Anime / Your Name

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I wanted to tell you that… Wherever you may end up in this world, I will be searching for you.

Your Name (Kimi no Na wa) is the sixth film that Makoto Shinkai has directed. Based on the novel he published a month prior to the film's theatrical premiere, Your Name is animated by CoMix Wave Films and distributed by Toho. The film premiered at Anime Expo on July 3, 2016, opened in Japan on August 26, 2016. Your Name received widespread acclaim for its high animation quality and strong narrative – the movie is the highest-grossing anime film of all time worldwide, and is the second-highest grossing anime of all time in Japan, behind only Spirited Away. Your Name follows the lives of two high school students, Mitsuha Miyamizu and Taki Tachibana, whose lives become intertwined when they begin switching bodies at random.

Rural-bred Mitsuha has long been dissatisfied with her life in the countryside and resents her role as a Miko, as well as her father. Her wish of being reborn as a handsome Tokyo boy is seemingly granted when she wakes up in Tokyo and is treated to a day in the life of a busy Tokyo high school student, adjusting to the hustle and bustle of the city that stands in stark contrast to the sleepy town of Itomori. While she dismisses her experiences as a dream, the phenomenon, seemingly related to the appearance of Comet Tiamat, begins to occur with increasing frequency, bringing Taki and Mitsuha's together in a way they previously thought unimaginable. The film is licensed by Anime Limited in the UK, and the English dub is produced by NYAV Post. Funimation and Madman Entertainment have respectively acquired the rights for the North American and Australian distributions.


Your Name provides examples of:

  • Aborted Arc: Despite being presented as a source of conflict in the film, the relationship between Mitsuha and her father remains rocky right up until Mitsuha attempts to persuade him one final time to evacuate the town. However, in the novel Another Side: Earthbound suggests that things between the two have become more cordial.
  • Adult Fear:
    • Mitsuha's father is consumed by grief after his wife died, leading him to move into politics and dull the memories by immersing himself with improving the town.
    • Following graduation, Taki encounters difficulties in finding full-time employment, mirroring challenges graduating students in 2016 and 2017 face when they finish with their education.
  • Adults Are Useless: Mitsuha only has Tessie and Sayaka's assistance in attempting to evacuate Itomori ahead of impact event, as all of the adults have dismissed their claims and pay them no heed. However, this becomes subverted when Mitsuha attempts to convince her father to order an evacuation and succeeds.
  • All for Nothing: The side novel Another Side: Earthbound reveals that, after his wife Futaba's death, Toshiki had set out to become mayor of Itomori in order to modernise the town, spending two years preparing and then getting elected into a 4-year term. As he's preparing for re-election at the start of the film proper, comet Tiamat destroys the town into it one month later and with it, his goals of revitalising Itomori.
  • Alliterative Name: The main protagonists' names, Mitsuha Miyamizu and Taki Tachibana, have the same characters in their given and family names.
  • All Just a Dream: Taki and Mitsuha initially dismiss the body swapping as a dream until the occurrences become more persistent. Later in the film, Taki is left to wonder if his experiences were a figment of his imagination, when he learns that Mitsuha perished in the impact event annihilating Itomori.
  • All Men Are Perverts: Taki never fails to grope Mitsuha while inhabiting her body, which becomes a Running Gag.
  • All There in the Manual: Supplementary materials, such as the movie novelisation and side novel, Another Side: Earthbound, provide additional details into Tessie, Yotsuha and Mitsuha's father's perspectives, including how Mitsuha's father first met Mitsuha's mother.
  • Amazingly Embarrassing Parents: Mitsuha's father interrupts his political rally to lecture Mitsuha for her posture while she's passing by on her way to school, embarrassing her in front of the town's citizens.
  • Arc Symbol: The Red String of Fate figures very prominently in the movie to signify the connection between Taki and Mitsuha.
  • Arc Words: "Your name is..." appears frequently throughout the movie.
  • The Art of Bra Removal: The opposite holds true in Your Name; Taki lacks the familiarity to put on a bra while he's inhabiting Mitsuha's body.
  • Bait-and-Switch: At the film's closing, Taki and Mitsuha walk past each other, seemingly passing by without a second glance and leading to an ending consistent with Shinkai's earlier works, but ultimately, Taki stops and calls out to Mitsuha, noting she seems familiar, allowing the two to introduce themselves to one another.
