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Padded Sumo Gameplay
Good luck hurting anyone in this Fighting Game. Your main opponent is the controls.

This is mostly an RPG trope, but can be applied to any game with combat elements and some type of Life Meter.

This trope is about Video Games where it's nearly impossible to inflict lasting damage, resulting in combat practically just being mutual Cherry Tapping minus the humiliation. Actual skill is most likely still involved, but it will be more about intelligence (Min-Maxing, planning ahead) than agility (Dodging, improvising). This trope can happen due to various reasons; Higher defensive stats than offensive ones, an abundance of cheap healing supplies, useful healing/protection moves, et cetera. Please note that this has to apply to both Player Characters and enemies, or it's just a case of Nigh-Invulnerability or Marathon Boss.

This trope doesn't have to be a bad thing. Lengthy battles tend to feel more epic than short ones, and some gamers enjoy calculating the best possible tactics and perfecting them.

Compare Stone Wall, Slap-on-the-Wrist Nuke, Cherry Tapping, Marathon Boss, Damage-Sponge Boss, Nigh-Invulnerability and the mutual invulnerability Mutual Disadvantage. Contrast the inversion Rocket Tag Gameplay

Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Adventure 
  • Exaggerated and parodied in the "Monkey Combat" fight in Escape from Monkey Island. Both fighters regenerate health too fast to kill each other through standard means, so you need to find an alternate way of winning. (It is an adventure game, after all.)

    Fighting Games 
  • In Facebreaker, stamina recovers incredibly fast, to the point where unless one side connects with a Facebreaker, the fight's almost always going to sudden death. A normal KO is next to impossible unless you absolutely walk all over your opponent.
  • Sumotori Dreams, as the page image illustrates. It's impossible to harm the opponent in any other way but pushing him off the platform. Considering the way the game's Ragdoll Physics are rigged, much of the challenge is not falling off yourself while you're trying to do this.

    First-Person Shooter 
  • Halo, by the standards of many FPS games, with the exception of SWAT and various action sack modes. You can move equally quickly in any direction and are capable of dodging fire by strafing, crouching or jumping while still being able to fire your own weapon (sprinting wasn't introduced until Reach). It takes several hits or prolonged fire from most infantry weapons to kill an opponent. And any opponent who isn't finished off can escape and take cover and their hitpoints will quickly be restored to maximum thanks to regenerating energy shields.

    MMORPG 
  • MapleStory can have this, if you're trying to solo bosses at your level. It's usually expected that you would bring a party of solo about 20-30 levels above the recommended. If not, some bosses take minimal damage, and heal periodically, making battles drag on and on (if they're doable at all).
    • The Boss tends to be the padded sumo wrestler. Player Characters usually require lots and lots of endgame potions and fast reflexes and/or a macro that somehow managed to escape the hack detection.
  • World of Warcraft has this in spades in one-on-one PvP. Every healer class in adequate PvP gear is capable of outhealing any damage dealt by a damage-dealing class in a matter of several seconds while their offensive abilities are rather unimpressive. Tanks have multiple abilities to absorb and negate damage, while damage-dealing classes have higher than average amount of escape abilities. Nearly all tanks and damage-dealers may regenerate their health to some extent, and may often stall matches by being efficient at running away or incapacitating the enemy while their health goes up. While one-on-one duels are not something the game is balanced around, duels occur often between sole survivors at the end of the arena match, making the winner typically the one who made the least mistakes.
    • It should be noted that this is only true with experienced players. A character may still die rather quick to incoming fire if the player doesn't do anything to mitigate it. Skilled gamers have enough tools to survive quite awhile, novice gamers will wonder why they spend most of their time in battlegrounds waiting to respawn.
    • Since World of Warcraft is a continually evolving game how much this applies depends on the current expansions. For instance Wrath of the Lich King was well known for the Rocket Tag gameplay.
    • This type of gameplay is also common in the numerous MMORPGs with combat systems based on World of Warcraft.

