History WesternAnimation / Goofy

8th Nov '17 10:09:34 AM Wingnut
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Added DiffLines:

* MeaningfulName: He's [[CaptainObvious Goofy]].
3rd Oct '17 10:18:14 AM Rodangizzardcrusher3
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* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: In "Father's Day Off", every merchant who comes to the door greets him with a fairly big kiss on the lips and immediately departs. [[CheatingWithTheMilkman Just what mischief did his wife get up to?]]

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* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Used surprisingly often back in his original shorts.
**
In "Father's Day Off", where Goofy's wife is gone for the day, every merchant who comes to the door greets him Goofy (not realizing who it is) with a fairly big kiss on the lips and immediately departs. [[CheatingWithTheMilkman Just what mischief did his wife get up to?]]to?]]
** In "Teachers Are People", Goofy hears one of the mischievous students talking to the other children about something. After leaning in [[SilentWhisper to hear the whispering]], he suddenly turns bright red. He then turns to the board showing the next lesson, which involves ''[[TheTalk birds and bees]]'', and then proceeds to tear up the board and throw it in the garbage can.
2nd Oct '17 2:15:27 PM maxwellsilver
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Goofy first appeared in a WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse short, ''Mickey's Revue'', in 1932. After a few appearances in Mickey's cartoons and joining up with Mickey and Donald in classics such as ''Mickey's Fire Brigade'' and ''Lonesome Ghosts'', Goofy eventually starred in his own series of cartoons, with his voice provided by Pinto Colvig. When Colvig left Disney, Goofy was left without a voice, so Disney made the best of a bad situation and conceived the ''How to...'' shorts, where most of the dialogue was done by a narrator, with Goofy's voice provided mostly by stock audio. The concept of the ''How to..'' shorts was so well received, that they are a staple of Disney and considered some of Goofy's best cartoons. One of them, ''The Art of Skiing'', introduced his trademark ''[[StockScream Goofy Holler]]'' (YAAAAAA-HOO-HOO-HOO-HOOEY!).

In the 1950s, Disney introduced the "Goofy the Everyman" concept, in which Goofy was transformed into a family man going through common everyday trials like quitting smoking, dieting, raising children, getting a cold, and so on. He is never referred to as Goofy (though the title cards still said ''Walt Disney Presents Goofy''), instead he's usually named George Geef, though some shorts had other names. His character design is also changed, making his whole body pale instead of just his face, smaller eyes with eyebrows, removing the long dog-like ears, large buck teeth and the white gloves, giving him a more human look and also making him more intelligent and giving him a normal voice. These shorts depicted him with a wife and son. Often, the rest of society looked just like him. The humour was also more sedate, mostly poking fun at suburban life in the 1950s. This lasted until ''Aquamania'' in 1961, as Goofy reverted to his old form and voice in 1965's ''Freewayphobia'' and ''Goofy's Freeway Troubles'' (also known as ''Freewayphobia No. 2''), which were also his last ''How To...'' videos until 2007, as well as Pinto Colvig's final voicing of Goofy before his death in 1967, which also saw Goofy retired except for cameo roles such as ''Film/WhoFramedRogerRabbit''.

to:

Goofy first appeared in a WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse short, ''Mickey's Revue'', in 1932. After a few appearances in Mickey's cartoons and joining up with Mickey and Donald in classics such as ''Mickey's Fire Brigade'' and ''Lonesome Ghosts'', Goofy eventually starred in his own series of cartoons, with his voice provided by Pinto Colvig. When Colvig left Disney, Disney in 1938, Goofy was left without a voice, so Disney made the best of a bad situation and conceived the ''How to...'' shorts, where most of the dialogue was done by a narrator, with Goofy's voice provided mostly by stock audio.audio or an imitator until Colvig's return in 1944. The concept of the ''How to..'' shorts was so well received, that they are a staple of Disney and considered some of Goofy's best cartoons. One of them, ''The Art of Skiing'', introduced his trademark ''[[StockScream Goofy Holler]]'' (YAAAAAA-HOO-HOO-HOO-HOOEY!).

