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Theatre: Chicago
"Ladies and gentlemen, you are about to see a story of murder, greed, corruption, violence, exploitation, adultery, and treachery - all the things we hold near and dear to our hearts."

Chicago, a musical originally choreographed and directed by the legendary Bob Fosse in 1975, is the story of Roxie Hart, a wannabe cabaret star in 1920s Chicago. She sleeps around unknown to her husband, Amos, but has a falling-out with one of her lovers, shoots him and is arrested for murder. In prison, she develops a rivalry with the star Velma Kelly, who killed her own husband and sister.

Roxie, through bribing the prison warden, Mama Morton, gets the best lawyer in town, Billy Flynn. Billy is a smooth-talking trickster who has never lost a case. As tensions mount and the media make Roxie a star, fame begins to get to Roxie's head. But the press will love her even more if she is found guilty...

A biting satire of celebrity trials, the press and show business in general, Chicago had an extremely successful Broadway revival in 1996. From there, it was made into a movie in 2002. Also notable for the Broadway productions, which regularly star big names — the original boasted Chita Rivera as Velma and Jerry Orbach as Billy Flynn; the revival starred Bebe Neuwirth as Velma and Joel Grey as Amos, and since then has had tons of Stunt Casting.

Based on the 1924 nonmusical play Chicago by Maurine Dallas Watkins, which was in turn based on actual murder cases. It was adapted twice for the screen, first as a silent film in 1927, then in 1941 as Roxie Hart starring Ginger Rogers. Modern productions tend to go under the title Play Ball, the play's original subtitle, to avoid confusion with the musical.

This musical play contains examples of:

