Video Game: Crypt of the NecroDancer

Rise from your grave... and get down on the dance floor!
Those monsters driven mad by music, their twisted souls bound to the beat. And at the bottom... God only knows. You think you're ready? Well... you're not.
Crypt of the Necrodancer early access trailer

Cadence is digging up a grave when suddenly the ground opens up. She falls to somewhere, and lands on a rock. Unbeknownst to her, a mysterious and sinister figure known as the NecroDancer rises from the earth and steals her heart. Unsure as to what happened, as she feels an unwavering beat, she sets out to find the answers.

Crypt of the NecroDancer, created by Brace Yourself Games and published by Klei, is an Indie game that uses the almost unrelatable aspects of roguelikes and rhythm games to create a rather unique combination. The game was released as an early-access on June 30th, 2014 and saw a full release on April 23rd, 2015. The music was composed by Danny Baranowsky, who also worked on the soundtracks of Super Meat Boy and The Binding of Isaac.

In the Crypt of the NecroDancer your character can only move and fight to the beat of the music. The goal is to fight and dance your way through a procedurally generated dungeon, slaying monsters as you go along. You're encouraged to maintain the rhythm to obtain a coin multiplier and missing a beat or taking damage resets it. Though enemies travel in predictable patterns, the fast pace of the game makes it challenging.


Crypt of the NecroDancer contains examples of:

  • Action Bomb: Goblin Bombers. Pixies also do this, but only when attacked.
  • Action Girl: Most of the female characters, like Cadence, Melody and Aria are able to destroy monsters with their weaponry.
  • Actual Pacifist: Dove, who has no weapons in her item pool. Her only means of self-defense is a flower which confuses enemies. Even her bombs do nothing more than teleport enemies. She even cries out in sympathy if a monster dies from a trap (though tricking them into doing so is a good strategy for the player).
  • Antagonist Title: To the point where many players simply call the game "Necrodancer" for short.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: Several characters have items or even enemies removed from the game for them for this reason, even the two hardest characters in the game. The monk (who dies upon picking up gold) can't get the ring that causes him to dash forward upon killing an enemy, several characters start with the nazar charm which prevents wraiths from spawning, and Aria and Coda will never have to fight red or black bats or ooze golems.
  • Artifact of Doom: The Golden Lute.
  • Art Shift:
    • Most of the game's music uses synths. The boss Death Metal, arguably the most difficult one in the game due to his fast tempo, has real electric guitars and bass in the background.
    • Melody and Aria specifically have remixed soundtracks with different instrumentation all around.
  • Ascended Meme: Speedrunners often referred to the Yetis as "Klappas" due to their bothersome clapping attack and their similarity to the Twitch "Kappa" emote. When the full game came out, the credits gave punny nicknames to each enemy, and the Yeti got "Klappa".
  • Awesome but Impractical: Several weapons and items are potentially powerful, but very awkward to use. The whip, for instance, hits a wide range in front of you, making it able to take on a huge range of enemies but also impeding your ability to run around.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: The shopkeeper is one of the friendliest shopkeepers in the roguelike genre. You can shoplift and destroy his store and he won't even be fazed. However, if you attack him directly (with a fireball spell or a bomb), he'll quickly turn from your best friend to the toughest enemy in the game, with nine hearts of health, diagonal movement, being able to move every beat and having attack power that would make even bosses weep.
  • Big Bad: The Necrodancer a.k.a. The Bard, Octavian.
  • Blade on a Stick: Spears are one of the many weapons available to the player. They can attack an enemy 2 tiles away, or be thrown to hit an even more distant target.
  • Blackout Basement: Using the Shrine of Darkness causes every wall torch in the dungeon to disappear, at the benefits of being given a compass, 3 bombs, and a map. You also lose your torch, and you're given a Ring of Shadows, which will replace and destroy any ring you might currently be carrying. The ring of shadows alone will reduce you to a very small field of vision.
  • Boring but Practical: Many of the inexpensive items aren't very flashy, but are either far better than being unequipped (for instance, a base torch) or provide subtle help at little cost (such as the base pack).
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: The Dead Ringer is eventually revealed to be Dorian, Cadence's Disappeared Dad.
  • Breath Weapon: Red dragons breathe fire; Blue dragons have a cone of freezing breath. Zone 4 features traps in the form of fire-breathing pig statues.
