémon available this way rare, but all of them are guaranteed to have two perfect IVs (and the other four have the same 1/32 chance as always of rolling perfect randomly), there's a chance that the wild Pokémon will have its Hidden Ability, and there's a higher chance of encountering a shiny Pokémon. The four main flaws are that you can only access it after you beat the Elite 4, and that the Pokémon you have access to depends on who you have registered as your friend and whether or not you've seen them online after they've beaten the Elite 4, as well as the fact that many people have to resort to 'bartering' their Friend Code online to even have a slim hope of getting a good Safari, and then hoping that they and the 'owner' (who is a complete stranger, and most likely a foreigner) are both online at the same time. A textbook example of a 'Scrappy Mechanic'.
    • Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire updated Hoenn's Safari Zone uses standard battle mechanics as opposed to a Safari game. In-universe, this Safari Zone used to be just like the original's but the owner faced a backlash from raising the price of admission when it became popular. It was later converted to a non-profit organization for the benefit of the Pokémon.
  • HMs: They're required to make it through the game, but they each take up a move slot and most of them are practically useless in battle (except Surf, Waterfall, Fly, and to a lesser degree, Strength). Each use comes with a time-wasting animation and the moves themselves cannot be forgotten until you meet the Move Deleter, who always appears fairly late in the game. In fact, in Generation I there wasn't a Move Deleter at all! If you clumsily taught your Charmander Cut, better be prepared to have your Charizard still have it during the Elite Four battles.
    • This used to be justified to some extent, given that since HMs can (in Gen. I) be placed in storage like any other item, a Pokémon could be traded in knowing the move without the player having obtained the HM in the first place, and screen transitions cause trees to regrow after being cut down, boulders to replace themselves after being moved or broken, and so on. They can also create HM Slave(s) to avoid wasting moveslots on their good Pokémon, but that means they don't have 6 good Pokémon with them in caves (where they are often needed most). A player could inadvertently render the game Unwinnable by overwriting a necessary HM move in the wild and leaving himself trapped. Of course, this whole train wreck could have been averted with some Gameplay and Story Segregation.
    • With the introduction of the TM Pocket of the bag, there's no longer any need for an HM to be put in the PC, thus rendering the point of the moves being unforgettable completely moot. Yet they still are impossible to forget without the Move Deleter.
    • Black and White attempted to fix this. There are only 6 HMs, and you only need one to progress through the story (ONCE, at the beginning). The others lead to hidden items. Players are now kept in check through extensive railroading. The Strength boulders also permanently stay down instead of resetting themselves as they did with past generations, so you don't have to worry about using Strength again if you go back through an older area. The problem with the trees still exists, though, but now they at least stay cut down for 24 hours before regrowing.
    • You can't trade a mon that knows an HM to a newer game without going to the Move Deleter. It was a way to keep players from getting stuck, but it's still annoying. No Surfchus in Gen V, because the surfing Pikachu has to forget Surf before you port it.
    • And this whole annoyance could have been avoided with the implementation of The Legend of Zelda-style items that helped you overcome the obstacles. Ironically, the whole HM mess started out of a misguided attempt to ape the mechanics of the Zelda franchise, which was, then as it is now, extremely popular. There is a Dummied Out item in Pokémon Red and Blue that lets you surf, although it could have just been for debugging. Nothing like this has ever showed up in later games despite the massive outcry against HMs. The annoyance could also have been mitigated if the majority of said moves are something other than Normal-types and thus at least could be exploited for type advantages.
    • The Water-type move Waterfall, which was the Goldeen line's Signature Move in Gen I, became a HM in Gen II. In those two generations, it was effectively a Poor Man's Substitute for Surf,note  making it completely redundant as an attack, much like Strength made Cut redundant.note  Gen III made the situation worse when Surf was allowed to hit both opponents. Gen IV and later made Waterfall Not Completely Useless in battle by A: putting it on the Physical side of the Physical/Special Split while keeping Surf on the Special side, and B: having Surf hit not just all (adjacent from Gen V on) opponents, but your (adjacent) ally as well.note 
    • Pokémon Sun and Moon finally get rid of this mechanic entirely, replacing it with the much more convenient "Poké Rides", Pokémon you can instantly call at any time without having them in your party.
  • Many Gyms have gimmicks that are borderline Guide Dang It! in case you want to get straight to the Leader while avoiding the other Trainers. While this is very hard to do, it is feasible (the Saffron Gym is an example) - but only, as mentioned, if you have a guide handy so you'll know where to go (again, the teleporters in the Saffron Gym are an example; another frustrating one is the Opelucid Gym in Black/White where you have to step on switches on the dragons' hands so they'll go up or down and, depending on the hands' position, the statue's head will go up or down, enabling you to go where you want - or not). Even if you don't intend to take on the Leader right away, you may find yourself running in circles so often to the point of being frustrating (once again, the Saffron City Gym is guilty of this; first-timers may also have a hard time with the rollercoasters in the Nimbasa Gym).
  • Pokémon and items which require a rare Pokémon to unlock. You want an Aerodactyl in Gold/Silver/Crystal without calling upon the first generation games? You need to catch a Chansey and trade it to an NPC. The encounter rate for finding Chansey? 1%. And then you have to either breed it or catch another one if you want to add a Blissey to your Pokédex. Generation III made it necessary to catch a Relicanth to get the legendary golems, which - with its 5% encounter rate in a handful of very specific areas - has been known to require 101 consecutive uses of Sweet Scent to actually find. Oh, and if you want a Zorua in Black/White? You have two options: either a) have a fateful encounter Celebi, or b) one of the 3 shiny legendary beasts that were distributed a fairly long time ago. Fortunately, in the sequels, you can get a Zorua from a former Sage that doesn't require any event legendaries.
  • Losing battles that should have been easy wins through no fault of your own thanks to a critical hit is almost a rite of passage for competitive Pokémon battlers. Since switching is extremely commonplace in those matches, Pokémon will frequently switch onto a resisted hit or one that should deal a survivable amount of damage - only to see the dreaded "A critical hit!" message. If that was the only counter to the opponent's mon? Game over. As of Gen VI, critical hits have been changed to deal 1.5x normal damage instead of double, meaning they lean a little less towards random match deciders.
  • Likewise, when one's trying to catch a rare wild Pokémon, then accidentally makes it faint with a critical hit. This especially goes for shiny Pokémon.
  • The Name Rater. Game Freak could've made it as simple as including a name-changing app on whatever personal device you have depending on the region your game takes place in or maybe a function for the PC over at the Pokémon Center. Instead, you have to look for this guy and have him judge whether you can rename your Pokémon or not. He always gives you the option (granted, his occupation would make more sense as a name CHANGER since he never gives you an actual rating for your Pokémon's name) unless the Pokémon was obtained through a trade, migration, or an event. The former two would be somewhat more tolerable if he only reacted this way to the ones that already had names, but this reaction towards event-obtained Pokémon is unacceptable. You aren't even given a side-quest to obtain the Pokémon most of the time like they did with Darkrai, Victini etc.; they just straight-up give it to you. The least they could do is let you name the Pokémon after the delivery guy gives it to you like any other gift Pokémon you get within the game.
    • You cannot change the nicknames of traded Pokémon. While this is a decent feature with Pokémon received from friends, it's awful for in-game trades, such as the Farfetch'd in Red and Blue, the ONLY Farfetch'd in both of those games, nicknamed "Dux". This is especially Face Palm-worthy when the Pokémon in question doesn't even have a nickname to begin with.
    • It's even more frustrating in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. One of the steps that you must take to obtain Regigigas is to nickname your Regice. If, for some reason, your Regice is one that you obtained from a trade, you won't be able to nickname it. No Regigigas for you if you don't want to (or cannot) capture the one in your save file.
    • Now in Black and White, all new Pokémon's names are in lowercase (Raichu) so when you have your old Pokémon (RAICHU) from a previous generation, you can't get its name lowercased. If your Pokémon is one that can still evolve, its name will become lowercase once it evolves. This also affects Pokémon from the German, French and Japanese versions: they will lose their respective version names when evolved. Pokémon Bank thankfully fixes the capitalization for Pokémon without nicknames when transferring them up to X/Y, but unfortunately if your Pokemon has a nickname it's going to be stuck in all caps.
  • Game Corners. Some TMs, held items, and Pokémon are only available through these annoying gambling minigames unless you want to spend an obscene amount of money buying all the coins yourself. Made even worse in certain generations where the slot machines are so rigged they'd actually be highly illegal in a real-life casino. If ever there was a legitimate excuse for Save Scumming or even GameSharking, this is it. Black and White finally ditched the concept altogether. Though it was more due to stricter regulations on game content, some found it welcome.
    • The inability for players to buy Game Corner coins in Pokemon Heart Gold And Soul Silver is this to many. A new minigame called Voltorb Flip allows players to amass coins for free, but rather slowly relative to the number of coins needed to buy anything worthwhile. Factor in the fact that some players don't have the patience to learn how to play Voltorb Flip...
  • The Storage System in Generation I (changed in subsequent gens). When a box was full, you had to go to a PC and change it manually, not so bad, except it won't let you know when the box is full until you are trying to catch that danged Tauros you spent the last 20 min. looking for. Generation II had a partial fix, as Bill would call you up if your current box was full. However, you still had to go to a PC and change it manually. Better hope you're not in an area with a lot of Pokémon you want to catch.note 
  • The trading system, in any country not named "Japan". For many years, the only way to get Pokémon from other versions is to physically find another player and either player needed a link cable to connect the two Game Boys so they could trade. This wasn't a problem for kids at school since the series grew popular with them and someone was bound to have a link cable, but if you lived in a place where not many people had the games, or you didn't have many friends, you were out of luck for 100% Completion. People either opted to own two Game Boys, a link cable, and both versions of the current generation Pokémon games so they can trade with themselves, or went for the cheaper route and got a Gameshark or Action Replay so they can just cheat for the Pokémon they needed and get the event Pokémon that they couldn't get. This trading mechanic is very popular in Japan due to how densely populated most cities and towns are, so it wouldn't be hard for players to meet other players that had the game. Outside of Japan, it is not the same case.
    • It's an even bigger Scrappy Mechanic for users of emulators, which, for rather obvious reasons, can't trade at all. Enjoy having your Haunter stay a Haunter forever!
      • Some emulators however, emulate the trading aspect as well, which means you can still trade with yourself or someone else with the emulator and evolve Pokémon that must be traded to evolve.
    • The advent of Nintendo's handhelds being able to connect to the Internet and the Global Trading System, fortunately, has largely alleviated these problems. Someone who wants to trade now only needs an Internet connection and they can search the entire planet for people offering the Pokemon they want.
  • Mythical Pokémon (that is, gift or event-only Pokémon). Want a Celebi? Too bad, they're nigh-unobtainable without cheating or hearing about a giveaway and being in the right place at exactly the right time. Wi-Fi connection events in Gen IV and Gen V fixed it somewhat, but if for some reason you couldn't connect to the Internet on your DS (and even going to a McDonald's wasn't guaranteed to work, as you still might not be close enough to the router), you're screwed.
    • Made worse by the fact that prior to the DSi and Gen V, most routers and encryption types were not compatible with Nintendo Wi-Fi. So unless you had one of the chosen Wi-Fi routers and your router unsecured or is the easiest encryption to overcome, you still won’t be getting that precious Celebi that you’ve been asking for.
    • The worst thing about this is that the first event-only Pokémon, Mew, was only such because one of the programmers added it in at the last minute and never intended for it to be obtainable, which is why it has no bearing on Pokédex completion. Ever since then, more Pokémon have been gated off in the same manner (with the number per generation going from one to four), though they're all obviously planned out ahead of time for a later release. There is no valid reason (no, not even the Grandfather Clause) for such unobtainable 'mons to exist/remain event-only in later generations, making poor Mew a Franchise Original Sin in this regard. Even worse, the practice of "hide now, release separately later" is frighteningly similar (if not the Ur-Example) to the maligned practice of "on-disk DLC".
    • In Gen VI, the model for a few of these events changed to being serial code-based, but these also draw the ire of fans. In lieu of a wireless distribution that is limited only by time, these things are limited in terms of quantity as well, and information on which locations are doing the distributions is often scarce. Many people who have gone to stores giving out these codes have complained that even though they are supposed to be handed out for free, employees often refuse to surrender the codes unless they purchase something else as well. Even after inputting the code, you need to connect to Wi-Fi in order to activate it, making the process quite redundant in some aspects. At least the codes can be duplicated (legally!) through StreetPass, but that requires finding somebody nearby who was able to get a code in the first place!
    • What is not mentioned about many events is that stores can choose to opt out. A store chain that exists in your town is doing an event Pokémon? Watch - you'll get the one district out of your entire region that opted out. In that case, you'd better have a driver's license and a car.
    • The events can also vary by region. Americans tend to get shortchanged often on these. If you live in Europe, your event gets you a Darkrai, a Mythical, event-only Pokémon with high power and great stats. America? A Dragonite with Multiscale. Something you're likely to breed up with the perfect IVs to boot.
      • Beause of this and the sheer number of Mythicals, depending on where you live you may not be able to get all of them in a given generation. If you went to every giveaway/downloaded every Wi-Fi event in the UK during Generation V, without transferring from Gen IV you'd still be short at least one Mew, Celebi, Jirachi, Manaphy and Shaymin! Gen VI mercifully averted this as every Mythical from before Pokémon X and Y was released over 2016, but since that was done as a Milestone Celebration for the franchise, don't expect a similar event to happen again for a long time.
    • If you're lucky, certain events may be repeated. Some, however, are done only once and then never again. Had you missed the initial Genesect Wi-Fi event when Pokémon Black 2 and White 2 were first released in America/Europe, you weren't getting it ever, since unlike Victini, Keldeo and Meloetta, it never got a rerelease during Generation V.
    • The ways of attaining Mythicals in-game has quickly devolved to the point where they are given gratuitously. In Gens III and IV, you got items that let you go to areas you couldn't otherwise go to, learn interesting things about the Mythical in question, occasionally meet NPCs not seen anywhere else (like Professor Oak in Platinum's Shaymin event), and fight and catch the Mythical as your own. In short, event-exclusives were EVENTS. The last time this happened was with the Liberty Pass in Black/White. Ever since, you're always given the Pokémon itself by an NPC in a Pokémon Center with no fanfare or grandiose whatsoever. You can't even nickname them since they always have an gimmick OT like "WIN2011", so technically they're not even yours.
