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Fifteen games have been released as part of the Bakuten Shoot Beyblade portion of Beyblade.


Portable

Jisedai Beigoma Battle Beyblade

Jisedai Beigoma Battle Beyblade was released for the Game Boy Color on July 23, 1999 in Japan only. It was developed by Rokumendo Co., Ltd and published by Hudson Soft.

As the first media entry in the Beyblade franchise, Jisedai Beigoma Battle Beyblade had little example but the craze it was part of, hence it taking cues from Pokémon. It is a topdown Role-Playing Game with a map to explore, NPCs to battle for money, beyblades / bit-beasts, and experience, real-time combat, and a story to follow. The game is the origin of Takao, Kai, and Hitoshi, but features plenty of characters more that didn't get incorporated in the larger franchise.

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Beyblade Fighting Tournament

Beyblade Fighting Tournament was released for the Game Boy Color on August 11, 2000 in Japan only. It was developed by Rokumendo Co., Ltd and published by Hudson Soft.

Beyblade Fighting Tournament was published shortly after the manga launched and incorporated elements from it. It follows the story of the manga so far, but is far more about battles than about story, moving from tournament to tournament. There's still elements from Pokémon, but subtler. Among these is the choice of any from four lines of bit-beasts divided in nine themes for a total of 36 bit-beasts. The bit-beasts are Dragoon, Dranzer, Driger, and Draciel, and the themes are "default", Master, Ice, Spark, Death, Rock, Knight, Kid, and Armed. Hitoshi serves as the final boss and will wield the corresponding bit-beast of the Metal theme. Gameplay consists of upgrading your bey and getting a good shoot. After that, winning a battle is a matter of luck.

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Bakuten Shoot Beyblade

Bakuten Shoot Beyblade was released for the Game Boy Color on July 27, 2001 in Japan only. It was developed by Rokumendo Co., Ltd and published by Broccoli.

The first game to carry the Bakuten Shoot Beyblade banner, it was an Updated Re-release of Beyblade Fighting Tournament that instead of the BBA and their bit-beasts introduces Daichi and A. Dragoon.note  This is, in fact, the game that introduced the character, much like Jisedai Beigoma Battle Beyblade introduced Takao and co. Other than having one single blader and bit-beast to push forward, gameplay is the same as in Beyblade Fighting Tournament. The story goes up to the American arc, because that's how far the manga had gotten.

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Bakuten Shoot Beyblade

Bakuten Shoot Beyblade is a trilogy entirely released for the Game Boy Advance on December 06, 2001, June 27, 2002, and December 06, 2002 in Japan only. The separate names of the games are Bakuten Shoot Beyblade - Gekitō! Saikyō Blader, Bakuten Shoot Beyblade 2002 - Iku ze! Gekitō! Chō Jiryoku Battle!, and Bakuten Shoot Beyblade 2002 - Gekisen! Team Battle!!. The last game came in two versions, which are subtitled Seiryū no Shō ~Takao Hen~ and Kōryū no Shō ~Daichi Hen~. All three games were developed and published by Broccoli.

The Bakuten Shoot Beyblade trilogy is a Role-Playing Game-Visual Novel hybrid. Gameplay is divided in several rounds wherein mutiple opponents have to be defeated and experience, new shooters, and new beyparts have to be earned. Before and after each round, there's conversation between the characters. As well, the trilogy works towards a continuous storyline that centers around Kaoru Amō, a trilogy-exclusive close friend of Kai. Beybattling is done in two stages, one being real-time stadium movement, the other move selection within a Combatant Cooldown System.

Beyblade: V-Force - Ultimate Blader Jam

Beyblade: V-Force - Ultimate Blader Jam was released for the Game Boy Advance on November 14, 2003 and November 18, 2003 in the EU and the USA respectively. It was developed by Full Fat Productions Ltd. and published by Atari.

Undoubtedly owing to its unusual origin, Beyblade: V-Force - Ultimate Blader Jam has curious gameplay for a Beyblade game as it is remarkably similar to Atari's 1984 hit Marble Madness. It narrates the story of the Psychic arc of the second season, and between these cutscenes players have to guide a bey through a map to the finish line. A good shoot to start with lasting spin is important, but the spin power can be replenished by crossing special tiles that are spread around. Along the way, collectibles and upgrades can be found and enemy beys will have to be bumped off the map, but there is a time limit that has to be considered.

Beyblade: G-Revolution

Beyblade: G-Revolution was released for the Game Boy Advance on November 18, 2004 and November 26, 2004 in the USA and the EU respectively. It was developed and published by Atari.

In a real-life case of Book-Ends, Beyblade: G-Revolution is the final Bakuten Shoot Beyblade video game released during the original run and it is the only game to feature gameplay like Jisedai Beigoma Battle Beyblade. It is a topdown Role-Playing Game with a map to explore, NPCs to battle for money, beyparts, and experience, real-time combat, and a story to follow. The story is similar to that of the third season, but mostly takes place before the World Tournament and gives its own take on how Takao filled those days.


