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Fridge: Futurama
Fridge Brilliance
  • "All My Circuits". The hit-show beloved by robots everywhere in the universe. Most renowned for two aspects: Calculon's over-the-top acting and it's seemingly illogical overusage and exaggeration of TV drama cliches. Every episode we see is apparently unrelated to the previous ones shown, and even then, how could viewers possibly be expected to keep track of how many characters have amnesia, or split-personalities, or even heptuplets? Simple. They use their memory banks. Humans might be able to grasp part of "All My Circuits", true, but in the end it's target audience is robots! Robots who record the shows the episodes they watch and an easily remember all of the intricacies of the plot! To us, "All My Circuits" is an overhyped mess, but to the robots, it's just as amazing as lauded. Provided you've downloaded all the episodes.
  • In "Luck Of The Fryrish", Yancy Fry, Sr. (Phillip Fry's father) is depicted as being incredibly paranoid about nuclear war. Though this initially comes across as him simply buying into the Y2K panic, we discover in "Roswell That Ends Well" that the man he thought was his father was killed from a nuclear blast in a testing range. As such, it makes sense that he would have gone his whole life obsessing about that fact, to the point that he would construct a nuclear shelter.
  • This one actually involved my refrigerator. It's never bothered me that the Planet Express Ship constantly changes its design from episode to episode. I always figured it was the writer's way of messing with the fanbase. In fact I think Word of God confirms this. However, as I was rearranging the shelves in my fridge, it occurred to me that, in the future, most, if not all, structures might be easily rearranged. Most likely, every aspect of the ship can be switched around, or moved with relative ease. This is reinforced with all the in universe changes they make to the ship (like altering it to move underwater with paper mache)
  • Well, I just thought of Nixon and why we never see his "fabulous new bodies" he apparently needs to be re-elected as per his arguing that he has a new body and the Constitution clause doesn´t apply to him. Well...he doesn´t. As per Head in Polls, he apparently argues (and everybody acknowledges) that no "body" can be elected twice. As he is a mere head in the jar, he does not need anything to run as many times as he need. Why people of Earth are voting for him is however a different question...
    • Not to mention that he didn't even need the original "new body", since the old one only got elected to the American Presidency and he was running for Presidency of Earth.
      • They say that 'nobody can be elected president more than once' but never define it as President of Earth. Earth in Futurama is not a single super state but more of a conglomerate of independent states (I think this is directly stated in one of the commentaries). This troper thinks that the wording is specific so that you can't get elected President of one of the States or earth if you've been President more than twice, no matter what Presidency you held. They even say in 'A head in the polls' that 'United States is part of Earth'. Again this troper thinks it's not as much a Take that against US (that too) but a statement that US has teamed up with all other Nations to form a common ruling body to deal with earth colonies and other empires.
  • Something just hit me about Bender's personality when I rewatched the first episode. Before and during the climactic chase sequence in the head museum, Bender was nothing more than suicidally depressed and alcoholic who went by his programming (he initially refused to bend the metal bars of the window in the Hall of Criminals because he wasn't a de-bender and Fry's motivational speech was having no effect at all). When Bender walked into a lamp and got short circuted, his "mind", or programming, was realtered so that Bender would be able to bend the metal grate and become hooked on bending random objects. Near the end of the episode, he breaks out three beer bottles, drinks them all, and snatches Leela's ring off her finger. Now, this could just be Wild Mass Guessing, but it's possible that the Bender we know and love today could have resulted from that one jolt of electricity. In essence, from that one accident, Bender's total outlook on life was completely altered!
  • I just had a Fridge Brilliance moment about Leela. Specifically, why she's gone back and forth on Fry's obviously sincere love for her. Think, for a moment, about on of Leela's first focus episodes. It opened with her going on a date and utterly rejecting the man in question because he had a lizard tongue. Hypocritical, but telling. The episode goes on to show us that Leela's main problem with finding love is that she's very picky. She has standards and she sticks to them. All the men she's dated have been good looking men with high positions in society, or at least a decent income. The Mayor's aid, the doctor that gave her two eyes, even Lars was earning good money at the head museum. Now what does this all mean? Why does Leela need such high standards? Because if she has high standards, she's the one doing the rejecting. Think about it. If she wasn't the one being picky, she would be rejected at every turn by men not interested in dating a cyclops. Somewhere deep inside her mind she's still that little orphan girl hearing "One Eye! One Eye!" over and over again. She needs to find a good man, one who is handsome and successful and talented, or else she has given up and settled for less. She just can't do that. Add that mind-set to a man who works a dead-end delivery job, is childish, and has almost no responsibility to speak of, you get a flat rejection every time, moments of romantic brilliance or no. And even then, at least half of those moments (Saving the world, Proposing with the Stars, writing the Holophoner symphony) were either wiped from her memory or utterly ruined by what happened afterwards.
  • A rather minor example, but an example nonetheless. During "The Luck of the Fryrish," it is stated that Philip J. Fry was the first man to step foot on Mars. At first it seems quite minor, but if you put some thought into it, you'll realize that Yancy had named him after Fry so he could carry on his memory. As such, it's entirely plausible that Yancy had in fact directed him in this course, as it was Fry's dream to travel into space. This only makes the episode all the more heartwarming.
  • In "A Clockwork Origin", Farnsworth takes the gang to Odulvai Gorge to search for the "missing, missing link between man and ape." While digging up fossils, Hermes accidentially uncovers a flash-fossilized skeleton of what he states is "another one of Fry's dogs." But wait, if Seymour was established as Fry's only pet, and he had no other known dogs, how is this possible? Well, if you remember "Bender's Big Score", the supposedly "paradox-free" method of time travel that the Scammers uncovered created exact duplicates of the person who used the time sphere, and the time duplicate was always doomed to a horrible fate, you could argue that the Seymour that Lars kept company was a time duplicate as well, and that when Bender flash-fossilized him, that was his fate. Thus, the fossilized remains of the dog Hermes dug up could have been a time duplicate.
    • Or he was just making a joke.
      • More likely that everyone who knew Seymour and Fry's relation thinks any fossilized dog is Fry's, information on the 21 century is spotty at best.
  • In 'The Lesser of Two Evils', the crew visit the Past-o-rama show, which showcased the world of the 20th/21st century. However, to the viewer, one can see many anachronisms, including Einstein in a balloon, and cowboys chasing mammoths, so obviously, it is not a... perfect rendition. But why? Because over 1000 years has passed, and the information they would have had on our era - at best - would be incomplete due to 1000 years of erosion, weathering and other factors. Do we know really that much about the dark ages?
    • Although some of the icons used in that commercial did come from that time period. Einstein was reaching the height of his popularity around 1945, the common stereotype that we associate cowboys in media like television and movies were first seen in the early 1900's and 1910's.
    • And, of course, even if they do have knowledge of the time, at one point, everything flows together in history. Victorian England, for example. If you imagine what it looked like, you are probably thinking of how it looked around 1895, with about 63 years of Victoria squeezed into about an afternoon. Or the Wild West. The Dalton Brothers in gunfights against Wyatt Earp and Billy the Kid. Watch out boys, or Hanging Judge Roy Bean will get ya! We imagine everyone hanging out together in the Tombstone saloon, drinking whiskey and playing poker. And in a couple of hundred years, our times will too have flowed together with the last and the next.
    • The two alien invasions in the very first episode, where they were shown destroying the city around Fry (yet missing the cryogenic chamber lab) might have also destroyed some of that information, and plenty of internet databases that would have stored that kind of information, and over the years, people had to try to piece together whatever was left.
  • Whether intentional or not, there is a beautiful bit of foreshadowing in "Bender's Game". Remember the reason why Ben-I mean, Titanius Anglesmith didn't bite the big one when Fry tried to kill him? He was doing Gynecaladriel, Queen of the Water Nymphos in her sleeping bag. Then comes Season 6. Apparently, Bender was already attracted to Amy somewhere in the depths of his subconscious!