In the 1950s, Disney introduced the "Goofy the Everyman" concept, in which Goofy was transformed into a family man going through common everyday trials like quitting smoking, dieting, raising children, getting a cold, and so on. He is never referred to as Goofy (though the title cards still said ''Walt Disney Presents Goofy''), instead he's usually named George Geef, though some shorts had other names. His character design is also changed, making his whole body pale instead of just his face, smaller eyes with eyebrows, removing the long dog-like ears, large buck teeth and the white gloves, giving him a more human look and also making him more intelligent and giving him a normal voice. These shorts depicted him with a wife and son. Often, the rest of society looked just like him.him, something carried over from the later ''How to...'' shorts starting in ''How to Play Baseball''. The humour was also more sedate, mostly poking fun at suburban life in the 1950s. This lasted until ''Aquamania'' in 1961, as Goofy reverted to his old form and voice in 1965's ''Freewayphobia'' and ''Goofy's Freeway Troubles'' (also known as ''Freewayphobia No. 2''), which were also his last ''How To...'' videos until 2007, as well as Pinto Colvig's final voicing of Goofy before his death in 1967, which also saw Goofy retired except for cameo roles such as ''Film/WhoFramedRogerRabbit''.
1st Oct '17 2:24:16 PM maxwellsilver
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Goofy first appeared in a MickeyMouse short, ''Mickey's Revue'', in 1932. After a few appearances in Mickey's cartoons and joining up with Mickey and Donald in classics such as ''Mickey's Fire Brigade'' and ''Lonesome Ghosts'', Goofy eventually starred in his own series of cartoons, with his voice provided by Pinto Colvig. When Colvig left Disney, Goofy was left without a voice, so Disney made the best of a bad situation and conceived the ''How to...'' shorts, where most of the dialogue was done by a narrator, with Goofy's voice provided mostly by stock audio. The concept of the ''How to..'' shorts was so well received, that they are a staple of Disney and considered some of Goofy's best cartoons. One of them, ''The Art of Skiing'', introduced his trademark ''[[StockScream Goofy Holler]]'' (YAAAAAA-HOO-HOO-HOO-HOOEY!).

to:

Goofy first appeared in a MickeyMouse WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse short, ''Mickey's Revue'', in 1932. After a few appearances in Mickey's cartoons and joining up with Mickey and Donald in classics such as ''Mickey's Fire Brigade'' and ''Lonesome Ghosts'', Goofy eventually starred in his own series of cartoons, with his voice provided by Pinto Colvig. When Colvig left Disney, Goofy was left without a voice, so Disney made the best of a bad situation and conceived the ''How to...'' shorts, where most of the dialogue was done by a narrator, with Goofy's voice provided mostly by stock audio. The concept of the ''How to..'' shorts was so well received, that they are a staple of Disney and considered some of Goofy's best cartoons. One of them, ''The Art of Skiing'', introduced his trademark ''[[StockScream Goofy Holler]]'' (YAAAAAA-HOO-HOO-HOO-HOOEY!).
(YAAAAAA-HOO-HOO-HOO-HOOEY!).