    • Starting with Gen IV, certain Mythical Pokémon that know moves it can't normally learn (usually a mascot legendary's Secret Art) may be given away. While a fun novelty, this can also turn some of these Pokémon from "above-average" to "absolutely incredible" (a Victini with Bolt Strike and Blue Flare can be devastating). Natually, these events are only ever done once and rarely ever repeated, especially since they're often done to promote a new movie and are thus "irrelevant" once the next one is hyped up. This also has the possible effect of the only event being Japan-exclusive.
    • So long as you have a Wonder Card for the event loaded onto your cartridge, you can get the Pokémon or item (provided you haven't done so already). And of course Wonder Card data gets wiped with the save file, so we hope you weren't ever planning on starting a new game on a cart with cards of long-gone events on it. But don't fret; you can give Wonder Cards to other systems so they can access the event! ...but only some of them. As in, only the Japanese Secret Key Wonder Card in Gen IV can be sent to other players, and nothing else can. You'd think with how much trading is emphasised, that it'd extend to things people otherwise can't get (though at least OR/AS's Eon Ticket can be StreetPassed).
    • Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire gives fans a glimmer of hope: Deoxys appears as the Final Boss of the game, meaning that anyone can now have one regardless of internet connection or time period. Time will tell if other Mythicals will receive this treatment, or if this was just a lucky one-off. Pokémon Sun and Moon took further steps in the right direction with the very first Mythical Pokémon of Generation VII, Magearna; players simply need to scan a non-expiring, non-unique QR code after clearing the main story. Even better, the player actually owns it (that is, they can nickname it and it has their OT... not that disobedience is a concern at that point).
  • The Day Care. It raises your Pokémon for you. It sounds good, except your Pokémon will not evolve if they reach their evolutionary level while in the Day Care. The Pokémon you leave in the Day Care can also learn moves, but if they already have 4 moves, one old move will be deleted. Problem is, you don't get to choose which old move gets deleted or if you even want the new move at all, which makes it a huge pain if you're breeding for egg moves. Thankfully, Generation VI won't apply the changes until the Pokémon is removed from the Day Care, so you don't have to withdraw them all the time to rearrange their movesets. Generation VII further alters the Day Care, now called the Nursery, so that it no longer levels up the Pokémon stored there, making this mechanic not an issue anymore.
  • The Individual Value (IV) system. Natures are similar, but they're much easier to breed (or soft-reset, in the case of pre-existing encounters) for. IVs are hidden numbers in a Pokémon's data; each stat has a number that that goes from 0 to 31, boosting the Pokémon's stat by up to 31 extra points at level 100. It was meant to make each individual Pokémon more distinct, but in the end, there are many problems. While the series values friendship and working hard as key to success, if your favorite Pokémon has bad IVs, the key to success will be to breed a better one, an extremely convoluted process that involves lots of luck and possibly inbreeding. Unlike Effort Values, you can't do a single thing to change IVs without hacking the game. Do you have a Pokémon that needs to use Hidden Power? Your problems are compounded by several orders of magnitude, especially considering all the math that goes into Hidden Power. Most damningly, the system is bad for legendaries. Why? You can't breed for better ones. It's one of the biggest reasons for the massive amounts of hacking and the popularity of online battle simulators. Some even consider the IV system one of the biggest barriers for players trying to get into competitive play — if your team doesn't have perfect stats, you have no choice but to get out of the competitive scene and go hatch a few gazillion more eggs, since only perfection is good enough for competitive play.
    • Generation VI went some ways into making the system easier to deal with. Holding a Destiny Knot when breeding a Pokémon will transfer five IVs to the offspring. Baby Pokémon, Legendaries, and Pokémon from the Friend Safari will have multiple stats with IVs of 31 when caught (two for Friend Safari, three for Pokémon in the No Eggs/Undiscovered group, most notably Legendaries and Babies in X/Y). Even more, Hidden Power was changed so its damage value was no longer determined by IVs (but its type still is), being at a flat 60 damage. Some players wanted the system gone completely, but the changes have pacified them for the time being.
    • Generation VII introduced Hyper Training, which allows you to max out the IVs of a level 100 Pokémon by trading in special items. While it's worthless for breeding and can't change Hidden Power (a double-edged sword, as this makes breeding for Hidden Power easier... as long as you're not a legendary, in which case you're fuuuuucked) due to not directly altering the IVs, and it requires a lot of grinding or good luck to get the special items, it makes Save Scumming for unbreedable Pokémon much easier, especially because there are a lot of them in Sun/Moon. In addition, this game's stat judge can be accessed from any PC once you unlock it, and it even shows a little graph for the Pokémon's IVs. In previous generations, the judge would only remark on an IV of 31 or 0, so your Pokémon could still have abysmal IVs you wouldn't know about unless you calculated them. In addition, it is possible to chain a Pokémon with up to four perfect IVs... by dealing with the S.O.S. system, which is detailed below.
    • The annoyance became such a point of debate that some of the fangames based on the franchise are praised because of their direct approach on IVs, like giving them a dedicated tab on the Status window or downright manipulating them. The creators eventually buckled down and ascended the latter in Generation VII, with the introduction of Hyper Training.
  • Pokémon Stadium was programmed with an anti-cheating mechanic that wouldn't allow you to transfer any data from a Red/Blue/Yellow game save that was tampered with a cheating device like a Game Shark. Which was fine and all... except for the fact that it also refused transfers from saves which had encountered natural glitches, even something as basic as encountering a Missingno. And even worse was that some game paks still wouldn't transfer even if you deleted the save and avoided glitches. If you trade a mon from a Gen II game who knows moves that existed in Gen I, but could not learn naturally in Gen I, the same thing also happens.note  To add insult to injury, Stadium was one of the most infamous cases of The Computer Is a Cheating Bastard in a franchise known for it.
  • Legendary Pokémon (as well as some special overworld Pokémon) can only be fought once; make them faint or run away and they disappear. And they don't come back. Ever. While veterans will know to save beforehand, first-time players who are unaware that these are one-time-only encounters can easily screw themselves out of a Snorlax or Zapdos forever. Thankfully, every game since Platinum makes them respawn every time the Elite Four is beaten until they're caught — though should a player make them disappear before then, they'll lose out on a powerful ally that makes defeating them the first time that much easier.
  • Unlike many other Role Playing Games, Pokémon games only have one save file. While a natural consequence of the original games pushing the Game Boy's limits, it becomes less and less excuseable with the passage of time, and this, alongside the ever-growing number of Pokémon to collect — including all the Pokémon and items that exist only as Temporary Online Content — actively discourages players from starting a new game, lest all their hard work be gone forever with a lot of effort necessary to completely restore it (and if you have Mythicals? Better get out your hacking tools, because you'll never get legit ones again). The advent of Pokémon Bank soothes the pain somewhat (you can simply send all your precious Pokémon there and withdraw them after starting a new save), but event-only items like Mewnium-Z will still be lost.

    Started or Originated in Gen II 
  • Roaming Pokémon. They're legendary, which makes them hard enough to catch on their own. They only show up randomly, and it's often hard to track which route they're on at all, not to mention they often switch randomly. They run at the first opportunity and the standard status effects don't prevent them from fleeing; only trapping them will work, and the trapper must remain in battle. A few running Pokémon even have the move Roar, which instantly forces you out of the battle (and, in FireRed & LeafGreen, at least, prevents you from ever encountering them again). The one upside is that their HP and status don't replenish between encounters. The runners' natures and stats are determined randomly when they start running, not when you catch them so save scumming for one that's actually usable is impossible.
    • Fans have since mocked the concept. Awkward Zombie makes fun of roaming Pokémon unaffected by sleep here and a DA artist mocks three roamers.
    • In the third-generation games, with the exception of Emerald, a glitch forces all roamers to have horrible IVs. Although the HP IV is unaffected, the Attack IV maxes out at just seven and the rest of the IVs are all zero. After spending all that time and effort trying to chase and catch the roamers, it's a major kick in the shorts to find out they're far weaker than they should be.
    • The fourth generation has two roaming Pokémon (well, there's five in Platinum) but it's a little easier to bear thanks to a feature that allows the player to track roamers on the bottom screen of the DS.
    • It's not bad in Pokémon Black and White though. Right before your game's respective roamer is introduced into the game's plot, Professor Juniper gives you Chekhov's Gun in the form of a Master Ball. Wherever the roamer may be (be it Tornadus or Thundurus), the marquees at each rest stop will tell you that a storm is going on in that area which will save you the trouble of blindly searching for it.
    • It's even better in Pokémon Black 2 and White 2, where there are no roamers in the entire game for the first time since the first generation. And for the stationary legends, you get two Master Balls, one of which is given for free. note 
    • The easiest way to deal with this is to simply look up the level of the Roamer you want to catch, put a Pokémon at or just below that level at the front of your party, buy a bunch of Repels, then run or surf from route to route on routes below said Pokemon's level. Eventually the roamer will warp to that route and you will encounter it, then just chuck your Master Ball. Tedious, but much less frustrating than hoping to encounter it the normal way.
    • Pokémon X and Y takes away the aggravation of fighting and capturing them, but still makes you hunt them down first. Instead of having you fight them when you stumble across them, they flee before you get to do anything. After encountering them like this a certain number of times, they'll settle down in a fixed location, where you can challenge them (and soft-reset) like normal.
    • Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire follow in Black 2/White 2's stead by having no roamers at all, with Latias/Latios becoming a Pokémon fought in a regular battle instead of a roamer as in the originals. This also applies to Pokémon who were roamers in past games, such as the legendary beasts, Tornadus/Thunderus and Mesprit.
    • The seventh generation, at least so far, is the first generation since the originals to completely do away with this, thankfully. Ultra Beasts and Necrozma are the closest things, since they're found in random encounters, but the game outright tells you which routes they occupy (except Necrozma, but even he is always found in the same place), they don't flee the battle or roam from route to route, and they don't even have their stats predetermined until they appear, meaning Save Scumming is a valid option once more. Heck, you can knock one out and then run into it again immediately afterward, without even having to re-fight the Elite 4.
  • Evolution by happiness. Unlike Level Grinding, trading, or use of a certain item, there's no quick way to evolve a Pokémon by happiness. You have to keep it in the front of your party, battle with it, pile on the items and/or not let it faint. Depending on the game you might be able to feed it Poffins or Pokéblocks, but it can still eat through your supplies very quickly. If you want to make your Pokémon evolve by happiness by next level, then you have no choice but to stick it in the front of your party and go running around, north, south, east and west, for literally thousands of steps. This method will take at least more than three hours. It's bad enough when it's a Pokémon you want to use, but when you just want to get it on the Pokédex it's downright annoying. Plus, since there's no set level for a happiness evolution, if you aren't careful you can potentially lose out on a good move by evolving too early/late.
    • There are ways to get around it though: Put a Exp. Share on that Pokémon and let the other Pokémon battle for it; equip the Soothe Bell, which doubles the rate of happiness gain; catch the mon by a Luxury Ball, it gains an additional happiness boost on all positive actions as well; or stuff them full of vitamins (Carbos, Proteins, Calcium, etc.) or friendship-raising berries. note 
    • Pokémon Sun and Moon eases this a little bit by allowing players to develop some hot springs in Poké Pelago. Putting Pokémon in there steadily raises their happiness... provided you don't leave them in there for too long (24 hours), in which case their happiness starts dropping.
  • The level curve in Pokémon Gold and Silver and the remakes, Heart Gold and Soul Silver. In other words, there is this long portion of the game where wild Pokémon are at such a low level that they're not even worth using or training. For basically the entire second part of Johto after you beat Morty, the wild Pokémon are usually high 10s or low 20s, and the trainers aren't very strong, either. They're greatly disproportionate to the tougher fights such as Gym Leaders. To put that in perspective, after beating a Level 38 Houndoom in the Radio Tower in HGSS, then you can go to Route 45, which has wild Pokémon in the mid-20s (though admittedly, the Trainers on that route are slightly higher), and the Ice Path right after has slightly lower levels in fact. Then, in Kanto, the wild Pokémon are at roughly the same levels they were in Generation I and their remakes, with a few exceptions. Your best bet is to hope trainers will call you and want to battle you, or in HGSS hope to be on the right day and get certain trainers to rematch you, and even then that will only get you so far. This makes it very unpleasant to train up a new Pokémon, not to mention in Nuzlocke runs, makes it painful to recover after a death. There was also Pokemon Stadium 2's Prime Cup which required the player to have six level 100 pokemon to compete in it. If Gen II was your starting game, then you had an absolutely miserable time raising a team to 100 because of the god awful low level curve in those games that made it tedious to train a team up for competition. And don't even get started with the level gap between Blue (the last Kanto gym leader) and the final boss, Red. Blue's highest level Pokémon's are three level 58's (Gyarados, Exeggutor, and Arcanine). The first Pokémon Red sends out? A level 81 Pikachu (88 in the remakes). If your Pokémon team isn't at least reached level 65, prepare for an absolute Curb-Stomp Battle against Red.
  • The PokéGear and the PokéNav in the Johto games and Emerald. Normally they're phones that allow other trainers you've already battled to call you for rematches or to inform you of Pokémon swarms in certain areas, which is quite nice, except more often than not, they'll call you with some pointless information like how cute their Pokémon are, or they fed their Pokémon some berries and state they ate some themselves and wonder if it's safe for humans, or brag about their Ratattas.
    • This was partially true for HGSS; but they gave you the option to rematch Gym Leaders with decent leveled Pokémon and they removed the limit on who can call you so you have more options available. But it was a PAIN in the Crystal version of the game since your Poké Gear space was limited, because some trainers offered wonderful benefits (there were four trainers who you could talk to that had evolution stones which were painfully rare in Gen II), decent leveled Pokémon for rematches (considering the level curve, this was needed), or insights into rare Pokémon. Decisions weren't easy.
    • Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire'' saved PokéNav in the form of AreaNav where it functions similarly, but the trainers are more prone to be rematched and they can have teams up to somewhere around the 50s in the postgame, making it easier to grind levels from than in the originals, where the level cap is merely 39.