  • Attack of the Killer App: With the ending of the 3rd movie rendering dark matter inert and the 4th movie reviving extinct animals that presumably include the anchovy, which would be able to shut down her robot oil empire, how exactly does Mom plan on keeping her fortune? By emulating one of the most profitable companies of the twenty-first century and selling shiny gadgets that the population will flock to like sheep that are as overpriced as they are arguably overrated.
  • In "Roswell That Ends Well", Zoidberg says he has four hearts. Then later, in "A Taste of Freedom", it suddenly changes to three. Continuity Snarl? Not if you remember that the Roswell scientists took one.
  • In "I Second That Emotion", when the doctor took out Nibbler's fang, Fry noticed that there are rings on it, and the doctor suggested that it probably indicated Nibbler's age. Fry then said that it would take a genius to count all those rings, right before the doctor told him that, according to the rings, Nibbler is five. The joke is probably that Fry was too stupid to count five rings, but later in the series, we found out that Nibbler is older than the universe, and Fry has a "special" brain. It could be that Fry actually saw billions of rings, while the doctor only saw five, because Fry is the only one who are supposed to know that Nibblonians are an ancient race, and therefore only he sees billions of rings.
    • Note that the joke could also be the complete lack of logic in the vet's "If he's anything like a tree" argument.
    • Also note that the doctor had just received a head injury and wasn't thinking clearly.
    • The vet didn't even know what species Nibbler was, what would he know from teeth rings?
  • Also, at one point, Bender claimed that his father was killed by a can-opener. Considering that his mother is a robot arm, could it be that his father is a big can containing "material" to build a robot, which his mother "receives" and then assembles?
  • I just realized something: you know all the jokes in "All My Circuits" about the various Soap Opera cliches like "Fourth Evil Septuplet". Thing is, Calculon is a robot. He could have 7 identical models that are unusually close enough to consider themselves family.
  • Bender's name: not only is representative of his job ("I'm a Bender. I went to Bending college. I majored in Bending.), it's also representative of his character. Bender is seen almost continuously drinking, smoking, gambling and whoring. In other words, he keeps going on benders.
    • Or rather, he is constantly on one big bender.
    • As a Brit (where 'bender' is slang for a gay man) I illogically assumed for many years that it was a way of Getting Crap Past the Radar. Cue dumbfounded expressions from American friends a few years later...
  • In one episode, Fry says that Everybody Loves Hypnotoad has been going downhill since season 3. Fry has immunity to any kind of mental control thanks to his "superior, yet inferior mind", which means he has watched Everybody Loves Hypnotoad without being hypnotized! Which means that h-ALL GLORY TO THE HYPNOTOAD!
  • In "The Beast With A Billion Backs", Bender has to trade his first born son to the Robot Devil for an army of robots to conquer the Earth. Why does the Robot Devil ask for Bender's son instead of say his soul? He asked Bender in an earlier episode if he came back to Robot Hell to resume his eternal punishment, meaning Bender's soul (or the robotic equal) is still condemned to Hell and the Robot Devil already has it.
    • According to Conan O'Brien, Bender doesn't have a soul... Or freckles.
  • In "Lrrreconcilable Ndndifferences", the crew build a new Statue of Liberty. Why was this one not in "The late Phillip J. Fry"? It was a consequence of Fry's doing. Fry didn't exist in that future.
    • Or, the people of New New York got rid of the statue as soon as Ndnd and Lrrr left, because the statue was ugly and reminded them of slave labor.
  • In "The Why of Fry" we learn that the reason why he can save the universe is because he is his own grandfather. This wouldn't have happened if he went into the future. Previously, in "Anthology of Interest" the "what if" universe gets destroyed because Fry didn't go into the future.
  • Considering how small Nibbler is and how much he eats, all the food that enters his body must be compacted to an incredible density... so it makes sense that he poops Dark Matter.
  • Why do robots get high off electricity and why do they have a religion? Because they were programmed to develop a moral code and if all the robots of the world ran on electricity we'd run out, so they programmed them to feel bad after they did it.
    • And that argument doesn't apply to beer because...
      • Simple, actually. Beer costs money but electricity doesn't. You can't charge a toaster for the electricity it runs on; you charge its owner. Robots need beer to function and electricity to run. It's easier to make them more prone to something more profitable, so a backup program was installed in all robots to have deteriorating effects to electricity abuse so as to not give them leverage over humans, and robots who can't afford beer can't live solely on electricity.
  • Earth's position in the universe has never been explicitly stated, but the show has averted Earth Is the Center of the Universe nonetheless. Not only is Planet Eternium at the exact center, Earth must be very, very close to the edge - the Planet Express ship was able to reach the nearest edge of the universe (the one facing the cowboy universe) within an hour. However, it took them two weeks to get to the part of the universe that ended immediately after Dog Doo 8, and they were in danger of going so far away from Earth it would take a lifetime to get back when they went through the Panama Wormhole.
  • At first it seems like some parts of the series are subject to Technology Marches On, for example Lucy Liu's data is copied onto a floppy disk in the 3000's...But then you realize that after Earth was successfully invaded twice, technology probably has been left a little... funky.
  • A minor example: in "Why must I be a Crustacean in Love?", why does Fry have an oh crap look on his face upon hearing the Decapodian anthem? Because he is a massive fan of Star Trek (as seen in "Where No Fan Has Gone Before") - and as such, has seen all of the episodes, including the episode "Amok Time", which includes, amongst other things, Spock fighting Kirk to the same music.
  • In The Beast With A Billion Backs, Bender gives a speech about how love is selfish, needy, and greedy. This has a ton of Fridge Brilliance when you think about how during the course of the movie, Bender has been jealous of Fry's lovers and has been trying to spend time with him, unsuccessfully, and Fry's romantic relationships were getting in the way. Bender spends ridiculous amounts of effort to get Fry to spend time with him, and tries to get revenge on humanity as a whole when he doesn't. (even giving his firstborn son to get an army from the robot devil!) So when Bender was talking about love, he was referring to his feelings toward Fry. He loves Fry, though not in a romantic way, even if he won't admit it.
  • The end of Futurama: The Beast with a Billion Backs had this effect on me. At first, I thought they just couldn't think of a satisfying way to end the movie, and felt kind of cheated. Then I realized two facts that made me love the ending: 1) it was a satire - maybe a borderline Deconstruction - of the Christian apocryphal idea of the Rapture, which pointed out all the unfortunate ethical and moral implications inherent in the concept. 2) it showed off the true Crapsack World setting of Futurama. Fry's future is such a dystopia that not even "heaven" is safe from the underlying suckiness of existence. In any other show, it would have been depressing, but it perfectly fits the characters and setting of Futurama, so I found it funny. Make of that what you will. —Moogi
    • Especially considering Fry's line "I'm sorry, Bender. Robots don't go to heaven." — Andyroid
    • Futurama has many moments like this. One particular moment pops out in the second episode. At first, Fry and Leela's adventure on the moon seems like it's contrived. Why would a park make full functional rovers for a ride almost nobody goes on? But thinking about it, it showed me the stupidity of the future world, or alternatively, adaptivity by using rover that built the base. —Katana
  • In Teenage Mutant Leela's Hurdles, I was annoyed that they would consider the Professor being really really old worthy of voiding a lifetime discount. But in that episode, he was 161, and a year earlier had been rescued from the Near-Death Star because people are retired (from life) at the age of 160. His lifetime discount really did expire, and it was both a Continuity Nod and showing how things might become less simple now that he's not supposed to be among the living! -JET73L
    • Nope! It was revealed that The Professor was legally declared dead as a tax dodge (and/or taking a nap in a ditch) in "The Route Of All Evil".
    • At the same time, the Professor might've had to deal with that given his reaction to it, so either or could be the true reason behind that.
