Network Decay / Slipped

The channel still shows programming related to its original concept, although it is significantly showing programming not related to their genre in some way.

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    Bell Media examples 
  • MuchMusic has suffered from a large amount of degradation over the past decade, though not to the extent of MTV (its broadcast license requires it to air music videos). MuchMusic was essentially a free-for-all in the 1980s and 1990s, with few (if any) songs being censored and a wide variety of programming catering to virtually every taste (including programs devoted to rap and French music), as well as lots of indie bands getting a chance to shine through music video rotation. Between 2003 and 2006, most of the long-running VJs jumped ship and left for greener pastures, the station canned many of its unique and interesting showsnote , and then shifted their focus onto reality shows (like the Much VJ Search and American imports). Recently, many people (including many Canadian media outlets) lamented the fact that the station did absolutely nothing to celebrate its 25th anniversary. It was up to the fans to broadcast their own tributes for a station that had almost no trace of the elements that made it so popular and unique in the first place. Said media outlets also noted that MTV Canada (the all-reality and talk show offshoot of the original American channel, which is now owned by MuchMusic's parent company) is considered to be more relevant to young teenagers!
    • In September 2013, a number of "low-brow" shows airing on The Comedy Network (including Drunk History, South Park, The Simpsons, and Conan) moved to Much. At the same time, Much scaled back more of its music programming, adopted the ambiguous slogan of "It's a lot" in its advertising, and dropped music from its name. What makes the latter even more apparent? In 2014, the name of the MuchMusic Video Awards—the network's annual awards show, was subtlety amended to the "Much Music Video Awards", with a space. Similar shifts occurred with sister network MuchMore when it was re-branded as M3.
    • In July 2014, the bottom fell out. The Much division took the brunt of Bell Media's cuts in that month, with 91 people losing their jobs and most of the network's original programming, including Video on Trial ending abruptly because of them. Beyond filling the schedule with reruns of their weekly countdown show and automated playlists of music videos (which barely require any staff to set up) on the schedule to keep the CRTC satisfied, it didn't look good. At least Much actually did something for their 30th anniversary: airing a "top 100 music videos of all time" countdown, and an half-hour 30th anniversary special (all of which were repeated on each day of the Labour Day weekend).
      • These moves came, strangely enough, right after the CRTC denied license amendments that would have allowed The Comedy Network to air less Canadian content and more animated programming (Teletoon complained; Comedy is only allowed to devote 10% of its broadcast day to animation). Two years later, the aforementioned digital cable spin-off channels were also spun out to Stingray (an operator of Canada's digital cable radio platform).
    • In Atlantic Canada, there is ASN (Atlantic Satellite Network). Upon its launch, it was a sister channel to the ATV system of CTV affiliates in the Maritime provinces, now known as CTV Atlantic. In the early days, ASN was generally a local version of Citytv in Toronto, but carried some educational shows either produced by universities across Atlantic Canada or sourced from TVOntario, such as The Polka Dot Door or Today's Special, which themselves then disappeared, replaced by an Atlantic Canada version of Citytv's Breakfast Television. note  By 1997, after it was traded from CHUM to Baton Broadcasting/CTV, ASN generally remained the de facto Atlantic Canada version of Citytv, until the mid-2000s, when a large supply of programming sourced from CHUM declined, with more of its content supplied in-house by CTV, including Canadian Idol and some sports coverage, partially to compensate for the loss of a CTV affiliate on basic cable in Newfoundland and Labrador in 2002. note  In 2008, after CTVglobemedia (now Bell Media) bought out ASN's former parent CHUM, it became an affiliate of the revamped A-Channel (later A) system, becoming A Atlantic, but continued to air Breakfast Television under license from the new owner of Citytv, Rogers. note  However, this is no longer the case, as the A system was renamed CTV Two in 2011, and the ASN/A Atlantic version of Breakfast Television was renamed CTV Morning Live (along with its Ottawa affiliate, and west-coast CTV stations who promptly dropped CTV's "national" morning show Canada AM in favor of local morning news)
    • In Alberta, there is the Access Network, established as an educational cable channel in the 1970s by the government of Alberta note . However, by the mid-1990s, funding was cut for the channel, which was then privatized, sold to a consortium led by CHUM, and renamed Access. Though Access generally remained educational, it carried some general entertainment programs that could hardly qualify as educational, not to mention beginning to air commercials; even worse than the American Edutainment Show programming which fits in An Aesop somewhere in the plot to get their FCC credit, all the new Access had to do was have a professor ramble about vague themes connected to some easy-A "communications" class they applied to for a minute. It even carried The Colbert Report and Drawn Together at one point, the former of which is only tangibly considered educational. When CTVglobemedia acquired CHUM, Access was rebranded in 2008 to be more of a semi-affiliate of the A system in the sense that it carried prime time shows from A, but was still otherwise an "educational independent". This changed in 2011, when Access and A Atlantic (the channel formerly known as ASN) were integrated into the renamed CTV Two system. As a result of this change, Access became "CTV Two Alberta". However, it still technically carries educational programming throughout the day.
    Corus Entertainment examples 
  • The Canadian version of what used to be ABC Family, known as ABC Spark to avoid confusion with Family Channel, has seen a large shift in programming since it became wholly owned by Corus Entertainment and refreshed its on-air look to match its American counterpart, (after that network re-branded as Freeform). Previously, ABC Spark aired reruns of family-oriented YTV and CMT Canada programming to fulfill CanCon requirements. Not long after Corus took over, ABC Spark began airing crime dramas in the mornings and evenings and also became yet another dumping ground for reruns of lifestyle shows seen on Corus' women's networks as well the former Shaw Media networks. That ABC Spark also airs up to two hours of Just for Laughs: Gags reruns, a show that has become overexposed thanks to Corus airing reruns on their other family networks, doesn't help. They're even airing movies such as The Bourne Ultimatum and the 1998 American Godzilla film.
    • As of Summer 2017, Spark changed course and returned to airing more suitable fare. While crime dramas such as Private Eyes and reruns of Rookie Blue maintain a limited presence on the schedule, Spark has added more classic teen sitcom reruns, including golden era Disney Channel sitcoms Lizzie McGuire and That's So Raven.
  • Teletoon, in their efforts to be more like Cartoon Network, have aired more live-action movies in recent years. Their license mandates it has to be "animated" or "animation-related", which apparently includes "based on a comic book" as they've shown various comic book movies. Apparently, "has a cartoon based on it" also counts — Spaceballs and The Matrix have also been shown...And then they threw out said rules for live-action films by airing Gremlins, which might explain shows like Majority Rules! (which thankfully moved to Family Channel later on).
    • Their Retro spinoff channel was good about remaining animated (even the arguable exceptions of Fraggle Rock and The Banana Splits are a puppetnote  show and contain cartoon segments, respectively), but stretched the definition of "retro" with fifteen-year-old shows like ReBoot and King of the Hill. But then again, they could also be excused because their license defined "retro" as at least 10 years old, and ReBoot was a very popular series to begin with.
