Composite Character / Film

Those with their own page:


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    Animated 
  • In The Adventures of Tintin, this happens to several characters from the original comics, since the movie itself combines the plots of several albums. The film's version of Ivan Ivanovitch Sakharine shares the name of a minor character from Secret, but his more villainous characterization is drawn from the Loiseau Brothers from the comic, and he also inherits some traits of the comic's Omar Ben Salaad, such as his employment of Allan and his taking over the Karaboudjan.
  • Aladdin (Golden Films)has two examples. The Genie of the Lamp has the same roles of the Genie of the Ring, being him who rescues Aladdin from the Cave. Aladdin received a ring from Haseem, but that ring was forgotten by the plot. Since Haseem wasn't tricked and killed when Aladdin recovered the castle, Haseem takes the role of his more evil brother of the original tale, trying to kill Aladdin once more.
  • Rasputin as he appears in Anastasia is actually a mix between the historical character, and a character from Russian folklore Koschei the Deathless.
  • Batman: Mask of the Phantasm was adapted from the Batman: Year Two storyline. In the comic, the Reaper was Judson Caspian, whose daughter Rachael was in a budding relationship with Bruce Wayne. In the movie, Andrea Beaumont was both the Phantasm and the love interest.
  • Disney Animated Canon:
    • Alice in Wonderland:
      • the Queen of Hearts is mainly the Queen of Hearts, but has the Duchess's bipolar personality and uses the Red Queen's line "All ways are mine". This makes less sense than it does when the Red Queen says it, since the Red Queen is a chess piece with the ability to go any way she wants on the board. Though for the Queen of Hearts, it's likely due to her ego.
      • The Mad Hatter in the same film gets his obsession with unbirthdays from Humpty-Dumpty.
      • At one stage of that film's development, Dinah and the Cheshire Cat were merged into a single character.
    • 101 Dalmatians: In the original novel, the parents of the puppies were Pongo and Missis; Perdita was later brought in because Missis couldn't nurse all of her puppies by herself. The film adaptations drop that particular plot point altogether, and combine Missis and Perdita into a single character.
    • Bambi combined a few characters from the book with others. Friend Owl is an original character to the film. He most resembles the unnamed owl character but has the gender of the screech owl character. He is also referred to in a similar way as Friend Hare, who was replaced with the younger Thumper (who is a rabbit). In the book, Bambi's father is an unnamed buck. The Great Prince Of The Forest is an elderly buck who is rarely ever seen. He is mysterious and eventually serves as a mentor to Bambi once he grows up. In the film, his character was combined with Bambi's father.
    • In The Black Cauldron the characters of The Horned King and Arawn are combined. In Lloyd Alexander's five-part book series, Arawn is the Big Bad and The Horned King is The Dragon. The movie keeps "The Horned King" as his name and general appearance, but has Arawn's role as "the Dark Lord".
    • Ursula from The Little Mermaid is actually a composite of the Sea Witch from the original Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale and the woman who ended up marrying the prince instead of the Mermaid, and therefore prompting her to commit suicide.
    • Aladdin, in which they did it twice: condensing the two genies (magic ring and lamp) into one (lamp), and combining the sorcerer who wanted the genie with the vizier trying to discredit Aladdin after his rise to wealth. In fact, the two Aladdin examples mentioned above are commonly done in most adaptations of the story. Many readers aren't even aware of the fact that there are two genies in the story until they read the original. Interestingly enough, at one point there were plans for both genies to appear.
    • Clopin in The Hunchback of Notre Dame is a composite of the original novel's Clopin (the psychotic King of the Gypsies) and Gringoire (the goofy troubadour). Phoebus also takes some things of Gringoire.
    • Hercules:
      • The Fates from are a composite of the Fates from Classical Mythology (the youngest Fate spins a thread representing a person's life, signifying his/her birth; the middle weaves said thread, therefore determining how long that person will live; and the oldest cuts the thread, therefore killing the person the thread represents) and the Gray sisters (they all share a single eye).
      • They also merged Hades with Hera, and Hera with Alcmene.
    • In Tarzan Kerchak is a composite of Burroughs's Kerchak (leader of the Mangani during Tarzan's childhood) and Tublat (mate of Kala who is vaguely resentful of Tarzan, but not a villain). To confuse things further, The Legend of Tarzan introduced a character more like the book version of Kerchak (violent killer ape seeking revenge on Tarzan) ... and called him Tublat.
    • Also done in Treasure Planet; Squire Trelawney and Doctor Livesey of the original Treasure Island are combined into Doctor Delbert Doppler.
    • Queen Elsa from Frozen is a composite character of the Snow Queen and Kai from The Snow Queen. Naturally, she is based off the Snow Queen for being a queen with ice powers and a palace made of ice, but her role in the story is closer to that of Kai, a character who grows distant from a loved one (in this movie, her sister Anna) and they ultimately reconcile through the Power of Love. What elements of Kai were not used to create Elsa were used, along with those of the Robber Girl, to create Kristoff.
    • Maui from Moana is an amalgamation of his mythological counterpart's various stories from different Pacific Island traditions, although a lot of the stories are shared among many of these traditions. Some of the specific details:
      • In most traditions, Maui pulled that particular people's home island from the ocean. Therefore, the movie Maui has a history of pulling up island after island.
      • Retrieving fire comes from every tradition's depiction of Maui except the Hawaiian one, ironically.
      • Likewise, halting the once-erratic sun is present in most depictions of Maui.
      • His use of a fishhook as his primary weapon may stem from the Tongan Maui.
      • Creating the coconut trees from the guts of an eel he buried and hoisting up the sky are both taken from the Hawaiian Maui.
      • Having been abandoned at birth is taken from the Maori depictions of Maui, who was abandoned into the sea as a premature birth, only to be rescued and cared for by ocean spirits and his divine ancestor before returning to his family as a teen.
  • In Puss in Boots the giant in the Jack and the Beanstalk tale is long dead before the story begins. The golden goose that was their target is just a chick, and its mother (presumably the true goose from the tale) is the giant that Puss and company have to deal with.
  • The Big Bad Wolf in Shrek is apparently a composite of the wolves from Three Little Pigs and Little Red Riding Hood.
  • In the Direct-to-Video movie Superman: Doomsday, there's only one replacement Superman, who has elements of three of the replacements in the original The Death of Superman arc: he's a clone like Superboy, he has a zero-tolerance approach to crimefighting like the Eradicator, and he's secretly working for a villain like the Cyborg.
  • In Ultimate Avengers 2, Black Panther possesses the ability to transform into a werepanther, much like the Coal Tiger, his son from the Marvel Comics 2 continuity.
    • The War Machine suit appears in the film, but it's Tony who wears it instead of Col. Rhodes. Rhodey doesn't even appear at all in the film.
  • The Lego Batman Movie:
    • Batman himself, due to the fact the film takes place in a universe where all the previous incarnations happened, is one of almost every version of the character to date, but his costume is specifically based upon the first Tim Burton film, but with the glowing eyes of the DC Extended Universe incarnation.
    • Robin in the movie is Dick Grayson, but his large glasses and hairstyle are taken from The Dark Knight Returns' Carrie Kelly. His origin story throws out the circus trapeze act and instead has him already in an orphanage, where he empathizes with Bruce Wayne also being an orphan regardless of his background, just like "Robin" John Blake from The Dark Knight Rises.
    • The Joker has the purple suit and a hairpiece resembling his hairstyle in Batman: The Animated Series and the comics, but his forearms have tattoos similar to Jared Leto's take on the character.
