YMMV: Yu-Gi-Oh! 5Ds

Anime examples

  • Alternate Character Interpretation:
    • Divine.
    • Paradox. The anime doesn't give much to go on at all.
  • Anti-Climax Boss:
    • What Team Catastrophe turned out to be; they didn't want to win so much as they wanted to just break shit, and they were Placido's Unwitting Pawns to boot. Heck, Hans didn't even get to duel!
    • Ultimate Temporal Machine God Sephiron, Z-One's trump card. It can Special Summon as many of his Temporal Machine God monsters from his hand, Deck, or Graveyard as he pleases, turn their ATK into 4000, and then let Sephiron gain their combined ATK. It's destroyed the moment that it's summoned because of Yusei's Ass Pull.
  • Arc Fatigue: The WRGP/Arc Cradle arc. It consumed two-thirds of the series, where its preceding arcs were around thirty episodes.
  • Ass Pull: This is Yu-Gi-Oh!, so there's guaranteed to be a lot of come-from-behind victories revolving around cards that had never been foreshadowed. The most egregious example? Rubble King from Episode 10, a card whose effect depends on there being a lot of cards in the Graveyard... and it just happened to be the second-to-last card in Yusei's deck. This card was created out of whole cloth to enable Yusei's victory in that episode and never appeared again, not even being released in real life. And, technically speaking, he didn't even need it in the first place; he could have activated his winning trap card, Blasting the Ruins, at the start of his opponent's next turn.
  • Awesome Ego: No one is going to stop Jack Atlas! The fans love his immense ego.
  • Badass Decay:
    • Zigzagged with Aki. At the start of the series she was a cold stone bitch who nobody messed with, lest they suffer from her unleashing the powers she had. During the lead-up to the WRGP she was a moe school girl who did almost nothing plot wise. In the WRGP itself she's racing and dueling with the whole team... but loses in two turns in her only showing. She finally gets some badass creed back when Team 5D's heads up to Arc Cradle, where she teams up with Crow to soundly beat Sherry.
    • Jack starts to suffer from this, but then pulls off a wonderful subversion. While in the first season he was Yusei's equally-matched rival and the secondary main character, he gradually decayed until he became a Plucky Comic Relief at worst and a Memetic Badass bearing no relevance to the plot at best. A mini-arc addresses the perceived decay, with a robot duplicate of Jack's King persona claiming that the real Jack has lost his edge and couldn't win against his past self. After losing once, Jack has a rematch and whoops his doppelganger's ass in spectacular fashion. Another mini-arc saw Jack fighting against the forces of the Crimson Devil, where he steals its powers to make his newest trump card, Scar-Red Nova Dragon. It's also revealed that he's the reincarnation of a legendary Signer with a special power called "Burning Soul". It's implied that, without the legendary Signer by its side, the Crimson Dragon was losing against the Crimson Devil, which could mean that Jack is stronger than the Crimson Dragon itself. By the final episode he's turned himself from a self-proclaimed covered-by-money king into a real king, with only Yusei as his competitor for the position of strongest Signer.
  • Base Breaker:
    • Crow, Crow, Crow. Quite possibly the worst Base Breaker in the series, it's hard to find enough people who share opinions to come to a consensus on what they think he is and what he should be. Some people call him the Kamina of the series (though most detractors say that the honor should go more to Jack). Others love him for what he is, the Large Ham of the cast. Still others call him a Canon Sue, citing his use of an archetype that's been a tournament staple in real life, the fact that he became a Signer, and the fact that he never shuts up as reasons for being hated. This extends to just about any episode that revolves around Crow, to the point where, if you see Crow featuring prominently in an episode, there's bound to be an argument about it.
    • Aki fits this to a minor degree. Either you love or hate her Backstory and Character Development.
    • Even Yusei, the main character, has his detractors, who claim he's an Invincible Hero with too much Incorruptible Pure Pureness. Others think he's the best main character after Yugi, or even before him.
    • Kiryu became one with Crashtown (prior to it, he'd been quite popular). Maybe it was that he put the plot on hold for another six episodes in a season already mostly filler, maybe it was the fact that his new Deck was a complete Game Breaker, maybe it was because he essentially wrote out non-Team Satisfaction characters from the arc in a season that had already been bad for them, maybe it was because certain elements of his backstory got retconned... All these things either made people love him even more or turn their backs on him in droves.