    • Their late night block, under The Detour name, used to be more fair about airing live-action movies related to animation or comics and also aired anime films and OVAs. After changing their name to Teletoon at Night, it seems the only animated films they still air are either DC Universe Original Animated Movies on Fridays (following Teletoon's Superfan Friday block) or South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut. Currently, their weekend movies are all unrelated live-action films that cater to the core demographic that watches the animated comedies that air on Mondays through Thursdays. The closest you'll get to anything related to animation or even comic books are films like Cowboys & Aliens and documentaries. Just as YTV scrapping Bionix has led to the absence of mature anime on Canadian television, the lack of mature western animation on Teletoon as a whole is a definite example of the Animation Age Ghetto at work.
  • The Canadian channel Showcase Television once billed itself as "Television Without Borders" - an accurate description. Created by a coalition of burgeoning producers and production companies, Showcase truly broke new ground in Canadian specialty television - this is a channel that played mature-rated television series and films in pre-watershed hours, devoted an entire Friday block of programming to HBO series and risque material (including an original series focusing on fetishes) and generally had a devil-may-care attitude when it came to what was and wasn't acceptable for Canadian broadcast standards. The channel carried a mix of well-known Canadian series (Da Vinci's Inquest, Due South), American dramas (Oz, The L Word, Six Feet Under), weird erotica from foreign countries, British imports like Cracker, original series (such as their cult hit Trailer Park Boys, but mostly softcore porn), and much more.
    • But then, in time for the 2009-10 season, the channel's owner (Canwest, who was bankrupt, had just spun out its newspapers, and was about to sell its television properties to Shaw in early 2010) randomly decided that being basic cable's Refuge in Audacity was unattractive to viewers and advertisers, and punted that "devil-may-care" attitude out the door with a new imaging campaign and lineup. The channel refocused itself as a dumping ground for American drama imports (mostly NCIS) and Hollywood blockbusters, a far cry from what it used to be.
    • In recent years, the channel has recovered somewhat; it's had great success with new original series and co-productions such as Lost Girl, Continuum, XIII, Copper and Haven (the latter three being co-produced with international networks). Showcase has also been airing premium cable fare such as Boardwalk Empire, Game of Thrones, Strike Back, and Outlander. In commemoration of its 20th anniversary, they've even switched to a retraux version of their iconic 2000's logo.
    • Showcase Action (now known as just Action) started as s channel for action-oriented series and films. Fast forward to today, and the majority of its lineup is now occupied by TruTV shows (the Canadian version of Court TV ended up becoming Investigation Discovery instead).
  • W Network used to be one of Canada's premiere Women's entertainment networks, with a mix of original and acquired lifestyle and entertainment programs covering a wide range of topics and genres. Overtime, particularly after Corus gained ownership of the defunct Shaw Media's networks, W's more popular shows, including Property Bothers and Love it or List it, moved to other networks. While new episodes would premiere on some of these networks, W's original programming was ultimately recycled for CanCon filler. Then, in direct correlation with CMT Canada abandoning country music videos, W Network all but abandoned lifestyle programming and shifted to a format of movies and (crime) dramas. W Network has essentially become a makeshift Showcase, with repeats of Law & Order spin-offs instead of NCIS. The only aspect of W that remained unchanged from its previous format are shows like The Bachelor Canada and Will & Grace repeats.
  • There was once a time when YTV's mandate was "programming for the whole family", but they have largely abandoned that mantra in favor of "programming for kids aged 13 and under". When the Canadian channel first started in 1988, it showed a wide range of programming (up to and including The Carol Burnett Show, classic Doctor Who, Red Dwarf, Bonanza, Britcoms like Are You Being Served?, The Muppet Show and many more family-oriented shows). Throughout the '90s, the station, buoyed by it's original programming and "The Zone" afternoon block, was a household name. The station flourished with programming aimed towards 16-20 year-olds, as well as mature content in pre-watershed hours (including uncut airings of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Farscape). The channel was also the go-to place for anime in Canada in the 1990s and early-to-mid 2000s. Overtime, YTV expunged all anime programming (which, thankfully, moved to Teletoon) and became obsessed with derivative kidcoms and live-action shows, and more Nickelodeon fare.
    Discovery Communications examples 
  • The slippage of Discovery Travel & Adventure in Latin America has been relatively benign. Beginning as a dumping ground for Discovery's travel-related documentaries, the channel became Discovery Travel & Living in 2006, force-feeding cuisine-related shows like No Reservations, Cake Boss, Bar Rescue, and Hell's Kitchen into the mix. But the bigger problem? In 2011, Discovery chose to rebrand the channel with the logo of TLC, with the subtitle "Travel & Living Channel" — a justified retronym that was later replaced in the logo by a Discovery wordmark. Shows like Breaking Amish and Here Comes Honey Boo Boo could count as "lifestyle" only in a very loose sense.
  • Subjective example — Investigation Discovery was a spinoff of Discovery Channel, and it mostly ran stuff like 48 Hours: Hard Evidence and Dateline (recently adding I (Almost) Got Away With It, detailing criminals who, well, did just that) which were basically news reports on real-life crimes, legal dramas (sometimes bringing in controversial subjects like falling asleep at the wheel being considered as a capital offense), and forensic science shows detailing the processes and how they were important in either convicting the criminal(s) or figuring out what went wrong. Occasionally, stuff like Dr. G: Medical Examiner or shows about disaster investigation show up on that channel. Dr. G is after all about autopsies (a pretty big part of murder investigations), and shows about disaster investigation are, after all, investigations. They're just not entirely crime or are related to crime in most ways (Dr. G often has people who died of drug overdoses, accidents, stupidity, or diseases they didn't know about).
    • More recently as of January 2011, Dr. G moved over to Discovery Health and Fitness channel. That move brought Investigation Discovery back to mostly crime shows and perhaps back to recovery. However, some fans are complaining that the network is airing the same cases over several different shows.
  • The Discovery Channel still shows plenty of actual documentary material, despite having been decaying for almost as long as MTV has. In the late 80s the lineup was mostly serious documentaries, the most famous of which was Wings (no relation to the sitcom except for a focus on aircraft) but which also included classy repackaged BBC imports like Making of a Continent — and once a year there was Shark Week, which was just what you'd expect. By the mid-1990s, they showed an obscene amount of home improvement shows and cooking shows aimed at stay-at-home moms (enough to spawn the spin-off channel Discovery Travel & Living, now Destination America) and Wings had proven so popular it had been farmed out to its own spin-off, Discovery Wings Channel (now American Heroes Channel). Now those shows are being swamped with "guys building and/or blowing things up" shows in the vein of MythBusters and Monster Garage and about four different shows about ghost hunters. In 2005, Discovery debuted Cash Cab, a game show that takes place in the back of a cab, leaving one unsure whether it even has a theme beyond "non-fiction". It gets weird when you realize that they're knocking some of their own shows off, especially Mythbusters into Smash Lab (with a focus on safety measures) and How It's Made into Some Assembly Required. The latter has almost only done products featured in the former (though How It's Made has been on for just about ten years, so it's hard to find something they haven't done). The Discovery Channel also used to contain a lot of nature, which is where the now-classic Shark Week (which they still air regularly) originated from. Most of the nature shows have since been relegated to Animal Planet. Amusingly enough, despite the slippage over the years, it remains the sole survivor of the educational channels on American cable television.
    • The Brazilian Discovery Channel is mostly true to its roots, in the sense that the Mythbusters is still the closest thing to a reality show it airs currently (although Monster Garage and others have already came and gone). However, much like the History Channel in the United States, it has recently been airing subject matter that can be charitably described as pseudoscience. After watching what some thought was a mockumentary (it wasn't) about how creationism was certainly real (not "plausible", but real), complete with how "easy" it was to build Noah's Ark, several viewers have refused to watch or trust any Discovery Channel documentaries since.