  • So I'm sitting at my desk, reading Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency, and I think, "This would be impossible to adapt to film. How could you transfer the contradictory and bizarre descriptions to a visual medium (e.g. "The ships hung in the air in exactly the way that bricks don't" from Hitchhiker's Guide)? Then I thought of Futurama, specifically when Fry had to jump out of a plane. An exchange like that wouldn't have looked out of place in a Douglas Adams book. To summarize: Futurama is the best adaptation of Douglas Adams' work ever. - randomfanboy
  • The "Retcon" (most fans will know the one as soon as I mention the episode in conjunction with Bender's Big Score) had to have been planned at least as far back as "Jurassic Bark", since Seymour almost definitely had to have been flash-fossilized while still alive and what are the chances that a dog would die of old age and immediately get flash-fossilized as early as 2012? -JET73L
  • In Bender's Game, Bender creates a Dungeons & Dragons character. The character's name? "Titanius Anglesmith". 'Titanius' is an obvious reference to metal, but it takes a second to notice the nuance of the surname - Angle-smith -> maker of angles -> bender. -Anomaly
  • When Leela was a baby, she was left with a note penned by her mother in order to convince the orphanarium that she was an alien, not a mutant. But a note written in Alienese, a language seemingly understood by many people on Earth, is untranslatable by Professor Farnsworth's translation machine? Leela's mother's exolinguistics skills meant that she could write complete nonsense on the note in a made-up language that looks deceptively like Alienese to a lay-person, but without actually meaning anything in Alienese. This would be like arranging Cyrillic characters randomly on paper and passing it off as Russian text to someone who is unfamiliar with the language and its script. The reason for this is so that no-one will discover that Leela is not an alien, the lack of backstory adding further credence. That way, when an abandoned Leela and the note are found outside Cookieville Minimum-Security Orphanarium, Mr. Vogel has no reason to doubt that Leela is an alien, and so won't attempt to translate the faux-Alienese. This is also why Professor Farnsworth is unable to translate the note: it doesn't actually mean anything in a real language. -kryz
    • Actually, the note can be translated. It says: "Your parents love you very much."
      • It's possible to combine both: the note is literally nonsense, but Leela's mother is being poetic or metaphorical or whatever when she says the note meant that they loved her.
      • Or it's a language she designed, and without any reference anywhere, means complete gibberish to anyone not Leela's mom.
      • Actually, it can be translated just like any other alien-language sign throughout the whole show, and it literally says "Your parents love you very much." if you translate it. This means that it couldn't be a language she designed, because it's the same common alien language, it's not gibberish, because it actually means something, and Leela's mom wasn't being metaphorical or anything! My guess is that the common alien language is not so common, and there are people who couldn't read it, like Farnsworth. Also, Farnsworth's machine probably doesn't work properly.
      • Maybe it's French, an incomprehensible dead language
  • In the preview of the first 90 seconds of the new season airing on Comedy Central was a joke where Fry asks Professor Farnsworth why he's suddenly covered in severe burns. The sight gag reveal was funny, but the extreme extent of the injuries left you wondering why Fry isn't in agonizing pain. When the premiere episode "Rebirth" aired, you learn at the end that the Fry with the burns, whom the viewers watched the entire episode was actually a robot Leela made out of grief because she thought the real Fry was dead. It then turns out the real Fry was still undergoing the rebirth process in the Professor's vat of stem cells. It explains why the Fry in the beginning didn't feel any pain from the burns. He was a robot! -Fastbak
  • I only just this instant realized that Zoidberg's accent, and, indeed, name, are supposed to be Yiddish. I know, I know... I know.- Tal9922
    • Speaking of Zoidberg, the second X Mas episode when he came in after everybody claimed they were Santa Claus while dressed as Jesus became much funnier when I realized that Jesus himself was originally Jewish so for the lone Jewish (or something) character to say that is more hilarious.
      • It's even more hilarious when you remember that Zoidberg is the only person who fits Robot Santa's incredibly high standards. Robot Santa considers even the tiniest of wrongs equal of punishment. Guess who's the one person who would've never been naughty.
      • He lived in relative poverty and always did everything he could to protect people. He was flawless, Jewish, honest, and celibate. He enjoyed being with his friends and loved helping and taking care of people. Even though he had a skill that enabled him to make money, he chose a life of poverty to be with the people he loved. Despite being horribly mistreated by many people, he genuinely had a great deal of affection for everyone he met.
      • Now, was that about Jesus or Zoidberg?
      • Jesus, obviously. Zoidberg doesn't have any skill to speak of at his job. The reason Zoidberg is in poverty is because he's an incompetent doctor.
      • Actually, Zoidberg is shown to be a relatively competent doctor, he just has no knowledge of human anatomy.
      • More specifically, he is competent, but only when operating on aliens.
      • And when Zoidberg got his 300 dollars, he realized that happiness comes from people, not things. Sounds like something a certain carpenter taught...
  • Anyone got any good Fridge Brilliance theories as to why there's "Just the one" alternate universe in "I Dated a Robot", but then the Professors manage to accidentally create gateways to a bunch of different universes in "The Farnsworth Parabox"? I feel like that's one that could benefit from some good fan-crackpot-theories. ~ United Shoes 37
    • I believe Word of God has it that "I Dated a Robot" features a parallel universe while "The Farnsworth Parabox" featured "perpendicular universes". Sounds good to me.
    • On that note, at first it sounds like David X. Cohen trying to be an ass, but it does make sense that those universes are not parallel universes, as the boxes are effectively intersection points, something parallel lines do not have with one another, so neither would parallel universes.
  • I never had a problem with the "Luck of the Fryrish" episode's ending, but it just suddenly became more meaningful to me. It is revealed at the end that the tombstone of one 'Philip J. Fry,' whom Fry thought was his spiteful brother Yancy after taking his name, contained a heartfelt engravement on it saying that this Fry had been "named for his uncle." It was Yancy's son. Anyway, this becomes more meaningful when you think of how the name "Philip J. Fry" for the Fry we know was itself a real-life tribute to the late Phil Hartman.- Invader897
  • Bender is named "Bender" because he "bends" things; girders, bars, people, right? Maybe, but, if he has to stay drunk to function correctly isn't he on a constant beer "bender"? —Misery Business 519
    • Yep. The funniest part is that when Bender does not get his booze, he develops a rust "5 o'clock shadow" and acts drunk. So basically, every time you see Bender acting normally, he's actually drunk off his ass.
      • Not just him! Every fully-functioning robot on Earth, if not the Universe, is by design completely brick-faced!
  • In "A Pharaoh to Remember" the people of Osiris IV claim to have been taught Pyramid building, Space Travel, and How to Prepare their dead to scare Abbot and Costello. Initially this looks like a reversal of ancient astronaut hypothesis and highly comical, then in the new series episode "That Darn Katz" it's revealed the cat people of Thuban 9 visited ancient Egypt. Obviously one of the things the Egyptians would have picked up from the cats is Space Travel. Still no clue who told them about Abbot and Costello though. —JustRad
  • In "Bender's Big Score", why would the Robot Devil perform at Leela and Lars' wedding, even though he's their enemy? Because he knows how devastated Fry would be after Leela and Lars is married.
  • Bender has a thing for Asian human women. Both humans he's ever had a romantic relationship with (Lucy Liu and Amy) are Asian.
  • In "Time Keeps On Slipping", why is Fry so confident about his Basketball skills even though he obviously sucks? Two possibilities; either he's that much of an idiot, or that it's been a while since he's played Basketball without his Seven-Leaf Clover.
  • When you find out at the end of "Why Must I Be a Crustacean in Love?" that Zoidberg's species dies right after mating, you realize why (a) they have no concept of romance ( who cares about pair bonding when it only lasts for one mating?); and (b) why Zoidberg's genes are favored over his status as a doctor (and it has nothing to do with him being poor; if both parents die right after mating, the only thing their kids get from them are genes).