In the 1950s, Disney introduced the "Goofy the Everyman" concept, in which Goofy was transformed into a family man going through common everyday trials like quitting smoking, dieting, raising children, getting a cold, and so on. He is never referred to as Goofy (though the title cards still said ''Walt Disney Presents Goofy''), instead he's usually named George Geef, though some shorts had other names. His character design is also changed, making his whole body pale instead of just his face, smaller eyes with eyebrows, removing the long dog-like ears, large buck teeth and the white gloves, giving him a more human look and also making him more intelligent and giving him a normal voice. These shorts depicted him with a wife and son. Often, the rest of society looked just like him. The humour was also more sedate, mostly poking fun at suburban life in the 1950s. This lasted until ''Aquamania'' in 1961, as Goofy reverted to his old form and voice in 1965's ''Freewayphobia'' and ''Goofy's Freeway Troubles'' (also known as ''Freewayphobia No. 2''), which were also his last ''How To...'' videos until 2007, as well as Pinto Colvig's final voicing of Goofy before his death in 1967, which also saw Goofy retired except for cameo roles such as ''Film/WhoFramedRogerRabbit''.
1st Oct '17 1:38:58 PM maxwellsilver
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* TooDumbToLive: In the cartoons, [[DownplayedTrope but he's only a mild example]], as he's more klutsy and ignorant than genuinely stupid.



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Goofy's son and wife are nowhere to be seen in more modern stories, like WesternAnimation/GoofTroop or WesternAnimation/HouseOfMouse.

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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Goofy's son and wife are nowhere to be seen in more modern stories, like WesternAnimation/GoofTroop unlike ''WesternAnimation/GoofTroop'' (which introduces his son Max) or WesternAnimation/HouseOfMouse.''WesternAnimation/HouseOfMouse'' (where Max works as the parking valet).
1st Oct '17 1:36:10 PM maxwellsilver
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->''"It is difficult to classify the characteristics of the Goof into columns of the physical and mental, because they interweave, reflect, and enhance one another. Therefore it will probably be best to mention everything all at once. Think of the Goof as a composite of an everlasting optimist, a gullible Good Samaritan, a half-wit, a shiftless, [[UncleTomFoolery good-natured colored boy]] and a hick.[[note]] He is loose-jointed and gangly, but not rubbery. He can move fast if he has to, but would rather avoid any overexertion, so he takes what seems the easiest way. He is a philosopher of the barber shop variety. No matter what happens, he accepts it finally at being for the best or at least amusing. He is willing to help anyone and offers his assistance even when it is not needed and just creates confusion. He very seldom, if ever, reaches his objective or completes what he has started. His brain being rather vapory, it is difficult for him to concentrate on any one subject. Any little distraction can throw him off his train of thought and it is extremely difficult for the Goof to keep to his purpose. Yet the Goof is not the type of half-wit that is to be pitied. He doesn't dribble, drool or shriek. He is a good-natured dumbbell that thinks he is pretty smart. He laughs at his own jokes because he can't understand any others. If he is a victim of a catastrophe, he makes the best of it immediately and his chagrin or anger melts very quickly into a broad grin. If he does something particularly stupid he is ready to laugh at himself after it all finally dawns on him. He is very courteous and apologetic and his faux pas embarrass him, but he tries to laugh off his errors. He has music in his heart even though it is the same tune forever and I see him humming to himself while working or thinking. He talks to himself because it is easier for him to know what he is thinking if he hears it first. His posture is nil. His back arches the wrong way and his little stomach protrudes. His head, stomach, and knees lead his body. His neck is quite long and scrawny. His knees sag and his feet are large and flat. He walks on his heels and his toes turn up. His shoulders are narrow and slope rapidly, giving the upper part of his body a thinness and making his arms seem long and heavy, though actually not drawn that way. His hands are very sensitive and expressive, and though his gestures are broad, they should reflect the gentleman. His shoes and feet are not the traditional cartoon dough feet. His arches collapsed long ago and his shoes should have a very definite character. Never think of the Goof as a sausage with rubber hose attachments. Though he is very flexible and floppy, his body still has a solidity and weight. The looseness in his arms and legs should be achieved through a succession of breaks in the joints rather than what seems like the waving of so much rope. He is not muscular and yet has the strength and stamina of a very wiry person. His clothes are misfits: his trousers are baggy at the knees and the pants legs strive vainly to touch his shoe tops but never do. His pants droop at the seat and stretch tightly across some distance below the crotch. His sweater fits him snugly except for the neck and his vest is much too small. His hat is of a soft material and animates a little bit. It is true that there is a vague similarity in the construction of the Goofy's head and [[WesternAnimation/PlutoThePup Pluto's]]. The use of the eyes, mouth and ears are entirely different. One is dog, the other human. The Goof's head can be thought of in terms of a caricature of a person with a pointed dome - large, dreamy eyes, buck teeth and a weak chin, a large mouth, a thick lower lip, a fat tongue and a bulbous nose that grows larger on its way out and turns up. His eyes should remain partly closed to help give him a stupid, sleepy appearance, as though he were constantly straining to remain awake, but of course, they can open wide for expressions or accents. He blinks quite a bit. His ears for the most party are just trailing appendages and are not used in the same way as Pluto's ears except for rare expressions. His brow is heavy and breaks the circle that outlines his skull. He is very bashful, yet when something very stupid has befallen him, he mugs the camera like an amateur actor with relatives in the audience, trying to cover up his embarrassment by making faces and signaling to them. He is in close contact with sprites, goblins, fairies and other such fantasia. Each object or piece of mechanism which to us is lifeless, has a soul and personality in the mind of the Goof. The improbable becomes real where the Goof is concerned. He has marvelous muscular control of his bottom. He can do numerous little flourishes with it and his bottom should be used whenever there is an opportunity to emphasize a funny position.[[/note]] [[BlatantLies This little analysis]] has covered the Goof from top to toes, and having come to his end, I end."''