    • The Dutch Discovery Channel has recently been airing soccer matches.
    • In some Middle European countries like the Czech Republic and Hungary, most of the "regular" Discovery Channel programming (like Mythbusters or How It's Made) has been relegated to a morning timeslot, with the rest being made up mostly of shows based around the concept of "people finding interesting loot" (Auction Hunters, multiple varieties of Storage Hunters, Container Wars, Baggage Battles, American Digger, Money Barn, Auction Kings, Garage Gold, etc.) and tons of other scripted or over-dramatized "reality" shows (Diamond Divers, Chrome Underground, Rods 'n' Wheels, Game of Stones, etc.). On any given day, these series take up more than half of the channel's programming, and the rest is very rarely educational anyway.
    Disney networks examples 
  • The Lifetime Movie Network (now known more by their catchy initials, LMN) used to exist to air nothing but Lifetime Movies of the Week, which also included TV movies that aired on the Big Three networks. With the broadcast networks completely ditching TV movies outside of Jesse Stone, the Hallmark Hall of Fame and the Walmart/Proctor & Gamble films which have to get on TV as if they were paying for an Infomercial, and their mother channel's new A&E ownership deciding to invest more in reality shows and Ripped from the Headlines TV movies which will age horribly in only a couple years, LMN began to air Hollywood films that fit the channel's focus group (or not considering they have aired the horror film Wrong Turn and its gory sequel Wrong Turn 2: Dead End a few times), shifting away from the Damsel in Distress rut it was in for many years. However, in line with the speedier Hollywood release cycles, even this move didn't help maintain the ratings.
    • In the summer of 2013 LMN began a quick slide towards decay from their format; Sunday nights were filled with programs to jump on the Oxygen/Investigation Discovery track of 'dramatized murder' programming (such as I Killed My BFF, Killer Kids) and a Saturday block of repurposed Bio Channel ghost story shows. There's also Killer Profile, an Exactly What It Says on the Tin program which seems to love going way into detail about how serial killers commit their crimes. The murder doc programming is cheaper to make, doesn't involve writers or celebrities or unions, and is certainly faster to watch.
    • Lifetime Original Movies produced for the network, while still being fairly diverse fare aimed primarily at housewives, have let their thriller series fall into a very tight formula. For a good while, every movie was called The Perfect ______, where the blank is either the victim if the antagonist is obvious or the villain if they can pretend to be normal for the first 15 or so minutes. The stories always played out the same way, ending with the antagonist threatening to kill themselves, the object of their obsession, the "competition", or some combination. The predictability of it was a selling point to some, though.
    NBC-owned examples 
  • The Sci-Fi Channel started out as a network devoted to Science Fiction shows and movies. Branching out into fantasy and horror barely even qualifies for this trope, as the three genres overlap frequently. Fans were even accepting when it became the "Paranormal Channel" with shows like Ghost Hunters, Destination Truth, and their numerous clones and spinoffs. It was when the channel started adding non-genre programming that ranged from reality shows, Law & Order: SVU reruns, a cooking show, and, most damningly, Professional Wrestling that it really began to decay. Their name change to "Syfy" cast further doubt on their commitment. The executives claimed they wanted a name that could be trademarked, but their insulting explanation for the name change, in which they refer to sci-fi fans as basement dwellers and insinuated that they repulse women, went a long way toward tarnishing the network's reputation.
    • There's a little bit of a Nostalgia Filter involved on this one: even as far back as 1997, Sci-Fi was running programs like CNET Central, an IT newsmagazine that even predates Tech TV in explaining home computing and the burgeoning world of dial-up internet to the masses.
    • The network slipped fully into Total Abandonment territory between 2010 and 2012 when it canceled Stargate Atlantis, Caprica, Stargate Universe, Eureka, and their "Ani-Mondays" anime block in rapid succession.
    • A number of new shows premiering in January 2014 and 2013 brought a significant focus on Speculative Fiction back to the channel; particularly during Monday and Friday night programming. While Syfy confirmed in 2014 that they were making a serious drive to return to space operas, it was WWE's programming moving to USA Network that marked the end of what many had called a long Dork Age. Despite this, non-genre movies and reruns of CSI can be regularly seen on the schedule, even after the network "rebooted" themselves with a rebrand in June 2017 and later added reruns of Futurama.
  • Sprout was originally known as PBS Kids Sprout, and the "PBS" name in the network had guaranteed that the network was about education and fun first, selling toys second. The network's steady cast of humans (only one left so far because of an Old Shame college comedy film in 2005, and another moved to behind-the-scenes puppetry), Sesame Workshop backing, great continuity (Chicken puppet Chica is the personification of a Ridiculously Cute Critter) and a schedule usually not filled with much change made it a safe haven while Nick and Disney marketed everything about their preschool characters. The network even made a habit of acquiring properties once aired by those two and building programming blocks around them for a while (though the practice stopped in recent years), and took over responsibility of NBC's children's block in mid-2012. Comcast bought out PBS and Sesame Workshop's interest in Sprout in 2014, but did not made any immediate changes besides ramping up the original programming. As time went on, though, more movies began to be played (particularly during the summer), the NBC block was dropped, and the contract with PBS expired, taking all but two PBS Kids shows with it. Furthermore, NBCU began to use the network to cross-promote its product, as well as the reverse, such as giving the network's Sunny Side Up Show a float at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Paradenote . Eventually, in 2017, following NBCU's purchase of DreamWorks Animation, it was announced that Sprout would rebrand into Universal Kids to appeal to a wider kid audience with live-action series, reruns of DWA's Netflix series and animated series from other countries such as Masha and The Bear and the Wallace & Gromit shorts. Even though preschool programming still continues to take the lion's share of the network's airtime, running 15 hours between 3 a.m. and 6 p.m, there have been many changes that happened during the transition compared to the minimal changes to the lineup during the Comcast takeover. Popular shows on the network such as The Berenstain Bears, Nina's World, The Furchester Hotel, Ruff Ruff, Tweet and Dave and Noddy, Toyland Detective note  either got pulled off the schedule entirely or reduced to one airing a week. The channel also runs ad breaks longer than the average kids' channel, with six and a half minutes of ads played in the middle of every show on the network.
    Public networks examples 
  • The Weather Channel used to be all-weather all-the-time, but in recent years has added documentary programs such as Storm Stories, It Could Happen Tomorrow, and recently When Weather Changed History, the latter two closer to an un-decayed Discovery or History Channel than Weather. Some of these programs actually feature earthquakes and volcanoes and meteor strikes on Earth, which aren't exactly weather material. In the evening, one may be lucky to get up to two hours of current weather news; which, unfortunately, is when much of the bad stuff happens. Fortunately, they do suspend said documentary programs whenever particularly dangerous weather situations develop like tornado outbreaks and hurricanes. The network also seems particularly interested in airing live coverage of satellite launches (as well as Exploration Flight Test-1, the first unmanned launch of NASA's new Orion spacecraft), often simulcasting NASA TV footage; often, Weather Channel provides the only live television coverage if local community access channels are not showing NASA TV footage, or CNN deems the launch not important enough.