    • Harley Quinn's outfit looks like the New 52 incarnation of the character, but uses the black and red colors from the original B:TAS design, and her pigtails are much longer, more resembling a jester's hat. She also dons a nurse costume very reminiscent of her Batman: Arkham Asylum design, but it's in her classic colors and obviously isn't a Naughty Nurse Outfit. Another outfit of hers is a dress with a black and red tutu similar to her Batman: Arkham Knight outfit.
    • While Barbara Gordon is still youthful, she's now Commissioner of Gotham City, which she was in Batman Beyond. Her Batgirl suit looks like a combination of Yvonne Craig's purple Batsuit and her recent Batgirl of Burnside redesign (particularly in the torso and boots), while her personality is taken from her time as Oracle.
    • Two-Face has the purple hair from Tommy Lee Jones' take on the character, but (half of) the face and voice of Billy Dee Williams. The left half of the suit being ruined and the level of damage done to the face also bring to mind Aaron Eckhart.
    • Bane's got the bomber jacket (and unique accent) of his Dark Knight trilogy incarnation, but his size and use of venom comes from the comics, while his mask is a mix of the two.
    • The Red Hood is a bizarre version. His figure is the tux and domed hood of the Joker, but under the hood, he has Jason Todd's mask. Yet he still seems to be a completely separate character. This is especially confusing since Batman in this continuity has obviously never had a sidekick before.
    • Chief O'Hara shares the name of Chief O'Hara from the '60s TV series, but her appearance and personality are much closer to that of Renee Montoya from the animated series and the comics.
    • In terms of Walking Spoiler characters, the Daleks seem to have the color scheme of blue, orange or red from their 2010 incarnations (there are no white or yellow ones, perhaps because in the actual show only one of each can exist). However, they also have flamethrowers, like the 1960s Daleks had, and their body shape seems more similar to the 2005 Daleks'.
  • In Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths, Superwoman still serves as Wonder Woman's rival and analogue in the Crime Syndicate, but according to Dwayne McDuffie, her secret identity is actually Mary Batson rather than a version of Diana Prince. There are actually some very subtle clues hinting at this if you pay attention, such as her enforcers resembling evil versions of the Marvel Family, and the complete lack of any references to the Amazons.
  • Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox:
  • Justice League: Gods And Monsters sees this happen as part of the Elseworld premise.
    • Most notably, Wonder Woman being Bekka from New Gods as outside of existing the the same universe, Wonder Woman has nothing to do with the New Gods. Superman is also a version of Chris Kent (being General Zod's son) and Batman is Kirk Langstrom (Man-Bat).
    • Lex Luthor is Lex Luthor in name only; he is far more similar to Metron. He even gets the chair in the end.
    • Tina is basically Francine, Kirk's wife, with a different name. Her name however is meaningful as her replica is Platinum of the Metal Men who's also called Tina in other iterations.
  • In Batman Vs Robin Dollmaker has the appearance and M.O. of Dollmaker III/Barton Mathis, a Batman villain in the comics, but the name of Dollmaker II/Anton Schott, who was a Supergirl villain, along with Schott's M.O. of turning children into killer dolls. His backstory continues this, with his father being named Toyman/Winslow Schott, but being a serial killer closer to the comic book's Wesley Mathis.
  • Penguins of Madagascar, being a sort of adaptation of The Penguins of Madagascar but set in the universe of the movies, combines attributes of the penguins from both continuities in varying degrees, up to Rico basically being a Canon Immigrant.

    Live-Action 
  • Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland (2010)
    • The Red Queen is mostly the Queen of Hearts, with visual cues from the Duchess and a few elements of the Red Queen from the second book. This is also done in American McGee's Alice and The Looking-Glass Wars.
    • The March Hare is a cook whose madness is indicated by throwing crockery at people. This one of the primary characteristics of the Duchess's Cook in the book (the other being an obsession with pepper).
  • Subverted with Deep Throat in All the President's Men. A number of critics and amateur sleuths were convinced Deep Throat was an invention of Bob Woodward to make it harder to identify one informant in Richard Nixon’s inner circle. Also because Deep Throat seemed too freaky to be real. Until 2005, when former FBI official W. Mark Felt revealed he was Deep Throat.
  • Almost Famous, the pseudo-biography of director Cameron Crowe, features the fictitious band Stillwater as a composite of several groups Crowe toured with as a Rolling Stone columnist, including the Allman Brothers, Led Zeppelin, and the Who.
  • Patty Ryan in An American Crime is a composite of three real-life girls involved in the historical events - Darlene MacGuire, Anna Siscoe and Judy Duke.
  • The film version of Animal Crackers merged two love interests, Mary and Arabella, into a single character named Arabella.
  • In Apollo 13, a whole team of astronauts and engineers working to figure out how to power up the command module again was rolled into Ken Mattingly and a couple of other guys.
  • Kubal and Shikishima, two characters created for the Attack on Titan movies, stand in for a few Adapted Out characters from the original story. Kubal stands in for Nile Dok (head of the Military Police), Kitz Woerman (advocates for Eren to be executed), and Bertolt Hoover (true form of the Colossal Titan). Shikishima replaces Levi (The Ace), Reiner Braun (true form of the Armored Titan) and Annie Leonhart (inherits her Titan form's fighting style, including consciously protecting their nape).
    • Hans/Hange Zoe replaces the also absent Erwin Smith as leader of the Survey Corps.
  • When it comes to the original set of Batman films...
    • Vicky Vale in Tim Burton's Batman was actually a combination of the comic's Vicky Vale (in terms of name and occupation) with Silver St. Cloud (in terms of personality and characterization), a love interest of Batman from The '70s who knew his secret identity.
    • The same film's version of The Joker gave him the defining role of Joe Chill.note 
    • Batman Returns has a version of the Penguin that seems to combine elements from his comic book counterpart but also to another member of Batman's rogues gallery, carrying prominent traits of Killer Croc. Things like his origins as a part of the wealthy Cobblepot family, his affinity for birds, his basic physical build, his resentment over being an outcast, and his trick umbrellas harken to the Penguin of the comics. But his much more monstrously deformed condition, how he was bullied/ostracized because of it even further, has some more bestial tendencies in places, and his time as a sideshow performer of some kind with a circus more closely align to Croc.
    • Batman Forever:
      • Forever gives us a composite origin for Robin, who is Dick Grayson in name and occupation (circus acrobat, alongside his parents), but gets his origin combined with Jason Todd's (Two-Face responsible for parents' death, and wanting to kill Two-Face for it). By extention, this merges Two-Face with Tony Zucco (the murderer of Dick's parents).
      • The same movie's take on the Riddler as an eccentric though introverted scientist working for Wayne Enterprise's whose big project is some sort of mind manipulation device is similar to the take on Jervis Tetch, aka the Mad Hatter, from the acclaimed Batman: The Animated Series. However is desire to prove his genius/greatness, his compulsion for leaving riddles and playing mind games, as well as his deep feeling of under-appreciation are reverent to the Riddler of the comics.
    • Batman & Robin has an interesting case where Mr. Freeze is a composite of two very different versions of himself. The tragic origins, including a sick wife he tried to cure but had to freeze to preserve, come from his Batman: The Animated Series version, while a lot of his behavior — themed henchmen, Card Carrying Villainy, and ice puns — are taken from the 1960s Batman show.
  • Eric Bana, Ewan McGregor, Josh Hartnett, Orlando Bloom, and William Fichtner's characters in Black Hawk Down are all composites of various different US Army Rangers and Delta Force operators from the novel of the same name. Necessary, since hundreds of soldiers took part in the Battle of Mogadishu and so making composite characters allowed the producers to cut the cast of dozens from the novel down to less than ten... and because one of the real-life counterparts would later be convicted of rape and child molestation.
