Adjective Noun Fred

A particular title structure like "Witch Hunter Robin", where the title takes the form of "Adjective Noun Propername", or a slight variation of that basic form. Often (but not always) the noun/adjective phrase describes what kind of thing the proper name belongs to.

Sub-Trope to Character Title.

This can overlap with Role Called; however, unlike Role Called, this kind of title doesn't necessarily refer to the main character. Compare Character Name and the Noun Phrase and The Noun Who Verbed. For someone whose actual name is Adjectivenoun, see Luke Nounverber. If the title is just The Adjective Propername (more likely in Silver Age comics than anime), that's The Adjectival Superhero. See Mad Lib Anime Title for other common patterns in anime titles.

This is normal practice in Japanese, and many translations keep the Japanese wording, however odd it may sound in English. A more English-sounding equivalent would be "Fred the Adjective Noun" or "Fred: Adjective Noun".


Title examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Anime and Manga 

    Comic Books 
  • Amazing Agent Luna
  • Parodied by Warren Ellis in Transmetropolitan, the in-universe anime series based on Spider Jerusalem is Magical Truthsaying Bastard Spidey. An extra adjective, but probably what Ellis was going for.
  • Adam Warren once did a Sailor Moon-esque parody of Genął titled Magical Drama Queen Roxy.

    Film 

    Folklore 
  • The Norwegian tale "White Bear King Valemon."

    Literature 

    Live Action TV 

    Newspaper Comics 

    Video Games 

    Webcomics 

    Western Animation 
  • Disney Channel Japan strikes again with Kikai Zone Gravity Falls ("Mysterious Zone Gravity Falls").
    • Likewise, the Japanese title of "The Hand That Rocks the Mabel" is "Chōnōryoku Shōnen Gideon" ("Psychic Boy Gideon").
  • Also from Disney Channel (but not just in Japanese for this one), American Dragon Jake Long.

In-story examples:

    Anime and Manga 
  • Some One Piece Characters, capitalized on by the World Government in their bounty posters:
    • Straw Hat Luffy
    • Cat Burglar Nami
    • Black Leg Sanji
    • Demon Child Nico Robin
    • Pirate King Gold Roger
    • Hawk Eyes Mihawk
    • Fire Fist Ace
    • Dark King Silvers Raleigh
      • Also in the Chopperman filler, you get characters like "Pervert Monster Sanjilops".

    Literature 

    Live Action TV 
  • Parodied in MA Dtv with the character and vaguely Asian-stereotype Miss Swan, who ran the "Gorgeous Pretty Beauty Nail Salon."

    Video Games 
  • In Banjo-Tooie, each boss has a silly descriptor, like "Grubby Boiler Monarch Old King Coal" or "Self-Important Anglerfish Lord Woo Fak Fak". Klungo actually gets a new one each time you fight him.
  • The boss captions in the Turbo-Grafx 16 version of Valis II are given in this format (the one exception, "Haizen the Ruthless," may be due to the general inconsistency of the translation).
  • Yoshi signs his message to Mario in Super Mario World as "Super Dragon Yoshi."
  • Dark Souls and its sequel seem to love this trope almost as much as the *Name* of *Location* variant. Many of the named NPCs and bosses seem to follow this convention. While some seem to be legitimate titles (Chaos Witch Quelaag, Royal Sorcerer Navlaan), others are clearly not (Big Hat Logan, Ancient Soldier Varg).
  • In Disgaea: Hour of Darkness, the stories Etna makes up for the next chapter previews all have titles in this form.
  • In the Wild Arms series, most boss names follow this pattern.