    • In this case it's a survival mechanism, as the simple graphic display of the weather they used to capitalize on is available at the press of a button on most digital cable services, the Internet (TWC owns Weather.com), cell phones, and even some game consoles.note  Ironically, it got so bad in early 2010 when they announced that they decided to air movies that are "weather-related" (Including Misery, which despite a bad snowstorm starting off the chain of events, has nothing to do with weather whatsoever), that DishNetwork threatened to drop the channel. As a result, they've adopted a Bloomberg-style information frame with local weather info during the entertainment content. Still, this makes the Bloodhound Gang's line "record The Weather Channel so I can watch it later" almost pathetically prophetic.
    • Their programming has had an even more tenuous connection to weather as of late, with shows such as Pyros and Ice Pilots that often focus more on the characters and drama with the weather seemingly a footnote. At least they announced that they won't be showing movies anymore.
    • Averted with The Weather Network/MétéoMédia, its Canadian equivalent, which thankfully stays true to its name and only airs weather news and local forecasts, along with some short feature segments about extreme weather, lawn & gardening, vacation spots, fishing, etc. sprinkled here and there. However, it has had a history of being criticized for showing too much advertising and focusing a bit too much on Ontario.
    • Also averted with The Weather Channel's sister network Weatherscan, which more or less fits the original channel's mantra of all weather, all the time.
    • After Direc TV actually did drop the Weather Channel in favor of rival Weather Nation, the Weather Channel agreed to tone down the reality shows some.
  • Not a network, but PBS's historical documentary series Secrets of the Dead originally followed investigators using modern-day science to learn about the long-ago dead. Now it just shows any documentary related to history, with the spooky title sequence quickly becoming The Artifact. For example, in their recent "Doping for Gold", about East German authorities drugging their Olympic athletes in the 1970s and 1980s, pretty much everyone involved in the story was still living and, in fact, interviewed for the show.
    Time Warner-owned examples 
  • Arguably, HBO fits here. With its initials standing for "Home Box Office", one would expect it to show movies - and one would be right some of the time. Instead, there is a great deal of original programming on the network, programming which have made HBO the poster boy of Tropes Are Not Bad. Said original programming has included critical darlings, award-winning programs, and top-quality series.
  • [adult swim], Cartoon Network's late night block, originally consisted of adult-oriented animation including seinen anime and black comedies, as well as unedited versions of titles from the original Toonami block. While the children-oriented Cartoon Network received some concerns about having a block of adult-oriented shows, not to mention the weirdness of some of the block's programming, Adult Swim was well received and helped contribute to the "Golden Age" of the network, as it generated popular and well acclaimed shows that broke out of the Animation Age Ghetto. Adult Swim also helped fuel the anime boom at the turn of the century with titles such as Cowboy Bebop, FLCL, The Big O and InuYasha, as well as being a haven for shows that were previously Screwed by the Network such as Family Guy, Futurama, Home Movies, and Mission Hill and even helped boost their popularity to the point that they were now beloved by their parent companies again.

    Unfortunately, these days were not to last. When Cartoon Network began to decay and sister block Toonami was canceled as a result, it was inevitable that Adult Swim was going to decay with it. Heck, the Boston Bomb Scare started out as an Adult Swim ad campaign for Aqua Teen Hunger Force so as an Unwitting Instigator of Doom, Adult Swim started this whole mess. One of the earliest instances of the decay was when Adult Swim ran Saved by the Bell for a week as a joke, inspired by complaints about their cheesier retro programming at the time, as well as about live-action movies on the regular Cartoon Network. Fans hoped it was just another one of Adult Swim's jokes (as much as they weren't laughing this time) as Adult Swim has been a notorious Trolling Creator. Unfortunately for them, Adult Swim began to increasingly move into live-action programing, from original series made by internally successful creators, such as Childrens Hospital, Tim & Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!, Delocated, to imported programming like The Office (UK). While the live-action shows on Adult Swim have better critical reception than their Cartoon Network counterparts, these works have also divided or enraged much of the fandom.

    The main concern is that Adult Swim's live action programming came at the expense of a number of animated shows being pushed out, with a lack of animated originals being produced in comparison to the growing number of live-action originals, in addition to an increasing over-reliance on FOX Acquisitions for viewership and filling timeslots, with more than half of its 10 hour airtime made of of them every night except Saturdays. Mirroring Cartoon Network's decision of ending Toonami, the most glaring example of the decay has been the block's move away from anime. Once one of the main reasons to watch the block—if not the main reason why Cartoon Network had the guts to make Adult Swim in the first place— anime would since be relegated to the Saturday Night-Sunday Morning timeslotsnote . This has been considered to be an almost legendary example of not just the decay of Adult Swim, but Cartoon Network as a whole. Suddenly, the block that saved shows from being Screwed by the Network were now screwing other shows over.

    The "live-action instead of animation" slope, combined with their increasingly vocal disdain towards anime, as well as their insults to their fans about the decay in their ad bumpers, have been enough to push many of its fans away. In fairness though, it's nowhere near as bad as a lot of the networks listed on Network Decay, as the presence of strong anime and animated comedies have managed to keep the block out of Total Abandonment and their fans clamoring for more. Adult Swim might have it worse than the rest of Cartoon Network when it comes to the "rollercoaster ride" the block rides in regards to this trope, due to the same constant schedule switching that has screwed over many of its titles, what's decaying one week can be on the upswing the next. They have also called Cartoon Network's decay out in the past, and even lampshade their own strange programming choices at times, so they're at the very least aware of their own "decay".
    • Adult Swim has made one significant contribution to the recovery of CN as a whole. On April Fools' Day 2012, Adult Swim briefly replaced their normal Saturday night block with Toonami to rave reception, and after a huge fan campaign, brought back Toonami on a regular basis on May 26, 2012. Not only was Toonami once again the network's dominant action-animation brand, it essentially became the Midnight Run, the direct predecessor of Adult Swim, in the process. Meanwhile, Adult Swim was free to focus exclusively on adult comedy, though original adult animation is still not as prominent as it used to be, despite TBS and even TruTV (both sibling networks) now producing live-action comedies of their own. While segregating anime and comedy into different blocks could be considered as Network Decay to some, note  the transition was already happening during the channel’s Dork Age, and Toonami’s formula is more suited for showcasing non-comedic programming. One enduring problem, though, is a limited budget for licensing anime to air, meaning that titles like Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex and season 2 of The Big O (both of which [adult swim] owns permanent rights to since they helped fund those anime back in the pre-decay days) are frequently inserted as timeslot filler. As the block regained its notoriety during the years, Toonami managed to get more recent and popular anime titles, subsequently moving filler programming to the dead of the night.
    Viacom Global examples 
  • The New TNN was the product of total abandonment by Viacom. When they acquired the country and bluegrass-flavored The Nashville Network, they tested the waters with younger-skewing programming such as RollerJam (basically Roller Derby but with Professional Wrestling tropes and Kayfabe) and later ECW on Friday nights (using them as a tentpole around motorsports and bull riding under the guide of extreme sports). Soon afterward, TNN started adding more films and off-network reruns too.
    • In September 2000, after acquiring WWE Raw, TNN rebranded as The National Network (later as "The New TNN") and became a general entertainment network (akin to USA Network, which Viacom had once owned part of via Paramount), albeit with a "middle America" flavor, according to executives. Then in 2003, TNN relaunched as SpikeTV, the "First Network for Men", with a new lineup hailed by an increase in low-brow "adult" series (some of the new programs launched in June, but the new name was delayed to August due to a lawsuit by Spike Lee) and other series of male interest. In 2005, after losing WWE Raw to USA Network, Spike picked up TNA iMPACT and began airing a reality show about a little mixed martial arts promotion known as the Ultimate Fighting Championship.