  • Protect and Detect. While in metagame, they can be the line between win and loss, in normal play they're most of the time annoying. It wouldn't be as bad if not the fact some of Pokémon learn them naturally, meaning you're bound to see AI spamming Protect/Detect on average Trainers, which will do nothing on longer run unless it's a battle facility.
  • Baby Pokémon. Much ire could be directed at them, but the main issue with them involves breeding. Baby Pokémon cannot breed at all, not even with a Ditto. This requires evolving them in order to breed them. Some Pokémon can bypass this by not having the proper incense when breeding, but some will hatch as babies anyway , complicating the process. If you want to chain-breed, or breed for good IVs for the ones mentioned above, put on your patience hat. Most baby Pokémon evolve by happiness (see above), and a few evolve by level (Tyrogue at 20, Smoochum/Elekid/Magby at 30). So, you have to grind their levels or happiness just to get to the next step in the breeding process. Also, some Pokémon can only learn egg moves as a baby,note  complicating this further. At least wild baby Pokémon, in X and Y, are guaranteed to have three perfect IVs. (This was dropped starting with Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire.)
  • Pokémon that require trading to evolve are obnoxious enough, but the ones that also require a specific item to be held while trading in order to evolve are even worse. The items they need to hold are either rarely held by wild Pokémon, found only by Pickup users near the level cap, or the item is only available once per game. Fortunately, the one-of-a-kind items are purchasable in battle facilities starting with Generation VI, but some of them are removed from being sold in Generation VII, forcing players to get them the hard way. In some games, the trade-with-item evolutions are rare wild encounters, which can also help somewhat for those who just want them for Pokédex completion.
    • Don't even bother trying to search on the GTS for these Pokémon. Out of a selection there will be one Pokémon at the most with the required item... and the offerer either wants a legendary for it or the evolved Pokémon you're trying to find. Every single time. Try to search for its evolved form and the results are the same but less in number. If you offer something and ask for the unevolved Pokémon, there's no guarantee it'll have the necessary item, even if you specifically request it holds the item. The Porygon line is the worst, as it needs to be traded while holding a specific item twice with different items each time to fully evolve!
  • On a related note: From this generation onwards, evolutionary stones can't be purchased anywhere at all, and finding them (or, in the case of Generation III, items needed to trade for them) require a bit of patience and luck. XY and Sun/Moon featured stone shops, but only for the "common" stones (Leaf, Fire, Water and Thunder); good luck trying to find the rare Dusk, Shiny and Dawn Stones.
  • The move Hidden Power. This is a move that can be any type... but it's all dependent on the Pokémon's IVs, and the math involved is staggering. Normally, one may brush this off as a gimmick move... until learning that for many Pokémon in competetive play/the Battle facilities, it can be the difference between usefulness and uselessness: as an example, you'll never see an Electric-type special attacker that doesn't have an Ice-type Hidden Power.Why?  While it's a pain to breed a Pokémon to have the type you want, the issue is worsened if it's a Legendary or Mythical Pokémon, which can't breed (and god help you if it's also a roamer, whose IVs are set when they start running around the map, making soft resetting for the type you want a Herculean task). This can also mean that your Pokémon better be one that can stand to have some less-than-perfect IVs to get the type you want.
    • Prior to Gen VI, not only did the type of Hidden Power vary, but so too did its damage output (ranging from 30 to 70), meaning even if you got the type you wanted, there was no guarantee it'd be at the best strength. Gen VI made all Hidden Power variants have 60 base power; consistent, but ten points lower from the strongest pre-Gen VI variant. Also, despite the type being introduced that gen, Hidden Power is completely unable to be a Fairy-type move.
    • If Hyper Training would be useful for one thing, it'd be changing your Pokémon's Hidden Power type to a more favorable one. Unfortunately, said type is set in stone no matter what (a double edged sword, since now a Pokémon need not have inferior stats just to counter a type that would otherwise wall it).
    • Legendaries having three guaranteed perfect IVs from Gen VI onwards means they can never have a Fighting-type Hidden Power. While not so much of an issue for most, it is for Necrozma, who learns very little in the way of attacks that counter Dark- and Steel-types which can resist its Psychic moves very well (it can learn Brick Break and X-Scissor, but it has a higher Special Attack stat and can't learn what few special Fighting-type attacks exist), and as such finds itself having a difficult time against them.
  • The inability to receive gift Pokémon from NPCs when your party is full. What makes this aggravating is that some of them can only be found in deep dungeons, occasionally the ones that need HMs to traverse through to reach them. This means that no catching wild Pokémon no matter how rare it is before getting that gift Pokémon. Sun and Moon eventually removed this restriction except for gift Pokémon given through online events, which usually occur in Pokémon Centers anyways.
  • Headbutting trees. In Johto and Kanto there are trees across the two regions that can be headbutted in order to find wild Pokémon inside. Most of the time it yields nothing in return, not helped by that Pokémon only obtained through this method cannot be located by the Pokédex. It gets an even worse successor in the form of Honey trees in the Sinnoh games (detailed in Gen IV below).

    Started or Originated in Gen III 
  • The Pokéblock system in Generation III. It seemed like Contests in that it could be seen as a minor gimmick you can move on from and forget about. However, it's necessary to evolve the already elusive Feebas into Water-type powerhouse Milotic. Cue hours spent tending to Berries, making Pokéblocks and stuffing its ugly face with them until it reaches the right Beauty value. To make matters worse, a Pokémon could only ever eat a certain number of Pokéblocks across its lifetime, and its Nature would alter the potency of the Pokéblock's effects; if your Feebas had the wrong Nature, it couldn't ever become a Milotic. Don't forget that Pokéblocks take the place of bait in Hoenn's Safari Zone (as well as the fact that there's always a chance that a wild Pokémon won't like the Pokéblock thrown at it). Want that rare Phanpy to not run from you? Better make more Pokéblocks! GameFreak thankfully fixed their mistake with Feebas in HeartGold and SoulSilver. Massages from Daisy will raise a Pokémon's Beauty, and nature will not affect it. It is still a Guide Dang It! moment, but hey, at least you don't have to find the right-natured Feebas, then be nearly perfect at blending rare berries, then PRAY that the Pokéblocks/Poffin are high enough quality to bring Feebas to a high enough Beauty. Fixed even further in Generation V. Feebas evolves if traded while holding a Prism Scale. The old method still exists, if anyone transferred a Feebas capable of evolution. Gen VI offered the best of both worlds, removing the limit on the number of Pokéblocks a Pokémon can eat.
  • Speaking of Feebas, just finding one is a Scrappy Mechanic in and of itself! They appear only on Route 119 in six specific squares chosen at random (and Route 119 is particularly large). Worse, even on the right square you only catch a Feebas 50% of the time per fishing attempt, making it even harder to tell which squares are the right one. It's even more annoying in Diamond/Pearl/Platinum. In those games, Feebas only appear in four random squares in the lake in the bottom of Mt. Coronet, and they only have a 35% chance of appearing per fishing attempt. Worst of all, unlike in Generation III, the specific squares that Feebas appear change daily! It's enough to make you want to tear your hair out. It's thankfully far less of an issue in Black/White, as they're fairly easy to find on Route 1 in Unova. In Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, this is also remedied- there are certain squares with a 100% chance of containing Feebas (they change during the day/night, but the squares during each time are always set). If you fish in any other square, there's a 5% chance of finding them.
  • The third generation introduced the split between the Regional Pokédex and National Pokédex. Basically, rather than allowing old and new Pokémon to be found wherever you go, a la Generation II, now you can only catch the newest ones (with a few old standards like the oh-so beloved Zubat) until you unlock the National Dex which will finally allow you to encounter older Pokémon. The catch? The National Dex can't be obtained until you've pretty much finished the main game. True, you can trade regardless of what Pokédex you have, but it does seem like the developers were a little too keen to ensure you used the new Pokémon.
    • Even worse yetnote , at the time of their release, Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire didn't bother beyond slapping the "Not compatible with previous versions" disclaimer on the back of the cover, thus inducing many fans to fear this was a franchise reboot (Pikachu being present in the Hoenn Pokédex didn't help at all), or even a Cosmic Retcon, you name it. Before the first pair of remakes, FireRed and LeafGreen, for Pokemon fans it wasn't simply a Dork Age, but an actual Darkest Hour.
    • In the Sinnoh-based games, you can't even access the National Dex until after you've seen every Pokémon in the Regional Dex. If you're not careful, you might miss some, but it's generally easy to do. The problem is that many don't appear until late in the main game.
    • Pokémon Black and White take this to its logical conclusion: the Regional Dex for Unova doesn't have any of the prior 493 Pokémon. This is a bit of a mixed blessing: no more Goddamned Zubat but no more old favorites like Eevee, Skarmory, Blissey, or Pikachu. That's right, even the Series Mascot is getting the boot until you get the National Dex.
    • The second Unova regional Pokédex seen in Pokémon Black 2 and White 2 has 300 Pokémon, with nearly half of them returning from other regions. This includes Zubat, though. (Thankfully, they're much less common.) However, unlike the previous game where only 1 Pokémon cannot be seen without trading (Rufflet or Vullaby, depending on the version), in the sequel game there are plenty more of which you won't see. Normally this would you mean you can "see" the missing Pokémon via breeding (for some odd reason some of the wild Pokémon are already evolved with no trace of the starting form) or evolving. However, there are Pokémon who you won't be able to see at all. Rufflet or Vullaby is among them. The starting and final forms of the starter Pokémon you didn't pick won't also pop out. Do note that you won't be able to seek Pokémon you haven't seen in your Dex yet, you cannot ask specifically for those on the GTS either, and that you won't be able to visit the Nature Preserve without a complete Unova Dex.
    • The Kalos Dex in X/Y is so large it had to be split into three. Fortunately, the National Dex is unlocked by beating the Elite Four, and you only have to see every Pokémon in the three regional dexes to unlock the Oval Charm. Unfortunately for completionists, Pokémon transferred up from older games only count for a lesser tier of completion; you'll have to breed new ones in X/Y for it to fully count (and you're out of luck with legendaries unless you have Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire, and the less said about Mythical Pokémon, the better).
  • FireRed and LeafGreen's evolutionary system is this to many people - before you obtain the National Dex, if you have a Pokémon that attempts to evolve into a Pokemon introduced after Generation I (e.g. Golbat attempting to evolve into Crobat), it will automatically cancel the evolution. Eevee is also incapable of evolving into Espeon or Umbreon due to the fact that the games have no time system, meaning it can only evolve through RSE or XD. Ironically in the latter, you're given the opportunity to receive an item that allows you to evolve Eevee into its Generation II evolutions - a Sun Shard for Espeon or a Moon Shard for Umbreon. They sure sound like the kind of items you wish were in FRLG, and what makes this worse is that the Nintendo GameCube, and thus XD already have an internal clock system anyway.
    • HeartGold and SoulSilver are guilty of a similar situation, but to a lesser extent. They may have updated the Johto Pokédex to include the evolutions of several Pokémon who evolve while knowing certain moves, but didn't Retcon any areas to allow Magneton, Eevee and Nosepass to evolve into Magnezone, Leafeon/Glaceon or Probopass respectively, despite the range of possible areas (Near the Power Plant's generator, Ilex Forest/Viridian Forest or the Ice Path).
  • Introduced in Gen III, abilities and natures, much like IVs (Individual Values) mentioned above, are in the game to add variety to individual Pokemon, but also like the IV system, they're subject to the RNG (Random Number Generator). A good number of Pokemon only have a single ability, but most species can have up to three. Generally speaking, abilities and their effectiveness vary greatly from Pokemon to Pokemon, but usually only one of them is ideal, and the others are not as useful. Abilities are usually hard-coded and were permanent until Gen VI introduced an item called the Ability Capsule. The Ability Capsule is an item that, when used, can change the ability of a Pokemon into the other ability (if the species has another). However, this doesn't work on hidden abilities (you can't change the ability to a hidden ability, nor can you change it to a normal one). Also the Ability Capsule costs a whopping 200 battle points (100 in Sun/Moon) and is consumed after use. There is no way to change the nature of a given Pokemon, and while 25 natures exist, only a select few of them are actually useful competitively, and even so, a nature that's great for one species would be terrible on another. Abilities and Natures can be influenced by breeding, but getting the correct combination on the right Pokemon is still time consuming and challenging.
    • In later games, getting a good Nature and IV set on certain plot-relevant Legendaries can be time-consuming and difficult, since after catching it, you tend to be thrust into a Boss Battle and/or at least one lengthy cutscene, and you can't check the Nature in battle. Pokémon Black and White is perhaps the worst instance of this, since after catching the version dragon, you go into two boss fights, then the credits roll, then the game saves, meaning that your Reshiram better not have an Adamant Nature, because you're stuck with what you got! Your only other options are to either purposely lose the subsequent boss fight(s) and check it afterwards, or somehow fill up your PC so that you can't catch it, allowing you to fight it traditionally later on. Sun and Moon fixes this by allowing you to check the stats of a captured Pokémon once it's caught.
  • Okay, so The Battle Frontier makes for a pretty good side challenge for the competitive gamer and whatnot, but why is grinding Battle Points necessary to get anything?note  By the time HeartGold and SoulSilver came around, the list of things that could only be bought with BP amounts to TMs, evolution items, training items, held items, and even Move Tutors. It wouldn't be such a bad idea if it didn't take forever to grind that many points. The only way you'll get a sizable amount in a decent time is to actually get the chance to challenge a Frontier Brain, but even provided you make it to them, they could still easily whoop your ass and ruin your streak without so much as a consolation prize. Apparently, Game Freak thinks only gods deserve to teach their bugs how to bite things or something.note 
    • Thank God for the Trainer House in Viridian City in HeartGold and SoulSilver,note  where you can battle Cal and other Trainers whose Pokéwalkers you interacted with and win 1 BP per victory. Made better by the fact that you can have up to 10 people (plus Cal) and just have them put low-level Pokemon in their teams when they interact with you. You can get up to 11 BP per day this way, which really adds up fast.
    • Meet Quick Claw Horn Drill, the champion sent by the Random Number God to smite those who had the unholy thought of setting some sort of world record at the Battle Frontier.Explanation 
    • The difficulty of racking up Battle Points was finally changed in X and Y, where you get Battle Points after every trainer you beat instead of having to fight through a group of trainers just to receive one measly BP. You can also take breaks without having to resume in the middle of a challenge, and can change up team members if somebody's underperforming instead of having to drag them along for the full seven matches or so.
