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Western Animation: Goofy
He'll be falling on his face any time now.

"It is difficult to classify the characteristics of the Goof into columns of the physical and mental, because they interweave, reflect, and enhance one another. Therefore it will probably be best to mention everything all at once. Think of the Goof as a composite of an everlasting optimist, a gullible Good Samaritan, a half-wit, a shiftless, good-natured colored boy and a hick.note  This little analysis has covered the Goof from top to toes, and having come to his end, I end."
Art Babbitt's uncensored Character Analysis of Goofy, June 1934.

Goofy is one of the world's most iconic cartoon characters and the third member of Walt Disney's quintessential Power Trio, along with Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck.

Goofy first appeared in a Mickey Mouse short, Mickey's Revue, in 1932. After a few appearances in Mickey's cartoons and joining up with Mickey and Donald in classics such as Mickey's Fire Brigade and Lonesome Ghosts, Goofy eventually starred in his own series of cartoons, with his voice provided by Pinto Colvig. When Colvig left Disney, Goofy was left without a voice, so Disney made the best of a bad situation and conceived the How to... shorts, where most of the dialogue was done by a narrator, with Goofy's voice provided mostly by stock audio. The concept of the How to.. shorts was so well received, that they are a staple of Disney and considered some of Goofy's best cartoons. One of them, The Art of Skiing, introduced his trademark Goofy Holler (YAAAAAA-HOO-HOO-HOO-HOOEY!).

In comic books of the 1970s, he had a Super Hero alter ego, Super Goof, that is still used in Italian stories. In the 1990s, he starred in a new TV series, Goof Troop, in which he and his son, Max, moved in next door to a Lighter and Softer version of Mickey's nemesis, Pete. This led to a movie based on the series; A Goofy Movie. Goofy is the only one of the Power Trio to get a full, non-segmented theatrical movie.

One of the most noted qualities of Goofy's slapstick humour lies in the fact that when he does something guaranteed to result in Hilarity Ensues (which is just about everything he does), there is a blatantly obvious outcome as to how it will go wrong - for example, falling off a ledge, or crashing into something. The obvious outcome should never be the end of it, and must in itself lead to Disaster Dominoes that the audience did not see coming.

Goofy also features in the Kingdom Hearts video game series as a shield-bearing knight and one of Sora's sidekicks alongside Donald.


     INDIVIDUAL SHORTS FILMOGRAPHY 

1930s

  • Goofy and Wilbur (1939)

1940s

  • Goofy's Glider (1940)
  • Baggage Buster (1941)
  • The Art of Skiing (1941)
  • The Art of Self Defense (1941)
  • How to Play Baseball (1942)
  • The Olympic Champ (1942)
  • How to Swim (1942)
  • How to Fish (1942)
  • El Gaucho Goofy (1943, originally edited to Saludos Amigos, 1942)
  • Victory Vehicles (1943)
  • How to Be a Sailor (1944)
  • How to Play Golf (1944)
  • How to Play Football (1944)
  • Tiger Trouble (1945)
  • African Diary (1945)
  • Californy'er Bust (1945)
  • Hockey Homicide (1945)
  • A Knight for a Day (1946)
  • Double Dribble (1946)
  • Foul Hunting (1947)
  • They're Off (1948)
  • The Big Wash (1948)
  • Tennis Racquet (1949)
  • Goofy Gymnastics (1949)

1950s

  • How to Ride a Horse (1950, originally part of The Reluctant Dragon, 1941)
  • Motor Mania (1950)
  • Hold That Pose (1950)
  • Lion Down (1951)
  • Home Made Home (1951)
  • Cold War (1951)
  • Tomorrow We Diet! (1951)
  • Get Rich Quick (1951)
  • Fathers Are People (1951)
  • No Smoking (1951)
  • Father's Lion (1952)
  • Hello, Aloha (1952)
  • Man's Best Friend (1952)
  • Two Gun Goofy (1952)
  • Teachers Are People (1952)
  • Two Weeks Vacation (1952)
  • How to Be a Detective (1952)
  • Father's Day Off (1953)
  • For Whom the Bulls Toil (1953)
  • Father's Week-End (1953)
  • How to Dance (1953)
  • How to Sleep (1953)