to:

->''"It is difficult to classify the characteristics of the Goof into columns of the physical and mental, because they interweave, reflect, and enhance one another. Therefore it will probably be best to mention everything all at once. Think of the Goof as a composite of an everlasting optimist, a gullible Good Samaritan, a half-wit, a shiftless, [[UncleTomFoolery good-natured colored boy]] boy and a hick.[[note]] He is loose-jointed and gangly, but not rubbery. He can move fast if he has to, but would rather avoid any overexertion, so he takes what seems the easiest way. He is a philosopher of the barber shop variety. No matter what happens, he accepts it finally at being for the best or at least amusing. He is willing to help anyone and offers his assistance even when it is not needed and just creates confusion. He very seldom, if ever, reaches his objective or completes what he has started. His brain being rather vapory, it is difficult for him to concentrate on any one subject. Any little distraction can throw him off his train of thought and it is extremely difficult for the Goof to keep to his purpose. Yet the Goof is not the type of half-wit that is to be pitied. He doesn't dribble, drool or shriek. He is a good-natured dumbbell that thinks he is pretty smart. He laughs at his own jokes because he can't understand any others. If he is a victim of a catastrophe, he makes the best of it immediately and his chagrin or anger melts very quickly into a broad grin. If he does something particularly stupid he is ready to laugh at himself after it all finally dawns on him. He is very courteous and apologetic and his faux pas embarrass him, but he tries to laugh off his errors. He has music in his heart even though it is the same tune forever and I see him humming to himself while working or thinking. He talks to himself because it is easier for him to know what he is thinking if he hears it first. His posture is nil. His back arches the wrong way and his little stomach protrudes. His head, stomach, and knees lead his body. His neck is quite long and scrawny. His knees sag and his feet are large and flat. He walks on his heels and his toes turn up. His shoulders are narrow and slope rapidly, giving the upper part of his body a thinness and making his arms seem long and heavy, though actually not drawn that way. His hands are very sensitive and expressive, and though his gestures are broad, they should reflect the gentleman. His shoes and feet are not the traditional cartoon dough feet. His arches collapsed long ago and his shoes should have a very definite character. Never think of the Goof as a sausage with rubber hose attachments. Though he is very flexible and floppy, his body still has a solidity and weight. The looseness in his arms and legs should be achieved through a succession of breaks in the joints rather than what seems like the waving of so much rope. He is not muscular and yet has the strength and stamina of a very wiry person. His clothes are misfits: his trousers are baggy at the knees and the pants legs strive vainly to touch his shoe tops but never do. His pants droop at the seat and stretch tightly across some distance below the crotch. His sweater fits him snugly except for the neck and his vest is much too small. His hat is of a soft material and animates a little bit. It is true that there is a vague similarity in the construction of the Goofy's head and [[WesternAnimation/PlutoThePup Pluto's]]. The use of the eyes, mouth and ears are entirely different. One is dog, the other human. The Goof's head can be thought of in terms of a caricature of a person with a pointed dome - large, dreamy eyes, buck teeth and a weak chin, a large mouth, a thick lower lip, a fat tongue and a bulbous nose that grows larger on its way out and turns up. His eyes should remain partly closed to help give him a stupid, sleepy appearance, as though he were constantly straining to remain awake, but of course, they can open wide for expressions or accents. He blinks quite a bit. His ears for the most party are just trailing appendages and are not used in the same way as Pluto's ears except for rare expressions. His brow is heavy and breaks the circle that outlines his skull. He is very bashful, yet when something very stupid has befallen him, he mugs the camera like an amateur actor with relatives in the audience, trying to cover up his embarrassment by making faces and signaling to them. He is in close contact with sprites, goblins, fairies and other such fantasia. Each object or piece of mechanism which to us is lifeless, has a soul and personality in the mind of the Goof. The improbable becomes real where the Goof is concerned. He has marvelous muscular control of his bottom. He can do numerous little flourishes with it and his bottom should be used whenever there is an opportunity to emphasize a funny position.[[/note]] [[BlatantLies This little analysis]] analysis has covered the Goof from top to toes, and having come to his end, I end."''
3rd Aug '17 7:43:35 PM Prinzenick
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* VocalEvolution: Pinto Colvig, Goofy's original voice actor, played the character all the way up to his death in the mid 60's, so as time went by, his voice subtly changed to become less, well, goofy sounding. By the time he last played the character in "Goofy's Freeway Troubles" and "Donald Duck Goes West", he actually gave Goofy a slightly ''higher'' (but noticeably more worn) sounding voice than he did in the 30's and 40's cartoons.

