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Monster Lord
Even sexy vampiresses realize the value of keeping "homely" friends nearby.

"They say the Zombie Master controlled these foul creatures even before his own death, but now that he is one of them, nothing can make them betray him."
— Flavor text on the Magic: The Gathering card "Zombie Master"

Some monster or non-human species have aristocracies with Blue Bloods that just so happen to actually have blue blood. And rarely, lowborn monsters (frequently former humans) can aspire to earn such titles with "heroic" deeds, political savvy, or by dint of Asskicking Equals Authority. Beyond that though, some Monster Lords are physiologically different from rank and file Mooks. Maybe the species as a whole has a caste system, and over time the leaders have become a different "race" that is more powerful by nature. Other monster races may have a life cycle where old or "mature" mooks become lords if they grow really powerful, use a magic ritual, or they have a really strong willpower.

The net effect is that the Monster Lord is a King Mook with a few extra bells and whistles. In video games, their "sprite" will likely be wholly unique, not a Palette Swap. They may be able to repel things that weaken lesser monsters. Their children/infectees will likely be stronger than other mooks, have an easier time becoming a Monster Lord, or naturally be born one. They will usually become a Hive Queen or have great Psychic Powers over the lesser monsters, especially ones they create. And of course, they will be physically stronger, tougher, and faster.

Frequently, the Monster Lord will be The Man Behind The Monsters. Even though not human, they will look human-like because the process of climbing the Evolutionary Levels ladder raised them higher up on the Bishounen Line. Of course, if there's a rung above Monster Lord, it'll probably be a One-Winged Angel and make them monstrous again. They also tend to be the oldest members of their species, thus the strongest.

One downside though is that Monster Lords tend to be epic spell components or chow in the Food Chain of Evil. So wizards, other monsters, or even their own underlings will try to eat them to gain more power.

Supertrope of Insect Queen. For the mechanical equivalent, see Mechanical Monster for examples. Contrast The Man Behind The Monsters.

See also the Monster Progenitor, who is usually the top Monster Lord of its kind.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Anime & Manga 
  • Guyver has this in the Zoalords, Hyper-Zoanoids, and bog standard Zoanoids.
  • The Youkai in InuYasha fit this; specifically InuYasha's father was a Lord of all the Inu-Youkai and had non-Inu Youkai vassals.
  • The Abyssal Ones in Claymore, the strongest among the Awakened Beings and Yoma. In particular, Isley of the North, who rallies an army of lesser Awakened Beings to assault Pieta.
  • The royal family of monsters in Princess Resurrection fit this trope to a 'T'.
  • Played with in Slayers: while all Mazoku are formed from concentrated negative human emotion, the five Mazoku Lords are distinct in that they were literally created from the Dark Lord's (who represents the sum entirety of said negative emotion) own substance.

    Literature 
  • The Dark Tower series by Stephen King has a couple of examples. The Low Men are weak-minded ratlike creatures; they rank lower than the Taheen, which are more or less humans with animal heads; and the whole bunch turns out to be led by ancient vampires. Among the vampires themselves, there are a couple of weak echelons made up of people converted to vampirism by the ancients, who are again the Monster Lords.
  • Myrdraal in The Wheel of Time are Monster Lords to the Trollocs.
  • Dracula is a count, and the other vampires mentioned in the book clearly view him as superior... but this may be less to do with his title and more to do with the fact he's implied to be their husband and/or father and also happens to be a badass.
  • The villains of Mercedes Lackey's Obsidian Trilogy are the Endarkened, who draw inspiration from classical depictions of demons and devils, with such features at bat wings and red skin. The servants of their world are Lesser Endarkened, who are uglier and lack wings, but have fur and cloven feet.
  • Just about every non-human faction in The Dresden Files has these. Notable examples are all of the various gods and their followers, the Sidhe (with their three-queen hierarchy), and the Goblins with their Erlking. The Red Court of Vampires has a king. Lord Raith for the White Court vampires.