    • While the Move Tutors in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire charge BP for their moves again, they're much cheaper than they were before. In HeartGold and SoulSilver, the "cheapest" moves costed 32 BP while the most expensive ones costed 64. In Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, the cheapest moves cost 4 BP while the most expensive ones only cost 16. Combined with the Battle Maison's more generous BP system, this makes it much easier to teach Pokémon new moves. And then Sun and Moon introduced the brick walls that are the Battle Royal Dome and the Battle Tree...
    • Move Tutors that teach a wide variety of moves in the Battle facilities (beyond secret arts exclusive to certain Pokémon), for some unknown reason, are always absent from the first set of games in a generation note , only to return for the third version/sequels/remakes. This is especally noticeable when going from the end of one generation to the start of the next; OR/AS has a vast array of moves that can give certain Pokémon an advantage, but Sun and Moon lacks these entirely.

    Started or Originated in Gen IV 
  • The Global Trade System (GTS) in the Generation IV games was an excellent concept, especially for people who've missed event-only Pokémon, but its terrible execution prevents it from being useful. Some of its flaws, in no particular order:
    • You can only search for Pokémon you've seen in-game. This makes it nearly useless for completing the National Dex since there are many species which you will never encounter unless you follow obscure steps to make it possible for them to appear, and many others that you simply won't ever see unless you get one somehow. It doesn't help that battling other players and playing the special battle formats don't fill out the "seen" entries.
      • Fixed in Generation V. In Pokémon Black and White, over 100 Pokémon are unobtainable via normal gameplay, but most of them (such as the Eeveelutions, Garchomp and Scyther) are used by NPC trainers during the postgame - if you battle the NPC trainers, you record the unobtainable mons as "seen", allowing you to trade for them over the GTS. This was probably done to make the GTS a bit more of a help in completing the National Dex.
      • Even better in Generation VI, as while you still can't outright search for Pokémon you haven't "seen", there is an option called "What Pokémon?", allowing you to type in the name of any Pokémon to search for it.
    • Search results are heavily limited (a maximum of 7 results per search) and they restrict it even further if you haven't been using the system much. You start with 3 search results and get upgraded to 5 and 7 by having made trades recently. While this was presumably done as a way to encourage people to be active in trades, it comes across as punishing players for not being able to use the system well by making it harder to use. The only way to work around this and find more search results is to restrict your searches - say, look for a level 9 or under male, then a level 9 or under female, then a level 10+ male, then a level 10+ female, etc. (Luckily, this mechanic has been removed in Gen. V, letting you get up to 7 search results every time, regardless of how much you use the system, and in Generation VII, you can see every single Pokémon of that species up on the GTS at a time.) And you will need to refine your search results, because...
    • The system has no way of filtering or enforcing a concept of reasonable trades. It is largely clogged up by trade offers that are absolutely ridiculous (Offering a level 1 Bidoof and asking for a level 100 Deoxys) or even impossible (I'd like a level 20 Dragonite, please).
      • The impossible ones are often done on purpose, with people exploiting a Good Bad Bug that lets you clone. Others store mons on the GTS when their PC boxes are nearly full.
      • The above has gotten even worse in Gen. V, as people seem to actually be looking for hacked Pokémon this time. You can't even search for a Pansear without seeing people asking for Lv. 9 and under Zekrom and the like. And if you deposit a Pokémon yourself, expect hours to go by with no results, due to the limited search results... all clogged by the aforementioned Lv. 9 and under Zekrom requests. The saddest part is that you can't even submit such a Pokémon, as the game detects illegitimate Pokémon and refuses to let you trade them. Why wouldn't Game Freak enforce such detection also for these requests is anyone's guess.
    • GTS trades won't allow you to filter or even see the ability or the nature of a Pokémon on display, leaving the thing for Pokédex purposes only, as bad as it is for that purpose already.
    • GTS Negotiations is a slightly less awful alternative. Instead of leaving a Pokémon and waiting days for a trade, you can hook up instantly with that one guy who decided to fire up the feature at the exact same time as you! And you can propose not one, but a whole three of Pokémon for your partner to pick one while you pick one of his three proposed! You can exchange for Pokémon you have not seen yetnote ! What is best, you can see Abilities and Naturesnote ! Too bad that Game Freak, understandably, was afraid kids would spread swear words through their PEGI+8 game's multiplayer features, reducing your communication possibilities to four bland, ambiguous emoticons (:D, D:, <3 and !) and a single sentence built out of premade lines with a handful of words for you to fill in. At least you can ask for a specific mon or two in that line, but no one seems to read it and/or have what you are asking for. Some players were reduced to attempting to communicate through nicknames of their Pokemon.
      • This would soon fall into the same predicament that the regular GTS fell into (as seen in one of the aforementioned notes): Sooner or later, you will find one of those kids who want that Lv. 9 or under Zekrom. If you try to propose something reasonable, such as starter-for-starter or fossil-for-fossil, they will immediately start spamming the D: option, then Rage Quit after a few seconds. These kids turned GTS Negotiations into a Non-Indicative Name due to their absolute refusal to make any negotiations. There's a reason GTS Negotiations was not retained in Generation VI.
    • Sometimes in Gen. V, you can't even CONNECT to the darned GTS because it's so flooded with people trading blasted Magnemite. (see the Join Avenue area in that gen's section) You'd think that the powers-that-be would update the servers used for the GTS sometime to handle higher loads once they realized what people were doing.
    • Generation VI fixes a lot of the issues with the GTS. You can search for any Pokémon if you know its name, even if you never saw it, you get more than seven results, and you can even filter the results not to show people requesting (most) legendaries or Pokémon you don't have in your PC. While the "impossible trades" thing is still an issue and the results are flooded with requests for legendaries even with the "special Pokémon" filter active (the filter only accounts for Pokémon that are not tournament legal, rather than including all legendaries, so you still get people looking for Entei and Latias), it's a step up. Gen VII takes this even farther by extending the "Special Pokémon" filter to include Legendary and Mythical Pokémon.
    • Also as of Gen VI, you are now allowed to write a small note with a deposited Pokémon. This may sound good on paper, but it makes it remarkably easy for Magnificent Bastard Snake Oil Salesmen to scam people out of their hard-earned legendaries by saying the Pokémon has perfect IVs, its hidden ability, is hacked, etc. when they don't. Given you can't check a Pokémon's stats or ability on the GTS, you will not know.
    • Clumsy censorship in the GTS: The GTS would refuse to allow Pokémon with certain strings of characters in their names (which would often fall victim to the Scunthorpe Problem). It got worse in Gen VI: you can't even name the Pokémon with names with those strings in the first place, even if you never intended to trade them at all! The banned strings include banned words in other languages entirely, even if they're perfectly harmless in your native language, and can be really obvious when you try to name a Pokémon "Violet" or "Spike" — not only perfectly valid names, but there is a prominent character in X and Y named "Viola", which is also banned! The filter frequently fails to catch legitimate swears, particularly ones containing "ass", and the online filter is not immune to being bypassed via hacking. If you transferred a Pokémon from a previous generation with a nickname the system deems inappropriate, it'll simply wipe its name when it comes over. So if you wanted to keep the nickname, and its nickname was not explicit yet blocked by the system, you'd have to figure out what nickname was closest to the original that is not blocked in the present generation and then go back to the previous game and rename it there. Infuriatingly, several of these blacklisted words under certain circumstances such as adding another character to either end, render them able to pass through the filter while other blacklisted words are left without the distinction.
    • As of Gen VI, the GTS refuses to allow Mythical Pokémon like Mew or Genesect to be traded... not that it stops players from being able to search for them in the first place. While certain ribbons are present on a handful to prevent trading the Pokémon over the GTS, even the ones that lack such ribbons (such as a Victini caught on Liberty Island) are locked out by virtue of their species. This is especially infuriating as Mythical Pokémon are exactly the kind of Pokémon that the GTS would be most useful for getting, yet they're the one kind that the GTS will refuse to take! Hackers have also learned how to bypass the block and upload Mythical Pokémon to the GTS, and often you'll find them with banned names such as EBOLA NIGGER just to rub salt in the wound.
  • To prevent a recurrence of the "unable to transfer" debacle in Gen III, from this generation onward, each generation is able to transfer Pokemon from the immediately previous generation to the present one. However, Pal Park and Gen V's Poké Transfer only allowed transfer of 6 Pokemon at a time with the actual transfer being a minigame! These restrictions were fixed with Gen VI's Poké Transporter, which sent all of the Pokemon in the first box of your Gen V game,note  followed by booting up the Transporter to conduct the transfer, but that had its own problems: You had to constantly reboot between the Gen V game to the Transporter to the Gen VI game to access the bank, then repeat per box. If your copy of the Gen VI game is physical,note  then you must continuously switch the game cartridges back and forth. Not only is this a huge annoyance, but the constant and repeated use has actually caused damage to the springs in some 3DSes, resulting in either a cartridge getting stuck or the system being unable to read them.
  • Vespiquen. It evolves from Combee at Level 21, but only if it's female. First, wait no less than six hours due to the Honey Tree mechanic, then you have roughly a 20% chance of finding a Combee AND a 12.5% of it being female. Didn't find a Combee? Too bad, the species is decided when you slather the tree, so you'll have to try again and wait another six hours. Gender can be decided, though. So you can save beforehand and keep restarting until you get a female. Or just get one of either gender and breed with a Ditto until you get a female.
    • Generation VII introduced Salandit and Salazzle, who although being much more common than Combee, are also a Pokemon family where the base form has a 7 to 1 male to female gender ratio and only the females can evolve. Once again, people are frustrated that the males are relatively unviable due to their inability to evolve.
    • The honey tree mechanism itself could also be considered a Scrappy Mechanic. There are 21 trees throughout the game in Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum which one can slather with honey, and between six and 24 hours later could come back to find one of a number of Pokémon there. The species is set once you slather the tree, so there's no real way to manipulate what Pokémon appears (if you decide to not save and turn it off if it's the wrong species, then you've just wasted the last 6 through 24 game hours). It's also incredibly likely that a player will forget to check a tree after slathering it, and after 24 hours the tree resets and to get a Pokémon from it you have to slather it again. Oh, and a number of Pokémon can only be obtained from these trees (without trading). One of them is the infuriating Munchlax, which only appears in four trees out of twenty-one, and the game gives you no indication as to which four trees these are. And to make it worse, it only has a one percent chance of appearing on those four trees. It could potentially take months to find one. There's also a bug that rarely causes two of the Munchlax trees to be the same, leaving the player with only three possibilities.
    • At least you can now find a wild Combee in Gen V. Much easier to get that elusive female. And Munchlax? Wait 'til summer in Unova, get the right Pokemon and trade the NPC for it.
  • Catching Beldum in Diamond/Pearl/Platinum, which has the same catch rate as an average legendary, is around Level 52, shows up only on a certain day (it IS a swarm Pokémon after all) and the only move it knows is Take Down. Metang and Metagross can be found in the wild in Generation V, and while they lack Take Down and can appear on any day, they still have the lowest possible catch rate. Later generations have also done nothing to fix the line's catch rate, leading to fun times for people trying to catch Metang in X and Y's Friend Safari or Beldum at Mount Hokulani in Sun and Moon.
  • Serene Grace Flinch makes many competitive battlers' blood boil. There are three mons (Jirachi, Togekiss, and Shaymin-S) with access to a move that has a 30% chance of causing the opponent to "flinch", a.k.a. miss their action for that turn, and the ability Serene Grace, which doubles the chance of any added effects taking place - to 60% in this case. Togekiss frequently combines this with paralysis, which adds an additional 25% chance of skipping a turn. Jirachi frequently combines this with a Choice Scarf, making outspeeding it nigh-impossible outside of mons with normally overkill Speed such as Speed Forme Deoxys. And Shaymin-S has access to the move Seed Flare, which has a whopping 80% chance with Serene Grace factored in to double the damage of its flinching move. Any of these mons can easily flinch an opponent over and over and over until even should-be counters are dead. When Shaymin-S was nominated for banning by Smogon...well, let's just quote the overseeing moderator on the results:
    "That's right folks, we just made history. Smogon just had its first unanimous vote ever! I would like to take this time to thank Shaymin-S for being so annoying that literally every voter wanted to ban its ass."
  • The lack of Fire-types in Diamond and Pearl (Platinum fixed this). There were only two lines in the basic version: the Chimchar line which was great and the Ponyta line which really wasn't. Now, fire types were not always in every team to begin with and had drawn the short end of the stick quite a few times. However, Diamond and Pearl made it so that Fire was going to be a mainstay in the game; which such instances being Bug-type specialist Aaron, the Bronzor line being painfully common (half of them with Levitate, in which case Fire WAS the only way to hurt them), and Steel-types growing in overall use (Byron's gym is even dedicated to them). It really hurt many players who wanted to use a different starter, or didn't want to use the Ponyta line.
  • In HeartGold and SoulSilver, you can get Rayquaza if you have Kyogre and Groudon in your game. Kyogre is in HeartGold and Groudon in SoulSilver. You have a Gen III game and decide to Pal Park the other one in? Bless you, poor child — you can only get to Rayquaza if both of them come from the Embedded Tower, meaning you'll need to have a friend or both games to get the green dragon!
    • Still, at least it was only just that one trio. Fast-forward to Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, and there are three such trios! note  Thankfully, though, the Pokémon required don't need to come from the same area or even generation.
  • In order to catch Regigigas in Diamond/Pearl/Platinum, Regirock, Regice and Registeel must be transferred from Ruby/Sapphire/Emerald. Meaning that if you didn't have (someone with) those games, Regigigas is forever gated off to you, and even if you do have them, you still might not be able to transfer them if you're not playing on an original model DS/a DS Lite, since from the DSi onwards, the DS family scrapped the ability to play GBA cartridges! What makes this worse is that Platinum DOES allows you to catch the Regi trio natively... but only with an event-only (because of course it was) Regigigas that, statistically speaking, you don't have (and if you do have it, there's not much point in using the Regi trio to wake up the normal one).

