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Archie Comic Publications, Ltd. is an American comic book publisher based out of Pelham, New York. It began in 1939 as MLJ Comics, after the initials of its founders, Maurice Coyne, Louis Silberkleit, and John L. Goldwater. MLJ’s titles included Blue Ribbon Comics, Pep Comics, and Top Notch Comics, and its superhero title The Shield ultimately yielded the character that would become the publisher’s new namesake in 1941: Archibald “Archie” Andrews.

The Andy Hardy films were the primary inspiration for this teenaged everyman, and his adventures with his friends soon became the publisher’s headliner. This led to MLJ changing its name to Archie Comics Publications, with the superhero titles being shifted over to the “Archie Adventure Series”.

Archie Comics pushed for the creation of The Comics Code, and more or less ran it for the entirety of its existence. Archie was the last publisher officially adhering to the Code when it ceased to exist in early 2011.note  Unofficially, they had stopped following it decades earlier, but nobody noticed because things like sex, drugs, or violence were never really part of the Archie universe anyway.

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More information and activities: http://www.archiecomics.com/

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  • Abandoned Mascot: MLJ Comics's original mascot was the patriotic superhero The Shield. However their smash hit Archie Comics series was so successful, not only did Archie become their mascot, but MLJ changed their name to Archie Comics. The Shield languished and became a public domain character, however Archie has made attempts to revitalize the character since the 1990s.
  • Appropriated Title: Archie Comics is named for the most popular title of its previous incarnation, MLJ, Ltd.
  • Creator Killer:Archie Comics is effectively a shell of its former self. Once boasting one of the few long-running titles due to DC Comics and Marvel Comics doing reboots every time they turned around (Marvel more than DC), they now boast only one title with double digits with a handful of others with single digits that appear infrequently. What happened? First came the painful lawsuits involving Archie Comics' Sonic the Hedgehog, which saw the title being forced into a Continuity Reboot (though it didn't lose its numbering). Soon after was Sonic the Hedgehog/Mega Man: Worlds Unite, which Archie attempted to raise flagging sales on Mega Man and tried it by buying up rights to other SEGA and Capcom franchises — doing so cost millions and the story barely recouped the money. Then came "Riverdale Reborn", which saw all of the Archie titles being canceled and given a Continuity Reboot of their own, forcing them into a failed Kickstarter attempt. Then, they focused on Riverdale, which proved good, but not the big hit Archie hoped for. Most of their titles are on "hiatuses" and the license to make Sonic comics is now in the hands of IDW Publishing.
  • Fanwork Ban: Concerned about the proliferation of Rule 34 fanfics, Archie Comics has put a general kibosh on all fan fiction of Archie Comics in general. That hasn't stopped people from putting up fan fiction and fan art on the Internet anyway, although more "official" venues still have to respect the ban; Fan Fiction Dot Net, for instance, took down its Archie section (but not its Josie and the Pussycats section), but Archive of Our Own still has one. The main exception is Archie Comics' Sonic the Hedgehog, since all Sonic characters are owned by Sega, which is Japanese and doesn't mind nearly as much. (Ken Penders, though, insists that any fan art of his characters include a copyright crediting him.)

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