  • Be Careful What You Wish For:
    • In Tessie's part of Another Side: Earthbound, he fantasises about destroying Itomori, because with his family company's strong ties to the town, it's the only way he'll ever be allowed to leave the town and away from his father's shown. However, Tessie does not anticipate the impact event that ultimately destroys the town.
    • Mitsuha frequently voices her desire to move to Tokyo, but when given the opportunity through switching bodies with Taki, she finds the city to be tricky to navigate and encounters an unsavoury fellow while working Taki's shift at a restaurant.
  • Big Damn Reunion: Mitsuha and Taki meet by chance at the very end and ask each other if they'd met before, tearing up in happiness at finally seeing the person they'd subconsciously longed to meet.
  • Bilingual Bonus:
    • The name of the Italian restaurant Taki works at translates as The Garden of Words. Curiously, this decision was made by the environment artist, rather than Shinkai himself.
    • The name of the comet "Tiamat" sounds strikingly similar to the Italian phrase "ti amo", which means "I love you." Now consider the genre of the film... If you want to head straight into Latin, "Tiamat" also sounds quite similar to "te amat", which directly translates to "he/she loves you".
  • Bland-Name Product: Although there is Product Placement in the film, KFC appears as KEO, and Prudential Financial becomes Pararudenta Financial.
  • Bookends: The film opens and closes with Taki and Mitsuha spotting one another in opposing train cars, although the ending presents the subsequent events, as well.
  • The Cameo: Yukari Yukino from The Garden of Words makes an appearance as Mitsuha's literature teacher.
  • Cassandra Truth: Mitsuha's grandmother tells her that no one will believe her about the impact event, correctly surmising Mitsuha's father's response to the threat; he finds that Mitsuha must either be lying or else, ill.
  • Catapult Nightmare: Taki is jolted awake when awakening as Mitsuha for the first time.
  • Censor Shadow: Bright sunshine covers Mitsuha's chest part when she watches herself naked in the mirror.
  • Chekhov's Classroom:
    • Yukari mentions the phrase "tasokare-doki/kataware-doki", an ancient term for "twilight" sounding phonetically similar to "who is that?", characterising twilight as "when the world blurs and one might encounter something extraordinary". Mitsuha and Taki subsequently meet one another under twilight for the first time.
    • While inhabiting Mitsuha's body, Taki learns about the concept of "musubi", which he later recalls, leading him to drink the kuchikamisake that Mitsuha had made and send himself back to Itomori with the goal of saving the town.
  • Chekhov's Gun:
    • Taki's bracelet bears resemblance to Mitsuha's hair ribbon and becomes an artefact that helps Taki to recall that he and Mitsuha had met in the past.
    • The kuchikamisake Mitsuha created during the kagura dance allows Taki to switch back into Mitsuha's body.
  • Chekhov's Hobby:
    • Tessie works part-time as a construction worker, and his father tells him to learn how to handle explosives. His skill with explosives are called upon when Mitsuha asks him to destroy a local transformer to prompt an evacuation.
    • A member of the broadcasting club, Sayaka hijacks the town's broadcasting system to announce the need for evacuation.
    • Mitsuha's experience in weaving allows her to mend Miki's skirt when it is slashed by ruffians.
    • Taki is a capable artist, and is first seen drawing Itomori while inhabiting Mitsuha's body. His renditions are accurate enough to remind a local of the town's name, bringing Taki a step closer on his journey to learn more about Mitsuha.
  • Contrived Coincidence:
    • The owner of the ramen shop Taki and his friends stop at is a former Itomori resident who later helps Taki reach the remains of Itomori.
    • As Mitsuha waits to board a train to go back to Itomori after a day of fruitless searching for Taki in Tokyo, a train Taki was taking just happens to show up at the station she was at. This gives her the chance to pass him her ribbon, which becomes important chronologically later.
  • Crotch-Grab Sex Check: Mitsuha pensively inspects Taki's lower regions when waking up in his body for the first time.
  • Cry Cute: After returning to Mitsuha's body, Taki loses his composure out of joy at learning she's still alive, attempting to give Yotsuha a tearful "big-sisterly" hug. Unfortunately, Yotsuha is unnerved, slamming the door shut and feeling that Mitsuha's lost her marbles.
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory!: Another Side: Earthbound mentions that Mitsuha's smaller stature made it more difficult for Taki to adjust to movement while inhabiting her body.