    Started or Originated in Gen V 
  • The Pokémon Dream World. It was originally for getting Pokémon with new or different abilities, but everything about it was a pain:
    • It's the only place to grow berries in the 5th Generation games; berries cannot be transferred from a Generation IV game (so no internet connection means no berries), and you started off with only 6 berry plots and a maximum of 15.
    • A mechanic punished you for inactivity on the Dream World. If you go more than 100 days without using the Dream World, all of your berries, save for one of each kind, were taken away and converted into Dream Points.
    • It crashed all the time. That's annoying enough in and of itself, but it also means you might not have been able to water your berries, so you might have lost them through no fault of your own.
    • A lot of the mons simply weren't available on the Dream World, so their new abilities couldn't be obtained legally. Many aren't available as females, so you can't breed their good abilities onto Pokémon with Egg Moves or better IVs/natures.
    • The sheer amount of time to "tuck" a Pokémon in: it could take upwards of five minutes to send one to the Dream World from the cartridge and about that much time to retrieve it from the Dream World, and you had to do this every time you wanted to get a single Pokémon from the Island of Dreams.
      • Game Freak thought they would be smart and make it so that Pokémon with the abilities that prevent sleep (Vital Spirit and Insomnia) couldn't be tucked into the Dream World. In a case of Developers' Foresight backfiring spectacularly, this completely prevented Vigoroth and Delibird without Hustle from ever being able to be used in the Dream World. The latter case is even more infuriating as Delibird's Hidden Ability (the very ones available from the Dream World nonetheless)) is Insomnia.
    • Also, visiting the Island of Dreams threw you in a random location instead of choosing which part of the Island you wanted to visit. Stack that on top of Pokémon ceasing to approach you for the rest of the day after you visited the island enough times, and it could get pretty aggravating, especially if there was a certain Pokémon in a certain location you were after.
      • Sending in certain types would increase the chances of visiting a specific location- Normal-types tended to visit Dream Park, Water-types tended to visit Sparkling Sea, and Dark, Ghost, and Psychic-types tended to visit the Spooky Manor, and so on, but good luck trying to get to Windswept Sky reliably- you were less likely to visit that place because all but one Flying-type is dual-typed.
    • Earning enough Dream Points to unlock berry plots and Island of Dreams locations was also a pain, since the only way to increase them is to water other people's berries (you could only water 30 berries per session), complete minigames, log on to the Global Link once a day, and gain a Dream Pal. Good chances are your only option is to grind up minigames, which tended to be tedious (I'm looking at you, Blow Out the Candles) and only gave 20 Dream Points apiece.
    • Finally, you could only choose one Pokémon to take with you. No matter if you befriended tons of potentially useful mons, even a rare female Fossil Pokémon- nope, it's only one you get to take per visit. And once you've taken that one, there was no more going to the Island of Dreams.
    • There was no way to add any of your real-life friends as dream pals. Instead, you had to rely on an ever-so-slight chance that you'd encounter their dream home when you decided to venture out and visit other people's homes. Otherwise, your "dream pal" list was gonna be full of total strangers that you can't communicate with beyond vague, fill-in-the-blank phrases.
    • Many Hidden Abilities are only available on Pokémon obtained from the Dream World. Need a Corphish with Adaptability, Lileep with Storm Drain, Carvanha with Speed Boost? Hope you got one before it shut down, or you'll have to find somebody else who did.
    • As of December 10, 2013, the Pokémon Dream World for Pokemon Black/2 & White/2 has been shut down, preventing players from using the original Dream World and collecting the Pokémon with available hidden abilities, along with growing and collecting berries and changing C-Gear and Pokédex Skins in their games. This is to replace it with the new one for X & Y, while players were given compensation with Miles and medals based on their prior progress.
  • Black City and White Forest, in the original games. Both are cool places, but to keep them at their best, the player must regularly use Entralink and the C-Gear. Thus, these locations are fairly useless to anyone without a lot of local friends who play a lot of Pokémon. Adding to that, they discourage casual playing. For Black City or White Forest to be anything resembling worthwhile, you have to get there (which requires beating the entire story) in LESS THAN A WEEK. For some players, this seems to be a complete impossibility. It's thus implied that the player must fire the game up and talk to all available residing people almost every day to keep them from leaving. The sequels opted to ditch the Socialization Bonus aspect and have both areas contain a unique Bonus Dungeon instead. Due to the scarcity of regularly rematchable trainers starting from this generation onward after the removal of the VS Seeker, along with the high levels of the Pokémon in these facilities' later zones, this change was extremely welcomed by many a player.
  • The Join Avenue is one of the greatest Game Breakers of the franchise. It's therefore understandably tedious to grind up to Game Breaking levels, but just making some use of it takes a good deal of time. You'll only get a set number of daily visitors based on your Avenue Rank. You'll have to decide between either building few stores to rack up points early (which level up the Avenue and bring in more daily visitors), or building a variety of stores to ensure you will not have any visitors who dislike everything you have (even with their "I want to go there!" speeches). Another source of visitors are other players whose IDs you have registered through the C-Gear's features (unlikely except if you live in Japan) and online battling and trading. To give you an idea of the impact the Join Avenue had on the GTS, Black 2 and White 2 gave birth to the "Magnemite Stock Market". Magnemite are available early on, easy to catch, and are drawn to you thanks to their Magnet Pull ability. They became the premier ID exchanging vessel and the most demanded, the most offered and the most exchanged Pokémon in the GTS, and remained that way for the generation's lifespan.
    • Pokémon Sun and Moon had the brilliant idea to combine their equivalent of Join Avenue with the PSS from Generation VI without any of the features that were liked about them, resulting in the much-reviled Festival Plaza. Unlike Join Avenue, Festival Plaza is accessed through the pause menu, and visitors can be pulled from any players online at the time, but that's where the differences end. The PSS-like features, on the other hand are a very different story. The convenient player lists have been buried in a menu and condensed into two: the default list, which contains everyone online in no particular order, and a VIP list, where you can add players for easy access. The only way to add a person to the VIP list is to find them in the default list, which can't be filtered to find friends that you've already registered to your system, resulting in a clunky mess. Furthermore, with the removal of the PSS, the popular O-Powers were also discarded, earning Festival Plaza even more ire from players.
  • In Pokémon Black 2 and White 2, Pokémon Breeders will always confront you for battle when you pass by their line of sight, even if you've already defeated them and regardless of your level. This is reset whenever you leave the route and come back. You can avoid them by hugging the edge of the path, because unlike most trainer classes Breeders have a limited line of sight, but this is not something you will think about when you're in a hurry to get somewhere, for example, leading to a completely pointless battle.
    • With a little practice, you can easily dodge them by passing by at the moment their backs are turned, or simply taking the long way around. This can still be annoying when your monsters are low on health and "the long way around" happens to be a big patch of grass/sand, though.
  • The VS Seeker and phone numbers' removals mean that outside of rivals, the Elite Four and Champion, the Game Freak employees, Nimbasa's sporting arenas, and in B2W2 Breeders, the Striaton triplets and Black Tower/White Treehollow, NPC trainers cannot be rematched. This is frustrating not only because trainers' Pokémon give more experience than wild ones, but also because the experience scaling system causes problems with grinding as there is no cap as to when the experience reduction for Pokémon of a lower level than your own stops.
    • Generation VI remedied this by ditching the scaling and overhauling the experience system to allow every participant to gain the same experience without it being split, or 50% if the Exp. Share was used, and also through the Battle Chateau's ability to alter the levels of trainers and the Lumiose restaurants in X and Y, along with Secret Base battles being easily accessible via non-expiring QR codes instead of directly linking with other players in the originals, special rematchable trainers with high-leveled Pokémon and the return of the Trainer's Eye rematch system in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, but with higher level caps. In all four games, Lucky Eggs are also much more easily obtainable through wild Chansey in Friend Safaris for the former pair of games, and wild Pelipper found through DexNav, Happiny and Chansey in the latter pair of games.
    • Generation VII however brought the scaling system back, removed trainer rematches again, limited Lucky Eggs to one per file by removing them from the Happiny line's wild held item pool, and made it so that the highest-levelled trainers in the game have Pokémon whose levels don't exceed 70. To many, this is even worse than it was in the mechanic's debut games since the pool for rematchable trainers are even smaller with even lower levels for most of them save for the Elite Four and GAME FREAK Morimoto.
  • The fact that male and genderless Pokemon can't pass on abilities, especially when figuring in Dream World abilities. Want a male-only species like Sawk or Tauros with its DW ability but can't connect to the Dream World for some reason? Sorry, you're out of luck unless you can get someone to trade you one. Ditto with the starters - when released from the DW, they're always male only. At least with females, you can trade or have one bred for you with its DW ability. As of Generation VI, this is no longer an issue for male Pokémon, albeit only while breeding with Ditto.
  • Hidden Hollows/Grottoes in Pokémon Black 2 and White 2. They're great for getting some Dream World ability Pokémon in the game itself, but over half the time, they have items or mulch in them. And the mulch is just Vendor Trash since berries only grow in the Dream World, and unless you're broke, mostly useless. And then they start repeating Pokemon... one or two extra are okay for trading, but then it's like "enough already!"
    • It's worse than that. They are far out in areas and require some distance to reach. And, like mulch, you're more likely to find worthless Repels and regular Potions. As for Pokémon, you have to engage in battle and defeat/flee from them so the grotto can regenerate something else... which has a 5% chance of occurring every 250 or so steps. Yeah, even Pokémon that are common or uncommon in encounter rates may be more likely to be Metal Slime by the Grotto's standards considering the effort and mess one has to go through.
  • The final games of Gen V finally bring a hard mode to Pokémon (referred to in-game as "Challenge Mode"), meaning that more skilled players no longer must rely on Self Imposed Challenges to keep their single-player experience fresh. Unfortunately Challenge Mode is crippled by strange, seemingly arbitrary restrictions. Only Black 2 players can unlock it, while White 2 players instead get a pointless Easy Mode. However, Challenge Mode is only obtained after you have already beat the Pokémon League, mitigating much of the appeal. You can't enable Challenge Mode and then restart the game without losing it. In order to play the entirety of Black / White 2 with Challenge Mode, which is what most players looking for a difficulty boost would obviously want, you must have someone gift it to you. Except it can't be via wireless- only the terrible IR port, used through the top of the cartridge, works. In conclusion, to play Pokémon with the sort of difficulty option 90% of games let you select from the start, you must either A: own two DS's and two Black / White 2 games, one of them being a copy of Black 2 you already beat, or B: have a friend you can meet in person who owns Black 2 and has cleared the Pokémon League. It may not be an insurmountable obstacle if you live in Tokyo, but it's a series of completely unjustifiable restrictions for the majority of older Pokémon fans, who are the sort of people who would want the option in the first place. All these restrictions apply to Easy Mode too (substituting 'White 2' for 'Black 2' where appropriate), which means anyone actually needing that lenience is unable to obtain it.
  • The fact that every time you switch systems, the Dream World and Join Avenue take mostly a whole day (24 hours for the Dream World, and later reduced to 20) to reset, and all your friend codes get wiped out if you try to connect to the GTS on different systems. Some folks still switch between a 3DS and a DSi or classic DS for lack of a 3DS compatible Action Replay or for Pokémon Bank purposes, and it's aggravating.
  • Remember that constant annoying alarming sound whenever your current Pokémon was on very low health? Here it's an entirely different alarm-like soundtrack that will replace the awesome music you really wanted to listen to. This will get on your last nerve in the difficult last battles where instead of the phenomenal battle themes (Like the Elite Four, N, Ghetsis, etc.) you will mostly hear that god-awful music.
  • Outside of Black 2 & White 2's Challenge Mode and Omega Ruby & Alpha Sapphire, all Gym Leaders from Black & White onwards have been limited to three Pokémon.note  This has drawn the ire of quite a lot of people since it helps render them anti-climax bosses. In previous generations, even the fourth or fifth leaders would have at least four Pokémon. They also reduced the number of Pokémon that the Elite Four uses from five to four and because you can now fight them in any order, the levels of their teams are the same. Things got worse in X & Y when the Elite Four became the only one in the series post Generation III who don't update their teams during rematches.
    • This is justified in Black & White due to it's unusually difficult Level Grinding. The experience payout scaling in Black & White and to a lesser extent, Black 2 & White 2, which makes overleveled Pokémon receive less experience points. Once one's Pokémon is overleveled even by one compared to the wild Pokémon, the amount of battles needed to gain a level dramatically increases. This makes winning against Gym Leaders unnecessarily frustrating in Black & White, as they have more instances of addressing Poor, Predictable Rock unlike past games, type advantages aren't as reliable, and the experience payout scaling removes the emergency option to properly level grind. Thankfully, Black 2 & White 2 alleviated this by introducing more encounter opportunities with Audino, and also allowing Dojos in Join Avenue, and X & Y returned to the old experience payout system... until Sun & Moon brought it back (though this seems to be so that the game does not fall into the same problems that X and Y did regarding difficulty).
  • Poor, poor Victini. Not only is it a Mythical Pokémon (see the Gen I folder for why that's already bad), but it has an amazing Secret Art in V-create which, at 180 base power, is the strongest Fire-type move in the series... and it's event exclusive too. Not as in it's exclusive to Victini, but that only certain Victini events come with it (natch, they're all gone by now), and there's no way for any other Victini to learn it naturally. This can be infuriating for fans of the little guy, especially since the 20th Anniversary Victini released for Gen VI games didn't come with V-create.
  • The way experience was generated in this generation was a bit irksome, especially as there was no cap as to when the exprerience reduction would stop, but many worked around it and didn't find it (too) invasive. However, the developers thought this would make experience grinding easy, and as a result, made certain (and tragically, fan-favorite) pokemon have extremely high levels to obtain evolution. Some examples include Pawniard to Bisharp (52), Larvesta to Volcarona (59), Rufflet to Braviary (54) and damning enough Deino-Hydreigon (64!). When Gen VI abandoned this mechanic to revert to traditional experience yields, the evolution levels were left intact and made training and evolving certain Pokémon an absolute chore, especially in combination with the amount of Lucky Eggs that could be obtained combined with the Gen I-esque Exp Share mechanics. Then Pokémon Sun and Moon brought the experience scaling mechanic back, and this time without any rematchable trainers outside of the Battle Buffet and League or reliable places like Black Tower and White Treehollow to grind...