  • In A Farewell to Arms, the world ending prophecy foretold that Mars will be destroyed due to sun flares, and Earth will not be affected. However, when Mars was dying, it almost collided with Earth. Why? Well, because Earth's orbit was changed during Crimes of the Hot, and the prophecy did not account for that change.
  • In "Where No Fan Has Gone Before" has Nichelle Nichols say she kissed Shatner after Melllvar calls them actors who only play heroes. The way it was shot, it seemed like a crack about Shatner being a bad kisser but remember, for the time period it was a controversy that a white man kissed a black woman.
  • Somehow, the Applied Cryonics building survived two attacks that destroyed New York and stayed standing until the year 3000. How did it manage that? Simple. We saw in Bender's Big Score that Bender was the one leading those attacks. At least he lead the first one, but the second one had the same kind of ships. Bender deliberately avoided attacking that building because he knew Fry was in there.
    • Alternatively, the second attack was a result of the second coming of Jesus(as a zombie). Zombie Jesus would probably know that shooting down Applied Cryonics would result in a universe-destroying paradox.
    • One wonders why the Applied Cryonics lab kept being a viable buisness for a thousand years, or managed to maintain power that long. Then you remember that the Nibblonians were responsible for Fry being frozen, and thus would've kept it going all that time with their super-advanced technology.
  • In "The Thief of Baghdad", Calculon plans to actually die in order to make his performance as accurate as possible-however one wonders why he didn't just get a new body, which all robots are capable of. Then you remember that Calculon was built in 2019, long before proper A.I was mass produced, meaning he would never have been built with a back-up chip.
  • In"Ghost in the Machines" the professor says that before Parade Day in New New York there was a parade everyday and how dark those days were then it hit me at every parade streets get blocked off and some places close for the day so with parades everyday, everyday some people either can't get to work or some lose their job.
  • In "That Darn Katz" it's said that Amy's been a grad student for a decade, which seems like a Lampshade Hanging. In "A Clone of My Own" during Professor Farnsworth's birthday video, it's said he spent 14 years in grad school. This seems to be the norm in the future, as opposed to 1 or 2 years in the 21st century. A millenium has passed, so the norm for education has changed.
    • 1 or 2 years? Maybe for a Masters, but certainly not for the Ph.D. that is almost certainly what Farnsworth and Amy would both have been going for (and which is generally necessary to be called "professor"). In the 21st the preferred length is usually 4 or 5 years, but even up to 9 isn't unheard of. The situation in the 3000s is an exaggeration of that, not a wholesale change.
  • In "The 30% Iron Chef", Bender makes a dish with salt that is 10% less than a lethal dose, but Zoidberg has seconds and is fine. This might seem like just Rule of Funny, but it makes sense when you realize that Zoidberg is a crustacean, and crustaceans have much higher sodium tolerance than other life forms.
  • The group attends a Beastie Boys concert at the beginning of "Hell is Other Robots" and they sing "Intergalactic" which includes a line about Mr. Spock. The line is not heard in this episode at all, because Star Trek is illegal in the future.
  • It's established that Bender was built only a couple years before the start of the show. This explains why he doesn't know about robot reproduction in "The Bots and the Bees." By that point in the series, he's technically a teenager, and at the age where a human teenager would learn about that stuff in real life.
    • It doesn't explain how he had a firstborn son in The Beast With a Billion Backs or how he had a clear understanding of how sex works in many episodes.
  • The episode "A Big Piece of Garbage" has Ron Popeil's head reveal that he created head-in-a-jar technology. It was basically a throwaway gag, but it explains why almost all the heads are from the early 21st century - becoming a head in a jar was most likely a fad when it was new and has since gone out of vogue with the technology being used rarely since then.
    • We do see some people, such as U.S. Presidents prior to the late 20th century with heads in jars. Since The Headless Body of Spirrow Agnew has been established to be a clone, these heads are more than likely cloned as well.
  • There are many examples of In-Universe History Marches On in the precancellation episodes, like Conan O'Brien losing his legs in the War of 2012 or gas costing $100 a gallon by the year 2012 in Bender's Big Score. Considering there was time travel in episodes like "Roswell that Ends Well," "Bender's Big Score" and "The Late Phillip J. Fry," the changes made in the past could've had a butterfly effect that changed those events as well.
  • Between the fountain of youth in "Teenage Mutant Leela's Hurdles" and the earth's orbit being changed in "Crimes of the Hot," this could explain why the characters don't age very fast despite the fact years pass. Notice that Fry ages normally when he goes back in time in "Bender's Big Score" but he looks the same in the final season as he does in the pilot.

Fridge Horror
  • I recently watched the episode God Fellas and an interesting notion occured. When Fry uses the radio telescope to communicate with the God Galaxy, it would take thousands (if not millions) of years for the radio waves to get all the way out there. So that would mean no matter how fast God chucked Bender back to Earth he'd still get there in the future right? Except, the God Galaxy has access to those little time bubbles from Bender's Big Score. This means that he could pop Bender back on Earth at the exact moment when Fry and Leela leave the monestary. What makes this horror is that Bender was essentially stuck in space from anywhere between a few thousand to several billion years. (And potentially all of that time was not spent with the God Galaxy) So Bender's age is (Time between creation and Roswell That Ends Well) + (Time spent buried in New Mexico) + (Time spent in limestone cavern waiting to return to the future) + (One trip to the end of the universe) + (One trip through the entire lifespan of the universe) + (one trip back to the future) + (Time spent waiting for Fry's message to get to the God Galaxy) = Bender is, by far, the oldest creature in the universe.
    • Actually, no. In an earlier episode, the Professor said that scientists sped up the speed of light, which is how space ships are able to travel around the universe so fast. This would naturally also apply to the message that Fry sent to the God Galaxy.
  • In Futurama, there is Nibbler, whose role as Leela's small brainless pet is in fact all a charade to hide his undercover work watching over the planet. Keeping in mind some of the stuff he has done while acting as Leela's supposedly unknowing pet (repeatedly hindered or outright endangered the crew's lives, eaten an entire preservation of animals and thus dooming an entire planets worth of species to extinction, stolen a Christmas dinner from a starving orphan, ripped off and stolen Amy's bikini, literally bitten Bender's shiny metal ass) come off as far less cute when you realize he's been doing all of it on purpose.
    Leela: It's not his fault he's a killing machine.
    • Is it really not Nibbler's fault he's a killing machine, Leela?...
    • Though, In "The Why of Fry" it was shown that the Nibblonians are naturally big eaters, as they had a feast of full animals, all of which were devoured in seconds, except Fry's, which he didn't eat and was asked by another if he was going to eat it.
      • Being a Big Eater doesn't really make Nibbler's consumption of an entire biosphere any less horrific, given the Nibblonians are supposed to be dedicated to the protection of the universe.
  • The crew went into the Wormhole around February, 3009. They came out at Earth in "Rebirth" in June, 3010. THEY SPENT MORE THAN A YEAR FLYING THROUGH THE WORMHOLE.
    • Or it sent them a year into the future.
      • Wouldn't be very practical for use as a cargo transport system then, would it? Imagine if you shipped something, jumped into the Panama Wormhole, then popped out it of a year PAST the due date of the item you were shipping.
      • Actually, thinking about that there's an extra bit of Fridge Brilliance. They traveled one year into the future through the wormhole, but to everyone on the ship the jump in time was instantaneous. This is a giant reflection on Futurama's cancellation. We waited the entire time for the 5th season to return, but as far as the series is concerned, no such time has passed for the characters. It makes perfect sense and is even lampshaded by the Professor.