    • In 2006, Spike moved away from men's entertainment and refocused on the action genre. Award shows dedicated to the horror genre and video games would be launched, the latter of which resulted in other gaming-oriented programs joining the network. Decay followed decay, however, as Spike all but morphed into the CSI and Star Trek repeat network until it lost the rights to those shows.
    • Beginning in 2011, Spike would pivot towards reality shows aimed at a more mainstream audience, at the expense of the more original guy-centric fare it used to focus on. The only scripted programming to be found on the network were movies such as the Star Wars franchise, which Spike used any and every excuse to air. The UFC ended up becoming a Cash Cow Franchise for the network, but nonetheless, Spike would lose the cable rights to Fox in 2013. Despite the later loss of TNA Wrestling in 2014, Spike has continued to ride on sports to attract viewers, with Viacom having acquired Bellator MMA and picking up other boxing and kickboxing events.
    • In 2015, in addition to another re-branding effort, Spike announced that it would bring back scripted programming, yet also announced several new reality-oriented programs meant to attract females such as Sweat Inc. and Lip Sync Battle. While Lip Sync Battle became a Sleeper Hit, the network has still carried a male skew, thanks to shows like Bar Rescue, Ink Master, and Cops. Meanwhile, the first of the newly rebranded Spike's scripted offering's, the 3-part miniseries Tut, received mostly negative reviews. Spike would eventually be re-branded as the Paramount Network in January 2018, as part of Viacom's 2017 turnaround plan which positions the film studio as one of its six core brands. Their plans seem to be continuing on with the shifts that Spike had been undergoing since 2015, but instead of another makeshift answer to USA Network and TNT, Paramount Network is positioned as a home for "premium" scripted and unscripted programming a la AMC or FX.
  • TV Land started out as basically Nick @ Nite 2, focusing on old TV shows that not even Nick At Nite showed anymore — Gilligan's Island, Mister Ed, Father Knows Best, etc. It would soon follow a similar track as other "retro" networks: acquiring shows that are either incredibly recent (Extreme Makeover: Home Edition, for instance) or have already been reran to death on other networks. TV Land would also begin airing original reality shows that have nothing to do with retro television on top of all this, though one can respect what they've done with She's Got the Look. The focus of the network's original programming ultimately shifted away from realty shows and towards traditional sitcoms, like Hot in Cleveland. In the summer of 2015, TV Land deliberately invoked this trope, with a new logo and more edgier comedies aimed at Gen-X audiences. While the network continued to air retro shows outside of prime time, they deemphasized their original format in favor of newer programming.
    • The problem that TV Land faces is the ever-shifting definition of what's considered "old" as the viewing audience, or specifically the advertiser-friendly demographic within that audience, ages and is replaced by younger generations (similar to what's happening with oldies radio). There's also the difficulty in finding shows they can afford the rights to. Shows that enter or are produced in syndication are easier to afford and come by, while many older shows are ceasing to exist at all. Fortunately for retro fanatics, free digital broadcast networks such as MeTV, Antenna TV, and Retro TV have picked up most of those shows, meaning you don't even need cable to watch them.
    • Another reason for decay; ten minute blocks of advertising. An average viewer might look at the network's staggered scheduling (often putting shows in 36-40 minute timeslots) which might suggest they'll see every minute of a show as it originally aired, only to have it be the same syndicated cut buttressed by an amazing amount of ads. Most Viacom networks carry a heavy commercial load, but TV Land is by far the most apparent example of this. What makes it worse is that Viacom networks will sometimes cut to commercial in the middle of a scene, which can look very awkward, especially if you know when the episode should usually cut to commercial.
    • As of 2017, TV Land's recent efforts seem to have been for naught. Outside of Teachers, Nobodies. (Which moved to Paramount Network), and Younger (which has become the network's breakout series), all of TV Land's Gen-X programming have been short-lived. Since the network isn't a part of Viacom's restructuring plan, programs in-development that were meant for TV Land have instead been shifted to other networks; it's unlikely that TV Land will premiere any new originals once their current shows come to an end. Even LOGO, which has its own decay problems to deal with, managed to pick up the retro programming slack. At the very least, TV Land is still in far more households than Logo.


Other "Slipped" examples:

  • CNN Headline News was originally 24 hours of just headline news, in the form of a thirty-minute newscast that repeated throughout the day. After an infamous re-launch in 2001 that tried to literally make the channel feel like a website, the network pivoted in primetime in 2005 to add "Headline Prime", which resulted in talk shows, tabloid material (murder trials have become a favorite topic as of late), all the pundits you can eat, and Missing White Woman Syndrome coverage. In December 2008, it changed its on-air branding to "HLN", perhaps keeping with its increasingly downmarket focus.
    • Most of these shows have ended and, as of 2014, it seems to have a format made up of 'news' seen in the Facebook trending sidebar, and Forensic Files reruns aired so much that Adored by the Network is putting it lightly. In January 2015, the network further emphasized its new social media focus with a new logo, a new afternoon show called The Daily Share, and a Jack Vale reality show that felt like it was meant for the pre-comedy TruTV. Almost all of this flopped, and it wasn't until November 2015, that Jeff Zucker finally admitted that HLN's current direction wasn't working. Dr. Drew and Nancy Grace left the network in late-2016, and all of the social media programming was eventually canned.
    • As of 2017, HLN's new modus operandi seems to be bringing current and former CNN anchors over to the network to host news-based programs in the style of CNN (including Ashleigh Banfield, who hosts Nancy Grace's de facto replacement Primetime Justice, which is more akin to her previous CNN daytime show), focusing on crime stories and other headlines lost to CNN's coverage of The Adventures of Donald Trump.
  • The Classic Sports Network was originally designed to re-air vintage games from the 1950s through 1970s. After ESPN bought the channel and redubbed it ESPN Classic, they began to shift more and more toward games of more recent vintage, and in the last few years have dropped most of the old game broadcasts altogether in favor of documentaries, sports-themed movies, American Gladiators, boxing, plenty of old bowling tournaments, and lots and lots of poker tournaments. Overshown games and matches from lower-tier conferences air have also aired on the channel, just in case ESPNU isn't enough to contain a busy day of sports action across the regular ESPNs and ESPN Deportes. This is justified, however. As the leagues, college conferences, and individual teams have started their own cable networks, they've subsequently needed the channel's classic programming to fill plenty of time for their own networks since you can only analyze your own current teams so much. Since they own the footage and need a lure for viewers to tune in when teams aren't playing, they've pulled it off ESPN Classic. Since there's virtually no demand for a boxing network due to the sport's current low popularity, that stays on ESPN Classic while the bowling and poker programs are in-house productions which can be reran ad nauseum.
    • Now that ESPN Classic is on a sports tier on most systems, the overflow programming has moved to ESPNEWS.