  • Bullfight Boss: A level boss and a zone boss:
    • The Minotaur, naturally. When the player is in an orthogonal line from them, they "charge" straight in that direction, and if the player gets out of the way, they'll eventually hit a wall or another enemy and be stunned for two turns.
    • Dead Ringer will charge you much like a Minotaur in his first phase, and will destroy his own bells if he charges into them. His charge is upgraded to a Flash Step once all the bells are rung or destroyed, and you defeat him by baiting him into slamming into a large gong in the top-center of the arena.
  • By the Lights of Their Eyes: If Cadence is aware of the presence of monsters, but they're not close enough to a light source, they appear as black silhouettes with glowing eyes.
  • Cartoon Bomb: One of your most useful tools. They destroy almost any wall in a 1 block radius (including diagonally), and hit enemies for 4 hearts of damage. Just be sure to run away after lighting the fuse.
  • Cast from Hit Points: Casting a spell while it's on cooldown will take some of your health instead.
  • Chest Monster: From typical chest mimics that drop loot, to wall mimics and even cauldron mimics.
  • Colour-Coded for Your Convenience: Black chests contain weapons or armor; Purple chests have magic and magical rings; Red chests cover torches, healing items and the like. Blue chests always require a key, which is hidden somewhere and the same shade of blue.
  • Cutting the Knot:
    • King Conga and Dead Ringer are each invulnerable at certain times (the former requiring you to defeat his mooks or destroy his throne first, the latter being a Puzzle Boss)... unless you have a Dagger of Phasing on hand, which allows you to bypass their armor and attack them directly.
    • Deep Blues and Coral Riff won't aggressively seek you out until you take care of their mooks, but if your weaponry is powerful or diverse enough, you can throw your weapon at them and save a lot of time.
  • Dark Reprise: Traces of level 1-1's music pops up in the True Final Boss's theme.
  • Death by Materialism: Quite literal in the Monk's case. Having taken a 'Vow Of Poverty', he will die if he collects any gold. (However, the shopkeeper has mercy on him and will let him have one item per level for free.)
  • Death Equals Redemption: Played With. Aria was hated by her family for seemingly abandoning them, but is found deep in the Crypt with a dagger through her heart. When revived with the Golden Lute, her final act is to destroy the Lute, bringing the curse to an end, at the cost of her own life.
  • The Dev Team Thinks of Everything:
    • Mainly with regards to the special conditions of alternate characters. For example, the Monk will die if he picks up the Crown of Greed, just the same as if he walked over gold, and attempting to get around Aria or Dove's weapon restrictions will result in death by "cowardice."
    • Because Dagger of Phasing is able to attack through walls it's also able to attack many enemies when they'd normally be invulnerable, making it one of the few ways to beat Puzzle Boss Dead Ringer without baiting him into the gong.
  • Difficult but Awesome:
    • Most of the shrines are either this or Awesome but Impractical. See their descriptions below under Power at a Price.
    • Since only the four cardinal directions are used for controls (with using two directions at once to use items/spells), this game can be played with a Dance Dance Revolution controller. Dance Pad difficulty gives the player a few bonuses, which will be needed.
    • Any weapon that requires reloading. It means either spending an action every few attacks or attacking like a normal dagger, and if you lose track of when it needs to be reloaded, things get bad very quickly. But these weapons all allow you to attack at long range and pierce enemy shields.
    • The Boots of Lunging let you leap four tiles with every move, and attack enemies in your way for massive damage. On the downside, actually controlling your character when you move four tiles per move is not easy. (Fortunately you can toggle them on and off).
    • All glass items. They outperform all others of their type, but are destroyed the first time you take damage. The glass jaw is even worse; you deal double damage, but die in one hit.
  • Difficulty Spike: Zone 3 adds enemies and dungeon elements that mess with your positioning and are much more aggressive, which require you to be far more attentive of your surroundings. Zone 4 spikes it even harder, adding even deadlier enemies and traps.
  • Disability Immunity: In a sense. Since Aria dies in a single hit anyway, she doesn't have to worry about the consequences of wearing the karate gi or glass jaw.
  • Disney Villain Death: Happens to The Necrodancer in the second ending. Curiously enough, this seems to be a far more permanent death than any of the other times he's died.
  • Double Unlock: Shopkeepers in the lobby can sell you items that'll appear later in the dungeons, and furthermore some of the shopkeepers must be rescued in the dungeons first.
  • Doppelgänger: Palette Swaps of your hero appear in Zone 2, and move whenever you do.
  • The Dragon: The Dead Ringer.