  • Canon Foreigner Abraham Whistler in the Blade Trilogy fills Jamal Afari's role as mentor to Blade, but he's more in line with "Bible" John Carik in looks and personality.
  • In Bonnie and Clyde, C.W. Moss is a composite of two members of the Barrow Gang, W.D. Jones and Henry Methvin.
  • In Captain America, Steve's girlfriend during the 1940's is a woman named Bernice "Bernie" Stewart, a combination of two of his love interests from the comics. She's named after Bernie Rosenthal, but like Peggy Carter, she's Cap's wartime girlfriend with an identical female descendant named Sharon (Peggy's niece and Bernie's daughter) that Steve ends up dating after he's unfrozen in the present.
  • In the film of Catch-22, Hungry Joe takes Samson's role as the guy who gets (accidentally) hit by a plane and killed.
  • The real Frank Abagnale Jr. wasn't chased by just one man - Carl Hanratty from Catch Me If You Can is an amalgam of several officers.
  • Christine merged the LeBay brothers into one character. This also served to completely invert one brother's personality and morals.
  • In Clash of the Titans, Perseus' life is threatened as a child by his grandfather Acrisius (who is then killed by Zeus) and as an adult by Calibos, the deformed former suitor of Andromeda. In the 2010 remake, these are combined into a single character: Acrisius, the husband of Perseus' mother, survives Zeus' attack in a deformed state and takes the name Calibos.
  • In the film version of Cloud Atlas, the characters Chang and Hae-Joo Im were combined to create the much more sympathetic character of Hae-Joo Chang, with whom Sonmi-451 falls in love with.
  • In the film adaptation of the Confessions of Georgia Nicolson series, Georgia's friends Ellen, Jools, and Mabs were initially replaced by a composite Token Minority character called Namita. Fans complained, and so Namita's scenes were redubbed and she became Ellen.
  • In The Count of Monte Cristo, there were three men who betrayed Edmond Dantes: Danglars, Edmonds ship-mate who coveted Edmonds rescent promotion to captain; Fernand Mondego de Morcef, cousin to Edmonds fiancée Mercedes who coveted Mercedes and betrayed Edmond in order to get him out of the way and Gerald de Villeford, the prosecutor who sent him to the Castle d'If. In order to stream-line things, make things more personal to Edmond and to get rid of some Values Dissonance Kissing Cousins, most adaptations combines Danglars and Mondego into Edmonds ship-mate and best friend who coveted his girlfriend.
  • In Daredevil, Wilson Fisk, aka The Kingpin, takes the place of Slade, the hired thug who beat Matt's father to death.
    • Elektra's origin has almost nothing in common with that of her comic counterpart, and is much closer to that of Echo, another female martial artist who tried to kill Daredevil after he was framed for the murder of her father. Interestingly enough, Echo appears in the movie's video game adaptation as a villain.
  • The Dark Knight Saga:
    • The movie Arnold Flass resembled Harvey Bullock more, being dark-haired, overweight, and unshaven rather than being blonde, fit, and clean-shaven as in the comics, but he does have the comics' version's corruption.
    • The film Gillian Loeb is basically Michael Akins with Loeb's name, being young, African-American, and honest, rather than being old, corrupt, and Caucasian. That said, he's still antagonistic towards Batman (due to being a vigilante).
    • Ra's al Ghul's alias Henri Ducard also fits this trope. In the comics, Henri Ducard was one of the people Bruce Wayne hired to teach him to be good at everything ever. However, he was not a member of the League of Shadows, let alone its leader, or even associated with al Ghul at all.
    • Lucius Fox's role was expanded to fill his normal role as CEO along side the role of tech support, which was occasionally filled by others or left unexplained and filled in gaps about how Batman uses Wayne Corp resources in his crimefighting.
    • John Blake has elements of the first three Robins. He grew up on the streets like Jason Todd, he deduced Batman's identity as a teen like Tim Drake and he's an orphan who becomes a police officer as an adult and Batman's eventual successor like like Dick Grayson. His real name being Robin is a neat nod.
    • Bane's role as a chief enforcer/guard for an al Ghul running the League of Assassins (called the League of Shadows in the films) is arguably reminiscent of the comic book character Ubu.
  • In Dark Shadows, the characters of Victoria Winters and Maggie Evans are now one and the same. Also, Angelique, who is a combination of herself and rival fishery owner Burke Devlin.
  • A sixth officer mentioned in the novel, and omitted from the film Das Boot, is the 2nd Engineer who joins the boat on a training cruise in order to take over for the Chief Engineer at the end of the patrol. The 2nd Engineer does not socialize or dine with the other officers and is immediately disliked by the Captain who pledges he will find a way to prevent the man from become the new Chief Engineer. In the film, much of the antagonistic elements of the 2nd Engineer are written into the character of the First Officer.
  • DC Extended Universe:
    • Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice:
      • Batman combines traits of his mainstream comic book, The Dark Knight Returns and Batman: Arkham Series incarnations.
      • Lex Luthor is actually named Alexander Luthor, Jr., a separate character from the comics. He also starts off with a full head of hair like in Superman: Birthright before losing it and more closely resembling the classic Lex.
      • Doomsday is created from the corpse of General Zod. His creation, with Zod being infused with Luthor's blood, also invokes the origins of the Connor Kent Superboy and Nuclear Man and he also has energy absorption abilities like the Parasite.
    • Suicide Squad: While the film version of Deadshot still carries the comic incarnation's nihilism, the casting of Will Smith and Smith's own comments about Deadshot trying to rid the world of worse criminals suggests elements of the original Eric Needham Black Spider (an African-American vigilante who fought criminals) were infused into this version of Deadshot.
    • The Flash in Justice League is Barry Allen, but has the more jovial, Plucky Comic Relief aspects of Wally West's personality.
  • Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid culls together Stock Footage of classic movies for humorous effect. So when multiple movies are used with the same stars, their characters are looped together into one. For instance, Humphrey Bogart's characters become Philip Marlowe and Ava Gardner's characters become Kitty Collins.
  • In the second Death Note movie, Takada replaces Higuchi completely and has a few elements of Mikami mixed in. She performs the role of the third Kira almost identically to Higuchi's portrayal, down to the character's being disposed of by Light.
    • In the first movie there's Shiori, Light's new Satellite Love Interest — she's the smart girl on campus like Takada (though as mentioned above Takada does appear later in Higuchi's role) and also fulfills the same role as Yuri, aka the Girl from the Bus. Also she has a strong sense of justice, is studying to be a prosecutor, and is very protective of Light—like another of Light's allies who never got any screentime in the live action movies—a Gender Flipped prenote!Teru Mikami?
    • L replaces Near as the one who captures Kira and gives him the "you're just a murderer" speech.
  • The Departed (based on Infernal Affairs): Dr. Madden is a combination of therapist Dr. Lee, the undercover cop's love interest, and Mary, the infiltrator's girlfriend, creating a Love Triangle where there had been none before.
  • The Blank of Dick Tracy makes the character also known as Faceless Redrum into the alias of another Dick Tracy regular: Breathless Mahooney.
  • Subverted (or possibly even double subverted, if the Playing With is to be believed) in Donnie Brasco. Lefty in the movie is a composite of the real Lefty, the real Sonny Black, and several other wiseguys Joe Pistone met during his undercover work. Sonny Black appears in the movie, although In-Name-Only. Michael Madsen wasn't too happy about that one.