    Live Action TV 
  • Vampires in Buffy the Vampire Slayer can become "Lords" if they live long enough... usually, this results in their Game Face getting stuck on.
  • Angel, meanwhile, had the Archduke Sebassis, lord of a legion of demons.
  • In Farscape, the Scarran ruling class looks far more humanoid than the "horse-faced" variety the series introduced first.
  • The officer caste Martian Ice Warriors in Doctor Who are very different in appearance from the usual ones (slimmer and much less heavily-armoured), although contrary to fanon the name "Ice Lord" is never used on-screen.
  • The Alphas in Teen Wolf all the way. While Betas are limited to Wolf Man, Alphas can fully shape-shift into huge, half-wolf forms. They're also stronger, heal better, and are the only type which can create more werewolves.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Dungeons & Dragons has had this with Lizard Kings (lizard men), Lamia Nobles, Noble genies, "Greater" monsters (basilisk, daemons/demons/devils, lammasu, shedu), demon princes and archdevils. A couple of adventures have had zombie lords as well.
  • Kindred in Vampire: The Requiem grow stronger with age and experience, represented by the power stat Blood Potency. Truly powerful vampires (Blood Potency 6) can only feed on humans note  and can create bloodlines which they can bestow on all their progeny and even supplicant vampires. Basically, a bloodline is a second "clan" that gives all vampires in the bloodline a fourth in clan discipline, which is often unique and very powerful compared to the core ten. Of course, they also develop a second curse.
    • The Ventrue also style themselves as this in both Requiem and Masquerade (its predecessor) to the point where their nickname in Masquerade is "Blue Bloods," though they have the same weaknesses as most other vampires; on the other hand, their Blue Blood nickname probably stems from their tradition of Embracing nobility and they do wield the majority of temporal influence. There's even a Ventrue bloodline in Requiem, the Deucaliones, who are formed around the idea that the Ventrue are the supreme clan and all others are innately flawed (which they are, but of course so are the Ventrue).
    • In Requiem, vampires can become this literally by creating Ghouled animals and plants, or by creating Larvae as minions — Larvae are "incompletely embraced" juvenile vampires, which thusly function more like blood-drinking, sun-averse zombies. This path is easier for Draugr than regular vampires, though.
  • Exalted's Raksha Nobles, the more powerful type of Fae, are as different from (non-heroic) Commoner fae as a protagonist is from a mook- literally.
    • The Descending Hierarchy of Malfeas is also like this; by order of the Yozi Cecylene, the lawmaker of Hell, the greatest demons (generally those of the Third Circle, the souls of the Yozis) are designated Unquestionable, Second Circle Demons (the souls of the Third Circles) and the most exceptional First Circles are citizens, with numerous privileges and protections, and all others are merely serfs, beholden to whatever commands those of higher rank would impose on them. The Yozis technically preside over the entire hierarchy, but are functionally distant, and even the Unquestionable are more preoccupied with their own alien agendas, so most actual politicking and conquest is done by the citizens without reservation.
  • Magic: The Gathering has this in the Zendikar Block. Only the most powerful vampires can convert people into true vampires by draining their blood, but lesser vampires can create zombies (called nulls) by draining the blood completely from a target. This power doesn't come up much in the game, but it is there in the fluff. The picture for this page features a vampire and some follower nulls.
    • Magic has these all over the races, and they used to even have the creature type "Lord." The type has been lost, but the effect remains: they power up other creatures of the same type, and some even make more of them, or make them easier to cast. Because the old versions of these cards bore the "Lord" type before the Grand Creature Update (which instead made them the same class of creatures and made it so that their abilities didn't affect themselves, but could affect other copies), now any card that boosts creatures of the same type are called "Lords". Goblins, Soldiers, and Elves are popular choices for lords because of their consistent focus on a group mentality, but there have been lords for Vampires, Merfolk, Zombies, Treefolk, Saprolings, Elementals, Warriors, Faeries, and Beasts. There's also Adaptive Automaton, who in exchange for having no abilities other than buffing others, has the ability to buff any type of creature of your choosing.
    • The Innistrad block has recently given rise to several of these, as it is largely based on Gothic Horror. Vampires have Olivia Voldaren, capable of turning other Creatures into Vampires, getting stronger because of it and then taking control of them, as well as the Bloodline Keeper/Lord of Lineage card which creates Vampires and then transforms when you have enough, making them stronger as well.
