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Immunity Disability
This is about a situation where a character that's immune to something experiences a drawback based on said immunity.

The kinds of disability vary - You Feel No Pain? You might not know what hit you or how much it damages your body. You're immortal? You'd be surprised at what you can live through. And so on and so forth.

Subtrope of Power at a Price and Blessed with Suck. If your particular immunity is to death, it becomes the subtrope Who Wants to Live Forever?.

Compare and contrast Disability Immunity, Logical Weakness, Disability Superpower and Exploited Immunity.


Examples

Anime and Manga
  • One Piece. While fighting a giant zombie, Chopper, the team's doctor, tells it that the fact that it can't feel pain is its greatest weakness, as it has no way of knowing how much damage its body parts are accumulating until they're so injured that they simply stop responding altogether. The Straw Hats eventually beat it by shattering its spine, leaving the thing laying on the ground wondering why it can't move.
  • In Part 2 of Jojos Bizarre Adventure, the villain Cars ends up gaining immortality and an auto-evolution ability after combining the Stone Mask and Red Stone of Asia. Joseph uses this ability against him by throwing him into an active volcano where he hardens in defense as it's about to erupt. He gets launched into space and is stuck floating around forever; eventually his mind shuts down completely.
  • Touma in A Certain Magical Index has his enchanted right arm, Imagine Breaker, that functions as an Anti-Magic. In a world filled with mages, this gives him a great advantage. However, among other sucky things, it also cancels beneficial magic such as Healing Hands. If not for his expert surgeon friend he would have died of many non-magical things that his enemy can use.
  • Blade of the Immortal: The protagonist, Manji, is not only immortal but can heal from virtually any wound. This comes back to bite him a few times:
    • In general, Manji bemuses that although he's one of the best swordsmen in Japan, his sword skills have slowly gotten worse because knowing he can't die dulls his instincts.
    • There's a special poison that works only on immortals; it doesn't directly kill them, but it basically reopens every single wound they've ever received after becoming immortal. When used on Manji, the results are especially gory, excruciating, and horrific.

Comic Books
  • Thurim in Requiem Chevalier Vampire had a Healing Factor gifted to him by Dracula. When Thurim rebelled, Dracula took advantage of Thurim's unkillability by having him drawn and quartered for eternity.
  • Superman's near invulnerability is often parodied by having it also prevent him from shaving because even his beard is too tough to cut.
  • In Rising Stars one man's power is invulnerability from external harm—but this also leaves him highly insensitive to any form of touch, except on the back of his tongue, where he could still taste. He developed an eating disorder and became an indestructible obese man.
  • In an Incredible Hulk storyline, the Hulk gets poisoned and has to give a blood sample; however, the needles can't penetrate his tough skin. He resorts to giving himself a bleeding wound by crushing a test tube in his palm.
  • The Sandman covers the trope as it applies to immortality:
    • Hob Gadling, who's been immortal ever since Death, in 1389, promised Dream not to take him until Hob was ready, spends the seventeenth century impoverished, sick and starving: "Do you know [...] how hungry a man can get if he doesn't die? But doesn't eat?"
    • Retired superhero Element Girl longs for death because her freakish appearance leaves her socially isolated and agoraphobic. However, because her body can automatically transmute itself into most any element, she's effectively immortal, and unable to commit suicide without the intervention of the god who bestowed her powers in the first place.
    • Dream's son, Orpheus, begs Death to make him immortal so he can enter the netherworld and rescue his wife Eurydice without dying. After failing in his quest, he tries to commit suicide but can't, and when a band of frenzied Dionysius worshippers tears him limb from limb, he lives on as a disembodied head, with only his estranged father able to grant him his wish to die.

Film
  • This sets off the whole plot of Santo vs. la Hija de Frankestein — Frieda Frankenstein has developed an immunity to the youth serum she needs to survive.
  • Downplayed in Captain America: The First Avenger. After Steve's best friend is KIA during a mission, Steve complains that one of the downsides of the Super Soldier serum is that he can't get drunk anymore.
  • In Death Becomes Her, the two women gain immortality just before one suffers a broken neck and the other has a hole blown through her stomach. Yes, they are immortal but their bodies are falling to pieces, literally. The very end of the movie has their heads rolling down the stairs.