  • Most film adaptations of Dracula eliminate at least one of Lucy's suitors (almost always Quincey Morris, and often Lord Godalming as well). Sometimes Lucy and Mina are combined into a single Distressed Damsel, and Jonathan stands in for all of her suitors.
    • In the parody Dracula: Dead and Loving It, Mel Brooks dispenses with all of Lucy's suitors except Seward, who becomes her much-older guardian instead. Harker takes over the role of all the four younger men. It's mentioned that he liked Lucy, while being Mina's suitor. Liked, not LIKE-Liked.
      Van Helsing: It must be done by one who LOVED her in life!
      Harker: I only LIKED her!
      Van Helsing: Close enough, here! (hands him the stake and mallet.)
    • Meanwhile, Harker's ordeal in Transylvania is given to Reinfield.
  • In Dracula Untold, Mehmet II is combined with Vlad's brother Radu the Handsome. The whole "Vlad's brother who supports the Ottomans and sides against him" motif in the film belonged to Radu in real life.
  • Dragonball Evolution fused the two Piccolos (Daimaou and Ma Junior) into one. Although, technically, Ma Junior was Daimaou in the original, or at least his reincarnation. He also replaces Pilaf as Mai's employer.
    • Goku's character acts suspiciously like the teenaged version of his son, Gohan, from one of the later arcs of Dragon Ball Z.
  • An early draft of Ed Wood showed Ed meeting his first wife Norma McCarty (and their subsequent short-lived marriage). After this part was cut some of their dialogue was moved to the scene where Ed first meets Kathy O'Hara, his second wife up to Wood's death.
  • In the novel Fast Times at Ridgemont High, the ticket-scalper character is separate from Mike Damone. The two were combined in the movie.
  • Michael Merriman (John Cusack's character in Fat Man And Little Boy) is a composite of two real Manhattan Project physicists, Louis Slotin and Henry K. Daghlian, Jr. Both died as the result of separate criticality accidents involving the same "demon" bomb core after the Hiroshima and Nakasaki bombings.
  • In the live-action Fist of the North Star movie, Shin's right-hand man Jackal takes his name from a gang leader villain in the manga, but his origin story as a villain who was disfigured by Kenshiro in the past resembles that of Kenshiro's evil adoptive brother Jagi. Neither, Jagi nor Jackal had anything to do with Shin, other than the fact that Jagi was the one who persuaded Shin to turn evil and Jackal was an underling of Shin in the TV series (but not in the manga).
    • In the same movie, Shin takes the place of Kenshiro's adopted brother Raoh as the killer of his Sensei, Ryuken.
  • In From Here to Eternity, Maggio is combined with Blues Berry, the soldier who dies after being repeatedly beaten and tortured by Judson. Maggio actually survives in the original novel.
  • In Ghost Rider, Johnny Blaze not only takes on qualities of his comic namesake, but also his successor Danny Ketch (such as his chain weapon and Penance Stare). His father Barton Blaze also supplants "Crash" Simpson in being the one whom Johnny tried to save with his Deal with the Devil.
    • Also, Carter Slade and the Caretaker were two different characters in the comics.
  • In G.I. Joe, Rex Lewis/The Doctor/Cobra Commander is a merging of Doctor Mindbender and Cobra Commander. Only in role, however, as Mindbender actually shows as a brief character in a flashback. [[He also replaces Eugene as the Baroness' brother]].
    • In G.I. Joe: Retaliation Roadblock's background has several elements taken from Stalker in the comics, such as being involved with a gang when growing up in the city, being best buddies with Snake Eyes, and having kids.
  • Both film versions of The Girl with The Dragon Tattoo turn Anita Vanger into a Posthumous Character; the woman thought to be Anita turns out to be Harriet Vanger herself.
  • Dr. Ishiro Serizawa from Godzilla (2014) has the surname and world-weariness of Daisuke Serizawa, is a palaeontologist that wants to study the monsters versus killing them like Dr. Kyohei Yamane, and his insistence that Godzilla will save the day.
  • Each character in The Great Escape is a composite of several people involved in the real event.
  • The Green Lantern movie establishes that Parallax was once Krona, a completely separate villain in the comics.
  • In the film adaptation of Gypsy, Uncle Jocko and Herbie become the same person.
  • In a pretty different sort of case, you've got Dr. Terence Wynn played by Mitchell Ryan in Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers. The character being a retroactive composite of two minor characters that had appeared in the series prior. The Dr. Wynn from the original Halloween (1978) played by Robert Phalen who served as a colleague of Loomis' who we see debate with him about Michael Myers as well as the Man in Black from Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers portrayed by Don Shanks that was a mysterious entity that came to Haddonfield and who watched over things throughout the film and rescued Myers from prison at the end. Both created independently of each other. The latter was a character created for the fifth film by its director Dominique Othenin-Girard to add some dimension of mystery, but nobody had a clue who he'd turn out to be. When writing a sixth installment Daniel Farrands said that his initial intent for Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers was to "bridge the later films (4-5) in the series to the earlier films (1-2) while at the same time taking the story into new territory so that the series could expand for future installments." Linking together these smaller disconnected characters and revealing him to essentially be the main antagonist of the film, if not the series up to that point, appears to be a product of that.
  • Harry Potter
    • A boy named Nigel seems to be a composite of the two Creevey brothers (Colin and Dennis). Oddly enough, Colin did appear (with that name) in the second film. Word of God is that Nigel was created after Hugh Mitchell (who played Colin in the second film) went through a massive growth spurt and the filmmakers didn't think he'd be able to portray a character who was supposed to appear small and mousy anymore.
    • Chamber of Secrets
      • It's stated that Vernon paid someone to fit the bars on Harry's window. In the movie version, Vernon just does it himself.
      • Minor characters are often written out with their often only prominent scene given to a more important character, such as Hermione asking Professor McGonagall about the Chamber of Secrets rather than Professor Binns.
    • Goblet of Fire
      • In the book, Moody actually Crouch in disguise gives Neville a herbology book hoping that Harry would ask him about Gillywig. When Harry does not ask Neville, he then has a loud discussion about gillywig when Dobby is listening so that Dobby would sneak some for Harry. In the movie Harry does talk to Neville meaning Dobby's role is not nessecary.
      • The character of Ludo Bagman was removed and some of his characteristics combined into the character of Barty Crouch Sr., resulting in Crouch being more comical than his completely serious nature in the book. His commentary is taken up by Cornelius Fudge during the Quidditch World cup. His exclusion is likely due to much of the scenes involving him being cut so what little remained was given to others.
    • Half-Blood Prince
      • Bellatrix Lestrange is prominently involved in the battle, but she was not even in the corresponding scene from the book. All her actions in the film version of the scene (coaxing Draco to kill Dumbledore, firing the Dark Mark into the sky, catching Hagrid's hut on fire) were performed by various Mooks in the book.
      • Luna Lovegood takes over Tonks' role of finding Harry on the Hogwarts express in .
    • Due to actor Jamie Waylett's legal troubles, Crabbe was written out of Deathly Hallows, and his ultimate fate was given to Goyle instead. Blaise Zabini was then brought in as the third man of Draco's Power Trio.
  • A rare non-adaptation example: the first few drafts of Hot Fuzz had a love interest for Nick Angel. When her part was cut, the majority of her lines (as well as the peace lily subplot) were given to Danny Butterman's character, which resulted in quite a bit of intentional Ho Yay.
  • In Hulk, Bruce's father (who had no abilities in the comics) is given the powers of the Absorbing Man, and later transforms into a being of pure electricity, much like Zzzax.