  • Alliterative Family: Velma Kelly and her sister Veronica, though it's suggested those are just stage names.
  • Alliterative Name: "And now, ladies and gentlemen, the Keeper of the Keys, the Countess of the Clink, the Mistress of Murderess' Row, Matron Mama Morton!"
  • All Take and No Give: Amos and Roxie's marriage, with Amos as the Giver and Roxie as the Taker.
  • Ambiguously Gay:
    • Matron Mama Morton.
    • Billy Flynn, in some productions.
  • Amoral Attorney: Billy Flynn, who manages to acquit two murderers that we know of and likely dozens that we don't.
  • Asshole Victim: Invoked; in "The Cell Block Tango" the first proper lyric is "He had it comin'!" although at least some of them are extreme cases of Disproportionate Retribution.
  • Attention Whore: Roxie
    Roxie: And the audience loves me. And I love them for loving me and they love me for loving them. And we love each other. 'Cause none of us got enough love in our childhoods...
  • The Bad Guy Wins: Billy Flynn gets both Roxie and Velma acquitted in the end.
  • Berserk Button: Apparent with some of the other women in "The Cell Block Tango", especially with the woman who killed her husband for popping bubblegum too loudly.
  • Bilingual Bonus: The Hungarian is left untranslated. For those wondering, her monologue in the Cell Block Tango translates to, "What am I doing here? They say my famous lover held down my husband and I chopped his head off. But it's not true. I am innocent. I don't know why Uncle Sam says I did it. I tried to explain at the police station but they didn't understand."
  • Black Comedy: Throughout. For example, presenting Katalin Hunyak with the famous Hungarian Rope Trick!, or the stories of the murderesses in "Cell Block Tango".
  • Blasphemous Boast:
    Billy Flynn: I don't like to blow my own horn; but, believe me, if Jesus Christ had lived in Chicago today and he had five thousand dollars and he'd come to me things would have turned out differently.
  • Blatant Lies: Most of Billy Flynn's role.
  • Boom, Headshot: One of the other women in the prison is in for shooting her husband in the head with a shotgun.
  • Butt Monkey: Poor Amos... he even has a song, "Mr. Cellophane", about it.
  • Cheating with the Milkman: Mentioned in one of the spoken passages of "The Cell Block Tango":
    ...in storms my husband Wilbur, in a jealous rage. "You been screwin' the milkman!" he says.
  • Chewbacca Defense: "Razzle Dazzle" is this trope in song form.
  • Comedic Sociopathy: The play's humor.
  • Courtroom Antic: Basically all of Billy Flynn's role. Lampshaded with "Razzle Dazzle".
  • Crapsack World
  • Death by Woman Scorned: A recurring theme in "The Cell Block Tango" — Velma killed her husband and his lover (her own sister), Annie poisoned her boyfriend after finding out he was already married to six other women (One of those Mormons, you know), and Mona killed her boyfriend after finding out he had three other girlfriends and a boyfriend.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: "So I took the shotgun off the wall and I fired two warning shots... into his head." For popping bubblegum.
  • Downer Ending: In the original musical, no-one in the audience gets what they want. Anyone supporting Roxie or Velma will be disappointed that they stay small-time. Anyone wanting them sent down, will be sad they got off. Amos is still left with nothing, and the only person who was innocent is the one who dies. The two most unsympathetic characters, Mama and Billy, get away scot free.
  • Evil Versus Evil: The rivalry between Roxie and Velma.
  • Fake Pregnancy: Roxie fakes a pregnancy in order to gain public attention and sympathy leading up to her murder trial.
  • Fanservice: Loads of it.
  • Fiery Redhead: Roxie.
  • Genre Blind: Hunyak insists that the law will be on her side because "Uncle Sam is fair and just". Note that she says this right before she gets executed.
  • Girls Behind Bars: Murderess Row
  • Humble Pie: Roxie is acquitted, but literally moments later, a new heinous crime is committed and all the reporters rush out of the courtroom, leaving her all alone and without the fame and adoration she had been seeking.
  • Hypocritical Humor: "Class," in which Mama and Velma lament the lack of manners, dignity, and overall class... while simultaneously swearing like sailors. ("Holy shit!" "Holy shit!" "Jesus Christ!" "Every girl is a twat!")
  • "I Am" Song:
    • "When You're Good To Mama" for Mama.
    • "All I Care About Is Love" for Billy.
    • "Mr. Cellophane" for Amos.
  • Implausible Deniability:
    • June's solo in "The Cell Block Tango":
      June: Now, I'm standing in the kitchen carvin' up the chicken for dinner, minding my own business, and in storms my husband Wilbur, in a jealous rage. "You been screwin' the milkman!" he says. He was crazy. And he kept on screamin', "you been screwin' the milkman!" [drumbeat] And then he ran into my knife! He ran into my knife ten times!
    • Velma's solo in the song is the same:
      Velma: My sister, Veronica and I had this double act. And my husband, Charlie, travelled around with us. Now, for the last number in our act, we did these 20 acrobatic tricks in a row. One, two, three, four, five... splits, spread eagles, back flips, flip flops, one right after the other. So this one night before the show we're down at the Hotel Cicero, the three of us, boozin', havin' a few laughs and we ran out of ice, so I go out to get some. I come back, open the door, and there's Veronica and Charlie doing Number Seventeen, the Spread Eagle. [drum beat] Well, I was in such a state of shock, I completely blacked out. I can't remember a thing. It wasn't until later, when I was washing the blood off my hands, that I even knew they were dead.
    • The denial is made by a cheating boyfriend while he's still in bed with two other women: "Who you gonna believe, your own eyes or me?"
  • Institutional Apparel
  • It's All About Me: Roxie. Velma, too, to a less obtrusive extent.
  • "I Want" Song: "Roxie"
  • Karma Houdini: Velma, Roxie, and Billy Flynn. Meanwhile, inverted in that Hunyak gets punished, and Amos gets dumped and gets nothing.
  • Keep It Foreign: In the Hungarian production, the Hunyak was replaced by Cheng Li, a Chinese inmate who spoke untranslated Chinese during "The Cell Block Tango".
  • Knitting Pregnancy Announcement: Roxie allows herself to be seen knitting baby clothes as part of her fake pregnancy sympathy ploy.
  • Language Barrier: Hunyak, a young Hungarian woman, doesn't speak English. It gets her executed for a murder which she did not commit.
  • Lovable Rogue: Roxie's a lying, scheming, glory-seeking, Jerkass murderess but still manages to be endearing at several points. Ditto for Velma and Billy.
  • Madness Mantra: The refrain of the Cell Block Tango "Pop, six, squish, uh-uh, Cicero, Lipschitz..."
  • Malicious Misnaming:
    • Billy Flynn always gets Amos's name wrong, calling him Andy — until the trial, when Flynn suddenly gets his name right, putting him off his guard and helping Flynn get the testimony he needs. The implication that this is a deliberate tactic is strengthened by an earlier scene where Flynn is talking to Roxie without her husband present, and gets his name right then.
    • Flynn does the same thing to Roxie once, calling her Trixie, in the scene where he's shelved her case to focus on a fresher scandal.
  • Mama's Baby, Papa's Maybe: Played with. Roxie pretends to be pregnant to gain the press and jury's sympathy. Her husband Amos is excited until it turns out that he couldn't possibly be the father of the child and gets very upset about Roxie being pregnant with another man's baby.
  • Meaningful Name: The only two innocent characters in the musical have names that imply that they are fools:
    • Hunyak, the only wrongly convicted prisoner, and the only one to be executed. "Honyock" is an ethnic slur that was popular in America from the 1880s through the 1950s. It is derived from a Hungarian word meaning (among other things) "simple minded" and "loser." Mostly directed at Central-Eastern Europeans. Her real name, Katalin, means "pure".
    • Amos, who keeps having to remind Billy his name isn't "Andy". This is a reference to Amos 'n' Andy, a race comedy radio series originating from Chicago radio station WMAQ beginning in 1928. Most of the series' male characters were performed by two white comedians who had worked in minstrel shows on vaudeville. In the series, Amos was a schemer and Andy was innocent and a bit simpleminded. (This is a happy accident as the name Amos is a carryover from the original play and movie which both predated Amos 'n' Andy.)
  • Noodle Incident: "I Can't Do It Alone" is an in-universe Aversion. Velma is trying to convince Roxie that the Kelly Sisters' Double Act is too fantastic a chance to pass up on, so she demonstrates it for Roxie — but it just looks silly with one person. It gets especially funny if you listen to the Revival cast soundtrack, as you only gets hints such as "See? I kick really high!" and an enthusiastic "SIDEWAYS!"
  • Pet the Dog:
    • Subverted with Billy Flynn. Though he intended to be Roxie's defense attorney for $5,000 and nothing less, he agrees to help with only $2,000 that Amos managed to scrape together. Supposedly, it is because he admires Amos' loyalty and love to Roxie. However, he's being facetious. Flynn couldn't care less about Amos' loyalty; he smells money in the case and doesn't want to let the possibility go. It doesn't take him long to get the rest of the money by trading on the public's fascination with Roxie.
    • Played straight with Mama Morton when she works on behalf of her prisoner the Hunyak, translating for her lawyer and insisting on her innocence. It's not enough to save her, but its the only time we see Mama doing something without benefits.
  • Refuge in Audacity: "Razzle Dazzle" is practically a hymn to getting away with murder through liberal use of outrageous stunts.
  • Sliding Scale of Idealism Versus Cynicism: The Musical wasn't a great success when it first came out because it was considered too cynical. The revival is currently running (it's been about 15 years), and it is one of the longest-running shows in Broadway history.
  • Sophisticated as Hell: "Class", in which Velma Kelly and Mama Morton lament the decline of modern morals, is this trope from start to finish.
    Whatever happened to, "Please, may I?"
    And "Yes, thank you?"
    And "How charming?"
    Now, every son of a bitch
    Is a snake in the grass
    Whatever happened to class?
  • Stripperiffic: Both genders and everyone (except for Amos, Mama Morton and Billy Flynn) is like this. And even Billy has gets his share - one of his numbers is a striptease.
  • Take That:
    • Mary Sunshine is an unflattering take on Maurine Dallas Watkins, who wrote the original non-musical Chicago based on crimes she had reported on. Oddly enough, the Mary Sunshine character and her flighty personality is lifted from the original Chicago (though the drag queen element is added for the musical), so it seems the character was originally Self-Deprecation.
    • In the end, the whole "we couldn't have done it without you" bit is this.
  • Token Good Teammate: To the extent that a group of people who do a co-ordinated song-and-dance number like "Cell Block Tango" protesting their innocence can be considered a team, Hunyak is the token genuine innocent.
  • Too Good for This Sinful Earth: Hunyak, who is the only woman in "The Cell Block Tango" who did not commit the murder she was accused of, is the only person we see found guilty and executed.
  • Trickster: Roxie and Billy Flynn.
  • Truck Driver's Gear Change:
    • "Cell Block Tango" starts in F minor, goes up a semitone before the second repetition of the chorus, then reverts temporarily to its original key on the fifth repetition that follows Velma's solo, then goes up a half-step in the sixth repetition, then a half step for the finale.
    • "When You're Good to Mama," at least in the film version, starts in F# major, then goes up a semitone about halfway through the song. In the theatre, it starts in G and stys there the entire song.
  • Ugly Guy, Hot Wife: Amos and Roxie. And he knows it too.
  • The Unfair Sex: Played both ways, but with tongue firmly in cheek.
  • Unsettling Gender-Reveal: Mary Sunshine is really a man. "Things are not always what they appear to be."
  • The Vamp: Most of the female characters.
  • Villain Protagonist: Roxie is well-known to the audience to be guilty of murder and is generally a poor example of a human being.
  • Villain Song:
    • Velma and the murdresses get the first one in "Cell Block Tango", explaining why they killed their victims.
    • Roxie has hers in the self-titled "Roxie", where she explains how her desire for attention and fame is what drives her.
    • Billy explains his Amoral Attorney attitude with such blatant dishonesty that it wraps around to honesty again in "All I Care About is Love".
    • Mama Morton describes her corrupt ways and possible lesbian affairs with her prisoners during "When You're Good To Mama".
  • Wide-Eyed Idealist: If what Mama Morton says about her is true, Hunyak is this. It doesn't end well for her.
  • Your Cheating Heart: Roxie's murder victim was the man with whom she was cheating on her husband. Also the grounds for Velma, Annie, and Mona's homicides.

The original nonmusical play provides examples of:

Other adaptations of the play provide examples of:

  • Adaptation Distillation: In Roxie Hart, Amos did in fact shoot Fred Casely, but Roxie took the blame instead hoping to become famous. Also, Billy Flynn was the prosecutor, while Roxie ended up falling in love with the public defender. Regardless, it was still a satire of how the media influences the law.

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