YMMV / Final Fight

  • Ambiguously Evil: By the time of the Street Fighter Alpha series, almost anyone who once worked for Mad Gear (with the possible exception of Rolento) seem to have a questionable moral status.
  • Awesome Music: The soundtrack of Final Fight CD, composed by T's Music. The Industrial Area's BGM, for example.
  • Contemptible Cover: The original SNES port features a cover that is naught but a blank background and an extreme close-up shot of Haggar and a burly Leatherman thug, possibly meant to be Abigail, eyeballing each other. It sends a somewhat different message of what the game is about than Capcom USA probably intended.
  • Die for Our Ship: Due to Guy being shipped with both Rose and Ibuki, as of Ultra Street Fighter IV, Rena, a very minor character, is now a major victim of this.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Most of the mooks in the series have their fans thanks to their memorable character designs:
  • Epileptic Trees: Thanks to an official artwork of Lucia doing aerobics with Chun-Li, the fact that both are detectives, and the resemblance of her moves to Chun-Li's signature Hyakuretsu Kyaku, it's been implied that Lucia may have trained under Chun-Li or is even friends with her.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: Streetwise, an attempt to capitalize on the Grand Theft Auto craze, was poorly received by fans and critics, and the series was discontinued itself. Though it doesn't stop people from using Cody's full name from said game.
  • First Installment Wins: Although Final Fight did become a trilogy that introduced new characters with each installment, the very first game seems to be the only one that Capcom pays any attention to these days:
    • Cody and Guy have become staples of the Street Fighter franchise since the Alpha sub series. Maki's only major appearance outside of Final Fight 2 was in Street Fighter Alpha 3, while the closest that Carlos received was a brief cameo in Alex's ending of Capcom Fighting Evolution. Lucia and Dean were given the worst treatment; neither has showed up anywhere outside of Final Fight 3 yet.
    • Although the Mad Gear gang was supposedly large enough to appear twice in the trilogy, only the first game's members have been featured or even referenced outside of it. This is still a better deal than what the Skull Cross Gang got; its members have been completely ignored.
    • The first installment is the only part of the trilogy that has ever been ported to multiple consoles, including one handheld system. The later two sequels have remained exclusive to the SNES.
  • Funny Moments: The end of the car smashing minigame, where the owner of the car comes back to what's left and falls to his knees proclaiming "Oh, my God!" In the overseas SNES versions, the line was changed to "Oh, my car!"
  • Game Breaker: Final Fight One has Street Fighter Alpha versions of Guy and Cody to unlock. While not that much different, their stats are tweaked compared to the originals. Alpha Guy still has the same speed and attack power, but takes far less damage from most attacks. Alpha Cody on the other hand while he has the same speed, he takes a bit less damage than normal and dishes out far more damage. Either one will make the game pretty trivial.
  • Good Bad Bugs: You can force Edi.E to go it alone by not scrolling to the end of the stage. Makes the fight with him almost too easy.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Although Guy is canonically married to Rena, he was paired with Maki (Rena's younger sister and Guy's rival for the Bushin-ryu succession), Rose, and Ibuki, among others.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Father Bella.
  • Memetic Badass: MIKE HAGGAR, THE MANLIEST FUCKING MAYOR OF ALL TIME. He will personally punch each and every criminal in the face. Marvel vs. Capcom 3 takes this to new levels: The manliest PRESIDENT.
  • Nightmare Fuel:
  • One-Scene Wonder: F. Andore G. Andore, and U. Andore from the first game. They only appear in one area of the game (the wrestling ring in level 3), but are memorable for how large their life bars are for regular baddies.
  • Polished Port:
    • The X68000 version is very close to the arcade version, and includes Poison and Roxy.
    • The Sega CD version is very well-done, with a new game mode and a CD soundtrack. It also includes Poison and Roxy, albeit with slightly more conservative outfits.
    • Final Fight One for the Game Boy Advance corrects virtually all of the problems the SNES version had (see below), with the exception of Poison and Roxy. It also has unlockables, such as alternate outfits for Cody and Guy and a stage select, among others. The only thing that isn't good about the game is its soundtrack.
    • Final Fight: Double Impact is virtually identical to the arcade, has both the original soundtrack and a remixed one, has various graphic filters, and has online play.