  • The Hunger Games: Mockingjay:
    • In Part 1, Effie's character is given the role(s) played by Fulvia and Katniss's prep team in the story and some of their dialogue from the book, while all four of those characters are Adapted Out. This is reportedly because Suzanne Collins liked Elizabeth Banks's portrayal of Effie in the first two movies so much that she didn't want to see her Demoted to Extra like she was in the final book.
    • In Part 2, Prim is regarded as Peeta's "closest person" and thus is the one allowed entry to his room in hopes of curing his hijacking. The "closest person" in the book is Delly Cartwright, Peeta's best friend who doesn't appear in the film.
  • The Baker and the Narrator in Into the Woods, more or less. Any Narrator lines that have been left intact are now said by the Baker via voiceover, and new dialogue is included for the sake of exposition. This concept holds significance, as the film ends with the Baker telling his son the story of his adventure, which happens to be the exact same story that he tells the audience throughout the film.
  • In many adaptations of Jane Eyre, Helen Burns is combined with Julia Severn, the girl who has her hair cut off as punishment for curling it (making the character even more tragic - she has all her hair cut off and then dies of tuberculosis a few scenes later). In some versions the haircutting happens to Jane herself. Also a few adaptations combine the kindly Miss Temple with Miss Scatcherd.
  • JFK does this here and there, most notably with Willie O'Keefe. Willie is a composite of several of Jim Garrison's witnesses, among them Perry Russo, the central witness of the case; he exists in the film largely so that Oliver Stone doesn't have to answer why Garrison chose not to use most of them in the trial (and to hide Russo's laughable unreliablity).
  • In J-Men Forever, the multiple villains edited from the original Republic Film Serials became the singular Lightning Bug. To explain his radically changing appearance, The Lightning Bug was made into a Master of Disguise.
    • Commando Cody and Larry Martin (of Zombies of the Stratosphere) are compressed into Rocket Jock; as both characters had virtually the same costume, this required no handwaving.
  • John Carter, the film adaptation of John Carter of Mars appears to have collapsed several minor characters into more major related ones. Notably, Tars Tarkas is chieftain of his own band of Tharks in the film, whereas in the book he was second-in-command to Lorquas Ptormel; Tardos Mors is Dejah Thoris' father in the film, while he was her grandfather in the book, thereby combining him with his son Mors Kajak; and film Sab Than is Jeddak (king) of Zodanga rather than prince, combining him with his father Than Kosis.
  • Kaa in The Jungle Book (2016) has the villainy of her 1967 counterpart and the wisdom and size of her original book counterpart.
    • Bagheera gets his stern and Brutal Honesty from the original Disney movie and the badass skills from the original book.
  • The PR guy (Ed Regis) and the lawyer (Donald Gennaro) from Jurassic Park were merged for the movie.
    • The nerdy black kid and the adventurous (and older) blond girl that were Levine's assistants/protegees in The Lost World (1995) were merged into Malcolm's black gymnast daughter for the second film.
    • From The Lost World: "Doc" Thorne, Badass Bookworm and former scientist that now makes field systems for a living, was merged with Eddie Carr, his no-nonsense, smart employee. The movie version of Eddie has his own field systems company, but is much geekier. Even though he tries to rescue Sarah, Malcolm, and Nick from the falling trailer exactly as Doc Thorne did, he's torn apart by the T.rexes. The original Eddie is killed by raptors instead, while Thorne lives to lead the survivors off the island.
    • In The Lost World: the movie's Sarah Harding has elements of Richard Levine's character (for example, the incompetence - novel!Sarah was nowhere nearly as idiotic) and plays his role in parts.
    • Owen Grady from Jurassic World, though an original character for the film, has traits of both Ian Malcolm (a flirting clown and Deadpan Snarker who has common sense about the ethics of genetics) and Alan Grant (a Velociraptor expert and children protector).
  • Kull the Conqueror:
    • The plot is actually an loose adaptation of the Conan novel The Hour of the Dragon combined with Kull's backstory how he became king, making the main protagonist a composite character of Kull and Conan.
    • The main villain Akivasha is a combination of two villains from the novel: a female vampire with the same name that wants to seduce the main character, and Xatoltun of Acheron, an evil sorcerer brought back to life by a couple of scheming nobles and served as the story's Big Bad.
  • In the sequel to Kick-Ass, Jim Carrey plays a character called Colonel Stars and Stripes, a composite of Colonel Stars and Lieutenant Stripes from the comic.
  • Kingsman: The Secret Service: Mark Hamill is combined with James Arnold to become... James Arnold as played by Mark Hamill. Most of the original James Arnold is transferred to a new character, Richmond Valentine.
  • In Left Behind II: Trbiulation Force, Verna Zee is the composite of her original character with Lucinda Washington, the African-American editor-in-chief of the Global Weekly office in Chicago who was raptured. For the most part, movie Verna is book Verna's personality in Lucinda's body (or a version of Lucinda that never became a believer).
  • The 1935, 1952 and 1998 versions of Les Misérables either diminish the role of, or remove entirely, Enjolras, giving his role as leader of the Friends of the ABC to Marius.
  • Too many to count in The Lord of the Rings, which had to deal with the books' Loads and Loads and Loads of Characters. In the books, the elf-lord Glorfindel saved Frodo at the Ford of Bruinen. In the movies, Arwen does it. In the animated film, it was Legolas.
    • Not so much a character, but the films clearly imply that the Eye of Barad-dur is Sauron. In the books, while the references are quite subtle, the Eye is implied to be just a tool of Sauron, separate from him. The Eye existed before Isildur destroyed Sauron's physical body, and Gollum briefly mentions having seen Sauron's reconstructed physical form while he was tortured in Mordor.
  • The protagonist of Lord of War is a composite of several real life arms dealers (five, according to IMDB).
  • In the 1971 film of Macbeth, the part of the third murderer was given to Ascended Extra Ross, instead of some nameless guy.
  • Chico in The Magnificent Seven is a composite of two characters from the original Seven Samurai: Katsushiro, the young samurai who begins a relationship with a village girl, and Kikuchiyo, the boisterous samurai wannabe who tags along with the others uninvited and turns out to be a peasant by birth.
  • Bert in Mary Poppins is a merging of several minor characters from the original short stories.
  • In Men of Honor, Robert De Niro's role as the hardline, racist Master Chief who makes Brashear's life hell, is an amalgamation of a couple different commanding officers the real Brashear had during his career.
  • Whilst Mr Barron from Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children is the film counterpart of the unnamed Wight who killed Abraham and stalked and manipulated his Grandson Jacob in the form of psychiatrist Dr. Golan in the book, his position as leader of the Wights and Faux Affably Evil nature are taken from Miss Peregrine's evil brother; Caul Bentham.
  • Moneyball merges several of Billy Beane's associates, particularly Paul DePodesta, into Peter Brand. DePodesta refused to have his name used in the film, which led to this.
  • An interesting example can be found in The Mothman Prophecies. In the film, the Mothman itself and "Indrid Cold", a mysterious man who gives the actual prophecies, are stongly implied to be one in the same being, having the ability to change form. In the book, writer John Keel made it clear his belief that the two were separate entities.
  • In the film version of My Left Foot, the character Dr. Eileen Cole never existed. She was supposed to represent an amalgam of several people who helped the main character.
  • In the film Nick Fury: Agent of SHIELD (starring David Hasselhoff, not Samuel L. Jackson), Baron von Strucker is succeeded as the leader of Hydra by his daughter Andrea, aka Viper. In the comics, Viper/Madame Hydra is an orphan whose true name is unknown, and Andrea von Strucker is one half of the mutant Fenris Twins.