    • Bruno. Despite some people find that he's a Canon Sue, a lot of people love him after his true nature has been revealed.
  • Better on DVD: Especially when filler episodes can be skipped over and some, like Crashtown, can be treated as a bonus arc.
  • Black Hole Sue:
    • In a way that was in no way the fault of the production crew and in every way the fault of the card game executives, Crow ended up warping the intended plot quite a bit. The story goes something like this: Crow was never intended to be a main character (and in fact was originally conceived as a villain, believe it or not), but after Blackwings started selling like hotcakes in Real Life, the Konami suits ordered the anime crew to make him a permanent member of the cast (so more Blackwings could be made, of course). This ended up causing quite a few things to be cut in the name of selling cards, including Demak's Backstory and a rematch between Rua and Bommer. So while Crow isn't a Black Hole Sue in the context of the 5D's universe, he is one meta-textually.
    • Yusei became one after the Dark Signer arc. Though he'd always been the protagonist, it was only then that he started seriously developing BHS traits: he was given the Head Mark for poorly-defined reasons, he got several plotlines devoted to himself and would butt into plotlines that he had absolutely no reason to be involved in, various other characters suffered Badass Decay and severely lost power and importance while he only got stronger, and circumstances became contrived to keep him from ever losing, from the "third wheeler" format of the WRGP to the percentage of Ass Pull cards in his Deck increasing from "acceptable" to "every single turn" (with High and Low being the single worst offender). The series even gave up on the "Z-One is Yusei" twist, which had the side effect of declaring Yusei to be the most important person on the planet and absolving him of committing even future sins. It got so bad that the fandom even developed an "it's Yusei's coma fantasy" theory. It's become tradition to put out Duelist Packs consisting of cards used by the protagonists. Yu-Gi-Oh! GX got three Judai packs spread out over the series's run, plus one for Manjoume, one for Johan, one for Kaiser, and one for Edo. What characters did they put out during 5D's? Three Yusei packs in a row, followed by one Crow pack.
  • Broken Base:
    • Let's just say that the only thing that the fandom can generally agree on is that the music is great and the first 64 episodes were better then what came after that. You'll have arguments on anything from how many seasons exist to correct character spellings to anything involving Aki and Crow.
    • Crashtown Arc - pointless filler that ran on for too long and changed absolutely nothing, or interesting arc focusing on a character that until now had been Put on a Bus? The fans may never agree.
    • As of Episode 107, Placido's transformation. The coolest villain in all of Yu-Gi-Oh!, or just silly?
    • Z-One's true identity- a good plot twist, or poor writing after foreshadowing pointed to something else?
  • Canon Sue:
    • Bruno is the most obvious example. In his very first episode he heavily outshines both Crow and Yusei at D-Wheel mechanics and computer hacking, beats Crow (an excellent duelist) and Jack (the former King of Games) at a duel puzzle after Yusei (the current King of Games) asks him if it's even possible. Admittedly, both Crow and Jack hit the Idiot Ball in that episode — Crow fell for an obvious trap, and the Hot-Blooded Jack fell for the very same trap he'd just seen a minute before. And Bruno did get better in the episodes after his introduction, wherein his dueling/hacking expertise took a large backseat to his status as a non-action Butt Monkey. His knowledge of duels and D-Wheels was later justified by the fact that he's Antinomy, a professional Turbo Duelist from the future assigned to watch Yusei.
    • The jury is still out on whether or not Crow counts for this trope. See Base Breaker above.
  • Complete Monster:
    • Divine is the leader of a group of duelists training to control and harness their psychic abilities, in order to turn them into soldiers of war against the rest of humanity. His earliest duelist, Toby Lola, was unable to withstand the procedure meant to test his abilities. Believing him to be weak and useless, Divine ordered the intensity of the electric shocks to be amplified, which caused the young boy's death. He also does his best to keep his prized duelist Aki secluded from anyone outside the Arcadia Movement; partly so she'll remain full of hate and resentment at the world, and partly to hide his own secret motives. To this end, he gasses Ruka, Rua, Yanagi, and Himuro when they come to him for aid against the Dark Singers. Then he threatens Rua's life in a psychic duel to test if he has powers like his twin sister Ruka. Later that day he has another Psychic duel with Carly, where he murders her by sending her through a window with a direct attack, and kick-starts her rebirth into a Dark Signer. He then returns from his Disney Death at the hands of Carly, posing as a security agent to attack Yusei and Mikage. Divine states that anybody who falls prey to him will simply follow his orders and nothing more, as he takes full advantage of that individual's weakness, just like he did with Aki.