  • For those looking to create "living Pokédexes" with every Pokémon form, Kyurem's formes are this. Both Black Kyurem and White Kyurem are mutually exclusive; once one is made, another Kyurem can't transform until the first one defuses, meaning both forms can't be in the same game at the same time. On Pokémon Bank, Black/White Kyurem can't even be deposited. Since Necrozma's formes work in a similar way, the problem seems likely to reoccur with it in Gen VII.

    Started or Originated in Gen VI 
  • Pokémon-Amie has a minigame where you make facial expressions as an on-screen indicator shows. Simply starting the minigame requires lots of background light, the 3DS facing you in such a way a face indicator shows up, and tilting your head enough that it starts. The biggest problem is that the game barely recognizes the expressions. You'll be grinning like an idiot and tilting your head, yet the game won't recognize you and your Pokémon will be disappointed. If it tries to ask for a smile, you'd be lucky if it even recognizes the "small smile." At least you don't have to use this minigame at all if you want to max your Pokémon's Affection. When Pokémon Sun and Moon retooled Pokémon-Amie into Pokémon Refresh, they wisely dropped this minigame.
  • The Poké Transporter and Pokémon Bank's hack detection is (controversially) wonky. Sometimes it will let blatantly hacked Pokémon like shiny legendaries with perfect stats through, or Pokémon with unreleased Hidden Abilities (like Snivy with Contrary or Totodile with Sheer Force). Other times, it will refuse to let perfectly legal Pokémon through; event legendaries are frequent victims.
  • Horde battles have a rare chance of one or more Pokémon having their Hidden Abilities. Great! Is the Pokémon a species that doesn't appear in the Friend Safari? Is it an ability that requires you to scan each member with Role Play or Skill Swap? Get out the patience hat, because that's what you'll have to do to find one. Pokémon in hordes have their Hidden Ability at about a 5% chance. You'll have to go through a lot of them to find one, and if you do find the right Pokémon, you'll have to withstand all their attacks while trying to scan and trim the horde to the last one.
  • Wonder Trade. It's a blind trade, you offer something for trade and a random partner is found to trade with you. The trouble is, the feature gets flooded with Com Mons. People start using it as soon as they get the game, in hopes of getting good pokes. But all they have at that time are junk Pokemon from early in the game. And some are just lazy, wanting something for nothing. Either way, you'll get a lot of Zigzagoons, Wurmples and starters, and only rarely will you get decent Pokemon.
    • It's also possible that you'll get obviously hacked Pokémon. Like a Shiny Arceus.
  • Despite being the defining gimmick of Gen VI, Mega Evolution suffers quite a bit in X and Y:
    • Some of the Mega Stones are version exclusive in X and Y. Much like version exclusive Legendary Pokémon, there is only one Mega Stone of each kind in the game. Because of how rare they are, you'll have to give up one of your version's Mega Stones in exchange for another, meaning it's impossible to have all the Mega Stones unless you have both versions of the game. Oh, and don't expect the stones' versions to match up with the versions for their corresponding species: while Houndoom and Aggron are exclusive to X, their Mega Stones can only be found in Y, with the reverse being true for Tyranitar and Manectric. Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire fix this by having all the Mega Stones available in each version, but Sun and Moon made it worse by only adding less than half of every Mega Stone available in the games, with most of them costing 64 BP each.
    • Your options for Mega Evolutions pre-Elite Four are very slim; out of twenty-five Mega Stones, only six can be obtained. All the rest can only be found in the post-game, for only one hour each day, and they're almost all in very out-of-the-way places.
  • Speaking of Scatterbug, the Vivillon mechanic: Vivillon contains 18 different patterns in game, but they're region specific. So to get them all you either need to hope you have spare legendaries to give up in the GTS, or get lucky with the Scatterbugs you receive from Wonder Trade. It's not for nothing that it's National Dex number is 666.
  • The Friend Safari. This place replaces the older Safari Zones, but instead of having a set list, it depends on the player having a large number of friends registered on their 3DS system. This is fairly uncommon outside Japan, so people would go onto message boards and barter friend codes (more often than not, the original poster wouldn't reply). If the player managed to get someone's Friend Code, then a Safari would be available; however, the third Pokémon is unavailable unless the 'owner' has entered the Hall of Fame, and Hidden Abilities are locked off unless both the 'owner' and the player are online at the same time. This is extremely difficult to manage when the Safari came from a complete stranger, as you cannot negotiate a certain time or ascertain whether they have become Champion. Furthermore, this is the ONLY place to get some Hidden Abilities, and the third slot often contains the most sought-after Pokémon. Additionally, the player cannot access their own Safari, so even if they have a great Safari, they would have to look for a similar one; not to mention that one cannot change their Safari type or contents whatsoever (it's based upon the 3DS's Friend Code). Truly a Scrappy Mechanic, which Game Freak wisely dropped in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire in favour of a normal area with the 'Safari Zone' name.
  • The only way to farm evolutionary stones in Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire aside from frisking certain wild Pokémon is to play the Secret Super Training minigame and get them as prizes. This wouldn't be so bad if you got one each time, but they're randomly selected among other items such as Soda Pops and Vendor Trash regardless of your performance, so you might either be lucky and get a stone immediately or sit and shoot at balloons for half an hour.
  • Berry trees have to be re-planted in Omega Ruby & Alpha Sapphire if they are picked. Especially when needing to use berries to make Pokeblocks, because if you pick one of every berry of a certain color for that purpose and never re-plant any, you're out of luck! Good thing Feebas can still evolve in the same way as Generation V.
  • It's no surprise by now that the GTS is very flawed, but this one takes Sturgeon's Law to some new extremes. Every Pokémon deposited into the GTS can be obtained in exchange for a Pokémon of the owner's request. While this idea seems decent enough, the owner can request any Pokémon in the National Pokédex of any given range of levels. This often results in droves of Com Mons with impossibly-leveled Pokémon or Olympus Mons on their price tags; searching up any Pokémon on the GTS will bring droves of them that require Mythical Pokémon to trade for. This becomes especially problematic in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, where the player needs Dialga & Palkia to obtain Giratina, Tornadus & Thundurus to obtain Landorus, and Reshiram & Zekrom to obtain Kyurem. Each member of these pairs is exclusive to one version, and GTS offers for them usually require you to give up your own version exclusive (if they aren't already asking for a level 100 Mythical), rendering the whole purpose of them moot. It doesn't help that your only other options for these mons is to either get lucky with Wonder Trade or find someone who has the version exclusive you need.
  • The attractions on the PokéMileage Club allow you to get valuable items that are otherwise hard to get in-game outside of a one-of-a-kind overworld item (such as Protectors and Whipped Dreams). The problem is, the prize you get for completing them is completely random, meaning you can blow your entire budget of Poké Miles and still not get what you're after. You wanna get more? Be prepared to walk one thousand in-game steps just to get one measly Poké Mile. And the attractions that hold the items cost 100 Poké Miles per play (for those who can't do the math, that equates to walking one hundred thousand in-game steps just for one shot at Balloon Popping). You'd have a better chance slogging through the Battle Maison to get the same item directly. How many points you get per balloon is totally random too, and even then they don't influence your chances of getting the prize you want. In other words, the points are pointless.
  • Evolving Sliggoo into Goodra is a level of pain previously known only to the damned. It must level up to at least Level 50 while it's raining. To start off with, it's not exactly an easy conclusion to make, but once you do find out about it, you'll realise just how frustrating it is. Despite learning Rain Dance via level up, leveling up when it's in effect won't evolve Sliggoo; it has to be raining in the overworld itself. Fortunately, every game includes a place where it is always raining (X/Y has Route 14, the very route in which Goomy are found, Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire has Route 120, and Sun/Moon has Route 17 and Po Town), and using a Rare Candy allows the evolution.
  • Some OR/AS players have a tendency to decorate their Secret Base and position their Friends in such a way that obtaining that Base's flag is impossible unless you recruit the Secret Base's owner into your friend list, or even block the entrance off from the rest of the base entirely. Heaven forbid if you Street Pass more than fivenote  Secret Bases with such arrangements. This makes the Flag Collection sidequest (already a very time-consuming chore) pad out much, much longer than it should be.
  • Soft-resetting for ideal Natures and IV spreads on plot-important legendaries has always been time-consuming and difficult thanks to lengthy, unskippable cutscenes following their fights, but Gen VI (in particular OR/AS) is where it really got out of hand thanks to the cutscenes being more dynamic and longer to go through. Where past games typically only had one legendary where SR'ing was especially tedious, it has three - the mascot legendary, Rayquaza, and Deoxys. For the mascot, you have to sit through a four/five minute long cutscene before you can check its stats. For the latter two, you have to first catch Rayquaza, then fight Zinnia, then watch a cutscene, then fight Deoxys, and THEN sit through a whopping ten minute cutscene you cannot skip before you're allowed to check either one's stats. The kicker? You can't save between any of those moments, and for Deoxys, you can't Synchronize it as the game automatically puts Rayquaza at the lead of your party (no, you can't change the order). No wonder everyone just KOs them and beats the Elite Four again to make them respawn sans the lengthy plot guff. Thankfully, Sun and Moon allows players to immediately check a Pokémon's summary after its capture, making it much faster to soft-reset for a Pokémon with an ideal nature.

    Started or Originated in Gen VII 
  • Not only do Sun and Moon have the shallowest range of Pokémon available in-game in terms of the percentage of all Pokémon available at the time of all main-series Pokémon games (discounting Magearna and Marshadow, there are 384 Pokémon available out of 802, less than 48%), not only being a huge contrast to the past three sets of games but managing to surpass even Black and White (games already infamous for their extremely shallow range of Pokémon, especially during the main game where only Pokémon introduced in those games were available) in variety, and that's before the now-defunct Dream World is taken into consideration; but the majority of Pokémon introduced in this generation have godawful speed, which hinders their viability in-game and in competitive play.
    • Many of the Gen VII Pokémon have extremely low appearance rates. A special mention goes to Mareanie and Dhelmise - the former can only be encountered when a Corsola (itself a rare Pokémon found via fishing, though slightly more common in bubbling spots) calls for help, and the latter can only be found in Seafolk Village, being an extremely rare fishing encounter that is slightly more common when the fishing spot in can be found in is bubbling.
    • In addition, the National Dex no longer exists in the games — every Pokémon in-game is identified in the party or PC by their Alola Pokédex number. Gone are the days of easily being able to check which Pokémon you own and/or have seen. In order to check the entries, cry, animations etc. of Pokémon not in the Alola Dex, you'll need to use Pokémon Bank. On the plus side, having only the Alola Dex to complete makes getting the Oval and Shiny Charms much easier.
  • The Rotom Pokédex will not allow you to access the minimap until it is done talking to you, a common occurrence in a cutscene-heavy Pokémon game such as Sun and Moon. The minimap itself is quite small compared to that of Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire's, and the directional marker doesn't work in most areas that aren't a populated area or traditional route, especially in caves.
  • The S.O.S. system. Unlike Horde Battles which were their own kind of battles, any wild Pokémon on Alola, with a few exceptions,note  can summon allies to their aid, and can keep doing so infinitely outside of the 50/50 chance that this ability fails. This will be the bane of your existence for several reasons:
    • If you're trying to catch a single Pokémon, this can lead to battles dragging out far longer than one would like (especially if their attacker has low offense and/or the Pokémon has a low catch rate), due to you having to KO one of them to catch the other (because apparently if so much as one more Pokémon is present, your character suddenly gets the aiming capability of an Imperial Stormtrooper). Should the capture fail, they could then bring in another ally, and the cycle repeats ad nauseum. Fortunately, wild Pokémon are far less likely to summon an ally if they're suffering a status condition, not that the game ever tells you that. More annoying, it's the only way in this game to obtain Pokémon with their Hidden Abilities, and they require almost obscene kills before they (infrequently) show up. And may the Tapus help those who want a specific gender to it, too (e.g. a female Eevee with Anticipation).
    • There are some Pokémon that can only be caught in the wild through this method. One example involves Corsola either calling for help and getting Mareanie or another Corsola. If your luck is bad, you're sitting through a lot of time knocking out Corsolas and can end up running out of healing items and Leppa Berries, making things even worse. On the flip side though, the S.O.S. method is phenomenal for Stat Grinding... but if you're trying to catch a Pokémon whose EV yields aren't good for your current party, you'll be feeding them a lot of EV-reducing berries afterwards. If a wild Pokémon is defeated and the other Pokémon isn't of the same evolutionary family as the one originally encountered, the chain will be broken and it will not call for help. In many cases it's far easier to simply use Poke Pleago's Isle Evelup and wait for a day to max out EVs instead.
    • Calling for help is a free action for wild Pokémon, independent of its actual turn. This means that even if you're not trying to keep a Pokémon alive, they can still drag the battle out for longer than intended because they can call in a new ally as soon as one is defeated, even if they already attacked that turn, and they suffer zero penalty for spamming this tactic (outside of the coin toss that no-one comes) since they're still able to attack you (or, god forbid, spam debuffs to make killing each one more and more difficult and drawn-out). This means virtually any Pokémon can become Goddamned Bats, and Demonic Spiders just got a whole lot more demonic. You'd better have an effective move that hits multiple targets and hope that no-one survives it.
    • It is entirely possible for a wild Pokémon at full health to successfully call for help at the end of the first turn. Unlikely as it is, it doesn't change how incredibly aggravating it can be. This combined with the possibility that it can do so right after beating down your Pokémon to critical health, it makes most wild encounters painful.
    • As they start as regular battles, the levels of Pokémon called by this mechanic are not lowered unlike in Horde Battles, so you are basically handicapped if your lead Pokémon is around the same levels as the Pokémon in the area.
  • The removal of Super Training, Horde Battles and the Macho Brace has not sat well with a lot of fans, as Stat Grinding is now more obtuse and difficult (forcing one to rely on S.O.S. Battles — themselves a contentious mechanic — for the best and most efficient results, or Isle Evelup which, although it allows multiple Pokémon to be trained in a group, is incredibly slow even at its highest level). The EV-boosting items, also capable of passing down IVs, still require Battle Points to obtain. However, both of the battle facilities are extremely relentless in these games, and you'll probably need competitively-bred Pokémon (the very things that will entice many a player to grind BP to purchase the aformentioned items in order to breed and use Pokémon ready for battle facilities) to make much leeway through them, meaning that it might take a long time before a player will have amassed enough BP to afford the items.