to:

* VocalEvolution: Pinto Colvig, Goofy's original voice actor, played the character all the way up to his death in the mid 60's, so as time went by, his voice subtly changed to become less, well, goofy sounding. By the time he last played the character in "Goofy's Freeway Troubles" and "Donald Duck Goes West", he actually gave his Goofy voice has a slightly ''higher'' (but noticeably lower and more worn) worn sounding voice than he did in the 30's and 40's cartoons.
22nd Jul '17 2:16:03 AM StFan
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* How to Ride a Horse (1950, originally part of Disney/TheReluctantDragon, 1941)

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* How to Ride a Horse (1950, originally part of Disney/TheReluctantDragon, ''Film/TheReluctantDragon'', 1941)
17th Jul '17 9:43:31 PM ghidorah15
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* CharacterizationMarchesOn: He was more of a {{Jerkass}} in his first few appearances in the Mickey Mouse comic strip, stealing furniture to open a detective agency, playing pranks on Mickey's pets, and so on. This was soon dropped and we got the bumbling yet nice character we all know.

to:

* CharacterizationMarchesOn: He was more of a {{Jerkass}} in his first few appearances in the Mickey Mouse comic strip, stealing furniture to open a detective agency, playing pranks on Mickey's pets, and so on. This was soon dropped and we got the lovably bumbling yet nice character NiceGuy we all know.
21st Jun '17 10:54:29 PM Sdman101
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** In VideoGame/KingodmHearts he's depicted as smarter and more bright than the rest for the most part.

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** In VideoGame/KingodmHearts VideoGame/KingdomHearts he's depicted as smarter and more bright than the rest for the most part.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=WesternAnimation.Goofy