  • Dummied Out: The Teal Scroll, which sent you to the next floor without having to fight the miniboss, was removed from later versions of the game for making speedruns too luck-based, though it's graphic, as well as voice clips for a "Descend" spell, can still be found in the game's data folder.
  • Dungeon Shop: Every non-boss floor has a shop in it, and the vocally-gifted shopkeeper is the same person. If somehow the shopkeeper dies, he stops appearing in that dungeon run.
  • Early Game Hell: In general, the first two areas will be the most challenging since you have less powerful items. However, the third main character, Aria, is hit by this the hardest since she goes through the zones in reverse, which means she faces the worst traps and most of the especially troublesome enemies in the first half of the game; zones 2 and 1 are usually comparatively easy. In addition, her only defenses are single-use items and spells, and at the start all she has in that department is a single potion.
  • Epic Flail: Features flails as an unlockable weapon. It hits enemies on five sides, and all those attacked are knocked back and staggered.
  • Equipment-Based Progression: Every run has your character traveling through a dungeon, and as you move along, you come across chests and shops filled with items that give your character an advantage. Played straight in All Zones Mode, where your character starts off sans any upgrades or any equipment picked up in the lobby.
  • Fake Ultimate Mook: A number of enemies can seem to fall under this, the main examples being Golems, who move extremely slowly but take a lot of hits, and Yetis, who attack while moving but are equally slow and die in a single hit.
  • Final Boss: The NecroDancer, fought by Cadence in tandem with Dorian and later by Melody.
  • Flawless Victory: Don't miss a beat or take a hit during a boss battle in All Zones Mode, and you'll get to choose from one of three treasure chests to open before you advance to the next stage. Strictly enforced with Aria, because a single mistake will kill you instantly.
  • Frictionless Ice: Zone 3 has this; you keep moving in one direction, unable to stop or attack, until you either hit an obstacle or leave the ice.
  • For Doom the Bell Tolls: Dead Ringer is all about this. Ominous bells play through the entire fight, and the area is littered with gigantic bells that instantly summon minibosses when struck.
  • From Nobody to Nightmare: The Necrodancer was once a rather unassuming Bard named Octavian. Then one day he found a Golden Lute and began to abuse its powers...
  • Gameplay and Story Integration: Deliberate Intergration in three cases. Melody needs to keep playing the Golden Lute to stay alive. If you switch weapons, she stops playing and dies instantly. Likewise, Aria is frail and suffering from a grievous heart injury, so any mistake causes her to die. The Bard is Octavian before he became the Necrodancer, and thus is unaffected by the Necrodancer's magic. Therefore, he can fight freely at his own pace.
  • Generational Saga: Reversed, thanks to the Golden Lute. You start with Cadence, eventually unlock her mother, Melody, and then finish the game with her mother, Aria.
  • Glass Cannon:
    • Taken literally with glass equipment; they're the most powerful type (glass weapons deal 4 base damage, glass armor completely negates damage, etc.), but if you get hit, they break (in the case of weapons or the shovel, they leave behind glass shards so you're not completely defenseless). Taken to its logical conclusion with the Glass Jaw: you deal double damage, but if you get hit, you break.
    • Because of her nature as a One-Hit-Point Wonder (meaning that she has no access to heart containers and can only get the Glass Armor or the Karate Gi (which doubles the damage you deal AND take), and no need for rings or consumables related to health), Aria inevitably becomes one or dies. The Gi and Glass Jaw are especially useful, since she doesn't take a penalty from them.
  • Go Out with a Smile: Aria, after destroying the lute and breaking the curse, passes away peacefully, in the knowledge that she had put and end to the curse.
  • Hailfire Peaks: Zone 3 has two sides, one of which is Slippy-Slidey Ice World and the other of which is Lethal Lava Land. The music even changes appropriately (hot metal tunes for the fire side, and cool techno beats for the ice side) when you cross from one side to the other.
  • Hand Cannon: The Blunderbuss.
  • Handicapped Badass: Eli, who has a shovel for a hand, but can kick bombs, which he has an endless supply of, toward enemies.
  • Harder Than Hard:
    • Aria can only use the dagger as a weapon, has only half a heart and can't collect any more, and dies if you miss a beat. In addition, her story mode starts in Zone 4 and goes in reverse.
    • The final character, Coda: Aria's half-heart, death to a missed beat, and can only use the dagger; Bolt's double-time speed; and the Monk's Vow of Poverty which makes touching gold fatal.