  • Darkest Hour: Mitsuha, Sayaka and Tessie's plans to save Itomori's citizens appears doomed to fail when Sayaka is caught mid-broadcast and is forced to shut down. Meanwhile, Mitsuha trips and falls en route to trying to convince her father to order an evacuation.
  • Dark Reprise: The upbeat vocal opening theme, "Dream Lantern", is remixed into the slow, melancholic instrumental "Kataware Doki" that is played when Taki and Mitsuha meet in person at the caldera's edge by twilight.
  • Dead All Along: Taki is shocked to learn that Mitsuha and Itomori's residence perished prior to his interventions altering the course of history.
  • The Dead Have Names: Taki, Tsukasa and Miki find a book in the local library that contain the list of deceased from the impact event, including Tessie, Sayaka and Mitsuha's names.
  • Death from Above: A fragment of breaks off Comet Tiamat's main body and decimates Itomori, producing five hundred casualties and leaving a crater beside the original lake.
  • Delayed Ripple Effect: When Taki learns of Itomori's destruction and Mitsuha's death, his memories of her begin fading, and diary entries in his phone spontaneously erase themselves before his very eyes.
  • Distracted from Death: Mitsuha's father, Toshiki Never Got to Say Goodbye to Futaba because he was out trying to find other doctors to try curing her.
  • Dramatic Drop: Emphasising her shock at Taki's outrageous actions, Mitsuha drops the rolled omelette she was about to eat when she hears that Taki had kicked over a table in class the previous day while inhabiting her body.
  • Dramatic Irony:
    • One of the news commentators remarks that the probability of Comet Tiamat's fragment striking a populated area was unlikely.
    • Toshiki's section of Another Side: Earthbound discusses how many shrines pass on all their secrets to only one designated heir, including the disadvantages of this system should that heir die before passing those secrets on in turn. Anyone who's watched the film before reading the book will wince, knowing exactly what's going to happen to Futaba in future.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: The owner of the ramen shop owner that Taki and his friends stopped at can be briefly seen listening to Toshiki's rally.
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: After eight years of searching and feeling a persistent sense of longing during this period, Taki and Mitsuha finally meet one another. Their earlier efforts, while unable to stop the town from being destroyed, allow Itomori's residents to be saved, whereas in the original timeline, the citizens had died in the impact event.
  • Eureka Moment: In Another Side: Earthbound, Toshiki comes to understand the Miyamizu's beliefs upon seeing the fragment of Comet Tiamat.
  • Everyone Can See It: Taki and Mitsuha's friends and family observe a noticeable change in their respective personalities during their body swaps, and later, Miki feels that Taki has fallen in love with Mitsuha, despite not knowing her.
  • Everyone Lives: It turns out that through Taki, Mitsuha, and her friends' combined effort, they were able to prevent major casualties from the impact event that destroys Itomori.
  • Family Theme Naming: Mitsuha's name means three leaves, her sister Yotsuha's name means four leaves. Their grandmother's and mother's names, Hitoha and Futaba, mean one and two leaves respectively.
  • Fate Drives Us Together: Taki and Mitsuha are brought together by the body switching phenomenon.
  • Finish Dialogue in Unison: Taki and Mitsuha voice their frustrations at the others' actions when they realise that they are "switching places".
  • Five-Second Foreshadowing: After Taki asks the ramen shop owner to help him reach Itomori, he and his wife exchange looks that indicates foreboding, Tsukasa and Miki's remarks similarly hint at the sights awaiting Taki.
  • Foregone Conclusion: Mitsuha's first appearance in the movie is as an adult, leading to the question of how she gets to this point.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • Mitsuha's grandmother mentions that a great fire destroyed Itomori's records, taking with it the meaning behind their rituals. This hints at the idea that even if people can be saved, their traditions will be lost to time.
    • In the novelisation, Mitsuha comments that Taki's crush on Miki is one-sided because she's older than he his, but as it turns out, so is Mitsuha.
    • When both Taki and Mitsuha flip back to their previous day's journal entry, both are dated September 12. However, Taki's falls on a Monday, whereas Mitsuha's falls on a Thursday, suggesting that their timeslines differ.
    • During Taki's date with Miki, they visit a photo exhibition on nostalgia where some of the photos showcase Itomori and life in a bygone era, as well as remembering a town already destroyed.