  • Scientists raised the speed of light. How can you change a fundamental constant like the speed of light? It would be possible if our universe was a false vacuum: that is, if the apparent minimum energy state that can exist in our universe was not actually the minimum and if it was possible to go lower by the creation of sufficiently energetic particles. If this was true, the creation of such particles would cause the energy state of the entire universe to decay to one where physical laws, including physical constants, are different. The Fridge Horror comes in when you realize that, in order for the new universe to exist, the current one would have to be destroyed.
  • Proposition Infinity supports the theory that gays can't marry due to their promiscuity. Think about it.
    • What?
    • I think it mostly supports the theory that Bender can't marry due to his own personal promiscuity.
    • Less his promiscuity and more that he's just a Jerk Ass.
    • Vertical infinity, anyone?
    • What's really irritating (if not fridge-horrific) about "Proposition Infinity" is that they retconned what had been established as a taboo against robosexual relationships (in the Lucy Liu episode) into a full-on legal ban just for the sake of making some cheap current-affair gags about US gay marriage laws. Worse yet, they actually made the gags weaker by establishing that robosexuality is already illegal - if Professor Farnsworth had gone on a crusade to make it illegal that would mirror the current legal situation more closely.
  • In the parallell universe story, they get a box in which their own universe is in. And only they know of it. What happens when Earth is destroyed? Shouldn't the universe end?
    • It's stated that it's needed a power like "sun itself" to be able to destroy it. Even if earth is destroyed, i doubt the box could be destroyed too.
      • Still, think about that: spaceships exist where you can jettison stuff into the sun. You have an object that contains the universe. Anyone with the box could effectively ransom the entire universe, if not just destroy it. It doesn't help that the guy who owns it is Professor Farnsworth...
    • Fry and Leela aren't together but their alternative counterparts are married. Keep in mind that the alternative universe, for the most part, has opposite approaches, like flipping a coin would be heads in one universe and tails in the other. Now, with that in mind, now that Fry and Leela are dating, what happens to the alternative Fry and Leela?
      • The only thing treated as opposite was the coin flips—everything else was apparently the same, down to peoples' personalities. Alternate Fry and Leela are probably still married, barring any coin-flip related incidents.
      • It's actually explicitly stated that the only difference was with coin flips.
  • Fry once attempts to swallow a softball, and apparently succeeds, leaving him with one explainable, softball-sized lump on his abdomen... and another, completely unexplained softball-sized lump nearby. Except the softball would almost certainly have been dissolved in his stomach before entering his intestinal tracts... meaning he has two unexplained, softball-sized lumps on his abdomen.
  • In "The Tip of Zoidberg" near the end where They're using the Rube Goldberg machine to kill the Professor Bender chops the salad with the Cyanide axes... Which the professor later eats...
    • The salad was chopped by three of the axes, and since there were six axes total and two of them had been poisoned, there's a 40% chance that the salad wasn't poisoned. Sure, that was totally irresponsible of Bender, but it wasn't necessarily going to kill the Professor. Especially considering that he's alive in the next episode.
    • Probabilty was actually 20%. It would be a 66% that the first axe was not poisoned, then a 60% that the second axe was not poisoned if the first was not poisoned, and finally a 50% that the third axe was not poisoned if the first two weren't either.
  • The writers have said that the Futurama universe is basically our world, except sci-fi and with more stuff. Futurama is a Crapsack World. Make of that what you will.
    • This was probably intentional, however.
  • In The Late Philip J. Fry, Future!Amy is with Future!Cubert. Where is Kif?
    • He has probably aged to the point where he has become a colony of flying hookworms.
  • At the end of "The Beast With A Billion Backs", we learn that Yivo has Gonorrhea. And for a good chunk of the movie, Yivo was having (unprotected) sex with the entire universe.
    • Yivo contracting Gonorrhea and the ability to have sex with the entire universe means that shklee is in some way biologically compatible with humans and possibly the rest of the universe. Since shklee lives in an alternate universe where shklee is the only living organism, shklee must have picked up the disease from someone in this universe. Meaning shklee probably contracted a lot of other illnesses as well, and since gonorrhea is still around, some other well known STD's may have made to the future as well. Also, since Yivo is the only natural organism in shklis universe, shklee may not have ever developed an immune system. So all the diseases shklee contracted are likely to kill shklim and shklee has no way to fight them off. Also, why has gonorrhea not been cured. Laziness (working on dog make-up), greed (but think how much we make in treatment), inability (some things can't be done), or necessity (people have to die somehow)?
    • One more thing: Yivo was explicitly mating with the entire Universe. Everybody in the Futurama Universe might be pregnant with an Eldritch Abomination.
    • The fact that Yivo can mate opens up a rather disturbing possibility: the only reason why a being like Yivo would develop the power to mate is if there are others like it. The idea that there could've been multiple versions of Yivo is creepy enough, but it leads to a far more disturbing question: given how Yivo so godlike in power it can invade an entire universe, just what or who killed shkler species so greatly it led the sole survivor no evidence that shkler race existed?
  • In the episode "The Cyber House Rules", Leela gets a synthetic eye surgically attached to her face so she can live a normal life, and subsequently starts going out with a childhood crush named Adlai. Later on in the episode, she and Adlai consider adopting a child from the orphanarium they both grew up in and have trouble deciding between the children, until Leela sees a little girl with a third ear on her forehead being taunted by the other kids in an all-too-familiar way. When Leela suggests they adopt the three-eared girl, Adlai is alarmed but warms up to the idea when he realizes the ear could be surgically removed, but Leela indignantly tells him the little girl is fine the way she is. She then forces Adlai to restore her cyclops eye, wrapping everything up in a neat little Aesop... until you realize that the little three-eared girl still doesn't have a family and probably never will. As important as it is to know how to value yourself for who you are, rotting in an orphanarium is probably a less effective way to learn that lesson than having a family that actually loves you. The odds of adoption are substantially lower for an orphan past infancy; add a vestigial ear to that unhappy formula and you have a little girl who's probably doomed to a life of misery, poverty, alienation and bitterness... just like a certain cyclops.
  • The episode "The Late Phillip J Fry" has the Professor build a one-way time machine. Fry, the Professor, and Bender test it just before Fry and Leela have a date. The crew goes forward through time and finds that time is utterly cyclic, winding up two universes ahead of their own. The only difference is that the universe is ten feet below and five feet to the right of the old universe, so the Professor's time machine arrives in a nearly identical universe. It falls on the alternate Bender, Fry, and Professor, killing them. Fry happily goes on the date with Leela. Except, you know, he has been involved in the deaths of three people, wordlessly stepped into his alternate self's life, and the Leela he loved aged and died alone two universes ago. Not only that, she wound up in a loveless marriage to Cubert as a Fry surrogate before an ugly divorce. Leela, in her old age, actually blasted a love note to form small stalagmites from water dripping into the "Cavern on the Green" for Fry to find many years in the future.
    • Fry isn't picky when it comes to Leela(s), which is evidenced in "Rebirth". His robot duplicate said he loves Leela, "any Leela". So we can assume this is picked up from the real Fry's mentality. He probably is well aware that the woman he actually fell in love with is lost to the ether two universes back but he's here now and doesn't really care since he can make the Leela of this universe happy as much as he had intended for the one that he had a relationship with in the original universe. The bit about him shamelessly assuming his paradox double's identity is still solid, though. That is a bit creepy and underhanded.
    • Actually, it does make perfect sense for the characters involved. Think about it. They just discovered that the universe is in a constant repeat. When they return, they kill their counterparts, albeit accidentally. Fry wouldn't assume blame and resume his lifestyle because there was nothing else he could've done (it wasn't his fault the universe was off by a couple of feet), and after he had just learned to cope with moving on from a life he felt he'd never get back and losing the woman he loved, this second chance is something he'd more than gladly return to. The Professor is used to fucked up science shit like this from a long line of unrelated deaths, and Bender... well, the ending says enough for him.