    RPG 
  • A good example of this is Baldur's Gate, where (especially early on) it's common for opponents to stand around missing each other for round after round, the victor ultimately defeating their opponent after landing two or three hits.
  • The first two Fallout games had a similar issue in the very late game, where opponents with power armor are almost incapable of doing even a single point of damage except in critical blows, so combat basically boils down to watching “0 Points Of Damage” bullets bounce off each other until “Critical Hit for 999 HP” obliterates somebody. It's likely for this reason that when New Vegas re-introduced damage threshold it also kept armor from reducing more than 4/5 of the damage an attack can do.
    • Fallout 3 plays this trope straight, especially in the DLCs. It is possible to use stealth or cover, but the game's economy makes stimpak spamming a much easier tactic.
      • To elaborate, many of the added enemies have pointlessly high amounts of HP and qualify as Demonic Spiders for most of the game. By the time you hit level 30 (the cap), they will not individually be threats to you...just will take forever to kill, even with your Infinity+1 Sword.
    • The key in the first two games is not to use burst weaponry but to instead switch over to single-shot, high-powered energy weapons (and to a lesser degree rocket launchers), which would actually deal real damage through armor.
    • Conversely, on New Vegas's higher difficulties, fights with more powerful enemies become Rocket Tag Gameplay: some of the strongest weapons do over 100 damage a shot before subtracting DT (more with a Critical Hit, which you can make amazing common) then have their final damage multiplied several times from perks, sneak attacks, and headshots, while the strongest Bonus Boss only has 2000 health and 20 DT. You yourself can only have DT in the 40s and a couple hundred hits points, so most really strong enemies can kill you in one or two hits unless you pile up damage resistance from taking multiple chems simultaneously.
  • The Legend of Dragoon has this toward the end. The final boss fight can take HOURS, even if you're well prepared.
  • In Skies of Arcadia, due to the increasing health and and defense of certain types of enemies, it can actually be faster to have your entire party charge up the spirit gauge in order to use the full party's ultimate attack, Prophecy (which drops a freaking moon on their heads) anytime you come across one such foe.
  • Pretty easy to do in Pokémon with two stall-heavy Mons, or if the battle has been going on for a while and Mons only have Struggle as their move left. Reaches ridiculous levels in Wobbuffet vs. Wobbuffet battles, where due to a lack of actual attacks beyond counterattacks means that they can only hit with Struggle, and their high HP (and very, very low attack power) means that winning with that will take a long, long time. And heaven help you if you both have Leftovers attached, which will easily heal more HP than Struggle will hurt you for...
    • The Struggle attack now deals 25% damage to its user (when it does connect). Thus, in a Wobbuffet vs. Wobbuffet battle, the winner is the last one to strike.
      • The same generation also allowed mons with Shadow Tag to switch out against other mons with Shadow Tag, and switching into Wobbuffet is generally safe (Wobbuffet cannot damage you unless you hit it first), so a Wobbuffet vs. Wobbuffet matchup will quickly end with one or both Wobbuffets being withdrawn in favor of mons with much greater offenses.
  • Final Fantasy XIII has a variation in which normal attacks are the equivalent to chucking a grain of sand at a pyramid, even against normal encounter enemies. The only way to deal strong damage and turn the tide of battle was to just pound away with basic physical and magical attacks to stagger the enemy, which would quickly raise the damage multiplier, allowing for real damage potential. But it still doesn't stop bonus bosses from taking a solid hour to beat.
  • The first of the Four Generals chapters in Sailor Moon: Another Story is a painful example, where you play as a solo Sailormercury, a healer with only one incredibly weak attack, and fight a boss as weak as you are with gobs of HP. Unless you've searched the level carefully for some hidden equipment the fight is close to unwinnable, and even if you have it's still interminable.
  • Epic Battle Fantasy 3 had this problem in the late-game. Your characters had enough defensive and healing abilities that getting wiped out was unlikely. But the bosses had so much HP...
  • The FIRST boss of Bravely Default could be this, especially in Hard Mode. You have only two party members and only the freelancer job, and unless you grinded probably only have the Freelancer's healing ability on one of them. The boss is a Dual Boss, and one of them is explicitly a healer. The fight can easily go back and forth as you attack and heal, though it does a good job of teaching you the importance of the Brave and Default system: Knowing to lessen the amount of healing you need to do by Defaulting and maximizing damage by Braving. If you try to Shoot The Medic you need to have perfect timing of when to Brave otherwise it just goes back and forth with healing (The player's healing ability is no cost, and bosses have infinite MP). Trying to kill the muscle first can actually be easier because he has the tendency to blow himself up when his HP is low, but that does absolutely nothing about the healer's ability to heal themselves.

    Simulation 
  • Various MechWarrior games have had bits of this, but it's particularly noticeable in almost all games with light battlemech combat - while they aren't particularly well armored, they generally lack the firepower to kill each other quickly, leading to the light two mechs spinning around each other at 100+ kph firing their lasers repeatedly. Mechwarrior 4 had this in spades, as most mechs carried copious amounts of armor, so much so that only some of the silly min-maxed custom loadouts could kill another mech (in the same class) in less than 30 seconds.