  • Heal Thyself: From healing spells, food, blood magic and other magical objects, there are a number of ways to find HP.
  • Heart Is an Awesome Power: When you slay an enemy while wearing the Ring of Courage, you immediately take that enemy's place (or move forward a square towards where that enemy was). The real surprise comes from the fact that if taking that step would put you in a position to get attacked by enemies, the attack is stopped by your courage. You can even completely avoid traps by using this ring, a fact that the game kindly teaches you in the third Codex trial.
  • Helpful Mook: The pixies in Zone 4. Touching them restores you one heart of health. However, attacking them will cause them to explode like a bomb.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Destroying the Golden Lute results in death. The deed is done anyway.
  • Hurricane of Puns: Each of the bosses has their own punny name and theme music:
    • Deep Blues plays his blues while sending his fifteen chess piece minions after you.
    • Death Metal looks like the Grim Reaper and has a real fast theme as well.
    • King Conga has his zombie minions dance in a conga line before taking you on, and is a gorilla.
    • Coral Riff is a giant octupus with a guitar for a head, and various instruments played by its tentacles, in a half-flooded arena.
    • The penultimate boss in Cadence's story, Dead Ringer, is a suit of armor with a large mallet. The fight itself is a Puzzle Boss involving a set of bells placed throughout the arena.
    • The end credits list every enemy in the game; each monster and mini-boss is given a suitably music-pun-based name (the Slime is "Boogie", the Golem is "Hard Rock", the Spider is "8-Legato", the shopkeeper is "Freddie Merchantry", and so on).
    • Many song titles from the soundtrack are some variety of pun. Some examples: 2-2 is "Grave Throbbing", 4-1 is "Styx and Stones", Deep Blues' theme is "Knight to C-Sharp", the True Final Boss theme is "Absolutetion".
  • Hyperactive Metabolism: Healing items come in the form of food. You can choose between apples, cheese, drumsticks and ham.
  • Hyperspace Arsenal: Averted for the most part. Cadence can only carry one shovel, torch, set of armor, helmet, and pair of boots. (And she starts with just a shovel and a dagger.) She also starts off with only being able to carry one weapon (which can be increased to two weapons if she picks up a holster) and one consumable item (that goes up to two if she picks up a backpack, or an infinite number of consumables if she picks up a bag of holding - playing the trope straight.)
  • Infinity+1 Sword: The Jeweled Dagger is the most damaging and stable weapon in the game. It makes up for its short attack range by being throwable, dealing massive damage to all enemies in a line.
  • Interface Screw:
    • A banshee's shriek deafens your heroine, rendering the player temporarily incapable of hearing the song they need to keep moving in time with.
    • When fighting King Conga, or if the Shrine of Rhythm is active, every eighth beat is dropped.
    • The Ring of Shadows greatly reduces your vision range.
    • The sunglasses provide a damage boost but reduce all enemies to silhouettes, making it harder to tell which version many of them are.
      • Each enemy version has different eye colors to help identify them.
    • Stepping on a confuse trap or being the victim of a Lich's spell temporarily reverses your controls.
  • Kaizo Trap: It's not over after Aria kills the Golden Lute since all the statues will attack with a firebeam starting from the top row, which can very much kill her before she gets to the exit. And of course, missing a beat after killing it will also kill her.
  • Kung-Fu Proof Mook: The Blademaster enemies in Zone 4. They parry any weapon attacks normally, and can only be hurt right after they attempt to counterattack you.
  • Large Ham: The NecroDancer himself. His hilariously evil voice is first heard in the official launch trailer, and he also talks like this in his fights and cutscenes... Mostly. At some points he does talk normally, but it doesn't tend to last. There's one scene in particular when he abruptly flips from normal to overly-evil-voice in mid-sentence.
  • Life Drain: All blood weapons are known for this power. For every 10 foes defeated, half a heart is restored. The Crown of Thorns shares this same ability with blood weapons, with the exception that upon being equipped, damage is dealt.
  • Losing Your Head: When a skeleton is down to its last heart, its head goes flying off its shoulders. They start running away when this happens.
  • Macrogame: The diamonds you collect throughout the dungeon are used to unlock upgrades and additional items that can be found in subsequent runs.
  • Magikarp Power:
    • Obsidian items start off only as powerful as your starting gear, but increase in power the bigger your groove chain gets. That said, they also reset to minimum power if your groove chain gets broken.
