Infant Immortality / Film

  • 2012 - Nothing bad will happen to you, so long as you keep hold of one or more children, or the dog. The Russian trophy wife learned this lesson the hard way.
    • The trope is actually averted twice in the movie, with the deaths of the families of Tony and Satnam (the Indian astrophysicist). In both cases, their moment of death happens while they're on the phone, and the film cuts to a character on the other end as the call suddenly cuts off.
  • Armageddon: Many people die in the opening cataclysm. A small pug is spared.
  • Taken to semi-extremes in Blade: Trinity. Dracula kidnaps an infant, and threatens to throw it off a skyscraper. He doesn't though, but instead tosses it in the air, letting it fly for roughly twenty feet, and then is caught hard by Blade. The infant survives all of this.
  • In the 80's, uber low-budget yet oddly entertaining Mexican supernatural slasher titled Cementerio del Terror, various characters are introduced, and ultimately twelve of them are put in the path of the psychotic killer and his army of zombies. They are three male college students and their three girlfriends out partying, five children out on a dare (the oldest being of about 14 years old and the youngest about 8), and a Dr. Loomis-esque doctor in search of the sadistic killer. Now, take three guesses as to which five characters survive the killer's rampage.
  • Cube is an example of a mentally handicapped adult being the only survivor of the nastiness. If one takes Cube Zero into account, it's very likely he too was murdered.
  • In the disaster movie Dante's Peak, the dog (an adorable Picardy Shepherd) disappears about halfway through the movie, while the family are escaping from the erupting volcano. At the end, it turns up alive and unharmed about of absolutely nowhere. This is the film that gave Grandma third-degree burns with sulphuric acid.
  • The movie version of Stephen King's Cujo ends, well, differently to the book.
  • The titular monster of the B-Movie The Giant Gila Monster gets a lot less scary when it completely fails to catch and eat a crippled nine-year old.
    • Which is a shame, as Giant Gila Monsters are so inherently terrifying.
  • Hard Boiled: An extreme case - A baby rescued by the hero not only avoids blowing up or getting shot at, he saves the hero's life by putting out his pants, which caught on fire.
    • Especially considering that adult innocents get shot and killed with disturbing regularity.
  • Hellboy II: The Golden Army had Hellboy fighting a monster while jumping around on a building, all the while juggling a baby. Most people would set it down or hand it over to the numerous bystanders for safekeeping but thanks to this trope, heroes are free to engage in these theatrics without ever actually harming a child.
    • Done in the first Hellboy film as well, only this time with a box full of kittens. Baby + Cat= Immortality
  • In Independence Day, both the child and the dog of the protagonist survive all of the events, including a ridiculous scene where the dog manages to leap out of the way of a nuclear blast wave just in the nick of time.
    • Of course, there's also a massive aversion as a few million kids are killed when the aliens destroy the cities. We see several of them being carried by their panicking parents in vain attempts to escape the fireballs.
    • Lampshaded in "Independence Day: Resurgence", when after the alien queen escapes her crashed ship and goes after a group of kids in a school bus a dog appears out of nowhere and David Levinson, who's trying to escape, asks the girl who's rescuing it "Are we really gonna wait for the dog?"
  • Woman in the Moon includes a young stowaway on the moon rocket who doesn't get injured during liftoff in spite of his lack of restraints, and is narrowly missed during a gunfight.
  • Metropolis features a horde of children trapped in a flooding underground city, all of whom are saved at the very last minute. (In the book, however, it's implied that at least a few of them drown.)
  • Mad Max: there is a high-speed car chase and a baby wanders onto the road. After playing the suspense for all it's worth, both cars miss the child by centimeters. Later in the movie, a mother and her 3-5-year old are brutally run down off-screen.
  • Played with in Men in Black, in which James Edwards, in a live-fire exercise with other potential MIB trainees, shoots a cardboard cutout of a little girl instead of the scary aliens. In a subversion, he justifies this by claiming one alien was simply exercising on a streetlight, the other was sneezing, and the little girl was out late at night, eight years old, with a college-level textbook in her arms, so she was up to something bad.
    • And, judging that he was chosen to join the organization, this reasoning was absolutely correct.
  • Despite decorating his boiler room with dismembered dollies and crushed tricycles, infamous dream-haunting child murderer Freddy Krueger was never shown on screen in the act of killing a child. Menacing them, yes, and their apparent ghosts do turn up in dream scenes, but actual murders were confined to teenagers and adults.
  • Almost averted in Orphan although originally Daniel was supposed to die after Esther smothered him with a pillow.
  • In Predator 2, the eponymous alien bounty hunter spares a pregnant cop, and later lowers his sights on a child with a plastic gun after realising the harmless nature of the kid's "weapon." This is justified by the creature's personality as an honour-bound warrior; there's no challenge or sport in killing unarmed children.
  • Scarface (1983): Tony Montana fails to kill one of his enemies after seeing his little kids in the back seat of his car. Tony "never fucked over anyone who didn't have it coming to him".
    "I don't need this shit in my life!"
  • In the classic The Shape of Things to Come, during the prelude to war, the young son of one of the main characters is shown marching and playing his toy drum. As the war breaks out, we see the same boy lying dead amid the rubble, still wearing the toy drum.