    • Except that there was something they could do, the future where most humans were women had a backwards time machine, so they had as many chances as it took to stop there and get a time machine to use to get back to their original universe.
  • "The Why of Fry" with Fry being trapped by the crappy escape pod with the flying brains, in another universe. If the "Time Travel causes another universe" theory holds up in the show, it means that there's a universe where Fry never returned. Does that mean Nibbler stopped his masquerade and told the crew what transpired? Would he keep it up and leave a fake suicide note?.
    • No, since Futurama time travel functions via Stable Time Loop, which makes no sense if the many-worlds hypothesis is also true.
  • Most (if not all) robots in Futurama were built for a certain function. Some robots (such as Roberto) become even creepier if you think about that.
    • Actually Roberto acknowledges that he was the result of an attempt to build an insane robot. He thinks they failed.
      • It's possible that the inverse is true-dangerous robots like the Robot Mafia and Roberto could've been created to study and/or counteract what they represent(the Robot Mafia could've been made to outclass the human mafia and then be turned off or bring the mafia down from the inside, and Roberto could've been designed to better understand and cure the criminally insane). They just were too good at their job.
  • In the movie "Bender's Game", Mom tells Walt and Larry that when Ignor was born, she flipped a coin whether to keep him or the afterbirth. ... In the episode "Farnsworth's Parabox", the primary difference of the main parallel universe is that coin flips have opposite outcomes...
  • In "Into the Wild Green Yonder", the Encyclopod decides to preserve the DNA of homo sapiens. Fry points out that the Encyclopod only preserves the DNA of endangered species.
    • Only the Waterfall family is endangered. They die almost every time they appear.
      • The Waterfall family is not a species. And the comedic subtext makes it clear that the Encyclopod means humanity in general. Not sure it's fridge horror though since it's lampshaded.
  • In How Hermes Requisitioned His Groove Back, we see an old man waiting in line at the Central Bureaucracy for his birth certificate. Cut to Lethal Inspection, aired 10 years later, the old man finally gets to Central Bureaucracy, only to have a heart attack right there. So this really old man has been standing in line SINCE HIS BIRTH only for him to DIE the moment he gets to the front of the line!
    • It's not really that horrific. He explicitly asks for a death certificate just before he dies, so one could come to the conclusion that he got his birth certificate and returned for a death certificate. Still, it is rather shocking that a person can spend their whole life just to get a birth certificate.
  • In Fry Am the Egg Man, the bone vampire was born from a random egg that Leela bought from the the Farmer's Market. I am unsure if all of the eggs being sold were from the bone vampire, but imagine what would happen to the family or anyone who bought the eggs would react when they hatched into bone vampires. There is also the fact the planet the farming family gets the eggs from must be populated with them because how they reproduce. It's only a matter of time before any of them become a potential victim from one of those untamed creatures. Worse if one keeps an egg too long in the fridge and finds it hatch to shoot acid in their face.
    • The man selling the eggs to Leela established that the eggs were just collected randomly from the forest. All the eggs were different sizes and colors, indicating that they were all different species, so it's still very well likely that the egg Fry hatched was, in fact, the last bone vampire.
      • Nah there was a herd (a coven?) of Bone Vampires in a zoo on the planet of the apes that Fry and Leela have a holiday on.
      • It may only exist in captivity.
  • At the end of Bender's Game, all dark matter is instantly rendered inert. What about all the millions of people in dark matter burning ships? On every inhabited planet there would have been devastating crashes,not to mention the countless number of people stranded in the heart of deep space. It's akin to what would happen if all fossil fuels became inert on earth only on a much more horrifying scale.
  • If the werecar was built some time in the 2000's, that means its wireless technology couldn't be powerful enough to transmit to everywhere on earth. Does this mean that unless Bender went out of his way to visit the other were cars to distribute the uninstall program, unlikely given his laziness, that it's entirely possible for there to still be were cars.
    • But Bender's wireless is most likely powerful enough to transmit it and, considering the uninstall program was apparently supposed to remove all werecars that originate from Project Satan, the uninstall program itself could just linger in wireless network until it's taken care of all the descendant werecar programs.
  • Take a moment to think about the sad existence of the toy Bender the professor put the free will unit in. Having a sort of presence of mind literally no other robot had, and being unable to move or even talk the whole time, right up until it was torn away from him with absolutely nothing he could do about it.
    • Just because he stored it in the toy doesn't mean it was installed in and worked with the toy. That's like saying that the box your wifi adapter came in could get the internet until you took it out.
      • The dialogue of both Bender and the Professor suggest the toy did have free will.
  • In Bender's Game, it's revealed that Igner is actually the son of Mom and the Professor. With that in mind, i realized something... something quite unsettling... Think about Igner's character. Slow, dim-witted, meek, childish, clearly some severe mental deficiency of some kind, but it's never specified. Why? Because Igner is the result of generations of Fry's missing Delta Wave being passed on, and considering the Professor's a genius, it's clear to see that it skips every generation, with possibly even more severe deterioration with every second generation. Which is exactly why Igner is the way he is! He's the Fry of the Future!!
    • Not that I've seen much of him, but Yancy seemed fairly normal, as did his son, the missing Delta Wave was only because Fry was his own grandfather and it only affects him.
      • But then shouldn't Fry's father also be missing his delta wave since he's also his own grandfather?
      • Who said he didn't?
      • Because the whole point of the Nibblonians being forced to freeze Fry was that he was the *only* one without the delta brain wave. If his father also lacked it, then they had no reason to freeze him - just let him reproduce and pass it on through the generations.
      • It wouldn't pass on, it specifically only affects Fry. As for Fry being supposedly the only one... perhaps the Nibblonians just figured his father having it too was unimportant?
      • For the point about his father, the Nibblonians are smarter than that - Fry's dad, with his mentality permanently mired in the late '50s, would be a horrible choice to bring into the world of 3000.
  • In Benderama, there are so many nanoBenders that when they all combine into one, chunks of the Earth disappear, yet they're still only about the size of a building altogether. How did the Earth get so small?
  • Fry often functions as a Morality Pet/Morality Chain for Bender, and is the first friend he's ever had. Bender is practically immortal, with a maximum lifespan of one billion years(he's already at least a million, and a Holiday Special showed him lasting for half a billion.) This means that Bender will outlive Fry by a factor of MILLIONS.
  • Dr. Zoidberg finally gets a girlfriend in Stench And Stenchibility. It seems like a Throw the Dog a Bone moment, but Why Must I Be A Crustacean In Love reveals that when Decapodians pass on their genes, they die. What happens to Zoidberg when the 2 have sex, or decide to have kids?!
    • They could just adopt, or Zoidberg could get neutered to stop the Death by Sex aspect
      • Or it could be that it only works like that when two Decapodians have sex, possibly the fertilization of their eggs release some sort of toxin that's transmitted through water (they all went to the sea to reproduce) killing the parents (most likely to provide nutrients for the children and alternative food for scavengers keeping more children alive). Don't forget that we saw Zoidberg and Professor have sex earlier. Also Zoidberg was obviously in some sort of special state in Why Must I Be A Crustacean In Love which seemed to be tied to their reproductive cycle. So it might be that Zoidberg can never reproduce with another Decapodian again and so doesn't have the sex=death problem.
  • In Bender's Big Score after Bender believes that he has murdered Fry in the year 2012, the next scene shows him coming out from under the Planet Express building still crying. Think about it, Bender spent almost a thousand years in a state of depression because he thought he killed his best friend.
  • The (fourth) series finale, Meanwhile. At the end of the episode, the Professor fixes the time button in order to bring himself, Fry, and Leela back to the instant second before he had the general idea for it. Surely a happy ending, right? Fry and Leela still get to live their lives together, but this time with their friends and family. Except Professor Farnsworth says that none of them will remember the previous episode's events. Including him, since he clearly and specifically says "we." Which means that when he gets back to the past, he'll still think the time button is a great idea, so he'll still build it all over again with the same result. From Fry and Leela's perspective, this just means getting to live the same full life together. But for everyone else, the universe suddenly ends one day FOREVER.