    • Lotten is a tyrant lording over a small western-style town called Crashtown, who forces those he's defeated to join him or face slavery in the mines. He gets into a match with Yusei while Yusei, Kiryu, West, and Nico are trying to escape the mines, but before it can be decided he throws a stick of dynamite at the gang that results in a cave-in. When it explodes, Yusei and Kiryu fall off the mountain, while Nico and West are unconscious on the ground. Lotten takes them back to Crashtown, renaming it Lotten Town after Barbara and him double-cross his brother Malcolm. Later, not satisfied with the number of workers in the mines, he and Barbara begin forcing their henchmen to Duel for their survival, which is stopped by Yusei and Kiryu. Once he starts to lose his 2-on-1-handicap match against the two, he quits the duel and tries to run away, but not before he abandons Barbara to her fate and sets off explosives in the town.
  • Crazy Awesome: Jack, especially post-Dark Signers. Particular emphasis on the arc where he beats down an Eldritch Abomination by being Hot-Blooded, and turns it into his new ace card.
  • Die for Our Ship: Carly, Mikage, and Stephanie all receive this treatment in regards to their relationship with Jack. Ironically, Jack never officially gets together with any of them.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Jack in the first arc. Divine in general.
  • Ear Worm:
    • The dub theme song. Dear lord...
    • The original opening during the Dark Signer Arc will get stuck in your head as well.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Kiryu. The fact that he obtained a seven episode long arc focused on him may or may not be acknowledging his fan popularity.
    • Carly, thanks to her relationship with Jack. Shippers wanted to see more about it.
    • The Familiar of the Crimson Devil is quite popular as well, mainly due to his quirky personality.
    • Cup Ramen Man.
    • Martha, the foster mother of Yusei, Jack and Crow.
    • The whole of Team Taiyou, who were so utterly likable that most fans ended up rooting for them in their match against Team 5D's.
    • Nobody in the entire fandom seems capable of hating the MC.
  • Epileptic Trees:
    • Several, but one that sticks out is the thought that Rudger is Jack's father. Or that Godwin is Crow's father. Interestingly enough, in the 5D's manga, Godwin is Jack's adopted father.
    • Zonesei/Oldsei. Yusei is Z-One, a theory that was eventually jossed.
    • Sly is Divine's son.
    • Many people theorize that Yusei is now dead thanks to his final shown stunt of jumping over the bridge connecting Satellite and Neo Domino. It doesn't exactly help that Yusei already dodged huge air fans, jumped over a pit of magma, and stood on top of a cliff's railing in the final episode alone.
  • Estrogen Brigade: Let's not even get started on this one.
  • Evil Is Cool: Kiryu for being the most Ax-Crazy villain of the series.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Dark Signer Carly. Her voice even changes from a high-pitched girly voice to a more seductive and playful one to reflect this change.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: Many fans like to pretend that anything after the Dark Signer arc did not happen. Or that Z-One really was future Yusei.
  • Faux Symbolism: The Big Bad's ten Temporal Machine Gods are based on the ten aspects of the Tree of Life used in Kabbalah.
  • Foe Yay:
    • Rua/Aporia has quite the backing, especially once Aporia showed up to duel Z-One.
    • Jack's fangirls, Mikage, Carly and Stephanie.
    • Stardust Dragon and Red Demon's Dragon. Most fight scenes between them are portrayed rather harshly, yet they have no problem working together when necessary.
  • Fridge Brilliance: Some fans wondered why Yusei needed to find Accel Synchro when he already had Savior Star Dragon. But watching the Yusei vs. Placido duel, it becomes apparent that Placido had already found a way to counter Savior Star. Savior Star Dragon can negate one monster effect per turn, but stealing the Skiel Carrier cards gave Placido two lines of defense (Wisel Guard 3 and Skiel Carrier 5). Savior Star would negate one, bounce off of the other, and get absorbed the next turn. Game over, hero dead, town destroyed, roll credits. Jury's still out on Turbo Warrior, though.
  • Fridge Logic:
    • Quite literally. Crow somehow stopped himself from being sacrificed to the Earthbound Immortals by hiding in one for around twenty-four hours! This happens once again when he avoids being killed by jumping into a fridge with an old man.