    • Right after Taki's failed date with Miki, he finds a message from Mitsuha in his phone that mentions Comet Tiamat, which had passed three years earlier. When he tries to contact her directly, he cannot connect as her number no longer exists.
    • Mitsuha cuts her hair short and doesn't wear her red hair tie, because she had already given it to Taki when she went to Tokyo to see him, but since Taki doesn't start swapping bodies with her until three years later from his perspective, he didn't know who she is.
    • Taki and his friends first see Itomori from the derelict high school, which was spared from destruction. Later, Taki gets the town to evacuate here knowing the site will be safe.
  • "Freaky Friday" Flip: Taki and Mitsuha inexplicably switching bodies when they wake up is what drives the narrative
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus:
    • When Taki and Mitsuha are looking through their phones at one point, one of the dates shown is September 12, although the day of week is different.
    • When Mitsuha meets Taki in Tokyo before Taki even knew Mitsuha, Taki is seen with notes to study English. The two phrases shown on his notes are: "Have you seen Tiamat's comet?" and "I'm looking for my counterpart", both of which are significant within the film's context.
    • The unused clubroom that Mitsuha, Tessie and Sayaka met in, is filled with old game consoles like Nintendo GameCube, and the one shot of the room door shows that the room was formerly used by many other clubs. The presence of games like Metal Gear Solid suggest that the students had transformed the club room into a game room after the other clubs were shut down.
  • Gainaxing: Because Taki does not figure out how to properly wear a bra as Mitsuha, he inadvertently causes her breasts to oscillate during a basketball match, to much enjoyment from the male students.
  • Gender Vocabulary Slip: When Mitsuha is inhabiting Taki's body for the first time, she accidentally uses the first-person pronoun "atashi" towards Taki's classmate, then tries to correct herself by switching to "watakushi", "boku", and finally "ore", much to his friends' confusion.
  • Gilligan Cut: On the day of the visit to the mountain crater shrine, Taki says that, for Mitsuha's sake, he shouldn't play with her breasts. When the scene cuts to Yotsuha opening Mitsuha's bedroom's door, he is seen doing exactly thus.
  • Girl of My Dreams: Taki and Mitsuha occupy one another's bodies and do not meet, but their experiences eventually lead them to develop a strong sense of longing to meet with one another in person.
  • Hairstyle Inertia: Taki and most of the characters sport hairstyles that remain consistent throughout the film, but Mitsuha's hairstyle undergoes several changes: she wears folded twin braids in the beginning, shortens her hair following an Important Haircut halfway through the film and finally, wears her hear down with a French braid as an adult following the Time Skip. Sayaka spends most of the film with twin braids but has short hair as an adult.
  • Have We Met?: Upon meeting one another for the first time at the film's conclusion, Taki asks this question to Mitsuha, confirming that the other person has indeed been the person they've been longing to meet after eight years.
  • Heroic B.S.O.D.: Both Taki and Mitsuha are devastated when they learn of Itomori's fate.
  • Hero Stole My Bike: In the climax, Taki (in Mitsuha's body) borrows Tessie's bike so he can get to the Miyamizu goshintai; his body (and Mitsuha's consciousness) are there in 2016, which allows the two to meet face-to-face for the first time. On the way there Taki slips on a hill, barely saving himself but breaking the bike; later Mitsuha (back in her own body) tells Tessie "He said 'sorry about your bike'", much to the latter's confusion.
  • History Repeats: Tessie remarks that Itomori Lake is a meteor crater that formed 1200 years previously in response to Sayaka after she says that an impact event is purely hypothetical. This holds true when a fragment of Tiamat breaks off and forms a second crater close to the original.
  • Homage: There are not one but two moments where the now-adult protagonists pass each other seemingly without recognizing, heartwrenchingly similar to what happens at the end of 5 Centimeters per Second, which makes Taki calling out to Mitsuha and her responding positively so much more touching and awesome for not letting it play out the same way.
  • Hope Spot: When Mitsuha sees what Taki's written on her hand after she'd tripped, she sees "I love you" in lieu of his name. While encouraging her to continue to city hall, she also feels that this rather defeats the purpose of helping her to remember who he is.
  • How We Got Here:
    • The film starts when Taki and Mitsuha are adults, reflecting on the dream they cannot quite remember. After briefly glimpsing one another while on separate trains, the narrative returns to when they were high school students.