Console

Bakuten Shoot Beyblade - Beybattle Tournament

Bakuten Shoot Beyblade - Beybattle Tournament are three games with the same premise and similar gameplay, all developed and published by Takara Co., Ltd.note  Bakuten Shoot Beyblade - Beybattle Tournament is the first game and was released for the PlayStation on December 13, 2001 in Japan. For the West, it was renamed Beyblade: Let it Rip! and released on December 05, 2002 in the USA and on August 22, 2003 in the EU. Its successor, Bakuten Shoot Beyblade 2002 - Beybattle Tournament 2, was released for the PlayStation on August 01, 2002 in Japan only. The third game, Bakuten Shoot Beyblade 2002 Nettō! Magne-Tag Battle was released for the Nintendo GameCube on December 06, 2002 in Japan. For the West, it was renamed Beyblade: V-Force - Super Tournament Battle and released on September 23, 2003 in the USA and on November 28, 2003 in the EU.

The three Takara games are essentially the same game in a process of improvement that lacks a story mode each time, which is why they weren't received well by reviewers and buyers alike. The first game coincides with the first season of the anime, while the two folllow-up games are with the second season, meaning an art-shift, a cast switch, and the addition of the magnecore. For the tournament mode, the player gets to choose between a male Player Character and a female one, which designs remain the same across all three games aside from the fact they're redrawn and given updated outfits in the third. For the 1-on-1 mode, all characters are available to play (except Bladers A/B/C). Gameplay consists of real-time combat with simple controls to attack, dodge, summon a bit-beast, and brace for impact. There are RPG elements in that winning a battle earns experience for the player, experience for the bit-beast used, beypoints, and sometimes a beypart. The player can have multiple beyblades (essential in case the first is destroyed, or else it's game over) and customize then with beyparts earned or bought.

  • The characters featured in the first game are the Player Character (male or female), Blader A, Blader B, Blader C, Takao, Kai, Rei, Max, Rai, Michael, Ralf, and Yuriy. There are no unlockable characters.
  • The characters featured in the second game are Player (male or female), Takao, Kai, Rei, Max, Ozma, Dunga, Mariam, and Kane. The one [Secret Character unlockable character]] is Daichi.
  • The characters featured in the third game are Player (male or female), Takao, Kai, Rei, Max, Ozma, Dunga, Mariam, and Kane. The unlockable characters are Daichi, Gōki, King, and Blader DJ.

Bakuten Shoot Beyblade - Beybattle Tournament contains examples of:

  • Bag of Sharing: You can play with any character you want in 1-on-1 mode and the beypoints earned will be available to buy parts for your player character's beyblade.
  • Call a Hit Point a "Smeerp": The English version, at least, calls the currency won by battling "beypoints". Which doesn't at all sound like it'd be a legit currency in-world, but still it allows you to buy beyparts.
  • Consolation Prize: You still get beypoints if you lose a fight, just less than you would've if you'd won or at the cost of missing out on a part. You also get beypoints regardless if you play in the tournament mode or the 1-on-1 mode.
  • Leaked Experience: Averted. Any bit-beast you seek to improve will have to get separate training. Since you don't need more than one, this condition means the player'll probably stick to one or two bit-beasts.
  • Nonstandard Character Design: The games' own design style is rather generic, which means its own characters stand out badly among the unique style of characters from the first season. With the art shift of the second season, the games' own characters fit better, but they're still lacking detail, although the new outfits in the third game almost get the gap crossed. Also, despite the art shift, the second game uses the Blader DJ model from the first season.
  • Pink Girl, Blue Boy: The first player character designs have the boy wearing a blue sweater and the girl having pink hair. In the third game, it's even more obvious with the muted tones and the girl exchanging her yellow sweater for a lilac one.
  • Smurfette Principle: Zigzagged. In the first game, the female player character is the only female character around. In the second and third games, the only established female character incorporated is Mariam. If you don't pick the female player character, Mariam's the only female character around.
  • You Gotta Have Blue Hair: Everything that can be expected from the regular characters. The female player character has pink hair.


Computer

Top Blade

Top Blade V was released for Windows (98/ME/2000/XP) in 2001 in Korea only. It was developed and published by Sonokong Co, Ltd.

Top Blade V

Top Blade V was released for Windows (98/ME/2000/XP) on January 20, 2002 in Korea only. The game was ported to arcades the following year. It was developed and published by Sonokong Co, Ltd.

Other

Dream Mix TV World Fighters

DreamMix TV World Fighters is a Mascot Fighter by Konami, Hudson Soft, and Takara, released on December 18, 2003 for the PlayStation 2 and the Nintendo Game Cube in Japan only. One of the mascots contributed by Takara is Takao Kinomiya.

Puzzle & Dragons

Puzzle & Dragons was released for iOS, Android, and Kindle Fire, of which the first release date February 20, 2012. It was developed and published by GungHo Online Entertainment. It is a puzzle-RPG with many Crossover-type collaboration events, one of which was with Bakuten Shoot Beyblade.


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