    • Arguably, ESPN itself may be slipping too for much of the same reasons, and other factors. Since it was among the first national sports channels in the country, it originally had a wide array of sports programming to choose from. But nowadays, it isn't the only player in town, given that all four major U.S. networks have at least one or more sports-oriented cable network in their portfolios, not to mention all the league-, sport-, and even college conference-specific networks out there too. On weekdays, unless there is a major event happening, much of ESPN's lineup consists of talking head shows, radio broadcast-styled shows, and even actual radio shows.
      • Cord cutting has contributed to fewer people subscribing to the network (though it's almost entirely against their will, given that ESPN's main channels all but demand basic cable carriage), reducing a key source of revenue. Critics have argued that ESPN has ultimately been overspending on rights to its key properties, not foreseeing that changes in viewing habits would directly impact their business model. Realizing it had to do something to counteract these losses, ESPN laid off at least 100 employees in April 2017, including a number of anchors, analysts, and beat reporters (their most egregious cut? Laying off most of their NHL reporters during the playoffs. Thenagain, ESPN hasn't aired the NHL since at least the early 2000's, and the network promptly hired prominent NHL writer Greg Wyshynski to replace them). At the same time, due to the proliferation of digital platforms, the idea of a straight sports highlight show has become extinct; the weeknight version of Baseball Tonight was also canned at this time (arguably MLB Network's MLB Tonight had been eating its dogfood and then some. Ironically, ESPN 2 ended up adding MLBN's Intentional Talk at around the same time. But given MLBN still produces it, it just means one less fish for ESPN to have to fry on its own), and ESPN has slowly been re-launching selected editions of SportsCenter as personality-based shows. While live sports still remain an aspect of ESPN's overall strategy, the overall value of the channel may be decreasing.
  • For nearly 40 years, CityTV was the Canadian broadcast equivalent of the "quirky young upstart". Combining rich multicultural programming with plenty of highly-regarded local shows (Fashion Television, The New Music, Speakers Corner) with oddball cult shows like Lexx, The Collector and Relic Hunter, the station flourished under creator Moses Znaimer's playful philosophy. It was a station that pushed the boundaries by being the first Canadian cable station to air softcore erotic films (Baby Blue), aired a show that focused on frank discussions of sex and sexuality at 4 p.m. every afternoon (Life on Venus Ave.) and (like Showcase Television) didn't really care about adherence to other Canadian channel formats. With CHUM's purchase of CKVU in Vancouver, and later Craig Media, Citytv expanded into a network covering much of central and western Canada as well.
    • In 2007, CTVglobemedia bought out CHUM Limited. As CTV could not own the Citytv stations due to ownership caps (the CRTC only allows duopolies in the same city if each station broadcasts in a different language. The A-Channel stations in proximity to major CTV stations are okay because they technically serve different markets), CTV sold them to Rogers Media. Under Rogers, the bottom fell out, only worsening in recent years. Their lineup became flooded with U.S. import leftovers that CTV or Global weren't interested in, while more layoffs and cuts followed over the next few years (particularly at the stations' news operations), along with experiments that went nowhere (such as the Citynews Channel, which died after a year). In late-2013, the network awkwardly re-named itself "City", and dumped its annual New Year's Eve special from Toronto.
    • As of late, there are signs that Rogers is trying to reverse the damage. The network began greenlighting more original scripted shows and became a broadcaster for the NFL, Hockey Night in Canada, and a new primetime NHL game of the week on Sunday nights called Hometown Hockey. While Hometown Hockey moved to Sportsnet for 2015-16, it was replaced by a new comedy block anchored by the acquisition of Family Guy and Bob's Burgers among others.
  • French-Canadian channel Ztélé advertised itself as "TV Of The Future" — i.e., a channel dedicated to all things technological and sci-fi (with some supernatural thrown in) — at its debut in 2000. Recently however, the sci-fi part of the channel has been getting the shaft, with an increased emphasis on heavy machinery and cars and most fiction series are nearer to fantasy than sci-fi. While the former still first the network name, the latter has fans really concerned. (The only shows currently broadcast worthy of the title of sci-fi are Sanctuary, Torchwood, Eureka}, and even Chuck.)
  • Gospel Music Channel started out in 2004 airing exactly that; gospel music videos and programming around it. However, the channel's title made sure it was stuck in the religious tier where they had to deal the same dichotomy the Faith & Values Channel had for years before their purchase by Hallmark converted them into the Hallmark Channel; a good and kind view of religion stuck in a channel tier where the apocalyptic ramblings of TBN and Daystar personalities scared anyone from watching anything near it. In February 2010, the network rebranded solely by their initials, GMC, to get away from that image, and seemingly picked up every original show ever produced by PAX, along with Amen, Sister, Sister, 7th Heaven and any sitcom or drama which has a somewhat spiritual bent like Promised Land and Touched by an Angel. The gospel music was pushed to mornings, Sundays, and special events. As the channel got better funding, and other 'religious family channel' competitors such as FamilyNet, iLifeTV and ALN were purchased by other parties and converted to more secular formats, GMC picked up those programming rights (mainly old sitcom reruns from the 80's and 90's), along with creating more original movies and airing performances of African-American stage dramas. By 2013, it was clear that gospel music was a minority of the network's schedule, and because of that and the confusion with the truck brand, GMC was rebranded to the more neutral "Up" at the start of June 2013.
  • BYU TV still deals mainly with Mormonism, but has opened up their schedule a little more to carry the sports of Brigham Young University, along with some acquired dramas and documentaries to add some variety of the schedule, creating the odd mix of a university sports network mixed with a religious network with some secular programming (including, among other things, reruns of Wind at My Back and Sue Thomas: F.B.Eye), and a cooking/crafting network.
  • Retro Television Network (also known as RTV, formerly RTN), a network of classic TV programming seen on the digital subchannels of local television stations, has faced some struggles mainly related to their former ownership under Equity Broadcasting. The network was in danger of fading away after Equity didn't pay the bill to the rights for CBS/Paramount shows, and again after the network owner decided to air something that totally makes sense between reruns of The Incredible Hulk and Knight Rider — a political talk show called Unreliable Sources. Then in January 2009, Equity fell completely apart, declaring bankruptcy, which ended up throwing several of their stations off the air because they couldn't afford the digital upgrade later in the year. RTV had been taken over by another entity (Luken Communications) who leased Equity's master control distribution system (apparently a system so complicated it was a copyrighted concept, and also involved Equity-owned stations such as Fox affiliates from as far as Montana and Michigan's Upper Peninsula being ran completely from Little Rock). But then Equity issued a Take That! and tried to pull the plug on their own creation by throwing out the new RTV owners and forcing viewers through a month-long process that involved a complete rebuilding of RTV's infrastructure in Chattanooga, Tennessee by Luken. Unreliable Sources was canned immediately and the network resumed an almost all-classic TV lineup (besides a light morning talk show, Daytime, from one of their affiliates note , which has since been cancelled). However, in 2011 the network lost the rights to NBC Universal's library and Sony's library to competitors MeTV and Antenna TV respectively, and is stuck shows like Crook and Chase from 1995, car shows, Highway to Heaven, and Cold Case Files repeats. This has lost them many affiliates to Antenna TV, Me-TV, the lifestyle-oriented Live Well Network (owned by Disney/ABC), and the independent African American network Bounce TV. Retro attempted rebound by picking up Mystery Science Theater 3000 and the original run of Doctor Who. But they lost Mystery Science Theater 3000 in 2016 to Sinclair's Comet network, and lost all of their carriage by stations associated with the Big Four networks in April 2017, when their Santa Barbara station dumped them in fear of the network struggling to remain 'a going concern', along with a strict carriage contract which disallowed even the move of main network programming to RTV temporarily for severe weather coverage.