    • Toshiki's section in Another Side: Earthbound when Taki, inhabiting Mitsuha's body, is attempting to convince him to order Itomori's evacuation before flashing back to Toshiki's first meeting with Futaba and Hitoha twenty years prior to the events of the film.
  • Human Notepad: Taki and Mitsuha scribble notes on the other's body to communicate and express their frustration at one another when the body-switching starts. Taki later suggests that they write their names on one another's hands so that they do not forget one another after meeting in person for the first time.
  • Imagine Spot: Mitsuha imagines herself in two different situations near the film's beginning, and both lead her to recoil in disgust:
  • I'm Crying, but I Don't Know Why: Mitsuha begins tearing up seemingly for no reason when thinking about the date she set up for Taki. When she and Taki are older, they are also prone to waking up in tears, although beyond a persistent sense of yearning, neither can pin down why they feel this way.
  • Important Haircut: Mitsuha cuts her hair the night before Comet Tiamat's apogee. Tessie suggests that Mitsuha might've had her heart broken, and this turns out to be true that she did it because of her feelings for a guy. While seemingly far-fetched, it turns out that Mitsuha went to Tokyo to bid Taki the best on his date with Miki, but because of the disparity in their timelines, the Taki she finds does not recognise her.
  • Indirect Kiss: Taki drinks Mitsuha's kuchikamisake, which was made by mixing rice and saliva in her own mouth.
  • In the Blood: Mitsuha's grandmother mentions both her and Mitsuha's mother experienced dreams of living other lives, implying their body-swapping ability is due to their ancestry.
  • It's a Small World After All: The "Where Are They Now?" Epilogue shows that Takagi and one of Mitsuha's former classmates ended up working at the same Lawson convenience store.
  • I Want My Beloved to Be Happy: Mitsuha attempts to advance Taki's relationship with Miki, unaware that he has fallen in love with her by this point.
  • I Will Find You: Taki resolves to meet Mitsuha again after their first meeting; he keeps his promise, as the two meet in the film's final moments.
  • Karma Houdini: The ruffian at the Italian restaurant is never mentioned again and presumably never gets any comeuppance for his wrongdoing.
  • Laser-Guided Amnesia: Both Taki and Mitsuha lose only their memories about one another after altering the past.
  • Lonely Piano Piece: "Date", which plays during Taki's date with Miki, becomes this after it becomes apparent that the date's a failure. There is also the similar-sounding "Mitsuha's Theme" playing during the flashback to Mitsuha's trip to Tokyo where she initially fails to find Taki and, when she actually does so, it's a younger him who doesn't recognize her.
  • Love Before First Sight: Even though they have not met the other in person, Taki and Mitsuha eventually fall in love with each other.
  • Love Confession: Taki writes one on Mitsuha's hand instead of his name.
  • Love Epiphany: Mitsuha realises she has feelings for Taki after recalling Taki's upcoming date with Miki, and Taki realises thus when when Mitsuha suddenly disappears from his life.
  • Love Transcends Spacetime: Despite being separated by time and space throughout the film's run, Taki and Mitsuha persistently feel a connection with one another that allow them to meet again under twilight, and even after their memories for one another dissipate, lingering feelings led them to recognise one another immediately upon meeting again.
  • Magic Realism: The body-swapping phenomenon merely serves to enable the narrative; explanations of the underlying mechanisms are never given, and outside of the phenomenon, other aspects within the film are grounded in reality.
  • Make a Wish: Mitsuha complains frequently about having to live in a backwater town, and at one point declares that she wishes to be reborn as "a handsome Tokyo boy" in her next life.
  • Man, I Feel Like a Woman: The first thing Taki does in Mitsuha's body is look down and grope Mitsuha's breasts out of confusion.
  • Maybe Ever After: The film leaves the outcome of Taki and Mitsuha's reunion open, while the the novel suggests the two end up together.
  • Meaningful Name: The name Itomori (糸守) translates to "thread-guard", in keeping with the ideas of how threads can bind together even the intangible.
  • Mental Time Travel: Taki and Mitsuha exchange bodies during different time periods. Taki discovers this when he learns of Itomori's destruction, while Mitsuha never realises that this is the case.
  • Mind Screw: The last section of Yotsuha's part of Another Side: Earthbound contains a strange sequence where Yotsuha might or might not be experiencing a waking body swap with or dream of one of the Miyamizu ancestors. Little explanation is offered of the surreal events she encounters therein.