  • Evolution Moves are moves that certain Pokémon are now guaranteed to learn on evolution, no matter the level. However, some moves you'd think would be these, aren't, such as Alolan Marowak's Shadow Bone, which only it can learn at Level 27. Cubone evolves into Marowak exactly one level later, so the only way to get it is to use the Move Reminder, who isn't found until the Pokémon Center outside the Pokemon League. Even worse, there was a (now patched) bad glitch where these moves would sometimes overwrite any other moves a Pokémon would happen to know at this level, screwing over certain Pokémon like Kadabra.For clarification... 
  • When collecting Zygarde Cores and Cells, the game neglects to tell you how many are left on a given island, or indeed how many are left overall unless you check the Zygarde Cube manually in the bag. Furthermore, some can only be found at either day or night, and some still can't be found until the post-game. And you'd better keep a checklist of what Cells you have and haven't collected, because the game won't, potentially leading to a scavenger hunt just for the last one.
  • Alola is not kind with location-based evolutions — the zone where Magneton, Nosepass and the regional early Bug-type Charjabug need to level up in to evolve only comes in on the fourth island, near the game's ending. For reference, such zones appeared near the middle in past games. Crabrawler has it very bad, however; it needs to be leveled up in Mt. Lanakila, which is the region's Victory Road, and as an early-game Pokémon, it doesn't have the stats to support itself until then. One wonders why the Ice Stone (otherwise used exclusively on Alolan Vulpix and Sandshrew) couldn't have been the requirement to evolve it instead. The Ice Rock, required for Eevee to evolve into Glaceon, is located within the mountain as well, whereas the Mossy Rock to evolve it into Leafeon is in the Lush Jungle, less than halfway through the game.
  • The new fishing mechanics can be a pain. Now, there is a 1 in 3 chance of getting a Pokémon encounter (the other possibilities are nothing and an item). Due to the limitations of fishing zones and the removal of multiple fishing rods the high encounter rates for Magikarp cannot be lowered outside of bubbling spots. Good luck finding a Pokémon that is not Magikarp. It got so bad that you could offer up a Pokémon caught by fishing for something very nice on the GTS Market.
  • Menu navigation can be somewhat annoying now that players can no longer completely exit menus by pressing X. While irritating to casual players, imagine how bad it must get for hardcore players and breeders. Don't even get started on how annoying it is with the Pokédex.
  • The amount of clothes available in Sun and Moon has not only been reduced from the amount (and variety - long sleeved clothes apart from ripped jeans aren't available either) available in X and Y, but now some types and/or colours are version exclusive as well. To obtain clothes exclusive to the other version, you'll need to find someone wearing them in Festival Plaza and hope to dear god that they'll offer the article of clothing you want, and then purchase it off them. The clothes available in the Gracidea boutique in Hau'oli Mall can reach up to hundreds of thosands of dollars, and in turn thousands of Festival Coins when offered in the Plaza.
  • The Festival Plaza is what happens when you take Black 2 and White 2's Join Avenue, combine it with Gen VI's PSS, remove the best parts of both features, and add a couple more obnoxiously frustrating mechanics to create an incredibly loathed game feature.
    • On the Join Avenue side of things, shops cannot be leveled up anymore, certain shops are now truly version-exclusive note , only a certain amount of guests will want to be recommended somewhere to allow the plaza to level up. To generate more, you'll either have to wait a certain period of time or participate in a mission online to refresh the current range of guests. Even at high plaza ranks, Sophocles will frequently offer low-star facilities. In order to gain shops from guests, you'll need to purchase them with Festival Coins, something that Join Avenue didn't require you to do. Whatever shop is offered is the one in the first slot of the other player's plaza, and the highest-tier shops usually require more than a thousand FCs. If you are offered a shop you already have, the price is doubled.
    • There are not only more varieties of shops in Festival Plaza than there were in Join Avenue, but also less slots. If you get rid of a shop, be prepared to either fork out a lot of coins to get it back or have horrible luck at Sophocles offering it to you when you level up.
    • The colours that dye houses focus on are version-exclusive. You can dye items other colors using berries (pastel at one-star buildings, dark at three-star buildings, and pastel/dark at five-star buildings), but you'll need nearly a hundred berries spread across three kinds to dye a single article, with many options requiring berries not available until Poni Island that also take several days to grow. In addition, the colours of dyes tend to have a slightly different hue from store-bought clothes of the same colour. While purple and green dyed clothes happen to be truer purples and greens than store-bought and blue-tinted purple and green clothes, blue dyed clothes are more teal or turquoise than they are blue in contrast to store-bought blue clothes.
    • The internet-based communication features are now accessed from Festival Plaza. The main appeal of the PSS was being able to access features such as the GTS, Battle Spot or other players, friends or passersby alike, from regular play in the overworld without having to go someplace else to do those things. In addition, the player listings for friends and guests are all cramped up into one small list that is much smaller than any of the PSS's lists, unless any of them have been registered as VIPs. You'll also need to exit Festival Plaza if you want to organise Pokémon in your boxes, requiring that you also disconnect from the internet.
    • When doing certain communicative features in Generation VI, Poké Miles were automatically given to the player. When doing these things in Festival Plaza, you must manually talk to the player you just did something with in the castle to receive some FC, or you will miss out on them the next time the guest in the castle changes when you communicate with someone else.
    • People who whisper "Do you know how I feel?" will ask to be directed to a random shop. Unlike the people in Join Avenue who did this, they have a chance to be disappointed by whatever you recommend to them. In a similar vein, when people ask to be directed to another guest with a high rank in a certain gameplay category, the game will offer you a list of about ten people to choose from instead of all of the current guests in your plaza. It is very likely that the person with the highest rank for the requested category will not be an option. Unlike Black & White's vague request examples, which required a bit of Guide Dang It! levels of research to manipulate, there's no way to predict what those who use this phrase want.
      • Remaining offline for a period of several days causes the majority of the guests' rankings to level out, potentially making it difficult to select a guest with a high rank when requested. If that wasn't bad enough, unlike in Gen V where Join Avenue's popularity rewards were set depending on whether or not the guest was an NPC or another player, the FC payout in Festival Plaza depends on whether or not the guest is a regular guest or VIP (with the registration process for that known to be extremely unreliable, especially if you're online) and that's before the game punishes you for not going online for several days by reducing the FC payout.
    • If your internet connection falters during an online trade, you will be banned from trading online for several days. Similarly, if you lose connection to the internet during a mission, it immediately ends and you will receive no reward for it regardless of your progress.
    • Signing up for a global mission requires you to acquire your game's Game Sync ID. However, as with many features involving the Pokémon Global Link, it is filled with a myriad of bugs. Many people have discovered that they need to completely connect their games to the PGL in order to be eligible for a global mission despite what the games and official sources say. This would be easy if you didn't need to make a Trainer Club or Daisuki Club account before you can make a Global Link account, and easier if the username/password recovery system of the PGL actually worked.
      • On a similar note, Game Freak set the goal of the first global mission as catching 100 million Pokémon within two weeks. Only a small fraction of the Pokémon games bought ever end up being connected to the PGL, mostly due to the tedious registration methods, and by the time the mission started many people had already completed their Pokédexes and thus the main incentive for catching Pokémon was rendered unimportant for them. Needless to say the mission completely bombed, a fate that many of the frustrated players had predicted when they were only 1% of the way to the goal two days into the mission.
  • The Battle Royal and Battle Tree are infamous for being absolutely unforgiving by the standards set by previous battle facilities, even early on in the Royal's Normal Rank and the Tree's regular Single, Double and Multi Battle challenges. You'll definitely need Pokémon with high IVs in order to even consider making progress, because even the basic rank modes have Pokémon usually seen in the Subway and Maison's Super modes.
    • Unlike the Battle Subway in Unova, which more than likely because it was available relatively early in the game akin to the Battle Royal, the Royal will throw fully-evolved Pokémon from other regions at you from the get go, with some even Mega Evolving. In Battle Royals, NPC contenders also frequently tend to gain up on a single opponent as the match ends when one person has all of their Pokémon faint. That single opponent is often the player, especially at higher levels.
    • Early on in streaks of the regular-tier challenges, the game will begin selecting opponents of difficulties usually unseen until the super mode challenges or ones designed to counter your teams, and regardless of whatever challenge type you're already taking the game, in tradition with older battle facilities will eventually start to skew the RNG away from your favour when it comes to things like stat reductions, accuracy or status afflictions, or spew illegal Pokémon. While the Soul Dew has been nerfed and is now allowed for player use in battle facilities, unlike in previous games where the NPC opponents were allowed to despite the player not being allowed to, the game now has opponents with Pokémon with illegal movepools in their teams. The most infamous of this was the Shell Smash Kommo-o (which, as it turns out, was a glitch: the 1.1 patch removed that combination from the Battle Tree).
  • Hyper Training can only be used after the game is beaten, and only on Pokémon at level 100. However, Pokémon in Sun and Moon, due to the return of Gen V's experience scaling system, the removal of Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire's rematchable NPC trainers in places like routes and landmarks, the lack of a facility such as Nimbasa Stadiums, Black Tower, White Treehollow or the Battle Chateau, and the Lucky Egg from Happiny and Chansey's wild held items in tandem with the trainers in the post-game Battle Buffet and the wild Pokémon in Poni Gauntlet's levels not exceeding 60 and the Elite Four and challengers' Pokémon's levels not exceeding 70, grinding is much, much more strenuous than it was in the previous generation.
  • Pokémon Refresh may have removed the minigames that people had mixed opinions on, but by doing so it also made it much harder to reduce hunger and enjoyment to allow those to be refilled to gain more affection. If you don't use a Pokémon in battle, its hunger and enjoyment will slowly fall as you walk around, and adding onto that Poké Beans fill hunger more quickly than Poké Puffs do, meaning less of them can be fed to a Pokémon before it gets full. Thankfully, rainbow beans can alleviate those problems. Although rare, they increase affection by 100 points, enough to trigger the experience boost and one of the requirements for Eevee to evolve into Sylveon.
  • The apricorn balls, once exclusive to the Johto games, are back. However, you can now only get one of each per save file, even less than the already-scarce Master Balls. With their situational catch rates, you'll probably want to save before attempting to use it on a wild Pokémon.
  • In a similar situation to the Safari Zones in previous games, Pokémon encountered at Isle Abeens can be shiny. They're even worse than shinies found at the aformentioned facilities, as there is nothing you can do to influence whether you can keep them or not apart from the initial interaction.
    • On the flipside, there's no way to "shoo" any Com Mons or undesirable wild Pokémon from Isle Abeens (without taking them and releasing them shortly thereafter). If you refuse to take them into your party/box they'll stay there forever until you do, taking up space for any more wild ones to show up.
  • The Battle Royal Dome has the maximum level be 50; any higher, and it's lowered for the match. That's all well and good; what isn't is that Pokémon lower than that stay at the same level, leaving them to get creamed by Pokémon much stronger than them. What's more, you're first able to take these on just after clearing the first Akala Island trial, when your team is likely around the mid-to-late 20s.
    • What makes this even worse is that the game makes you watch a cutscene about how great Battle Royals are and fight a tutorial Battle Royal against Pokémon around your level as part of the story. However, if you then turn around and decide to do a Battle Royal, you'll face the aforementioned lvl 50 'mons, making the Battle Royal essentially a postgame feature that Game Freak decided to hype and tutorialize halfway through the second island. At the very least, the Battle Royal still gives you 1BP when you lose, so slowly grinding battle points by repeatedly losing hopelessly over-your-level battles is a viable (if depressing) way to get some of the BP items they sell at the Battle Royal Dome.
  • While Mega Evolution already got a raw deal by being locked off until the postgame, over half the Mega Stones are outright gone. If they're not in the Alola Dex and aren't a Kanto starter, they likely can't ever Mega Evolve. Even worse? The ones that are available cost 64 BP each. Have fun slogging through the Battle Tree, which is oh-so-happy to use a Mega Latios and other Mega Evolutions when you the player can't!
    • Though not by playing the game, you can get the other Mega Stones... as entry gifts for online competitions, which last for a limited time, after which they won't be available (at least for a month or two before they get released to all players via codes). Not only is Game Freak effectively holding hostage something that ought to have been obtainable in-game from the outset (or at least patched in/released via Mystery Gift from the get-go), but participating in said online contests requires a Global Link account — which itself is not without problems. Oh, and if you're a serious competetive player? Have fun slogging through large swathes of casual players who normally wouldn't touch competitions, but have to since it's the only way they can get Beedrillite. And if you're in the latter group, have fun getting steamrolled by everyone and their grandmother using the Tapus and/or Ultra Beasts.
  • While the ability to transfer Pokémon from the Virtual Console versions of Pokémon Red and Blue is appreciated, it does have flaws:
  • Transferring from Gen VI to VII is, once again, a one-way trip. While this could be excused in earlier generations due to hardware differences and the like, it's harder to excuse here as both Gens are on the same console with the same service (Pokémon Bank) being compatible with each other.
  • With the release of the Pokémon Bank upgrade, you can now transfer all the Pokémon that can be stored in the Bank to Sun and Moon. However, some discoveries were made where certain Pokémon, after being transferred to Sun and Moon cannot be traded online or Wondertraded, only locally (most likely, these are poorly-thought-out attempts at hack detection that will eventually be patched out, rather than deliberate exclusions):
    • Gen III or Gen IV Pokémon that aren't obtainable in Alola cannot be traded online if they're in Apricorn Balls (despite the fact that a number of them can be caught in these balls in HeartGold and SoulSilver). Gen I and II mons are fine. This issue was fixed fairly early on so trading these monsters is possible.
    • Fossil Pokémon that are found in Alola (Cranidos, Sheildon, Tirtouga and Archen) cannot be traded if they've hatched in Sun and Moon and have their Hidden ability. Ones that originated from XY/ORAS and earlier are fine for trading.
    • Pokémon with hidden abilities that are species that are found via Island Scan (such as Chikorita with Leaf Guard) are unable to be traded.