  • In the Russian movie Night Watch, Bear's real name is Ilya. In the books, Bear and Ilya are two different people. The Inquisition in the sequel Day Watch might also count: in the books they are a big group, a third Watch, while in the movie they are just two old Creepy Twins.
    • The incident at the beginning of the first film, with Anton going to a witch to get his girlfriend back happened to a woman in the Day Watch book and was part of a larger story. Additionally, Anton is not Yegor's father in the books and was recruited as a teen, not an adult.
    • The killer of Dark Others in the second film is revealed to be Kostya's father. In the books, they are different characters.
  • The made-for-TV movie Noah's Ark made Noah into a composite of himself and... Abraham, and made other changes, such as Noah living in one of the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah (In The Bible, Abraham explicitly didn't live in either, certainly not that close to their destruction; and those cities were post-flood), and Lot just being some guy Noah knows.
  • Dr Langford Fife in the parody film The Norman Rockwell Code is a composite character of Dr Robert Langdon from The Da Vinci Code, and Barney Fife from The Andy Griffith Show.
  • North had the FedEx guy and Johnny Fingers from the book merged into one guy who appears to North randomly during his journey to find his parents.
  • Based on a true story, October Sky merged Sherman Siers and Jimmy O'Dell into one character called Sherman O'Dell. (The original book, Rocket Boys, did not do this.)
  • Pain and Gain: Dwayne Johnson's character Doyle is fictional, a combination of two or three additional members of the Sun Gym Gang.
  • Benjamin "The Ghost" Martin in Mel Gibson's The Patriot was based primarily on Francis "The Swamp Fox" Marion, with elements of about four other Revolutionary War leaders mixed in.
  • In The People vs. Larry Flynt, Edward Norton plays a character named Alan Isaacman, after the lawyer who defended Flynt before the Supreme Court. This character essentially stands in for all the legal assistants Flynt had employed. For instance, he is wounded in the 1978 shooting attack on Flynt; that event happened to Gene Reeves, Jr.
  • In the film version of The Lightning Thief, Annabeth Chase has the book version of Clarisse La Rue's first major scene, personality, and hair color. She's really more Clarisse than she is Annabeth.
    • Film!Luke takes over Ares' role as the person who duped Percy into taking the Bolt to Hades.
  • In Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney, Red White is merged with the character of April May. He murders Mia after learning she's uncovered certain evidence, but also is the one who wiretapped her phone to begin with and acts as the witness who accuses Maya of the murder. There's a more minor example later. While both Gumshoe and Larry are in the movie, Gumeshoe's role in loaning Phoenix the metal detector so he can look for "Gordy" is given to Larry, who owns the detector and is the only one to use it until the end of the last trial.
  • In The Adventures of Pinocchio, the villain Lorenzini is a merger of the characters Mangiafuoco (the Puppeteer) and The Little Man (Land of Toys coachman). Later, he is transformed into a giant sea monster, thus also merging The Terrible Dogfish into his character.
  • Originally Popeye was going to have Eugene the Jeep as a magical creature that could predict the future, but since they couldn't afford the required special effects, Swee'Pea was given Eugene's power of premonition.
  • The Postman has "Ford Lincoln Mercury", an amalgam of several characters. Abby is a mix of a minor one-chapter character named Abby, and the Love Interest who appeared later (in the chapters about the fake sentient AI and the Super Soldier army that never made it into the film).
  • Pride and Prejudice:
    • In at least the 1940 and 2005 versions, Mr. Bingley's two sisters Caroline and Louisa are melded into the films' version of Caroline.
    • It's common for modern-day adaptations to remove Kitty and/or Mary Bennet and transpose elements of them into Lydia, since fewer families have five children than in Austen's day, and they are the only sisters that don't end up with husbands by the end of the book.
    • The Bollywood adaptation Bride and Prejudice has Caroline Bingley and Luisa Hurst swapped for just one sister of Mr Bingley as its character Kiran Balraj. Bride and Prejudice also has Lakhi stand in for the two youngest Bennets, Lydia and Kitty.
    • The Latter-Day Setting Update has just one sister instead of both Caroline and Louisa. It also reduces Charlotte's character to one scene, with Mary being the one marrying Collins, while Georgiana Darcy and Anne de Bourgh are merged into Darcy's sister Euphemiana.
  • In the 1969 film of The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, the "Brodie Set" is reduced from six to four. In the absence of Joyce and Rose, Mary is the one who dies in the Spanish Civil War and Jenny is the one who Miss Brodie wants to have an affair with Mr Lloyd in her place.
  • Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time: Princess Tamina, judging by her actions and behavior, is a combination of all the female characters from the games (Farah, Kaileena, and Elika).
  • In Howard Stern's self-made biopic Private Parts, Kenny Rushton (played by Paul Giamatti) is meant to be a general composite of all of the stuffy uptight executives who gave Howard and his crew a hard time during his time working for NBC.
  • Queen of the Damned combines a number of characters in the novel, while many others are simply removed. Aaron Lightner, the man who recruited Jesse into the Talamasca and was her mentor for a time, is merged into the role of his friend David Talbot. Magnus, Lestat's maker, and Marius are merged into just Marius. Maharet in the novel has a twin named Mekare, and it's Mekare the one who kills Akasha and takes her place as the Queen. In the film, Maharet is never mentioned to have a sister, and she is the one who finishes off Akasha. The roles of makers are also shifted. In the film, Lestat turns Jesse instead of Maharet, and Marius turns David instead of Lestat. The film itself appears to be an amalgamation of the plots of The Vampire Lestat and Queen of the Damned.
  • In Raging Bull, the character Joey La Motta, played by Joe Pesci, is a composite of the real Joe La Motta and Jake La Motta's best friend, Pete Petrella. The infamous "You fuck my wife?" scene happened between Jake and Pete, not between the two brothers as depicted in the movie.
  • The Red Baron: "During WWI many Jewish pilots fought for the German Empire. ... They are represented by the fictional character of Friedrich Sternberg." Whose plane is identifiable by the Star of David in its Nose Art.
  • The film version of The Relic does this with their version of Lt. Vincent D'Agosta, mixing characteristics of both his novel counterpart and that of Special Agent Aloysius Pendergast.
  • Sheryl Yoast, Coach Bill Yoast's daughter in Remember the Titans. In real life, Sheryl was one of four daughters Coach Yoast had. Though the other daughters were okay with it.
  • Return to Oz, itself a composite of The Marvelous Land of Oz and Ozma of Oz, combines the (very different) characters Princess Langwidere from Ozma of Oz, and the minor witch Mombi from The Marvelous Land of Oz, into the evil Princess Mombi.
  • In the graphic novel Road to Perdition, the protagonists are pursued by several faceless goons. The movie combined them all into a single character, which the novel's author admitted was an improvement.
  • In Rurouni Kenshin, Jin-e takes Aoshi's role as Kanryu's bodyguard, as well as Gohei's role as the impostor Battōsai.
    • Gein, while seemingly being based on the Gein from the manga with his mask and cloak and initial use of wires to suspend Kenshin in the air, is more closer to being a combination of Aoshi and Hannya. From Hannya, he uses a mask to conceal disfigurement (though not to the level of Hannya) and uses a kodachi like Aoshi. Though Aoshi will appear in the sequel.
  • Although both appear in the film, Roxy Richter in Scott Pilgrim vs. The World inherits quite a few traits from the comic book's version of Envy, including her weak point. Interestingly, they were supposed to become one in the film's production, but later volumes convinced the film makers to include both characters.