  • In Shoot 'em Up, Paul Giamatti's Affably Evil villain Hertz has no qualms about killing babies if that's what he's been told to do, and seems to gleefully enjoy running over his target in his car. He's then Squicked out when he discovers that the "baby" he ran down was only a decoy. (The real baby, meanwhile, survives being in the thick of gun battles over and over without so much as a scratch.)
  • In the famous "Garbage Day" Rampage in Silent Night, Deadly Night Part 2, Ricky shoots a bunch of people, but spares a little girl with a speech impediment on a tricycle.
  • Snakes on a Plane: the baby is saved from the vicious snakes despite being a handy size and ending up on the opposite side of the plane from the last time we saw it. The person that saved the baby is shortly rewarded with death (and it was her last day on the job, too). It's then subverted with a man throwing an annoying dog at a snake to save himself; he's also promptly rewarded with death and as he was such an ass nobody cared.
  • In Speed, it looks like the bus is going to hit a baby carriage, and it does. It turns out the carriage is full of cans.
  • Star Trek: Generations — Spot the cat survived the crash of the USS Enterprise (much to the distaste of the actor Brent Spiner, who played Data (the cat's owner) and who in real life hates cats).
  • In Volcano, all the small children survive. And so does a small Jack Russell named Bill. Just in case that wasn't enough to assure you no innocents were harmed there is even a brief news report on vets setting up an emergency pet shelter.
  • This trope (especially as it applies to dogs) was identified by Roger Ebert in his review of (the 2005 Tom Cruise version of) The War of the Worlds.
  • Subverted and played straight in The Witches, the Grand Head Witch (as is the case with any witch) hates children and wishes to ride the world of them. While they seem to never kill children outright though, they still have no problem turning kids into food to be eaten, turning them into stone, turning them into animals that will be killed soon after, or trapping them in paintings. The book also implies that several transformed children (including two frogs and Bruce) would be killed shortly after in various ways and the Witches' main plan in the book and movie involves turning children into mice so that they will be killed by their parents and teachers. On the other hand, the main character survives and the movie has a scene in which the Grand Head Witch seems quite taken with an infant in a carriage - before pushing it down the hill. The hero saves it (justified in that it was mainly to serve as a distraction, rather than trying to kill it).
  • Kids in Marvel movies can count on Stan Lee to pull them out of harm's way. (Lee, in turn, can count on Matt Murdock.)
  • Lampshaded in the film of Inkheart. When they are captured, Mortimer tells his daughter, Meggie, to pretend she is in a book, since "children always survive in books." She then reminds him that the rule doesn't always apply, such as in "The Little Match Girl".
  • In Halloween II (1981), Michael Myers ignores a maternity ward filled with sleeping babies, instead choosing to kill the doctors, nurses, and security guards. On the other hand, one has to imagine that the explosion at the end of the film couldn't have been good for those sleeping babies.
  • Brazilian horror icon Zé do Caixão aka Coffin Joe tends to be a vicious sadistic against adults, but won't tolerate any harm inflicted to children, whom he sees as the hopes for a better (or, in his case, I'd rather say superior) world.
  • Baby's Day Out. A bloody construction site.
  • In Midnight Movie the only survivor is the Bridget's little brother named...Timmy.
  • Played straight in Con Air. It seems like Garland Greene, who is tauted as a horrific serial killer, is about to kill the little girl he runs into near the abandoned airfield, but he doesn't.
  • Played straight with Jonesy the Cat in Alien, in the Animal Immunity version of this trope. Ripley leaves Jonesy behind when the Alien surprises her, and it curiously looks at the cat as if it's about to eat it. When Ripley gets back the Cat is unharmed.
  • Iron Man 2 : Did anyone really think that hammer drone would kill that kid?
  • In all the zombie attacks in World War Z not a single child is bitten, nor is a child zombie shown. Tomas survives improbably even after his parents are turned and a young boy in Israel who is seemingly doomed is spared as the zombie horde ignores him due to their inability to see the sick.
    • Of course, the kid is terminally ill and we never see him get treatment. Subverted Trope ?
  • Completely ignored in Grave Encounters 2, where, during a scene, the undead satanic doctor slices a baby and spills its blood all over a tied up patient. While you don't see the wound on the baby itself, it's still very visceral from the angle it's shot.
  • The Cabin in the Woods. Played for Black Comedy when a group of nine-year old Japanese schoolgirls defeat a Stringy-Haired Ghost Girl by turning it into a frog. It's reported they have zero fatalities whereupon one of the Punch Clock Villains responds with a Cluster F-Bomb, as they require a Human Sacrifice.
  • Big Ass Spider features a scene where the titular creature stalks a young girl at a city park, but just misses spearing her with one of its legs. (Elsewhere, lots of adults get speared/webbed/devoured..)
  • Zoe, the little girl standing in front of the tsunami and Akio, the little boy with Ford during the MUTO attack both live through the moments of peril that they experience in Godzilla (2014).
  • Adult deaths flow freely in Kingsman: The Secret Service, but in all the scenes of mass violence, children are conspicuously absent. The only child to come under any threat is Eggsy’s little sister and she survives.
  • While it looks like the little girl who got attacked by dinosaurs at the start of The Lost World: Jurassic Park was eaten, since the attack happens offscreen, the example is nonetheless played straight in that she's stated to have survived.
  • Played straight for the protagonists of Oculus, but they had eventually grown up, which puts them on the danger zone of being killed. Kaylie dies, and Tim is blamed for her murder.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/InfantImmortality/Film