    • The Ring of Becoming turns you into a One-Hit-Point Wonder, but if you can transmute it, it's replaced with the Ring of Wonder, which combines the effects of most of the other rings in the game and actually doubles most of those effects.
  • Magnetic Plot Device: the Golden Lute is ultimately responsible for the entire story.
  • Meaningful Name: Several of the playable characters, whether by having a name related to music or one that hints at their playstyle.
  • Mondegreen: In a flashback, Cadence is eavesdropping on her father and uncle's conversation and wonders what could possibly be so important about "gold 'n loot"...
  • Money Spider: Every enemy drops coins upon being defeated. Minibosses drop more and Bosses drop large amounts of gold and diamonds.
  • Money Multiplier: Each enemy killed adds to the coin multiplier. note  In addition to this, permanent money multiplier bonuses can be purchased from the lobby shop.
    • In the game exist items which can increase the amount of money enemies drop: this can range from golden weapons, a ring of gold, and a crown of greed.
  • Mook Bouncer: The Magic Monkeys in Zone 4 will force-teleport you to a random area of the level if killed after they grab you.
    • Warlock enemies will forcefully teleport you to their location should you kill them with anything except spells and scrolls.
  • Musical Assassin: Melody's weapon is a golden lute, which damages any enemies ajacent to her each time she moves.
  • Musical Spoiler: As of the full version, its possible to determine if a floor's Shopkeeper is in fact a Monstrous Shopkeeper by listening carefully to their singing.
  • Musical Theme Naming: Cadence, our heroine, her mother Melody, and grandmother Aria. Also, Coda.
  • No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: The whole reason the game took place is because the Necrodancer betrayed Aria when she asked for his help.
  • No Name Given: The Monk, but not the Bard, who Melody reveals that his former name was Octavian.
  • Obvious Rule Patch: When the Codex areas were first added, the "Merchanticide" achievement became very easy to unlock, as one of the areas was all about the various ways players could provoke and kill the shopkeeper. A later patch closed the loophole, so they must kill the shopkeeper during an actual run to unlock the achievement.
  • Our Liches Are Different: Most of the playable cast has had their heart stolen by the Necrodancer, or are otherwise dead, and are only kept alive by the power of the Golden Lute. More literal in the case of Melody and Aria, if they stop playing the Lute they will die immediately. The only exception is the Bard which hints to his becoming the Necrodancer. This is fixed by Aria defeating the Lute which saves her family at the cost of her own life.
  • Power at a Price: Nearly every shrine in the game is this one way or another.
    • A Shrine of Blood will give you blood weapons, at the cost of nearly all of your health. Conveniently, blood weapons deal massive damage while you're at low health.
    • A Shrine of Glass turns all of your equipment into glass, making them more powerful, but also ensuring that they'll shatter if you get hit.
    • A Shrine of Risk offers you powerful weapons and HP items, but you're dealt damage when traveling between floors.
    • A Shrine of War gives you some kind of telepathy item, but evolves all enemies into their strongest versions.
    • A Shrine of Peace refills your life and gives you an extra heart container, but takes away all your equipment and replaces it with your starting gear.
    • A Shrine of Rhythm turns all your items into their Obsidian versions, but causes all the songs to skip every 8th beat of input. It will also deal a half-heart of damage whenever you mess up the beat.
    • A Shrine of Sacrifice can offer you powerful weapons, but requires that Cadence slay monsters right in front of the altar. Killing a miniboss before it fills it up the fastest, but causes only glass weapons to appear.
    • A Shrine of No Return gives you a glass rapier and a war drum, but damages you if you ever move to a square you occupied last turn (which one does frequently in normal gameplay). Which will of course break your rapier.
    • A Shrine of Pace rewards you with free items for finishing levels very quickly, but damages you any time you fail to do so.
    • A Shrine of Phasing gives the player a Ring of Phasing, but removes all their other equipment except bombs and spells, leaving them next to defenseless. (And incapable of winning unless you throw your dagger first or can find another weapon before the next boss, or are playing a character whose weapon can't be changed).
    • The hidden Blood Shop does this as well - offering you items in exchange for taking 1-2 hearts worth of damage. If you don't have enough life when you make the exchange, this will kill you (and give you a death by "Blood Debt".)
    • The Ring of War grants you additional damage and knockback, but causes more enemies to appear.
  • Power Glows: Blood, gold, and obsidian items all have ways to increase their power. When powered up, they will glow in your inventory.