    • A previous episode saves it. "The Late Philip J Fry" establishes that when the universe ends, a completely identical one comes into being. Since Farnsworth, Fry and Bender overshot the second universe by 6990 years, their counterparts in that universe will do just the same with the current one and due to the time button will have an incredibly high chance of ending up in one of the many repeats, and finding a solution that doesn't repeat history again and again. Plus there's going to be a Simpsons crossover in the future, so it's going to be resolved anyways.
  • The ending of "The Problem With Popplers" shows that it's possible to lose the status of "intelligent life form" in the Futurama-verse by acting in a particularly stupid way. Considering what humans in the show can act like...
  • This is a good one: how come New New York is still at sea level, but Old New York is hundreds of meters below New New York, when it was at sea level in the 20th Century? The answer: the global warming melted the poles, and then they started to mine the Halley Comet for ice to drop in the ocean, which would eventually raise the sea level even more!
  • During one episode, time skips ahead at random intervals. It eventually gets so bad that isolated areas leap ahead by decades at a time. Illustrating this, we cut to a gag involving two kids complaining about having to pay for senior citizens' social benefits, only to suddenly skip ahead to old age and yell "I deserve free money!". While it is just a quick gag, consider: only that one spot moved forward. Their families are (more than likely) still their normal ages. The kids' parents will now have to deal with the horror of their sons suddenly being far older than they are.

Fridge Logic

  • In Bendin' In The Wind, the group crash their Old-world Combi bus because they can't drive over the San Francisco Bay Bridge, it having converted into a hover bridge. Except they follow Beck's tour bus over the same bridge into SF just minutes before.
    • This Troper is a San Francisco native, they got into SF by crossing the (lesser known) Bay Bridge.
    • Or assuming that it was also converted to a hover bridge, they could have just looped around to the south, as SF is on a peninsula, not an island.
  • Bender's body composition: In 30% Iron Chef, he claims his body is 30% Iron. In Jurassic Bark, he claims his body is 40% Dolomite. And in A Head in the Polls, his body had 40% Titanium. 40+40+30=110. With all of the research, work, and math the writers do on everything, how did they miss this?
    • He had to be repaired at least one time, it's possible that the new parts had a different composition.
    • Not to mention, Bender is a notorious braggart for a master criminal who once pounded a guy into the ground like a stake with a shovel. Are we to treat this one differently because it has numbers in it?
    • Also Bender has been broken apart multiple times, so being rebuilt with new materials isn't out of the realm of possibility.
  • The inhabitants of the faceless dimension shown in "The Farnsworth Parabox" claim they haven't seen anything ever...but they're aware of what sight is?
    • Have you ever seen oxygen? Hope? But you know what they are.
    • Just like we are aware that homing pigeons and hammerhead sharks are able to sense magnetic fields and electricity, respectively, although we can not.
      • it is possible that the facelessness only affects earth, there could still be aliens with sight.
    • Or maybe it's just them who are faceless.
  • January 1, year 2000, 00:00 and seconds, Fry falls into the cryogenic tube for 1000 years. But he wakes up on December 31, 2999, sometime in the afternoon. Then he was not frozen for 1000 years, but for 999 years, 11 months and 30 and a half days.
    • Leap years. We have leap years because the year is not 365 days long
    • A 99.99986% accuracy on that timer is pretty solid, too
    • I imagine that the people working at the lab likes to wake people up during regular business-hours. It doesn't appear that anyone is working nights, at least not New Years Eve.
    • Fun fact of the day: The Gregorian Calender actually doesn't go up to the year 3,000. The reason for this is that A year is not 365.25 days long, and we determine a year by the earth's rotation around the sun. And, astrologically speaking, we don't know whether the year 3,000 will be a leap year or not because calculations are too inexact. But the freezing pod, being a machine, probably calculates years mathematically; and mathematically, the year 3,000 is not a leap year. So if the year 3,000 IS a leap year in the Futurama universe, it would account for the extra day.
. . . the saddest part is, I probably put more thought into that than the creators did . . .
  • You underestimate their geekiness.
  • In "Benderama" All of the world's water turns to alcohol. Within mere days the entire world is completely drunk, apparently having been forced to drink said "water". Unless the mini-Benders converted everything within bottles and cans to alcohol as well, there should at least be bottled water, or Fry's favorite, Slurm.
    • Considering the health factors, I think other drinks were available as six days of drinking pure alcohol would be incredibly lethal. It's also possible, since Bender reached sub-atomic scale, that any canned liquids once opened would have immediately been converted.
    • About everyone being drunk, what if the Benders converted the water inside of the people into alcohol? That's a bit of a fridge horror itself.
  • Alright, so in Bender's Big Score, when Bender is searching for Fry, he goes to Yancy's house. After claiming he's searching for Philip J. Fry. Yancy calls Philip, however it is revealed that it's just a little kid. Anybody who's seen Luck of The Fryrish will know Yancy named his son Fry in memory of his brother. Think about it for a little, and you can pretty much conclude this as Fridge Brilliance, as it's pretty obvious it was intentional - But wait, if Fry actually traveled back to the year 2000, then why is Yancy's son still named Fry?
    • They were already that close, they just had a normal sibling rivalry as kids
    • Also, let's take into account that Fry went on an overseas mission that probably took years. Therefore, whether it's "Bender's Big Score" or "Luck of the Fryish" the scene where Yancy names his son after Fry and claims he misses him everyday could tie into either canon. He could be missing him because he got frozen or because he's on an overseas trip and might not come back. They never explicitly say whether they believe Fry to be dead or simply gone at the time.
      • Paradox-correcting time code, bitch!
  • In the series, it is often stated that New New York was built on top of all the old buildings of Old New York. In fact, on more than one occasion, we see the gang descend into Old New York, often to find something nostalgic for Fry. Fry himself was frozen in a building which existed in 2000, therefore, Old New York. Yet somehow, when he wakes up in the year 3000, he is not underground, but above ground and yet somehow in the same tube in the same room in the same building. How did the whole facility get there?
    • If you check the backgrounds of the scenes in questions, you'll notice that the room in question is on the 64th floor (the number is on the wall when Fry exits the elevator), and the building has clearly been refurbished and redecorated/rebuilt, as it doesn't look quite the same — and when Fry first exits the building to step out onto the streets of New New York, he very clearly does not exit through the same door he entered the building through. The building miraculously survived the destruction of Old New York, and was tall enough that most of it remained above-ground when New New York was built — but now it's not as impressively tall and has a lot more basement levels.
  • Fry's brain is 'special' because he is his own grandfather—that is to say, he fathered his own father. Yancy is descended from that same father as Fry, so Fry is also Yancy's grandfather. Professor Farnsworth is descended from Yancy. So why is Farnsworth not also immune to the brains and receiving other such bonuses from the paradox of his ancestry? Fry is both his distant uncle and distant grandfather across generations.
    • Key word: Distant. After 1000 years, whatever genetic advantage Fry had would have been considerably diluted.
    • Maybe Fry's father, and Yancy, and even Phillip J. Fry the Second did have that special brain... but none of them was around for the Brainspawn, or indeed any of the dangers that Fry's 'special' mind could stop.
    • This descends into WMG, but Fry (and probably his dad) have the special brain because Fry and his dad form an infinite loop of being each other's father. Yancy isn't a part of the loop, so it makes sense why Farnsworth wouldn't have it.
    • The defective gene that creates a lack of a Delta Brainwave could be recessive-it would have to be, to keep the Stable Time Loop of Fry having a smart dad(if his dad was stupid like him, he may not meet his mother and everything would fall apart.)