    • This bit is exclusive to the English Dub. Jack, Yusei, and Crow grew up together in the same neighborhood, ever since they were babies. And yet Jack is the only one with an Australian accent.
    • Yusei is looking for a card that can defeat the Emperors... preferably a Synchro Monster... a card that can ignore the effects of monsters (low-level ones, if that's important)... a card that fits into his Deck strategy, and preferably his Deck... Nope, ain't got nothing like that!
  • Genius Bonus: Similar to the many references to real-life subjects hidden in Yu-Gi-Oh! GX, the Fortune Cup and Dark Signers arcs are full of references to Incan mythology, while the W.R.G.P. arc gives us references to geneticists, genetics, and biology.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • Lucciano is nucking futs, a Laughing Mad child psychopath, and a Large Ham if there ever was one. It gets a bit hard to mock him for it after realizing that he represents a child who was driven insane by the loss of his parents.
    • Straighter example: Zero Reverse and the Bad Future itself, thanks to Japan suffering what is pretty close to the real life equivalent with the 8.9 earthquake, tsunamis, and power/nuclear plants exploding.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • About a month and a half prior to the series airing, Yu-Gi-Oh! The Abridged Series had Tristan ride up on a motorcycle, and when asked he explained that "in the future, card games will be played on motorbikes," before cutting to a promotional artwork for 5D's. Then the series got dubbed, and who should be voicing Yusei but the same guy who voiced Tristan, using almost the same voice he did for Tristan too. Hilarity ensued.
    • Some fake episode titles mentioned something about a new Earthbound Immortal. With the airing of Episode 112, we learn that the Crimson Devil is actually an Earthbound Immortal that fought one-on-one with the Crimson Dragon and lost. Said immortal was based on a serpent Nazca Line, which wasn't known to exist at the time. In 2014, an actual snake Nazca Line was discovered.
    • Early in the series a few people speculated that Power Tool Dragon might be a Signer Dragon as well. However, most fans were quick to point out the inconsistencies if such were to be true (such as it being a Machine-type). It was also pointed out constantly in the show itself that Rua couldn't be a Signer, a notable example being a recap episode in the WRGP story arc that also stated the previous point about the dragon's typing. Cue Season 5, after the rumors were already long dead, where it turns out that Power Tool Dragon was actually a dormant form of the final original Signer Dragon, Life Stream Dragon, along with a new Signer mark introduced almost completely out of left field.
  • Ho Yay/Les Yay: Has its own page.
  • Hollywood Pudgy: Bruno, whose on-screen stats would indicate that he's probably closer to having a normal weight-to-height ratio compared to the rest of the cast, but because this is Yu-Gi-Oh!...
  • Incest Yay Shipping: Some fans see Rua and Ruka with this, particularly in one of the last episodes where Ruka has a new look and Rua is blushing at the sight of it.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Yusei. Possibly Lampshaded in Episode 80.
  • Magnificent Bastard:
    • Rex Goodwin, the man who manipulated the Signers and the Dark Signers to become a Signer and a Dark Signer at the same.
    • Z-One, the Big Bad of the entire series with an overpowered deck, tragic backstory and redeeming qualities.
  • Memetic Badass:
    • JACK. Just Jack.
    • Nitro Warrior. Every single time it is summoned (except for the final duel with Jack), the opponent is OTK'd - in Crashtown, Yusei summons Nitro Warrior and OTKs three guys at once!
    • Jose. He runs down the track after Jack's D-Wheel when it's his turn to duel, and keeps up with him until he merges with his D-Wheel a few moments later. Many jokes ensued about the possibility of him just running around the track for the duel without a D-Wheel, which apparently he could have.
  • Memetic Molester: Aki - a lot of people make jokes about how her usage of Rose Tentacles on Yusei was a little too suggestive.
  • Memetic Mutation: It should be noted that most of these involve Jack in some way.
    • CARD GAMES ON MOTORCYCLES!
    • JACK ATLAS.
    • Jack's "obsession" with coffee.
    • ATLAS PUNCH!
    • ATLAS CHOKE!
    • The dub brings one along in the form of "magic glue".
    • "ABSOLUTE POWERFORCE!"
    • ZETSUBOU!!
    • The dub also gives us "DRAGONS vs GODS!!!"