  • Punny Name: Many of the enemies and characters in the game, who are named after people and aspects of music, like NecroDancer, King Konga, Death Metal, Coral Riff and the shopkeeper "Freddie Merchantry." You can see them all during the credits.
  • Puzzle Boss:
    • Dead Ringer, who's invincible unless he charges into the gong spawned when all four bells are rung.
    • Return of the Necrodancer needs to be pushed into the pit of lava behind him, meaning either pushing him to the side of his minions or taking them all out with bombs.
  • Royal Rapier: One of the weapons available is a rapier, which does double damage on a successful attack on any enemy 2 tiles away. Your character will also step forward on such an attack.
  • Sequential Boss: Cadence's story ends with two bosses, Dead Ringer and the NecroDancer.
  • Shield-Bearing Mook: Skeletons in later zones have shields which can block weaker attacks from the front.
  • Simple Yet Awesome: The Dagger of Frost freezes whatever it doesn't kill, rendering even minibosses completely helpless, and instantly kills any enemy that's already frozen. Its only downsides are that it, like all daggers, has a range of only one space, and that fire or a bomb blast will melt it into a regular dagger.
  • Single-Use Shield:
    • Glass armor, the frost charm, the ring of shielding, and the crown of teleportation all will prevent a single hit and have various effects trigger instead, but will then break completely.
    • Starting in Zone 2, skeletons carry shields. These shields have a defense that's as high as the health of the skeleton using it note  and can stop any attack that couldn't 1-shot the wielder. If your attack matches or overpowers the defense of their shield, they lose their shield.
  • Shmuck Bait: The game sometimes spawns rooms that contain a valuable item surrounded on all four sides by traps. One of the possible setups has the loot surrounded by four seemingly harmless bounce traps, trapping the player inside until a monster comes along or the level music ends.
  • Shoplift and Die: Zig-Zagged. The shopkeeper is a carefree guy who sings along with the current music and will only attack you if you attack him first. Not only can you shoplift without consequence when wearing the Ring of Shadows, but you can even knock down his golden walls for some free gold. Should he die, not only can you take all his goods for free, but he'll drop the Crown of Greed, which will double all gold received (at the cost of causing your total gold to tick down along with the beat) and is essential to a high scoring all-zone run. However, if you do attack him via hitting him with a bomb, spell, or thrown weapon, he immediately charges you, able to move diagonally and hitting like a truck.
  • Slice-and-Dice Swordsmanship: Averted. Piercing and stabbing weapons tend toward long range, while slashing and bludgeoning weapons tend toward wide range instead, making them feel very different to use.
  • Sound-Coded for Your Convenience: The shopkeeper sings along with the music, and you can hear him outside of his shop.
  • Sprint Shoes: The Boots of Speed used to allow you to move twice as often per beat, but were removed from the game for being overpowered.
  • Start of Darkness: Octavian was but a normal bard until he found the Golden Lute and amassed an undead army.
  • Time-Limit Boss: Return of the Necrodancer. The walls close in with every few beats, and will eventually crush Melody.
  • Turns Red: Every one of the bosses except the True Final Boss. A few of them do it twice. That said, for several bosses their "second form" (where they attack themselves) is much easier than the first form (where their minions attack), and with the right weapons you can kill some bosses before they even leave their first phase.
  • True Final Boss: The Golden Lute, fought by Aria.
  • Underground Monkey: Some enemies, like slimes and bats, appear as differently colored variants with differing patterns in later zones.
  • Unusable Enemy Equipment: Unfortunately, you can't pick up the skeletons' shields for yourself.
  • Variable Mix: The shopkeeper will sing along to the music when you get close to him. Additionally, the third zone has two different tracks that it segues between depending on whether you're in the hot or cold area.
  • Villain Song: Dance for your Life, a Power Metal anthem sung by the Necrodancer. Sadly it exists only on the soundtrack and never appears in-game.
  • The Very Definitely Final Dungeon: Zone 4.
  • Video Game Stealing: Wearing the Ring of Shadows allows you to steal from shops.
  • Where It All Began: Aria's run, the third and final act of the story, goes in reverse - starting from the fourth dungeon and ending at the first.
  • Whip It Good: The Whip (attacks in an L shape, like knights in chess) and the Cat o' Nine Tails (allows one to attack while moving).
  • With Great Power Comes Great Insanity: After Octavian the bard finds the Golden Lute and learns about its powers, he soon abuses them, culminating in amassing an undead army.