Literature
  • In Escape From Genopolis, the people of Genopolis have eliminated all forms of pain, including hunger and thirst. This means that, aside from people forgetting to eat and not being able to gauge when they need medical help, nobody can feel emotion anymore.
  • Chrestomanci: At birth, it was foretold that Christopher Chant's weakness would be silver, so his father cast his strongest spells against silver affecting him. Ultimately, silver causes him to be Brought Down to Normal; when Christopher isn't touching it, he's the most powerful enchanter in the worlds. (It's implied that it was a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy.)
  • In the Forgotten Realms Pools of Radiance trilogy, Kern was born immune to magic. Unfortunately, this makes him immune to magic healing and teleportation. With concentration, Kern can sometimes suppress this immune.

Live-Action TV
  • The Twilight Zone Classic episode "Escape Clause". A man makes a Deal with the Devil to gain immortality, which is effectively immunity to death. He murders his wife so that he can experience the electric chair, but his lawyer manages to get him life in prison. Since he can't die, he's going to be there a long time.
  • In the final episode of Alias Big Bad Arvin Sloane has gotten his hands on enough Rambaldi documents to create a vat of fluid which somehow makes him immortal - and immediately thereafter a giant stone pillar falls on him, trapping him under it forever.
  • In Heroes, Claire can't get drunk because of her regenerative ability. She uses this to her advantage once, but complains about it other times.
  • Forever Knight: If someone learns of vampires, a vampire will hypnotize them to forget. If they're one of the few people who are immune to hypnosis they'll usually be killed.

Tabletop Games
  • Followers of Nurgle in Warhammer and Warhammer 40K are generally immune to pain, due to their bodies being so much dead or festering tissue. Likewise, Slaaneshi cultists are Too Kinky to Torture, but they require ever-greater amounts of sensory input to feel anything.
    • Blanks are rare individuals who are immune to all psychic powers. This causes a number of side effects:
      • Blanks not only nullify psychic powers on themselves, but often in a small area around them. Psychics in the area can normally find people by seeking out their psychic signatures. The dead-zone created by a blank is even more of a sign that something odd is there.
      • As emotions are a form of psychic power, blanks cannot feel emotion and drain emotions from those around them. This gives them an Uncanny Valley effect.
      • Being immune to all psychic powers includes healing or support abilities as well.
      • Because blanks are so rare, once discovered, you'll be picked up by the Inquisition and trained into a commando. Depending on your viewpoint, this is either awesome or horrible.

Video Games
  • In Disgaea, Ninjas are the only class able to dodge special techniques. Unfortunately, that includes healing spells.
  • Joshua Graham from Fallout: New Vegas suffers from horrific burns as a result of being covered in burning pitch as punishment for failing Caesar. He's also Immune to Drugs, meaning that no medicine can ease his constant pain.
  • One of the reason why fighting the Bonus Boss of Persona 3 is hard and tedious. You can at most resist her attacks. If you happen to null, absorb or reflect the element she's going to use, you get a 9999 damage Megidolaon to your face instead. This is an exception however, as other times being immune will greatly help you throughout the game.
  • In Magicka, accidentally casting immunity to Life makes you unhealable.
  • In Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup, there are a few cases of this:
    • Mummies do not become hungry and thus cannot eat. This also prevents them from drinking healing potions.
    • Undead characters are immune to Torment, but because it can only be cast by those who will feel its pain, they can't cast it either.
  • In The Last of Us Ellie's immunity to the fungus means that she won't become a zombie, but the Fireflies plan to use her to develop a vaccine would have resulted in her death.
  • In Dota 2, it's usually a good thing to cast Magic Immunity on yourself in the middle of battle to prevent the enemy from stunning you - but this also prevents your allies from casting healing spells on you.
  • A few skills in Elsword will deal more hits/be easier to follow up if the enemy is Immune to Flinching.

Web Comics
  • In Dominic Deegan resistance to magic is generally considered a disability, because while magic fireballs can't hurt you, white mages can't heal you when something non-magical almost kills you.
  • Guardian Angel of PS238, suffers from this. She's never experienced the feeling of rain until Harold neutralizes her power. Due to her power protecting her from everything, she's never developed any immunities and she essentially dies due to a common cold, which is made worse by the fact that when her power comes back, it prevents her from being injected with anything that might cure her.
  • In Errant Story, many half-elves are immune to some forms of magic (such as transmutation). Unfortunately, this includes healing magic. Some of those that can be healed spontaneously reject the healing later.

Web Original
  • Highlighted in a story from The Codeless Code, where a monk (read: programmer) is shown the error of his ways by having his sense of pain suppressed as he retrieves a coin from a fireplace.

Real Life
  • The Greek king Mithridates reportedly suffered from this. Having ingested small quantities of poison daily to acquire an immunity, his first attempt at Better to Die Than Be Killed by absorbing poison failed. The second try involved stabbing himself, and worked much better.
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