    • Had they kept Roxy from the comic book as-is, they'd also have to include Knives's overprotective dad, who helps Scott beat her.
  • Warden Norton in The Shawshank Redemption was a composite of various characters from the novella; in that, Shawshank prison was run by several different figures with varying degrees of cruelty. The same goes for his henchman, Byron Hadley.
  • Simon Birch: Reverend Russell is a composite of Reverend Dudley Wiggin and Reverend Louis Merrill from the book. Russell inherits Wiggin's sternness and from Merrill being Joe's father.
  • Spaceballs uses several examples in its parody of Star Wars. Lone Starr grafts Luke Skywalker's Force (er, Schwartz) powers and role as The Hero onto Han Solo. Colonel Sandurz is a mixture of the various Imperial officers that appear throughout Star Wars (although he can be most directly compared to Tarkin). Yogurt is primarily based on Yoda, but also has traits of Obi-Wan Kenobi.
  • Spider-Man Trilogy:
    • Mary Jane in the first film was a composite of comics Mary Jane, Gwen Stacy and Liz Allan from the comics. She gets Liz Allan's role as most popular girl at Midtown high and Peter's high school crush who is dating Flash but develops an interest in Peter, she gets Gwen Stacy's knack for being thrown off a bridge by the Green Goblin and she has Mary Jane's bad home life, name, interest in acting and red hair. All 3 girls were also involved with Harry Osborn like Mary Jane in the films but here the relationship most resembles the one with Gwen where both Peter and Harry were fighting for her. In the comics, Harry and Liz Allan became an item long after Peter had any interest in Liz and Mary Jane and Harry were dating before Peter had much of an interest in Mary Jane.
    • The sequel gave her Tsundere tendencies, which some see as similar to the ones displayed by Gwen in some of her earliest appearances before her characterization changed (although Mary Jane did have these tendencies in the comics too following her marriage to Peter). Likewise, when Gwen is introduced in the third film, she has MJ's status as 'love rival' from the comic and career as a model. Although in the comics Gwen started as 'love rival' (to Betty Brant) and was introduced as a high school beauty queen. Also, when Peter Parker went to the Savage Land for the Daily Bugle, Gwen was taken along as a bikini model.
    • The version of Norman Osborn from Sam Raimi's first Spider-Man has traits that bear resemblances to multiple characters form the Spider-Man mythos. In terms of his life positioning he does resemble the Norman of the comics. Being the founder and head of the company Os Corp, having a son with which he has a strained if not quite as intense relationship, the use of the Goblin persona and gear, etc. However the more timid Norman Osborn who is afraid of his dark side including going so far as to refuse to accept what he was capable of in murder with them blaming an "alternate entity" for it (in contrast to the more ruthless Norman Osborn who had a shady side even before becoming a costumed character), his friendship of sorts with Peter Parker before they become enemies, and his first true villainous act being the murder of his assistant after which he becomes a full-on costumed villain resembles that of Miles Warren aka The Jackal. Also notably his status as a scientist who is spearheading some groundbreaking work but facing intense pressure from his colleagues/superiors with the threat of losing his job that leads to him being desperate enough to make some sort of careless mistake that leads to him having an accident that leads him to becoming physiologically transformed and on put on the path to becoming super-criminals could be compared to elements of the lesser known Spider-Man villain Jackson Arvad aka Will o' the Wisp.
    • Similarly, the version of Otto Octavius from Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man 2 also has traits that bear resemblances to multiple characters from the Spider-Man mythos. Naturally his status as a successful scientist with mechanical tentacles of his invention that are welded to his back come from his comic-book counterpart, as well as at least a touch of his hubris. And also like his counterpart from Spider-Man: The Animated Series he is an idol to Peter Parker, and his chief work was a fusion energy project. However his more amiable demeanor, his happily married family life, his friendship with Peter Parker/Spider-Man, his genuine desire to help humanity with his work (in contrast to comic book Octavius’ more self-centered attitude), and his experiment going awry leading to his transformation into a supervillain with something of a split mind of some kind resembles that of Curt Connors aka The Lizard. (According to some sources, the character was in fact originally written to be Connors in an earlier draft) Also notably the character’s “symbiotic” relationship with the mechanical tentacle AI bears a striking resemblance to the character Eddie Brock/Venom. In both cases each was a human man (Otto and Eddie) who becomes combined with some powerful resource that gives him superpowers (the tentacles and the sybmiote) that has a personality of its own that comes to form an alliance with the man and sharing his mind/body. Also in both cases the character started out as a good man whose life was torn apart because of an honest mistake on their part, however both danced around accepting responsibility for it. Doc Ock even refers to himself as “We” during the film’s climax, which is a very well-known trait of the Venom from the comics. (That all being extremely ironic if one considers what Raimi has said of his opinions of Venom in interviews and how that character himself wound up being handled in the following film Spider-Man 3)
  • The Amazing Spider-Man Series
    • Likewise, Gwen Stacy in The Amazing Spider-Man. She has Gwen Stacy's name, blonde hair, interest in Science (played up by the movies unlike her depiction in the comics & The Spectacular Spider-Man), status as Peter's first lovenote , the police captain father, and Gwen's most iconic moment but also again replaces Liz Allan as Peter's high school crush and gets some of Mary Jane's more playful tendencies. In fact, when Emma Stone was cast many fans felt she would have been more suited to play Mary Jane.
    • The Amazing Spider-Man 2 sees Harry Osborn combined with some traits from his father, Norman, including being the first to don the guise of the Green Goblin and the one who causes Gwen Stacy's death.
  • In The Film of the Book of The Stand:
    • Nadine Cross and Rita Blakemoor were merged into a single character. In the book, Larry meets Rita in New York, but she kills herself a few days after they leave the city. He then meets Nadine in Maine. But in the movie, he meets Nadine in New York. And although she has Joe/Leo with her in the book, it's Lucy who has Joe in the movie.
    • Also, Dr. Dietz in the Atlanta CDC facility and Elder in the Vermont CDC facility were combined into Dr. Dietz in the series who appears in the Vermont facility. Basically, Dietz in the novel was a kind, honest, hardworking doctor who was making a sincere but doomed effort to stave off Captain Trips, before succumbing to it himself; after the Atlanta facility was compromised, Stu Redman was moved to Vermont, and when Elder caught Captain Trips he tried to kill Stu because he didn't want Stu to live while he died. These two characters were combined in the TV Series. Also, Dietz's bedside interaction with Stu was markedly different in the novel from how it was in the TV series; in the TV series, Dietz was nasty and arrogant to Stu while in the novel he was friendly. This difference is exemplified most in how in both adaptations Dietz told Stu "you son of a bitch," but in a different tone in each adaptation; in the TV series, Dietz said it in a very nasty, defensive tone, while in the novel he said it "with a sense of wonder," implying a non-insulting tone.
  • Street Fighter combined Blanka (the green man-beast from Brazil) and Charlie (Guile's combat buddy who was killed by Bison) into one character named Carlos Blanka, a combat buddy of Guile who gets captured by Bison and turned into a green man-beast. Even though Blanka's actual origin story in the games made it impossible for him and Charlie to be the same character, it didn't stop fans from speculating otherwise until Charlie debuted as a player character in the Street Fighter Alpha prequel series.