1960s

  • Aquamania (1961)
  • Freewayphobia (1965)
  • Goofy's Freeway Troubles (1965)

2000s


Tropes associated with Goofy

  • Arbitrary Skepticism: A trait he got in the Italian Disney comics. Goofy strongly refuses to believe in the existence of magic, no matter how many times Witch Hazel shows him her most powerful magic tricks.
    • To be more accurate, he refuses to believe that Hazel and any actual magic user or object (save for the peanuts that give him superpowers) may actually be magic. He actually believes in magic... He just can't recognize it.
  • Accidental Hero: In "Two-Gun Goofy".
  • Art Evolution: Went from a Half-Dressed Cartoon Animal, to fully clothed, to looking more human with smaller eyes and then back to his previous big-eyed look.
  • Ascended Extra: He started as an extra in some of Mickey Mouse's cartoons and went on to get his own series of shorts, his own television series and his own theatrical movie that was popular enough for a direct-to-video sequel.
  • Bears Are Bad News: In "Hold That Pose", Goofy takes up photography as a hobby and decides to photograph wildlife. His subject: a grizzly bear that is not particularly happy about having its picture taken. The result: a chase like you wouldn't believe.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: Do NOT harm Wilbur, Goofy's pet grasshopper.
  • The Big Guy
  • The Boxing Episode: The short "The Art of Self Defense".
  • Bull Seeing Red: "For Whom the Bulls Toil": After failing to move a bull from the road, he produces a red handkerchief, which immediately grabs the bull's attention. A few Ole's later, and Goofy's a matador.
  • Bumbling Dad: Much to the dismay of his son, Max.
  • Cartoon Creature
  • Catchphrase: "Gawrsh!" "Somthin' wrong here." "Heavens 'ta Betsy!", "**YAAAAAA-HA-HA-HA-HOOOOEEEEEEEY!", "Ah-hyuck!"
  • Characterization Marches On: He was more of a Jerkass in his first few appearances in the Mickey Mouse comic strip, stealing furniture to open a detective agency, playing pranks on Mickey's pets, and so on. This was soon dropped and we got the bumbling yet nice character we all know.
  • Chekhov's Volcano: The volcano in "Hello Aloha".
  • The Chew Toy: Although not to the extent of Donald, most of his shorts threw him into unfortunate situations at his expense.
  • Chronically Crashed Car: Goofy's cars fall, literally and figuratively, into this trope.
  • Clark Kenting: When he's Super Goof.
  • Cold Turkeys Are Everywhere: "Tomorrow We Diet": Eat! Eat! Eat! Eat! Eat!
  • Conjoined Eyes: Averted in his George Geef years and in Goof Troop.
  • Cosmic Plaything: Especially evident in some of the earlier shorts. A defining example is in the Mickey short "Hawaiian Holiday" where Goofy repeatedly tries and fails to surf a wave. Just when it looks like he's finally succeeded, the wave itself says "oh yeah?" and swats him into the sand. In other words, the world itself likes screwing with him.
  • Department of Redundancy Department: In the short "Tiger Trouble", when the narrator describes the tiger:
    Narrator: Man he likes to eat...A man-eater!
  • Depending on the Artist: Disney couldn't decide how they wanted Goofy to look during the 40's and 50's. He was depicted with or without his ears, black fur or flesh-colored skin, with or without gloves and with or without buck teeth.
    • In the short, Goofy and Wilbur, when Goofy takes of one of his gloves, his gloveless hand is revealed to be flesh-colored.
  • Diet Episode: The short "Tomorrow We Diet".
  • The Ditz
  • D.I.Y. Disaster: Occurs in many of his shorts.
  • Dogs Are Dumb: Maybe not as dumb as other cartoon dogs, but he still fits the bill
  • Don't Eat And Swim: In the cartoon "How to Swim", Goofy's changing cabin falls into the water while he's inside and ends up walking out, setting up a picnic area and eating a full meal without being aware that he's underwater. The narrator points out the rule of waiting before eating and warning about cramps, which appear as knots all over Goofy's limbs and body.