    • Yusei's poncho. It only shows up in the filler Crashtown arc, but is very well remembered by fans. Becomes an Ascended Meme of sorts where 'Poncho Yusei' is its own storyline in Tag Force 5.
  • Mind Game Ship: The relationship between Divine and Aki is virtually the embodiment of this trope.
  • Narm:
    • Cup ramen is a major plot point in a couple of episodes. The plot becomes downright ridiculous when Yeager's mother sells her prized show dress to buy cup ramen, and then ramen drives his backstory Off the Rails.
    • Team Satisfaction as the name of a vigilante dueling group. LittleKuriboh had fun with that in his 5D's parodies.
    • Let's just say that Placido was more intimidating riding his D-Wheel than becoming his D-Wheel.
  • Nausea Fuel: Takasu blowing nose hair at people. Jaeger's picture of his family.
  • Nightmare Fuel:
    • Aki in the early seasons. There's even an ending in the Tag Force games where she makes plans to reward the player character for dueling alongside her by unleashing all of her power on them. While sporting a nightmarish grin no less.
    • Everything about the Earthbound Immortals/Gods/Jibakushin. Every single bloody thing.
    • Kiryu's Infernity deck. Actually, just Kiryu.
    • A notable and unusual one is a shot of Ruka with a skull for a face.
  • Periphery Demographic: While the series is targeted towards young boys, it has also attracted an audience of roughly women aged 13-26 thanks to the Ho Yay and watching the original series as children.
  • Replacement Scrappy: Adding in Bruno to replace Kiryu for a new four-man group in Season 3. This lessened somewhat when more emphasis was put on Bruno being a Sixth Ranger to Team 5D's rather than the fourth member to Yusei, Jack, and Crow specifically.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • A number of people disliked Rua before the Dark Signer Arc.
    • Crow may also qualify, being given a legitimate expanded backstory in Episodes 94 and 95.
  • The Scrappy:
    • Who is a Scrappy in 5D's varies almost depending on who you ask. However, every fan seems to agree that Leo from Episode 85 is an absolutely terrible character.
    • The twins are hated for being The Load and for providing what is seen as unnecessary comedy to a rather dark series.
  • Seasonal Rot: Season Three (specifically the WRGP, before they go on to face the actual bad guys) tends to get a lot of flak for this.
  • Strawman Has a Point: While his plan to destroy an entire city was undoubtedly drastic, Z-One is the last human survivor who was trying to prevent the same thing happening to the whole world. Team 5D's fights against his plan without even trying to think up of an alternative way to prevent the apocalypse besides a generic hope speech.
  • Tear Jerker: Has its own page.
  • The Untwist: Z-One not being Yusei, despite sharing the same appearance and heavy foreshadowing.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Aki's character arc in the second season began with her wanting to learn how to Turbo Duel to understand the adrenaline and energy that Yusei and other Turbo Duelists feel, and it was hinted she wanted to get closer to Yusei after being jealous of female Turbo Duelist Sherry. Once she actually got her license to ride Aki only ever took part in a single Turbo Duel as a member of Team 5D's, and was eliminated in the same episode she went in. The same thing happens to Rua and Ruka; when they get a two-episode arc involving them Turbo Dueling using skateboards instead of motorcycles, it goes absolutely nowhere.
    • After all the focus on Jack and Carly's relationship during the Dark Signers arc, the dreaded Reset Button rears its shiny head. Their relationship is never put into focus or developed in any form or shape again, and instead Carly is reduced to being just another Jack fangirl for the sake of comic relief. The sound you're hearing is the sound of Jack/Carly shippers reaching for the torches and pitchforks.
    • Divine and the Arcadia Movement reek of wasted potential, especially since, with the exception of Aki, Psychic Duelists were never really brought up again once they were gone.
    • In 2015, news came out that the above plots were all dropped for the same reason, and the reason was an exceptionally strange one. Carly's season one voice actress was discovered to be a member of a dangerous cult that was under investigation in Japan at the time, which led to her being fired and the production staff panicking to cover up anything that might make the series seem pro-cult. Thus, Yliaster was retconned to being founded not by mystics in the past but time travelers from the future who went back to the past, Carly's entire arc was excised and she was Demoted to Extra, and the Psychic Duelists, who were actually a cult, simply vanished without explanation, leaving poor Aki without a plot of her own for the majority of the second season.