  • Concerning Star Wars
    • Kylo Ren from The Force Awakens is a composite of two of Anakin's grandsons from the Star Wars Legends continuity. He shares the name "Ben" with Luke's son Ben Skywalker, but like Jacen Solo, he's the traitorous fallen Jedi son of Han and Leia. Additionally, his backstory as a pupil of Luke's who was seduced to the Dark Side and murdered his fellow students, while being a fair retelling of what his grandfather did, is also the same as Legends character Kyp Durron.
    • The wide-eyed orphaned youth living on a desert planet who learns of their great Force potential as they are thrust onto an adventure with Anakin's lightsaber and getting R2-D2 as they become a Jedi. Working as an underling for a seedy rotund alien residing on a desert planet, a proficient mechanic, and inheriting both the Millenium Falcon and Chewbacca. As well as serving as the headstrong leading lady to boot. In that sense a case can be made that Rey of The Force Awakens is a composite of the three leading characters from the Original Trilogy.
    • Poe Dameron is a composite of Wedge Antilles, Leia Organa, and Han Solo from the Original Trilogy. Poe is an Ace Pilot who flies into a super weapons and destroys it from within just like Wedge. Plot-wise, Poe is a high-ranking resistance commander whose capture instigates the main plot very much like Leia. Poe also shares the snarky, surefire personality and Big Brother Instincts of Han Solo.
  • The Stunt Man. Director Eli Cross is a combination of Gottschalk the director and Bruno de Fe the cinematographer from the original novel.
  • In Swamp Thing:
    • Alice Cable is an amalgam of Abby Arcane and Matt Cable, being a government agent with the surname Cable, and Swamp Thing's love interest with a first name starting with "A".
    • Anton Arcane takes the role of the gangsters who destroyed Alec's lab.
  • In the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comic, Hamato Yoshi and Oroku Nagi fought over the love of a woman. Yoshi killed Nagi and the couple fled to New York. Years later Nagi's brother Saki avenged his brother's death by killing them and stayed in New York while calling himself The Shredder. The first movie simplified this by combining the two brothers: Saki is Yoshi's rival; Yoshi flees the country as a way to avoid having to fight him, but Saki follows them, and from there the story follows the comic.
  • Eric Sacks from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2014), is actually not the Shredder, instead effectively a stand-in for long-time Turtle foe Baxter Stockman, mixed with Oroku Saki's philanthropist/businessman persona from the 2003 series.
  • The T-1000 in Terminator Genisys is a Composite Character of the first cop Kyle Resee ran into in The Terminator and the T-1000 from Terminator 2: Judgment Day, which resulted in a dual Race Lift as the disguise's now Asian instead of either being a white guy like Robert Patrick as the original T-1000 or a black guy like the original cop.
  • R.J. MacReady in The Thing (1982) is based on the original story's McReady (The Hero, second-in-command of the base) and Van Wall (chief pilot).
  • In the film adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird, the characters of Miss Rachel (Dill's alcoholic aunt) and Miss Stephanie (the town gossip) were merged so that Stephanie became Dill's aunt. Nathan Radley Sr. and Jr. were also combined, though given how minor both are this doesn't affect the plot in any meaningful way.
  • Trainspotting has Davie Mitchell's embarrassing incident in the novel given to Spud, along with Second Prize's Alcohol-Induced Idiocy. Matty's death in the book happens to Tommy in the film. Many other characters are left out of the film, due to the book having Loads and Loads of Characters.
  • Occurs in the Transformers series. A few examples:
    • Sam is based mostly on Spike from the Generation One cartoon. However, his absorbing of the Allspark's energy and having visions due to it a taken from Buster of the Marvel comics.
    • Bumblebee combines elements of his G1 counterpart (the former Trope Namer), while his design takes cues from Autobots such as Prowl and Bluestreak.
    • Megatron takes elements of his Beast Wars descendant and original 1984 character.
    • Sentinel Prime is a combination of G1 Sentinel (former Autobot leader before Optimus), Alpha Trion (Optimus's mentor, as well as a scientific genius), and G1 Nova Prime (Becomes evil, and boasts about the superiority of Cybertronians over all life).
    • Jetfire is a combination of G1 Jetfire (originally being a Decepticon) and Kup (an old timer who tells stories of old times).
    • Brains was based somewhat on Blaster when he took on the form of a laptop, and Rewind, one of Blaster's Mini-cassettes, in that he spouts useless info.
    • Optimus Prime is more or less based on his G1 namesake, even having the same voice actor but in Revenge of the Fallen, being repaired with Jetfire's parts is a homage to Jet Convoy, the combination of Convoy and Jetfire from Micron Legend.
    • Sideswipe is slightly like himself combined with Hot Rod (rumored name) and Drift (wielding two sword).
  • A minor example in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, where the bandit Gold Hat makes a second appearance, replacing a totally different bandit in the book.
  • Instead of a literal "Hollywood Ten", Trumbo rolls several of them into the character of Arlen Hird (Louis C.K.).
  • In the Twilight films, the characters of Jessica Stanley and Lauren Mallory were merged into one character named Jessica.
    • Plus Eric Yorkie is himself plus Ben
  • In Velvet Goldmine, Curt Wild is mainly supposed to be an expy of Iggy Pop. A lot of the incidents involving him are based on other real-life figures, such as Mick Ronson, Lou Reed, and Mick Jagger.
    • Also, central character Brian Slade, while most ostensibly based on Bowie, is also a composite character and bears definite traces of Brian Eno, Marc Bolan, and Jobriath.
  • Any war movie ever made does this — both ones based on actual wars/conflicts and ones based on novels.
    • Averted in A Bridge Too Far where there are named historical characters who don't even have speaking roles. In fact, the majority of the characters are based on real people (yes, even the guy with an umbrella).
  • Gul'dan of WarCraft is mostly based on the original game's version of him in terms of plot importance and actions, but shares a few elements with alternate timeline Gul'dan from WoW: Warlords of Draenor, most notably his appearance and more direct control over the Horde.
  • In 2005's The War of the Worlds starring Tom Cruise, Ogilvy, the man who is trapped in a basement with Cruise's character and his daughter, is a composite of the astronomer of the same name, the artilleryman, and the curate from the original novel.
  • In Water for Elephants, the roles of Uncle Al (evil ringmaster) and August (evil animal trainer and Marlena's husband), were merged together to create the film's version of August.
  • This induces Fridge Logic in The Wizard of Oz. At the beginning of the book by L. Frank Baum Dorothy meets the Good Witch of the North, who tells her to "Follow the Yellow Brick Road." At the end, she meets Glinda, the Good Witch of the South, who tells her that the slippers her sister the North Witch saw her put on are the keys to get her home. In the movie, the characters are merged into Glinda, the Good Witch of the North, which leads you into wondering why she didn't mention the key in the first place. Handwaved in the film this by insinuating that the shoes, wouldn't work until Dorothy learned for herself that "there's no place like home." Glinda is even asked why she didn't tell Dorothy the shoes' magic power in the beginning and she laughs "she wouldn't have believed me. She had to learn it for herself."
  • In The Wolfman (2010), Sir John Talbot replaces the Gypsy's son, Bela, as the werewolf who gives Lawrence his curse. Ben Talbot replaces Frank Andrews as Gwen's fiancé.
  • James Bond: Pierce Brosnan's interpretation of the iconic spy is an amalgamation of his predecessors; he has Connery's charisma, Lazenby's vulnerability, Moore's humour and Dalton's grittiness. Brosnan's portrayal is therefore the most versatile among the actors who have played 007.
  • Iggy Thistlewhite's father and the mayor of Southtown are merged into one character in the Live-Action Adaptation of The Year Without a Santa Claus.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/CompositeCharacter/Film