  • Fry being his own grandfather... That means that Fry's bloodline is self-contained. He has no ancestors; he's come from nowhere and his existence is practically an afterthought of the universe thanks to a microwave accident, like the universe was made and he was added later. He's kinda like Jesus, in fact.
    • He still has ancestors—he's only his own grandfather on his father's side.
      • Nothing in show confirms that he's his Father's father. In fact, Yancy makes reference that his dad was also called Yancy (hard to explain away even if Enos was thought to be his dad). Everything fits better if Fry is his mother's father. Especially as you can trace 1 X chromosome originating with Mildred, passed to Mom, who passes it to Fry, who then takes it back and passes it Mom again meaning that mama Fry had the same X gene twice. Plus her brain seems to demonstrate more of the strange delta wave stupidity than Yancy.
      • Yancy doesn't claim his dad was called Yancy. The quote is 'Your name is Yancy, just like me, AND MY GRANDFATHER, all the way back to minuteman Yancy'. Thus, Luck of the Fryrish can be theorised to have deliberately foreshadowed The Why of Fry.
  • In When Aliens Attack it takes 1000 years for earth television shows to reach Omicron Persei 8. What did they do for entertainment in the early 30th century before TV?
    • Conquer planets and wear the faces of those conquered. Looking at it that way, it's entirely possible that TV is what brought Lrr, Ruler of the Planet Omicron Percei 8, into the lazy state of being his wife complains about today.
    • The same thing humans did before we got TV.
  • Okay (deep breath)... In the episode "Decision 3012", President Nixon's opponent, Chris Travers came from the future (that is to say, their future) where Nixon's plan to barricade out all illegal extraterrestrials led to robots being given all the menial labor jobs which led to the robots rising up against humanity. Travers won, which led to the negation of that future and Travers not getting sent back to prevent it, which resulted in Nixon's victory. Shouldn't that have led to the original future going back to happening and Travers getting sent back in time so he could re-negate the bad future, get re-erased, re-restore the timeline, re-un-negate the bad future, and so on and so forth until the two alternate timelines were constantly shifting back and forth like some kind of Schrodinger's universe? (BTW, 5,000 geek points and a hundred internets if you kept up with that).
    • -5000 points for missing the Call Back — Travers' time travel was the same one Bender used in Bender's Big Score, which was paradox-free.
    • Perhaps Travers disappearing was itself a part of the timeline that led to the robots taking over in the first place.
  • In Law and Oracle, Schrödinger was going 35 mph over the speed of light. In Teenage Mutant Leela's Hurdles, it is said that the ship goes 99% light speed. Why is it that simple vehicles on the road are faster than ships made for space travel?
    • This is a stretch, but Schrödinger may have been going 35 mph over the *old* speed of light, whereas the ship might have been at 99% of the vastly increased new light speed. That would be a strange way of talking though.
  • If MOM is Apple, does this make The Professor Microsoft?
    • No. Mom makes robots. The Professor runs a delivery service. They're not business competitors.
      • They could compete. Mom makes robots. The Professor makes all kinds of stuff, seems to be in it mostly just for the sake of the science, and, despite the numerous doomsday devices, is usually the not-evil one. Sounds exactly like Google to me. There's probably a What If machine in Mountain View.
      • Yeah, but they've never been shown as business competitors, they seem to more just really hate each other.
  • In "Luck of the Fryrish" why isn't Fry's nephew Phillip J. Fry's head in a jar at the museum if he's a celebrity?
    • Perhaps there's an opt-in?
  • In "The Prisoner of Benda", Fry and Leela have sex while occupying Zoidberg and Farnsworth's bodies, respectively. However, it is also revealed in "Why Must I Be a Crustacean in Love?" that Decapodians die after mating. How, then, did Fry survive?
    • That may only apply to sex with other Decapodians. The Decapodian body may not interpret what they did as sex. After all, Zoidberg himself has never, to my knowledge, been shown to have sexual attraction to anyone of another species.
    • Well, aside from the time when Farsnworth accidentally sprayed himself with fish pheromones...
    • Or the lobster from first season, or his girlfriend in second to last episode... or basically anyone who can stand his stench.
  • In "My Three Suns", Bender's lack of the sense of taste gets mentioned. In the meantime, in the episode immediately preceding it, Bender was seen eating an anchovy pizza and spitting it out along with everyone else at the Express except Fry. It could be that he spat it out for a different reason (e.g. the preservatives in the can of anchovy was sensed to be dangerous to his continued safe operation), but it's still rather weird.
    • Everybody was doing it, he just wanted to be popular.
    • Alternatively it was a programmed response by Mom to reject eating anchovy oil, ensuring she could keep her monopoly on robot oil.
  • In Future Stock, Planet Express's stock price collapses after That Guy dies and Fry turns the company back to The Professor. Except Planet Express shouldn't have a listed stock price because it wouldn't be publicly traded. At the shareholders' meeting, we see that the company is completely owned by the cast, plus Hattie who owns one share. Since Zoidberg started out with majority control, that accounts for every outstanding share of the company.
    • The fact that Hattie owns a share was probably a nod to the fact that Planet Express is publicly traded. It's just not a popular company to hold stock in at the beginning of the episode.
  • When Bender is sent to Robot Hell, he is told it is because of the terms of his contract with the Church of Robotology: "You sin, you go to Robot Hell." So... the best way to avoid Robot Hell is to not convert to Robotology in the first place?
    • Yep. Perhaps robots join the church because they know that they can't resist the temptation to sin, so they join because they believe the threat of Robot Hell will scare them into leading better lives.
  • In "The Problem with Popplers" Lrrr and Ndndnd's son Jrrr is a baby, but in T. The Terrestrial he is a teenager. How come Cubert, Herme's son Dwight, and the orphans didn't age at all in those years?
    • Because of the increased longevity/immortality of future humanity there is a maximum functional (Adult) population, with the old being sent to the near-death star, so the minors are kept as minors until a functional slot opens up, possibly using chronotons or something.
    • Alternatively, the Omicronians age faster until maturity when they take a dose of the immortality serum. mentioned in When Aliens Attack (where they come to see the final episode of Single Female Lawyer), thus retarding their aging indefinitely. Thus, Jrrr isn't necessarily a teenager in the same sense as a human teen he is an adolescent Omicronian of equivalent age to the time that has passed within the Futurama universe between his respective appearances, he's still a non-mature Omicronian and thus hasn't been given his immortality serum yet. Contrarywise, humans don't have any such thing but apparently still age at the same rate as humans now, leastwise when they are children/adolescents to young adults.
  • In "Crimes of the Hot" Bender was willing to sacrifice himself for the sake of the turtle because he knew that his pollution would just increase global warming. Why didn't he just move to another planet?
  • In "Decision 3012", Travers disappears at the end due to a paradox about him not having to travel back in time due to him succeeding at changing the past. But Fry was able to still exist and become his own grandfather after his original grandfather died as a result of him traveling to the past. So if making your own existence into a paradox doesn't make you not exist, then why would creating a paradox by succeeding at your goal while in the past affect whether or not you were in the past?
    • Stable Time Loop. Fry's changing the past, ultimately, created the present he had always existed in, meaning it was ALWAYS that way and there was no change. Travers created a different present by being elected, and therefore his WAS a change, and he had to be "edited out" to avoid destroying the universe.
  • In "The Sting" Amy mentioned that Fry's corpse is "stuffed with wood chips and preservatives." They sending his body into space, why would they need to embalm it?
  • In All The President's Heads, we learn that the founders of America were forced to sign the 'Declaration of Dependence', which resulted in America forever remaining a loyal colony of Britain (with all the stereotypes that brings). One question: how were they being forced? True, we see them being threatened at gunpoint... but death would make these founders martyrs, for some future charismatic group of men to bring the Declaration of Independence about. Did these founders not realise this? Or were they so scared of death that they sacrificed their country for their lives? If the latter is the case, how on Earth was America founded?

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