    • Jack's and Yusei's scarred friendship was one of the main focuses of Season One (and the entire focus for the first five episodes), but it was never fully explained what happened that caused them to grow so far apart after Kiryu's death.
    • When Sly, one of Rua and Ruka's classmate, was introduced, the series made notice that he had interest in Yusei's Stardust Dragon and wanted it for himself. This was never developed.
    • The Familiar was an incredibly fun character, and his boss, Red Nova, had a lot more to do with the Signer's lore than the Emperors and seemed a very legitimate threat that could have easily carried the season. They only show up for a two-parter, and their only relevance to the plot was giving Jack's Dragon an upgrade.
    • A lot of Foreshadowing went into hinting at Z-One being Yusei from the future. When it was revealed that he was just some random nobody who underwent plastic surgury to emulate Yusei, the fandom went nuclear.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion:
    • Rally. Someone really needs to tell that kid that he dresses like a girl, and the long fluffy hair doesn't help either. This is even lampshaded in Tag Force 4; when Carly tries to question Yusei about his life, Rally forces her and the player character into a duel. Carly whispers to herself, "What is with this girl!? She's cute, I'll give her that, but..." to which Rally angrily responds, 'I'M NOT A GIRL!!!'. Carly completely ignores this and continues talking to herself about accepting the duel.
    • Jaeger fits the trope, too. Lampshaded in Episode 81, when a holographic Jaeger "clone" can't make up its mind about whether it belongs in the men's or ladies' bathroom.
    • Lucciano has a long braided ponytail, eyelashes, and a feminine voice. But at least he wears the male school uniform.
  • Wangst:
    • Aki's backstory.
    • Yusei's on-again off-again fear of Wisel Emperor, an Anti-Synchro monster that he's already defeated. Using a Synchro Monster (admittedly it was a Deus ex Machina moment, but still...)
  • We Want Our Jerk Back: Kiryu was loved because Evil Is Cool. But when he came back as an emo, fans were rather disappointed.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Symbolic?
  • The Woobie: Aki in the first arc. Aporia is a Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds
  • Woolseyism:
    • The English dub's "Earthbound Immortals" just sounds more dramatic than the original "Earthbound Gods". There's also a similar instance of renaming the "Polar Gods" to "Aesir" in the dub/TCG. Aesir is a group of gods that Odin and Thor belong to and which Loki is heavily associated with, despite not actually being one himself.
    • A notable instance is changing Himuro's knife that he hid from the prison guards into magazines. The dub simply makes it more subtle and turns it into a Parental Bonus.
    • Due to Never Say "Die" the dub couldn't bring up Misty's brother's death, so the conversation about Aki's powers in their first duel changed from being about him to being about Aki's actions at the Fortune Cup. The Woolseyism part comes from Misty's Armor-Piercing Question of whether the crowd deserved to get hurt for mocking Aki and whether she actually just enjoyed inflicting pain. Her stunned inability to answer just emphasizes how powerful that question was.

Video game examples

  • Breather Boss: Compared to the Sequential Boss that comes before him, Jack in WC 2009 is this. Mind you, he's also the Final Boss.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Toru and Misaki (especially Misaki) from WC 2011. They're one of the few game-original characters in the WC series to be important and heavily fleshed out, and make a great íThree Amigos! with the player. They also have unique decks with uncommon archetypes (Scraps and Watts, respectively), as opposed to some of the cookie-cutter decks most NP Cs have.
  • That One Boss:
    • Dark Signer Bommer in 2010. A riding duel is painful enough since the game introduces it not long beforehand, but you also must allow him to summon his Earthbound God in order to win.
    • Dark Signer Kiryu from the same game could count during the first time you face him in story mode. Facing a boss playing an Infernity deck when both players start with no cards in hand is a nasty challenge for the unprepared. Though he can become a Breather Boss if you run a pure beatstick deck; being limited in draws means he can't build up any sort of counter.
    • Dear god, Lotten in 2011. He starts with ten cards in his hand and runs pure burn. Do the math. Sometimes you need a miracle not to be killed on the first turn.
  • That One Level:
    • The stealth missions of sneaking past Security. This was a pain to complete in 2009 and they mercifully toned it down in 2010.
    • The "battle" against the Ghosts in Over the Nexus, thanks to an Unexpected Genre Change to Bullet Hell. Better hope you've been keeping up with your D-Wheeler parts, because without a decent amount of health and good maneuvering ability you will be destroyed and have to start over.