  • TG4 (originally T na G, aka "Teleifís na Gaeilge") began as a channel devoted to Irish-language shows. Though it still shows many series in Irish, increasing amounts of time are given to American series such as Cold Case and Nip/Tuck as well as Westerns and French films. Most viewers wouldn't mind so much if these shows at least had Irish subtitles in the same way that most of the shows which feature Irish dialogue have English subtitles. One egregious example was the Hector O'hEochagáin Show, which had dialogue in both Irish and English. The Irish was subtitled, but the English wasn't.
  • New Zealand's equivalent of the above, Māori Television, started out as that, but with requirements for English-language programming in order to allow everyone to watch the channel. A few years into the channel's existence (and partly because the launch of their 100% Māori channel Te Reo was a success), they decided to become what TVNZ refused to be. In terms of movies, they originally showed Pacific-centric movies, but then started airing movies from all over the world, a bit like the SBS channels of Australia. Plusthe addition of national and international documentaries, unrelated in most part to the channel's culture, was also another factor in order to boost ratings.
  • There's this channel in Peru called La Tele. It started out airing mostly just telenovelas and movies aimed at female audiences. As the years progressed, Grupo ATV didn't know about the channel's purpose and started to become gender-neutral. In April 2015 it got to air the cartoons that used to air on Global TV (now RED TV) and the daytime schedule was retooled to feature some Disney shows, a couple of anime titles, telenovelas aimed at teenagers and three hours of Disney Channel's live-action shows in the afternoon. At night it started to show American shows that either ATV or RED weren't interested in airing anymore. It still shows some telenovelas, though.
  • IFC, which used to stand for Independent Film Channel, was originally devoted to showing independent and foreign films commercial-free and uncut (many titles in The Criterion Collection turned up). It always had original programming, but in 2010 they acquired the rights to many cult classics admired television shows, like Monty Python's Flying Circus, Arrested Development, and Undeclared. They also began to show mainstream-but-independently-financed films films such as A Fish Called Wanda in addition to their regular fare. By year's end, they started to show commercials during their programming instead of just between them — including their films (still uncut for content and time, but with two minutes of commercials inserted in random places) — while announcing a half-dozen more shows they'd acquired. This switch from being an indie film channel to cult show central wasn't necessarily a bad thing, especially since the company that owns IFC (AMC Networks) bought Sundance Channel in 2008 and both channels pretty much did the same thing.
    • Years later, however, IFC's lineup began to consist only of mainstream films and the above TV shows with only a few hours devoted to airing actual independent films. By the time they legally retired the channel's full name in 2014, IFC had become a horror and comedy-oriented AMC. Today, IFC has become an alt-comedy network, much in the vein of [adult swim], with original series like Comedy Bang Bang (which is popular as filler programming in the early morning hours) and only a smattering of movies. Though as far as alternative comedy goes, it's hard to justify a typical day of the channel's programming being nothing but Two and a Half Men repeats.
    • While Sundance Channel picked up some of IFC's indie slack, even they aren't immune to decay. Yet, since changing their name to Sundance TV in 2014, the channel has arguably become the least offensive of the AMC Networks when it comes to decay. Sundance's original programming seems to be taking the HBO/Showtime approach, while their acquired slate is mainly composed of both independent and critically-acclaimed films and classic TV shows such as The Andy Griffith Show and Mash.
  • ReelzChannel bills itself as "TV about movies", and began with a format which consisted of six movie news-related programs airing in a loop throughout the day back in 2006. However, this quickly proved to be monotonous and low-rated (E! also started with a channel format like this but also eventually changed in 1990), not to mention that the Internet has proven to be a better way to find out about entertainment news and criticism than watching a traditional 'junkets and press releases' program on ReelzChannel, along with the studios holding back publicity material for film's website and/or their DVDs.

    Thus, the channel still has some of those movie news shows (as well as movie shows hosted by Leonard Maltin and Richard Roeper), but because of forced decay also airs sitcom reruns like Becker, 3rd Rock from the Sun, and Ally McBeal that few watch these days, along with Johnny Carson's Comedy Classics. The network also killed their "talk about movies but never show them" format by picking up a few '80s and '90s films to air. The turning point came when Reelz picked up The Kennedys, a heavily-criticized bio film disowned by the History Channel, to try to gain some publicity and carriage for the channel, no matter how negative it would be. Airing The Kennedys may have been a good move for them. Reviews weren't bad, the ratings were decent (but high for the channel), and it won Greg Kinnear an Emmy.

    As of 2014 however, it's taken the Style Network/Oxygen template of decay. With reality series about "real" Hollywood Hillbillies, the distantly related-twice removed cousins of Al Capone getting into Duck Dynasty-esque antics (except with "the Mob"), and annoyingly long repeats of Snapped from Oxygen that were already run to death on the main network. Their "news" division is reduced to producing America's sixth-rated entertainment magazine show, Celebrity Page (which, until March 2016, was associated with America's sixth-rated entertainment magazine, OK!), featuring fluff content that makes Extra seem like the BBC covering the Ukraine in comparison.
  • Def II was BBC2's strand for "youth" programming in the late 80s/early 90s, broadcasting for a couple of hours in early evenings most days. They started off with fairly decent documentaries/current affairs, credible music shows, and some quirky reruns. But by the time it was cancelled its reduced running time comprised mainstream sitcom The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, ancient repeats of Buck Rogers, and the jawdroppingly-moronic music program Dance Energy, i.e. anything cheap that might attract a few ironic students or small children. Eventually they dropped the branding and absorbed what was left into the main schedules.
    • BBC2 itself seems to have been undergoing some slippage in recent years. Meant to be the more "highbrow" or minority-interest channel, of late much of this role has been taken over by BBC4 and BBC2 is becoming somewhat more mainstream.
  • In Australia, ONE HD was established as a sports channel before beginning to play movies and now drama series such as Sons of Anarchy and C.O.P.S.. This change was arguably inevitable, due to the parent Ten Network deciding to establish a sports channel when it didn't really have the rights to any sports that Australians might actually want to watch, certainly not enough to enable 24/7 sports programming. This led a rival network executive to deride the channel as being about "truck racing from Idaho".
  • Animal Planet has been slipping some lately. In 2008, the channel was revamped and many new programs were added in an attempt to attract the adult, more mainstream audience. Fewer documentaries are being shown, and the currently running shows (such as Tanked And Hillybilly Handfishing) focus more on people than on animals. One show, Haunting, is basically a generic ghost/paranormal show with a passing mention of the dog barking at nothing. Two other paranormal shows on the network, Lost Tapes and Freak Encounters, are mostly about people finding or encountering things of cryptozoology and myth, though primary animals and others have slipped in. The shows that actually focus on animals (such as Fatal Attractions, and Infested!) generally portray them in a negative light.
    • The network's new slogan, "surprisingly human", pretty much sums up their current state; most of the time, the animals are now simply used as an excuse to air a show that actually focuses on the people. The channel has harnessed the general public's fascination with watching adorable animals doing adorable things with its annual Puppy Bowl (basically puppies on a football field on the day of the Super Bowl, complete with Harry Kalas commentating prior to his death), and Too Cute. Yet in the past few years, they've rapidly accumulated new programs that don't even try to pretend that they have anything to do with animals. Dirty Jobs seems to try and focus more on episodes with segments involving animals, but often slips into non-animal stuff.