  • Drives Like Crazy: As Mr. Wheeler in the short "Motor Mania".
  • Early-Installment Weirdness: First appeared as an old heckler with a beard in the 1932 short, Mickey's Revue. He was also pantsless in his first few years, had a tail and was called Dippy Dawg.
  • Easy Come, Easy Go: Spoken word for word twice in "Get Rich Quick": first, when Goofy leaves the alley where he has been shooting craps and carrying a barrel as though he has bet all his clothes, but the barrel actually contains all the money he had won; second, at the end, as an Ironic Echo, when Goofy's wife confiscates all of his winnings at a poker game to use for herself.
  • The Everyman: The short "How To Play Baseball" introduced the idea of Goofy playing the part of many characters at once, with the potential to appeal to everybody and demolish an entire baseball field.
  • The Fifties: He's often the Standard '50s Father, occasionally with a Distinguished Gentleman's Pipe (overlaps with Bumbling Dad).
  • Flat Earth Atheist: Despite (or probably more likely because of) him living in a little world of his own at times, several comics have depicted him as this, most notably the series in which he hangs out with Witch Hazel and refuses to believe that she's a witch no matter how many impressive feats of magic she pulls off in order to convince him. He always has his own explanation for events, most of which are even more fantastic and unbelievable than "it's magic." Several other comics has depicted him as immune to the effects of hostile magic, purely because he doesn't believe in it and nothing can make him change his mind on the subject.
  • The Fool
  • Formally Named Pet: Mr. Pettibone, Goofy's pet cat in Mickey Mouseworks, House of Mouse, and Mickey Mouse Clubhouse.
  • Fully Dressed Cartoon Animal
  • Furry Confusion: When he appears alongside Pluto. Barring Rule of Funny, the most likely answer is that Goofy is to Pluto what a human is to a chimpanzee.
  • Furry Reminder: He has fewer Furry Reminders than either Donald Duck, Mickey Mouse, Clarabelle Cow, or even Pete, but even he has a few.
    • In Mickey Mouse Clubhouse, Willy The Giant refers to him as a dog.
    • In How to Hook Up Your Home Theater, right before his TV arrives to his house, he is shown sleeping on the floor like a normal dog, albeit lying in a human position.
    • Lampshaded in Stand by Me:
      Gordie: If Mickey's a mouse, Donald's a duck and Pluto's a dog, then what's Goofy?
      Teddy: Goofy's a dog. He's definitely a dog.
      Vern: He can't be a dog. He drives a car and wears a hat.
      Chris: Oh, God. That's weird. What the hell is Goofy?
    • In his brief appearance at the end of Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Goofy can be heard proclaiming that Judge Doom couldn't have been a dog, which rather implies that he considers himself to be one.
  • The Gambling Addict: In "Get Rich Quick", Goofy played a guy named George Geef who enjoyed spending his hard earned dough on a chance to make an easy buck, only to get reprimanded by his wife (or worse, have her take his winnings to pay the bills).
  • Glove Slap: Used in The Art of Self Defense to demonstrate what self-defense was like in the romantic age.
  • Gretzky Has the Ball: Intentionally done at the end of "Hockey Homicide" to show just how much the game has descended into chaos.
  • Half-Dressed Cartoon Animal: Goofy was pantsless and didn't wear a long-sleeved shirt underneath his vest in his Dippy Dawg years. He returned to this look in the 2013 Mickey Mouse shorts.
  • Idiot Hero
  • I Have Many Names: Dippy Dawg, George Geef, G.G. Geef, James Boyd, Mr. Walker, Mr. Wheeler, Johnny Eyeball, Goofus D. Dawg., Mr. X, Driverius Timidicus, Motoramus Fidgitus, Neglectarus Maximus, Stupidicus Ultimus
  • Inexplicably Identical Individuals: A good chunk of his shorts has everyone looking like him.