  • Misplaced Accent: Takagi makes a comment about how Taki, who is really Mitsuha, is speaking in a dialect.
  • Missing Mom:
    • Mitsuha lost her mother to an illness when she was young.
    • Taki's mother is absent in the film and is never mentioned.
  • Mood Whiplash:
    • The film projects a comedic atmosphere surrounding the misunderstandings that arise when Taki and Mitsuha exchange bodies, but once the phenomenon ceases, things take on a much more dramatic, emotional tone.
    • When Taki and Mitsuha meet in person on the edge of the caldera, emotions begin building up right up until Mitsuha seizes the moment to call Taki a pervert. The rest of the scene remains light-hearted until the twilight ends. Mitsuha subsequently vanishes, unable to finish writing her name on Taki's hand.
  • Mushroom Samba: When Taki consumes the kuchikamisake, he falls into a dream-like vision of Mitsuha's past that is rendered quite differently than the rest of the film.
  • Naked First Impression: When Taki wakes up in Mitsuha's body for the first time, he initially believes himself to be dreaming, blearily arises and undresses in front of the mirror to get dressed. After seeing Mitsuha's body in the mirror, he is jolted awake at this unexpected turn of events.
  • Never Got to Say Goodbye:
    • The suddenness that twilight ends means that Taki and Mitsuha never say goodbye to one another. Instead, they resolve to remember the other's name.
    • Another Side: Earthbound reveals that Toshiki wasn't able to be by Futaba's side when she took her last breath, which probably contributed to his remorse and subsequent actions.
  • Never Live It Down: Mayugoro is an In-Universe instance, being a sandal maker who was allegedly responsible for Great Fire of Mayugoro that destroyed Itomori's records two hundred years ago. Yotsuha comments on how sad it is that, regardless of his other contributions, the fire is his sole legacy. Toshiki makes a similar remark in his section of Another Side: Earthbound.
  • Never Trust a Trailer:
    • The iconic promotional image of Taki and Mitsuha encountering one another on the stairs as high school students never occurs in the film.
    • The Suntory commercials show a scene of Mitsuha and Taki chasing after each other through the streets of Shinjuku while wearing the winter uniforms of their respective schools.
  • Next Sunday A.D.: The film's epilogue is set in 2021, although Tokyo's skyline remains largely unchanged from how it appeared during 2016.
  • No Antagonist: The narrative in Your Name is driven by the characters' desires and goals, rather than any conflicts arising from any one individual or groups's actions.
  • No Name Given: Taki's father and Tessie's parents remain unnamed, even in the credits and official artbook.
  • Noodle Incident: Mayugoro's precise involvement and actions in the fire that annihilated Itomori's historical records are never explicitly mentioned, being lost to time.
  • Numerical Theme Naming: All of the women of Miyamizu lineage have given names with numbers in them. Hitoha means one leaf, Futaba corresponds to two leaves, Mitsuha is three leaves and Yotsuha is four leaves.
  • Offscreen Moment of Awesome: The proceedings behind how Mitsuha manages to convince her father into evacuating the town is never depicted in the film and novelisation.
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: Tessie's full name is Katsuhiko Teshigawara, but only his father refers to him as such.
  • Outgrown Such Silly Superstitions: A modern-day variant is found in Another Side: Earthbound. One of Toshiki's motivations for entering office as Mayor was to eliminate the Miyamizu's Shinto influences on Itomori after Futaba's death shattered his faith in the gods.
  • Painting the Medium: In the novelisation, different fonts and sizes are used to distinguish between Taki and Mitsuha's perspective.
  • Panty Shot: Mitsuha's are visible after she borrows Tessie's bicycle and races away on it.
  • "Pan Up to the Sky" Ending: The final scene pans up to a brilliant blue sky and gentle clouds after Taki and Mitsuha find each other again.
  • Parental Abandonment:
    • After Mitsuha's mother, Futaba, died from an illness, a grief-stricken Toshiki abandons his duties as a priest and leaves after his mother-in-law, Hitoha, tells him to get lost, leaving Mitsuha and Yotsuha with her. From here on out, their relationship is a contentious one.
    • Taki's mother is absent in the movie; Taki and his father never mention her, and the novel itself does not provide insight as to how this came to be.
  • Past-Life Memories: Early on, Tessie jokingly suggests that Mitsuha's odd behaviour might be the result of having lived a previous life. The lyrics of "Zen Zen Zense" also allude to this notion.