    • Nat Geo Wild seems to be a rip-off of Animal Planet's current state: shows about people that do something to animals with some hold-out all-nature shows. Although Animal Planet's "It's Me or the Dog" was probably based off of Dog Whisperer, Nat Geo Wild has plenty of copied series. When Animal Planet made a show about fish tank manufacturers, it got copied immediately. NG Wild even had a "Fish Bowl" on the day of the Puppy/Super Bowl (though it was even more of a No-Hoper Repeat, consisting entirely of goldfish swimming in a bowl with various Funny Background Events.)
  • As of June 2012, Great American Country, a rival to CMT, is airing reruns of shows like Paula's Home Cooking, Road Tasted, and John Ratzenberger's Made in America, shows that have nothing to do with country music, though it's probably more to exploit natural connections of the programming of other Scripps networks that fits in well with GAC's southern-tinged audience. That, and when most music video viewing is on YouTube, better to air anything that actually gets ratings. They also air the National Finals Rodeo, which does make sense on a network of this calibre too.
  • In Canada, Space — which is Syfy's de facto Canadian counterpart, emulated much of its slippage (barring professional wrestling) due to the Sci Fi Ghetto and having depended on importing and/or co-producing programming with them.) The channel, despite having an on-air presentation that was quite intergalactic, was airing more paranormal and fantasy-oriented series (such as Supernatural, Merlin, and The Almighty Johnsons), horror films, Syfy's reality shows, and even crime dramas (such as Castle, although the series' Genre-Busting and recurring themes do fit within these realms)
    • This shift was lampshaded by a re-brand in March 2013, which dropped the galactic motifs and changed their slogan to "It's all around you" (See what they did there?) to reflect their more Earth-bound lineup. The re-branding coincided with the premiere of its original co-production Orphan Black—which, however, has managed to be a very successful series. This was followed up in 2015 by another co-production in the form of Killjoys, which, for once, is a series set in space.
    • Re-runs of the various Stargate-verse and Star Trek shows are still present in its regular weekday lineup, along with Doctor Who. Even Space has, in the past, poked fun at the amount of Star Trek it has aired.
  • fXM: Movies from Fox (later renamed Fox Movie Channel in 2000) was created in 1994 as a pay cable network that aired films from the 20th Century Fox library uncut, and featured lots of vintage and/or obscure titles. This format stuck around until 2012, when the primetime hours were branded as FX Movie Channel — which airs films acquired for FX, including those from third-party studios, edits and all — a complete 180 of the channel's original concept.
    • As of June 2014, what was once known as Fox Movie Channel has been relegated to merely a programming block on the fully re-named FXM, under the FXM Retro branding. The digital broadcast network Movies! (partly owned by Fox) would pick up most of Fox's classic films.
  • BBC America was intended to be almost a Transatlantic rerun farm, giving American fans of British television a way to get their fix of Doctor Who, Being Human, and Top Gear, usually on the same day as British Audiences. Possibly due to British Brevity and a need to fill out their schedule, they've also started showing American-made shows like The X-Files, Battlestar Galactica, and Star Trek: The Next Generation. The reasoning behind this was those shows all feature British actors (Gillian Anderson, Jamie Bamber, and Patrick Stewart, respectively) despite two of them playing Americans and the third (supposed to be) playing a Frenchman. Beginning in 2012, they introduced original series like Copper and Orphan Black, the latter series going on to be a huge success both in the U.S and Canada. Yet on the other hand, BBC America also showed Trailer Park Boys, which (like Orphan Black) was partially justified in that Canada is part of the Commonwealth.
    • Though the channel is no longer the rerun farm it once was, it was still dedicated enough to actual British programming. New and re-ran episodes of the aforementioned Doctor Who, Top Gear, and Being Human, as well as other BBC shows like Nature and Dragon's Den are still heavily promoted, and even films by the British-born Alfred Hitchcock can be justified. Yet, BBCA have also shown the National Lampoon's Vacation movies and aired reruns of AMC's Into the Badlands. Then, just when viewers think they've figured out the channel's endgame, BBCA added another American-made sci-fi show in Star Trek: The Original Series, but also threw in reruns of CSI: Miami in 2016.
    • As of 2018, the channel's current schedule is dominated by American-made sci-fi and fantasy programming, with the only British programming to get a lion's share of airtime being Planet Earth marathons and early-morning repeats of Doctor Who. At this point, the most remotely British aspect of BBC America is BBC Worldwide's majority ownership stake.
  • The Canadian channel The Score had historically been a quirky sports news channel in the vein of ESPNEWS, spending much of its day airing blocks of sports news and highlights, Headline News style (i.e. on a video jukebox with an almost old-school ESPN 2-like feel). While it has always aired "leftover" sports not picked up by other networks in primetime (i.e. WWE, U.S. college sports), its afternoon programming (which was populated primarily by more in-depth shows such as Live @ theScore, The Footy Show) slipped on April 30, 2013, when the CRTC officially approved Rogers' purchase of the channel. Promptly, the afternoon programs were all thrown out and the lineup focused solely on TV simulcasts of radio shows from sister station The Fan 590, including Tim & Sid(ironically hosted by two former Score personalities) and Prime Time Sports (Which was popular enough to be retooled as a program on the main regional Sportsnet channels).
    • The Score was rebranded as "Sportsnet 360" on July 1, 2013; aside from the aforementioned programming changes, Rogers did not mess it up too much off the bat; in fact, the quality and accessibility of its own sports output (mostly Canadian university sports) improved with access to Sportsnet's production resources and promotion. Rogers also got a more accessible outlet for secondary national programming (Sportsnet One is a digital channel, while 360 is a historically basic cable channel with better carriage), Sportsnet's UFC rights were moved almost-exclusively to the channel, and it began to air NHL games in the 2014-15 season under Rogers' new contract.
    • In 2014 it was speculated that, especially given how much it paid for the rights, Rogers was planning to cut back some of its other niche programming rights, particularly the UFC, to focus more on the NHL. Sportsnet also cancelled almost all of its university football coverage in the 2014 season (basically, everything but the national semi-final games and the Vanier Cup), citing low viewership note . They didn't explicitly blame the NHL, but the timing of that change couldn't be more symbolic. TSN has since nabbed quite a few of Sportsnet's previous staples, including UFC, UEFA's Champions League and Europa League, as well as ATP tennis events.
    • Brady and Walker, which replaced Tim & Sid sometime after the aforementioned re-launch, got pulled from the channel after one of its hosts got fired. Like Prime Time Sports, Tim & Sid would also make the leap to Sportsnet Regional.
  • Viceland has slipped from its original format as a result of low ratings internationally. The U.S version, which replaced H2, brought in repeats of It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia. The U.K version, owned by Sky, one-upped the U.S by not only joining Philadelphia with fellow FX series Archer, but by bringing back anime to British television, with such shows as Cowboy Bebop, Tokyo Ghoul, Samurai Champloo, and even the English premiere of Seraph of the End. In Canada, Rogers decided to cut their losses and shut down the domestic Viceland channel in March 2018. Ironically, Rogers also owns the Canadian FX Networks, which also airs Philadelphia.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/NetworkDecay/Slipped