  • Iron Butt Monkey: In the How to... shorts.
  • Jekyll & Hyde: In the short "Motor Mania", Goofy has two personas: The friendly, mild-mannered pedestrian Mr. Walker and the rude, ill-tempered driver Mr. Wheeler.
  • Kindhearted Cat Lover: In Goof Troop. Yes, an anthropomorphic dog is a Kindhearted Cat Lover. Try not to think about that too hard.
  • Kindhearted Simpleton
  • The Klutz: He's the image of the trope's page.
  • Large Ham
  • Lemony Narrator: The narrator in the How to... shorts.
  • Loads and Loads of Roles: Several of his cartoons (especially the How to series) portray every character with Goofy-like features.
  • Moody Mount: His mount in "How to Ride a Horse".
  • Nice Hat
  • Nice Guy: His current characterization.
  • Old-Timey Bathing Suit: Goofy wears this anytime he is goes out in the water.
  • Pop The Tires: On the short "How to Be a Detective", the thug Goof is pursuing pours tacks on the road. Goofy quickly uses a broom to sweep them out of the way.
  • Private Detective: Goofy as Johnny Eyeball in "How to Be a Detective".
  • Rearrange the Song: The title card music for the majority of Goofy shorts was rearranged beginning in the 1950s with more of a big band/swing feel.
  • Rotoscoping: The short "Baggage Buster" used rotoscoping to animate Goofy, resulting in more down to earth movement for him. Both "Hello Aloha" and "How to Dance" also uses rotoscoping for a brief scene of a Hula dancer.
  • Shameful Shrinking: Goofy shrinks after being caught outside in his nightgown in the cartoon "Father's Week End".
  • Simpleton Voice
  • The Smart One: While still slow, he tends to pick things up a lot faster than his companions in Kingdom Hearts. He's apparently more computer-literate than Mickey here, too!
    • Although when an error for a "corrupted file" pops up he says it went all ker-smoosh.
  • Soap Punishment: Happens to Goof, Jr. in "Fathers Are People".
  • Special Edition Title: The original titles to How to Play Football had the credits spelled out by cards in the bleacher stands. Current reissue prints have more standard titles.
  • Stock Audio Clip: Goofy barely spoke in his '40s shorts (the original voice, Pinto Colvig, had left Disney for Max Fleischer's studio) and when he did, most of the time his lines and yells were from previous Disney shorts.
  • Stock Scream: The famous Goofy Holler.
    "YAAAAAH-Hoo-Hoo-Hoo-HOOEY!"
    • He had two others during the 40's and 50's.
  • Tomato Surprise: In The Return of the Phantom Blot, an accident Goofy ends up in at the beginning of the story causes him to think he is the Phantom Blot during the night, and ends up very sleepy during the day.
  • Too Dumb to Fool: In the comics. In one story, Mickey Mouse and the Jewel Thief, Goofy is the one character who is immune to the title crook's hypnotic powers.
  • Too Dumb to Live: In the cartoons, but he's only a mild example, as he's more klutsy and ignorant than genuinely stupid.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: In No Service, one of the brand-new Mickey Mouse series of flash-animated shorts, Goofy runs a seaside grill and so strictly follows the "no shirt, no shoes, no service" policy that he unceremoniously turns Mickey and Donald away because the former does not wear a shirt and the latter does not wear shoes. When Donald tries to gain access wearing Mickey's shoes and red pants, Goofy asks to see an I.D. So Donald digs into the pants and pulls out Mickey's driver's license.
    Goofy: That. Ain't. You. (kicks Donald out) Get out and stay out!
  • Tritagonist
  • Wartime Cartoon: "Victory Vehicles" and "How To Be A Sailor".
  • Why Do You Keep Changing Jobs?: This is Goofy's whole shtick. Popular opinion is that due to being such a klutz, he can never keep a job for long.

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alternative title(s): Goofy
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