    Strategy 
  • This can occur in Archon when a light-side Phoenix goes up against a dark-side Shapeshifter. The Phoenix has high HP and a fire attack that makes it invincible when it's in attack mode, so if both Phoenixes attack each other at about the same time, each phoenix will suffer Scratch Damage. A Phoenix/Shapeshifter duel always leads to a war of attrition, where the winner is the one with the most patience and the fastest trigger finger.
  • FTL: Faster Than Light: dump all your money into upgrading your shields, but forget to upgrade weapons? You won't be able to get through an opponents shields and they won't be able to get through yours. Missile weapons help avoid these situations, as they pass right through shields, but you have a finite number, they can occasionally miss, and there are drones that can shoot them down.
  • In Sins of a Solar Empire, by default, most units are capable of absorbing silly amounts of firepower, such as a colony ship brazenly flying through an enemy fleet and surviving. The "Shield Mitigation" mechanic is the main cause of this, and is present on on all ships which possess shield systems, even when the shields are down (it acts as a Reinforce Field on the ship's armor instead). Shield Mitigation causes ships to flat-out ignore 15% of incoming damage when full, and become more effective as damage is taken - going up to 60% damage negation on lowly frigates, and 65-75% on capital ships and titans, depending on their level. Disabling mitigation in the pre-match setup significantly increases the speed of combat.

    Tabletop Game 
  • Dungeons & Dragons 4th edition combat is often called "Padded Sumo" by its detractors, as health outstrips damage, many powers focus on moving enemies around, and your more exotic powers are most effective if used at the start of a fight (reducing the rest of the fight to basic attacks). Of course, defenders of 4th edition like to point out that combat in previous editions tended to focus on spellcasters spamming instant death spells on each other, seeing who would fail their saving throw first while the party's non-spellcasters enjoyed a refreshing beverage in the other room.
    • The actual reason for this was fairly simple: characters have an encounter power, two at-will powers, and a daily power to start out with, and by paragon tier have 4 encounter powers, 3 dailies, and at least 3 utility powers, in addition to their two at-will powers. As such, to use every power at least once in a combat, low level combat would need to take at least three rounds, whereas at paragon tier, you needed 6 turns to use all your encounter powers and each at-will power once, and possibly throw in a daily power as well. Having more powers than you could conceivably use in combat was pointless.
      Ironically, despite the rocket tag nature of 3rd edition combat, combat didn't take any longer in real time in 4th edition than it did in 3rd edition - in 3rd edition, the number of rounds tended to be less, but because of the way that spells worked, a great deal of time would be spent trying to figure out which of the thirty spells you had solved the problem, and looking up exactly what spells that both monsters and PCs possessed did.
  • One criticism of Spirit Of The Century that led to later iterations of the Fate system being toned way down in that regard was that it lends itself easily to this. In conflicts, important characters (player and non-player both) will generally take multiple "stress" hits (strictly temporary damage on a track with 5+ boxes that are only filled in one hit at a time) before the risk of more serious consequences or being actually taken out even comes up. Since it's a pulp game, weapons and such don't actually provide damage bonuses — a fist, a knife, and a gun are all equally effective at taking somebody down. And anyone who sees the conflict turn against them always has the option to just throw in the towel and offer a concession, so unless both sides make a habit out of playing for keeps and refusing those, a character who's been in a serious fight minutes ago can potentially be already no worse off for the wear once he or she has had time to catch his or her breath.
  • In BattleTech, fights between two mechs can take a dozen turns to end, especially when the two mechs are both of the Assault class from the 3025 era. The tiny weapon max range, huge amounts of armor, weak armaments, and relatively slow mechs of that era can make fights very long, though through armor criticals, ammunition explosions, fusion reactor critical hits, and cockpit damage can bring a mech to its knees with one lucky shot. Later eras, like the 3060 Fedcom Civil War, play this trope less straight as most mechs now carry even more firepower, but often at the cost of a more easily damaged fusion reactor.
  • In the first edition of Shadowrun, body armor provided automatic successes to reduce incoming damage. It was fully possible, even common place, for someone to survive a hit from an assault cannon without taking any damage.
  • Exalted suffers from this in spades. It's trivially easy to throw around one-hit kill attacks, sure, resulting in Rocket Tag Gameplay if nothing is used to stop them... but it's also trivially easy to defend against any attack with a fixed-cost perfect defense. Once everyone is using an impossible-to-bypass suite of perfect defenses, the game changes from Rocket Tag to Padded Sumo Gameplay, with no attack ever doing more than making the opponent pay a tiny amount of essence, the game's equivalent to Magic Points. As a result, your essence pool is your real life meter, and victory is usually about making the enemy spend essence faster than you.
    • However, the latest errata is intent on fixing this problem, reducing the lethality of combat in general and increasing the costs of Perfect Defenses so that the above-mentioned "paranoia combos" weigh on your Magic Points much more heavily.

    Non-Video Game Examples 
  • On Death Battle, the Terminator vs. Robocop battle goes on for quite a bit before any of the two combatants display any noticeable damage. Downplayed in that they later do start bringing out their best (Robocop takes out explosive charges, and the Terminator wields a plasma rifle) which does result in some serious damage.
  • In an early episode of The Simpsons, Dr. Monroe gives our favorite family foam-padded poles to strike each other with as a means of venting. When Homer notices this trope is in effect, Bart responds by taking the padding off.

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Sumotori DreamsImageSource/Video GamesSuper Hexagon

alternative title(s): Padded Sumo; Stone Wall Gameplay
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