  • Phone Call from the Dead: The reason why Mitsuha and Taki are unable to call one another is because Mitsuha has already been dead for three years by the time Taki starts swapping bodies and leaving phone app diary entries with her.
  • Post-Modern Magik: In the novel, Mitsuha considers cursing Sayaka and Tessie by means of LINE when they show up to watch the ritual she's performing in spite of her request for them not to come.
  • Product Placement:
    • Boss Coffee machines are seen in Mitsuha's town, and are considered "cafes" in lieu of an actual eatery. Shinkai also directed a series of commercials where Taki and Mitsuha promote Suntory drinks.
    • The Line web service shows up whenever Taki or Mitsuha receive a text.
    • Billboards in Tokyo show many real world brands, including Sony and Panasonic.
  • Race for Your Love: When Mitsuha and Taki catch a glimpse of one another on board trains headed in opposite directions, they disembark and run of to find each other, despite neither having any recollection of the other.
  • Reality Ensues: Mitsuha, Sayaka and Tessie's aim of evacuating Itomori prior to the projected impact event is stymied by their limited resources and the adults dismissing their predictions as ludicrous.
  • Real Place Background:
    • The stairwell in promotional materials and seen in the film's ending are modeled after the stairs leading up to the Suga shrine in Yotsuya, Shinjuku.
    • The town of Itomori is modeled after Hida in Gifu Prefecture, while Itomori lake is modeled after Lake Suwa.
    • The surroundings of Taki's home are based on a neighbourhood in Tokyo; true to its incarnation in the film, the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building is visible, and a straight line projected from Taki's apartment, though the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building does intersect with Lake Suwa and Hida .
  • Recurring Riff: "Itomori High School" and "Visit to Hida" share common sequences, as do "Date", "Mitsuha's Theme" and "Date 2", "Aki Matsuri/Autumn Festival" and "The Night Inn", while parts of "Yume Tourou/Dream Lantern" come back as a Dark Reprise in "Kataware Doki".
  • Red String of Fate: A physical red string is depicted on several occasions, including the film's opening sequence, to denote the connection that Taki and Mitsuha share.
  • Ret Gone: After Taki learns of Itomori's fate, Taki's memories of Mitsuha begin fading, along with all of the electronic journal entries indicating that they had been swapping bodies.
  • The Reveal: It turns out that Taki and Mitsuha swapped bodies over different time periods, with Mitsuha's timeframe being three years behind Taki's. Further to this, Mitsuha originally had died in the timeline.
  • Rewatch Bonus: Sharp-eyed viewers will start to notice minor details that supplement the setting and the characters on subsequent viewings.
  • Ripple Effect-Proof Memory: While their memories of one another cease to be after Taki changes the past to prevent Mitsuha's death, a trace of longing lingers with them until a chance meeting with one another allows their memories to fully return.
  • Running Gag: Taki takes to groping Mitsuha's breasts every time they switch bodies, and Yotsuha never fails to barge in while he's doing so. Mitsuha does something analogous on some of the swaps, but this is only shown a couple of times.
  • Sarcastic Confession: While Taki is inhabiting Mitsuha's body, Sayaka says that Mitsuha should be more concerned about her appearance in In Another Side: Earthbound. To Sayaka's confusion, Taki remarks that maybe he's not a girl.
  • Scare Chord: A sudden chime is heard before instances of the comet fragment impacting the surface save the impact that occurred after Itomori had been successfully evacuated.
  • Scenery Gorn: The remains of Itomori are rendered in a hauntingly high fidelity, highlighting the extent of the devastation following the impact event.
  • Scenery Porn: In keeping with Makoto Shinkai's style, Your Name features incredibly vivid and detailed settings, making use of the weather and lighting to accentuate the landscapes surrounding Itomori, Tokyo's cityscape and the building interiors.
  • Senpai Kouhai: Taki calls Miki senpai, but owing to a lack of familiarity, Mitsuha accidentally addresses her as –san during the first body-swap.
  • Set Right What Once Went Wrong: After consuming the kuchikamisake, Taki is sent back in time to Mitsuha's body prior to the meteor's impact. He enlists Tessie and Sayaka to help evacuate the town. When Mitsuha returns her own body, she continues with Taki's efforts, managing to convince her father to order the town's evacuation and saving the populace.