    • Gen II or Gen IV monsters that evolved from a Gen I monster that originated from the Virtual Console Gen 1 game cannot be traded (which would make things super awkward if you evolved a Virtual Console Seadra into a Kingdra via trading as you can't trade it back afterwards).
  • You still can't transfer items. While normally an inconvenience, the aforementioned absence and ransoming of over half the Mega Stones makes this limitation ever more apparant.
  • If the various convoluted ways of evolving Pokémon before weren't enough, Sun and Moon introduce version-exclusive evolutions. Now it's not enough for you to have another game (or know someone with one) to trade to, but it has to be the opposite version of your game as well (and just about everyone will invariably have the same version as you)!
    • While there are only two Pokémon that evolve this way, it stings for Lycanroc, given how the Moon-exclusive Midnight Form is worse than its Midday counterpart in just about every way. But at least you can catch both forms at Vast Poni Canyon based on the time of day. The same can't be said for Cosmoem, which evolves into the mascots, so getting the other evolution is a real pain if you want to keep it and not trade it for someone else's.

    Other Games 
  • Being a side game and all, it's understandable that Pokémon Mystery Dungeon would change the way a few of the moves work. Some changes, however, should not have been made. Spite removing all of a move's PP as opposed to only four and Knock Off potentially rendering a held item permanently unusable, to name a few. Probably the worst of all is Teeter Dance, which confuses all enemy Pokémon in a room here. This wasn't much of an issue in Rescue Team and Explorers since the only Pokemon that could learn the move before Generation V was Spinda, an uncommon species. However, in Gates to Infinity, the much more common Lilligant can learn the move as well. And they will spam it. Repeatedly.
  • The Monster Houses from the Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games. Quite annoying when you spawn in one, or just enter one altogether.
    • Sky Tower in the original games is the worst offender. The selection of Pokémon in it include Aerodactyl with Pressure (lowers your PP quicker) and Agility (raises the speed of EVERY enemy Pokémon by 2), ghosts like Shuppet who can sneak through the walls and attack you while you can't attack them back and who have Curse which takes away a quarter of your health each turn, Shedinja who can only be brought down by certain types of moves (and can also sneak through walls), Koffing who can and will poison you, Lunatone who can send you to sleep rendering you helpless... Get all these lovely creatures in one room, multiply their numbers by 5, give them a fierce desire to murder you and that is what Monster Houses are all about. And what if you enter one so your teammates are unable to help you? They'll either stand idly by and watch you get slaughtered or prance off to find a way around to get to you and get knocked out themselves, which is usually what will happen unless you spawn in one.
    • Perish Song. The hit rate is fairly low, but when you've got a half dozen Politoed spamming it like there's no tomorrow, the law of averages is bound to catch up. Once you've been afflicted, you're boned unless you can reach the stairs in 3 moves or are packing a Heal Seed or two.
    • Explorers of Sky hit a few new lows with these things:
    • One type of trap surrounds you with enemies, and then gives all enemies on the same floor a status condition which drains all your Power Points of the move you used to KO it. The status condition is applied to every enemy that is on the floor at the time it is triggered, never wears off, can't be destroyed by anything, and the dungeons these appear in are ones which prevent you from bringing items in for refills (or allow limited items, which isn't quite as bad but still difficult). To add on to that, if you've already used any move while on the floor, even if you knock out the foe with the Grudge status completely with your normal attack, the last move you used loses all its PP. The only way you'll be safe is if the foe is knocked out by an effect that wouldn't give you any EXP afterwards (recoil, Pass Scarf, etc).
    • Another type of trap randomly chooses one of the possible types of traps, then applies the effects to your whole party whether or not anyone else stepped on it.
    • And the worst of all: The new Brutal Bonus Level keeps all traps invisible, whether you've stepped on them or not, and whether you are using any item that normally makes them visible. Okay, Luck-Based Mission, we get the freaking point already.
  • The Aegis Cave mission in Pokémon Mystery Dungeon certainly counts, mainly because it's the most frustratingly tedious mission in the entire game. And, yes, it is mandatory. Basically, all you do is try to solve three word puzzles by spelling out the words ICE, ROCK, and STEEL. To do this, you have to collect stones with the correct letters on them from the Unown (Trust me, you'll run into plenty of Unown). Unfortunately, the Unown that drops the letter you need must be randomly chosen for the list of available Mons, then it has to randomly spawn, then you have to find it, and then, after all that, it only drops the damn stone 1/4 of the time! Which basically means you'll be going through the same parts of the dungeon over and over and over again until you slowly lose your sanity trying to collect whichever stones you need so you can get out of the blasted cave. Oh, and if you want to go back to recruit the Golems for 100% completion, you have to do it all over again. And it gets worse if you can't recruit a certain Golem the first time, because then you'll have to do it again.
  • In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity, several features from the main-series Gen V games are carried over. One of them is that TMs are infinitely reusable. However, you can't teach a Pokémon a TM unless they're in a dungeon and since they're no longer consumable, they're left in your inventory. This means that you have to take two items (the TM and a Deposit Orb, to send it back to storage) and go into a dungeon, just to teach somebody a new move.
  • The save system in Pokémon Colosseum, that forces you to reach a PC to save your progress, instead of saving anywhere like most of the other games (save the Mystery Dungeon games).note 
  • Pokémon Ranger:
    • The first game allows players to play a Ranger Net mission that rewards them with a Manaphy egg, which can be sent to any Generation IV game after beating the game... but not only do you need two separate Nintendo DS systems to do so, you also only get one egg per cartridge. Not per save file, per cartridge. See, even if you reset the game, the mission remains completed. While obviously done to prevent massive quantities of Manaphy eggs being sent to one game, the PAL version of Pokémon Channel did the same thing with Jirachi and pulled it off without killing the game's resale value (because who plays either game for anything other than that endgame prize?). Thankfully, one can take solace in that external hardware can be used to completely wipe all save data.
      • The two sequels made Ranger Net missions downloadable Wi-Fi events, but it had the same problem as getting Mythical Pokémon in the main games - be there at the right real-world place/have a compatible router at the right real-world time, or kiss that Darkrai/Deoxys/Manaphy egg/Shaymin goodbye forever. Oh, and the once-per-cartridge thing from the first game also returns, and deleting save data externally means deleting the mission itself, too.
      • Some Ranger Net Pokémon have random natures... but some are hardcoded, and can be detrimental. Guardian Signs could let you get a Heatran that knows Eruption; a move Heatran can't normally learn that does more damage the more HP it has (as such, fast Pokémon like Typhlosion benefit a lot from it). Its Nature is set to Quiet, which boosts Special Attack but lowers Speed, meaning that poor Heatran (who's already on the slow side) is going to have a hard time using Eruption without other Pokémon outspeeding it and attacking first.
  • My Pokémon Ranch: This WiiWare program is basically a Pokémon storage system for Generation IV. There's one problem — any Pokémon deposited into the ranch can only be withdrawn to that same file! The program warns you of this repeatedly, showing that this was not an oversight. This means that if you delete your D/P save file after depositing Pokémon, they are trapped in the ranch permanently! This makes it virtually useless for preserving your hard-earned Pokémon when you start your Sinnoh adventure over, something for which previous storage systems were quite useful. Fortunately, Pokémon Bank for Gen VI and (in January 2017) VII has no such restriction, allowing withdrawal of any stored Pokémon to any compatible game.

     Pokémon GO 
  • At least until the first update, the game not remembering login details when starting the app. Becomes doubly so when you try to log on multiple times only to get the dreaded Server Issues screen.
  • The entire lack of interaction with other players; such as not being able to battle other players' Pokémon locally without the use of a Gym, or not being able to trade (although the developers have said these features may be added in the future if there is enough demand for it).
  • Wild Pokémon don't have their exact distance or direction disclosed. In the first iteration of the tracking system, you're shown zero to three footprints, which respectively indicate a distance of under one meter, 20 meters, 100 meters, and one kilometer. To further compound issues, while you are shown where wild Pokémon might be, some of the indications may be false alarms, so you're randomly wandering for five minutes at a time just to get a read. When a glitch broke this system, it was replaced with a new one. Now, the game either indicates the nearest Pokéstop or shows a tall grass graphic behind the Pokémon to indicate they're close, which isn't useful if the Pokéstops are spread out. This is on top of having third-party tracking websites — which actually provided a helpful map — taken down.
  • The sheer power drain the game causes due to the fact it utilizes the phone's wifi/data connection, GPS, graphics processor, and optionally the camera at the same time. There is a Power Saver mode, but even with that enabled you're not likely to keep the game running for more than a few hours without stopping to recharge. This isn't helped by the fact that the game needs to be in the foreground to detect Pokémon, use Pokéstops, and count walking distance for eggs. Players are often advised to invest in portable chargers. Additionally, the game may not remember if "Battery Saver" mode is enabled when the game is turned off, and the mode has also been known to cause the game to become unresponsive to inputs, forcing a restart.
  • As noted above, eggs require the app to be running for your walking distance to count, which can take a serious toll on your battery life; you can't just put the phone in sleep mode and walk around. The Plus accessory will alleviate this by tracking steps when the app is closed, but it's still a $35 investment to make, and there's no smartwatch app to use in Plus's place. Furthermore, the game's accuracy in this regard is spotty at best. You can walk large distances and only see half or less of what you should have earned, or you can leave the phone completely stationary only to find the app has accumulated the necessary distance and hatched the egg. While the latter may be a Good Bad Bug, you have no control over it happening and it may mess with efforts to time hatching to the use of a Lucky Egg for more experience.
  • The player has no control over what attacks their Pokémon have, even when evolving them into their next stage. Attacks are chosen randomly and can change drastically upon evolution. This means you have to trust in the Random Number God when you spend your 50 to 100 candies to evolve your Pokémon, and hope you don't get a pair of useless attacks. This also applies to the XL/XS tags for height and weight, which can easily be removed or switch to the opposite tag upon evolving.
  • Once you pick between Team Instinct, Team Valor, or Team Mystic you never have the option to change again. This is a rather minor gripe, but as the game just suddenly forces you to pick a team at Level 5, some players may regret their decision if all their friends go with another choice or if that particular team has a very minimal influence in the area you live in.
    • Or TOO MUCH influence. all gyms in an area can be dominate by a strong group of players, leaving not only the rival teams' players out of pokecoins sources, but weaker players of the same team, too.
  • People who live in large cities have a major advantage over suburbs or rural areas, in that cities contain lots of landmarks and, therefore, lots of Pokéstops and gyms. In rural areas, it can be miles between individual spots/gyms, whereas in cities there will be several in short walking distance. Further, the frequency of Pokémon spawning seems to be dependent on how many smartphones are in the area. Densely populated areas report finding Pokémon with great regularity, while those out in the country can find nothing even after hours of searching. Finally, while urban areas allow you to get near wild Pokémon through the use of streets or parking lots, in rural areas they can be dropped in the middle of someone else's property with no (legal) way to reach them.
  • Every time you try to login while there are server issues, you're treated to the same Maintenance screen but can't go back out while the app is open. Therefore, you have to manually close the app and keep trying again. And you will need to keep trying over and over and over. Mercifully, time has pretty much eliminated this one.
  • Pokémon are prone to animations that prevent the ball from capturing them. Even when the ball is in the air and you can't stop it, the animation will prevent a capture. There usually isn't a set pattern either. The August 2016 update partially remedied this by allowing a Pokémon to be captured if their attack animation began after a Pokéball has been thrown, though your Pokéball still needs to make contact and some Pokémon have animations which involve them dodging out of the way. It also does nothing if the animation just happens to be moments before your throw, a distressingly common occurrence.
  • Pokémon that fly around (i.e. Beedrill, Butterfree, Pidgeot, Venomoth) are much harder to capture than most other Pokémon because it's harder to aim your phone at them in AR mode, and the hitboxes on them are much more finicky. You can throw up to fifty Pokéballs at them and not have a single one hit. It certainly doesn't help that they start off further away than other Pokémon, so you have to throw the ball pretty hard just to get it all the way too them.
  • Depending on how you aim, you may accidentally toss a curveball when intending to throw a straight Pokéball, distorting the ball's movement off to the side.
  • With the removal of battling wild Pokémon and the ability of any wild Pokémon to flee, catching Pokémon above 150 CP can be extremely annoying, especially if you don't have Great/Ultra Balls to make the job easier. Razz Berries reduce the risk of this, but it isn't a guarantee.
  • There are four "Continental Exclusive" Pokémon that will only appear in the wild in specific continentsnote . This means that any player not in those regions must rely on the Pokémon hatching from an egg. That's a 1 in 42 chance for a Tauros, Farfetch'd, or Kangaskhan from a 5.0 km egg, and a 1 in 17 chance for a Mr. Mime from a 10.0 km egg. Not even the infamous player who grinded through the game to complete his Pokédex has been able to get the three Pokémon outside of North America, even though he apparently hatches eggs on a regular basis.
  • The lack of any sort of natural healing, either over time or based on distance traveled. This means the only way Pokémon can ever be healed is by use the potions, which are finite, don't usually drop in excess from Pokéstops, and can't even be purchased from the shop. Rumor has it some sort of Pokémon Center mechanic may be introduced in a future update just to rectify this complaint.
  • Dodging is downright frustrating at times, due to lag issues which can make it difficult to impossible to know when an enemy is about to use a Special Attack (when an opponent uses their special attack it gives a prompt and a telltale animation, but sometimes with lag the prompt and/or the animation won't generate). Even if a player knows when to dodge, sometimes the game won't respond to the input, or even if it looks like the player did dodge they still take damage. As a result, many players don't even bother with dodging, preferring to just brute force attacks and try taking down the enemy before they get knocked out.
  • The rarity of the Starter Pokemon. You can start with one of four (Bulbasaur, Charmander, Squirtle or—if you play your cards rightPikachu), but once you pick your starter, you can't go back and catch any of the others. Instead, you have to wait until you encounter them in the wild like every other Pokemon. The problem is, all four of the starters are not only incredibly rare, but they're also shockingly difficult to capture (even at the first stage of their evolutions, they're really tough to catch) and have a high flee rate. While the rarity of the three main starters does accurately reflect the core game series, their rarity makes it very difficult to evolve them, and it's certainly not helped by the fact that they require 50 to 100 candies to evolve, due to being three tier evolutions.


http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/ScrappyMechanic/Pokemon