  • Porting Disaster:
    • The SNES version, especially compared to the polished ports above. Among the offenses:
      • No Guy. He was eventually made playable in Final Fight Guy, but in that game, Cody was missing.
      • No Poison and Roxy. They were replaced by two male fighters, Billy and Sid. Note 
      • After the first bonus level: A hoodlum exclaiming "Oh, My God!" was replaced with "Oh, my car!"
      • The Industrial stage and Rolento were missing entirely. Strangely, the elevator portion's music can still be heard in the sound test.
      • No scene transitions (i.e. punching down doors and walking through them). This includes the famous "Damnd laughs and walks away carrying Jessica" level 1 opening.
      • A couple items which condoned drinking were changed.
      • Due to the SNES's slower CPU, only three enemies were allowed on-screen at one time.
      • Slowdown, especially notable when barrels rolled into view.
      • Damnd's name was changed to Thrasher, while Sodom's was changed to Katana. The latter's name change was retained in the SNES port of Street Fighter Alpha 2.
      • Not as many voice bytes; for example, Haggar's "ROOOOOHHHH!!!" when performing his swinging arms move is absent, as is his "RUUUIO!" when performing his belly flop attack, and his "HIL HIL!" when performing a piledriver.
      • While the music is a mixed opinion thing, it doesn't try to replicate the CPS-1 sound of the arcade.
    • The version found in Final Fight: Streetwise is pretty poor.
  • Sequelitis: Streetwise. Some fans also consider Final Fight 2 to be this. See below.
  • So Okay, It's Average: Some consider Final Fight 2 to be a Mission-Pack Sequel, instead of a new game. Plus, there was not much change in the gameplay compared to its competition Streets of Rage 2, which had numerous improvements and changes than its predecessor.
  • Surprisingly Improved Sequel: Final Fight 3 (Tough) compared to 2.
  • That One Boss:
    • Abigail from the first game thanks to his special moves. His dash punch (telegraphed when Abigail turns red and screams) has a tendency to be at a higher priority than many of your moves. The more dangerous move Abigail has is his tendency to grab you even if you're attacking with a weapon. If he catches you, you will be thrown for heavy damage. Both special moves are also knockdown moves so if you're holding a weapon, you will lose it should you get hit.
    • Phillipe from the second game thanks to his instant sliding attack having a tendency to break your combos and keeping you at bay. Also not helping is Phillipe's saber having a longer reach than you and his tendency to grab you to smack you with the saber's hilt making it hard to get close to attack.
    • Stray from the third game due to being able to block and counterattack your moves. Like Abigail from the first game, Stray's dash punch can cause good damage to you and can be a multi-hit move. Stray can also do a leaping punch out of nowhere to surprise you.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy: Lucia's moves are difficult to connect and is overall weaker than her fellow Fragile Speedster Guy. However, she's quite the stylish fighter and she's definitely fun to use with enough practice.
  • The Woobie: Vanessa, after her brother is killed and her bar goes up in flames.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion: Much of the confusion concerning Poison's gender is due to the following reasons:
    • Poison and Roxy's exclusion in the overseas SNES versions of Final Fight. Final Fight Revenge, an American-designed 3D fighting game, adds further confusion as Poison was depicted as born female. The Japanese localization reverted back to her birth sex. Roxy's gender is classified "female" in the character bios of Capcom Classics Collection Vol. 1, but this is nothing but a retcon by Capcom USA.
    • Adding more fuel to the fire, not even Capcom of Japan seems to remain consistent on what they are. The fact both are depicted as having very large breasts, general female shapes and Poison being voiced by a woman in modern games aren't really helping matters, either.
    • Also counting for this for those who agree she's transgender is the ambiguity over whether or not Poison is pre-operation or post-operation in terms of sex reassignment surgery.
  • What Do You Mean, It's for Kids?: Final Fight One, which is a GBA port of the original title, has an "E" rating. While there's no blood/gore in the game, there's still a lot of physical violence, references to death, the bosses Damnd and Sodom retained their original names even though they had been censored in the past, and quite a few innuendos in the dialogue. Yet this game somehow only got the same rating as your typical Mario game.

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