    • The Lorywn-Shadowmoor block brought a megacycle of "Lieges", Ten creatures with 2 colors each that buffed other creatures that shared the same colors with it (the more colors they shared, the more they buffed). The set of allied color Lieges had minimal effects beyond this, usually some generic effect such as "trample" or "Flying", while the enemy colored lieges had effects ranging from being a nuisance (summoning worms each turn) to devastating (such as destroying any creature you want when you cast a dual colored spell of the same color). They were effectively lords for creatures of their colors.
    • Liege of the Tangle is implied to be the collective will of Mirrodin's forests, or at least one of the rulers of the "trees" there. It's effect is that it can "awaken" your lands into powerful elementals, specifically 8/8 elementals. Being an 8/8 elemental itself, this implies that it was the lord of the "tree spirits" and it was unique in that it could awaken others.
  • Rune Giants in Pathfinder were magically bioengineered by a vanished civilization to be Monster Lords for giantkind as a whole. They are enormous (around forty feet tall, which is about twice as tall as the next-largest giant races), and have some magical mind-control abilities that are particularly effective against giants. Other giants don't like them much.
  • In Promethean: The Created, most Pandorans are effectively mindless - even the ones with some degree of intelligence are more "animal cunning" than "thinking creature". Sublimati, however, have broken through that into true sentience. They often gather a number of lesser Pandorans around them as a hunting pack (typically with the Transmutation "Mantle of Lordship" - learnable only by Sublimati or Centimanus Prometheans), with which they track down and entrap Prometheans to feed on. Some Sublimati have other thoughts than just hunting, as well; one, the Lady of Chains, went so far as to start a cult among human beings. It has its own website.
  • Warhammer Fantasy Battle and Warhammer40000 both have several of these. Some of the more notable ones:
    • The Daemonic Heralds are more or less the rank-and-file daemons you can normally choose to fill out your armies, but have special perks to them (called Locus/Loci as of the latest edition) as well as heightened attributes (differs depending on the kind of daemon, as Khornate Daemons just have better statistics while Tzeentchan Heralds are more powerful wizards). The fluff itself implies that all daemons of the same alignment are the same, it's just that the higher ranked ones are just way more powerful versions of it's underlings. The Chaos Gods themselves are implied to be the most powerful Daemons of their alignments (although this is by a wide margin, as even Khorne's greatest champion is but a mere insect compared to him), and it's outright stated that there are many, many lesser gods that are just not as influential as the big 4.
    • The mortal worshippers of Chaos in both settings results in this as well. As a champion rises through the ranks, he gains the attention of the Chaos Gods and are granted their boons in the form of mutations or daemonic artifacts. The end result is the mortal becoming a full daemon; either they master their new abilities and ascend to the status of Daemon Prince (on par with most Greater Daemons in terms of power) or they succomb to the insanity brought on by the daemonic influence and become Chaos Spawns (gibbering masses of flesh that have no right existing, let alone moving under their own power).
    • Skaven who are born with Black Fur are taken away to be trained into Stormvermin, their elite fighting regiment. Their black fur is an indication that they are capable of growing larger and stronger than the common skaven, and thus can surpass the usual meek strength of the normal ratmennote . Likewise, Skaven born with Grey Fur are marked by their patron god, the Horned Rat, as being future Grey Seers. Grey Seers are powerful wizards of the Skaven and are held with both awe and suspicion; awe because they can invoke the wrath of the Horned Rat to kill their enemies, suspicion because you never know when you'll be deemed "an enemy".
    • Genestealer Patriarchs from Warhammer 40k are ancient purestrain Genestealers who managed to start up it's own cult. It's maturity has granted it psychic powers over the other members of it's cult, even other purestrains. However, because it's so old (and because it's servants dots upon it), it has grown obese, making it less suited to the physical combat prowess of it's younger broodmates. It compensates by being one of the most powerful psykers within the Tyranid Vanguard force. A similar creature, the Broodlord, is instead a heavily modified Genestealer that retains it's combat prowess and it's psychic powers, in exchange for no longer being able to control more than his immediate brood (which is usually only around 30 genestealers rather than a whole planetary force).
  • Orks (and orcs). Orks biologically follow Large and in Charge, as the more an ork fights and the more boyz are under him, the bigger he gets, and therefore the more fights he can win and the more boyz will follow him (due to beating the leaders of rival clans). The most successful bosses call themselves warbosses, and really big armies are led by warlords.

    Video Games 
  • Disgaea has this, even if you don't count the basically human Overlords. Examples include the higher tiers of most of the monster classes (Zombie King, Orc Master/King, Lord Cat God) as well as the Nether Nobles and some bosses.
  • Starcraft has a justified variant of this with Kerrigan. She's more human than the rest of the Zerg because she is an infected human.
    • More like a Human-Zerg hybrid than an infectee.
    • With Kerrigan's deinfestation in Starcraft II part 1, it looks like this trope will be played straighter than ever come Heart of the Swarm, as the mostly-human Kerrigan will still be commanding some, if not all, Zerg.
  • Doom 2 has the Arch Vile, which is not only the most powerful non-boss monster, but also one of the most human in its appearance. It has the power to bring dead monsters back to life.
  • Kingdom Hearts has Organization XIII for the Nobodies.
  • Popularized by the Trope Codifier Dragon Quest, medieval j-RPGs often have their Big Bad played by a "Maoh," a loose term often translated as "Demon King". It has become the series tradition for a Big Bad since the 3rd installment in 1988. Whatever species they actually are, they tend to rule over the local monsters and command some kind of dark magic. Unless it's just a negative title.
  • Daedra from The Elder Scrolls series play the trope straight. There is a clear heirarchy with unintelligent beasts at the bottom, various human-animal hybrids like Daedroth, Spider Daedra, and Winged Twilights in the middle, and the intelligent, humanoid Dremora/Daedra Lords at the top.
    • In the Dawnguard add-on to Skyrim, the Vampire Lords have all the powers and weaknesses of a lesser vampire, but can access a very powerful One-Winged Angel form that no other vampire can access. They gained these powers because they have a stronger connection to Molag Bal, the god that created vampires.
  • In Monster Girl Quest this trope is used by its very name.
  • Tewi Inaba from the Touhou series is a Rabbit Lord (or Lady, as the case may be), having evolved into a near-human form by dint of simply living long enough. (Chen and Ran from the same series don't exactly qualify, as they were created that way.)
    • In general, Eastern mythology (from which the series borrows heavily) often holds that an animal which lives long enough becomes a supernatural being or youkai, gaining powers and the ability to take on a humanoid form. Of course, modern works tend to use this mainly as an excuse to make their characters a Little Bit Beastly.
  • The Darkstalkers from the eponymous series have their own social hierarchy and aristocracy in Makai. The weakest members in the S and A Class noble families in Makai (from which Morrigan and Demitri hail from) are borderline Physical Gods, while C Class comprises livestock, slaves and humans, and D Class are monstrous/inhuman beasts.

    Webcomics 
  • Poharex has the Horned Snakes, which make up the commanders and officers in Darrakith's army, while the Silver Snakes, a different species, are the low-rank infantry.

    Western Animation 
  • Chaotic: the ant-like Danians have the battle masters that command the common foot soldiers (often in the Bad Boss kind of way) and then the queen that rules over all of them.
  • In How to Train Your Dragon 2 Bewilderbeasts are massive ice-breathing dragons who can command smaller dragons and rule nests as the "Alpha". The first one to appear is a good guy who protects his nest from dragon-trappers and gathers food for them. Unfortunately Drago Bludvist turns out to have a Bewilderbeast of his own, which under his command kills the good Bewilderbeast and takes control of all the adult dragons. Fortunately Hiccup manages to help Toothless resist and defy him, causing all the dragons to recognize Toothless as their Alpha.


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