  • Shameless Fanservice Girl: Mitsuha calls Taki out for being careless while in her body, although this arises as a result of Taki's understandable lack of familiarity with being a girl.
  • Shoo Out the Clowns: Your Name shifts from a comedic to more dramatic tone following the revelation that Itomori was destroyed three years earlier.
  • Shout-Out:
    • The composition of the shot and narrative context when Taki and Mitsuha meet at twilight at the mountain shrine crater is very similar to one from The Place Promised in Our Early Days.
    • Yukino from The Garden of Words makes an appearance as Mitsuha's literature teacher. The Italian restaurant that Taki works at is called "Il Giardino Delle Parole", Italian for "The garden of words". The café Taki and friends go to is also "Leaves of Words".
    • Train tracks akin to those seen in 5 Centimeters per Second separate Taki and Mitsuha when they spot one another and run to meet up at the film's conclusion.
    • In the novelisation, Mitsuha is so embarrassed by the thought of doing the miko dance that she inwardly thinks that she would rather be killed by Jason Voorhees.
    • In Taki's section of Another Side: Earthbound, he dances Michael Jackson's "Smooth Criminal" while in Mitsuha's body.
  • Sleep Cute: En route to Itomori, both Miki and Tsukasa fall asleep on Taki's shoulders on a bus.
  • Slow Electricity: After Tessie sets off explosives destroying a local transformer, the lights in the town go out one area after the other.
  • Slow-Motion Fall: After drinking the kuchikamisake, Taki slips and falls backwards in slow motion.
  • Small Town Boredom: Mitsuha wishes she could move to Tokyo and get away from Itomori, which lacks any major amenities and has short daylight hours. While she gets her wish, she has to adjust to being male, as well as putting up with Taki's hectic school life and part-time job.
  • Snap to the Side: Taki looks in this manner at Miki and Tsukasa, who are taking pictures of a mascot at the train station.
  • Sorry That I'm Dying: Futaba apologises to her loved ones some time prior to her death, but the details vary; Another Side: Earthbound says it was only to her daughters, whereas in the film, Toshiki is also present.
  • Spoiler Opening: The opening sequence contains parts from later in the film. This is a modification of the original storyboard, which further depicts details such as the second lake following the impact event.
  • Superpowerful Genetics: Females in the Miyamizu line are implied to be able to experience the body switching phenomenon; Grandma Hitoha mentions that she also had such experiences before, and Hitoha's daughter, Futaba, notes that, shortly after meeting Toshiki for the first time, felt that he is the one she would marry.
  • Surprisingly Good English: In the English dub, each of the four songs were performed again in English, with RADWIMPS guitarist and vocalist,Yojiro Noda, delivering a fluent and grammatically correct performance.
  • Tears of Joy: Taki sheds tears resulting from happiness Taki when he wakes up in Mitsuha's body for a final time. Both Taki and Mitsuha are also moved to tears when finally meet one another after eight years.
  • Tempting Fate: Taki and Mitsuha proclaim that their memories will endure even after they separate from the caldera, only for their recollections of one another to fail not long after.
  • This Is Reality: When Miki gives Taki an inordinately upbeat greeting in the novel, Taki inwardly wonders if Miki fancies herself the lead character of a moé anime.
  • Those Two Guys:
    • Mitsuha's unnamed classmates, two female students and one male student, occasionally make snide remarks about her but otherwise have a minor presence in the plot, showing up only for a brief moment in the epilogue.
    • Tsukasa and Takagi are Taki's friends, being supportive of him but otherwise have a limited role in the narrative. They share contrasting personalities; Tsukasa is more level-headed and is concerned with Taki whenever Mitsuha inhabits his body, while Takagi is more quick to jump into a situation.
  • Time-Compression Montage: Almost all of the body swapping occurs in a couple minutes' worth of scenes.
  • Time Skip: After the impact event, the narrative moves forward five years, to when Taki has finished his education and begins hunting for employment. From Mitsuha's perspective, eight years have passed.
  • Time Travel Romance: It turns out that whenever Taki and Mitsuha switch bodies, they travel three years from their respective timelines.
  • Title Drop: The phrase is mentioned several times in the movie; Taki and Mitsuha ask one another to reinforce the other's identity, and they also ask one another again as the film's final lines when they reunite.
  • Too Long; Didn't Dub: In English, the pronoun "I" is gender neutral. The English dub dispenses with the confusion arising when Mitsuha, while inhabiting Taki's body, refers to herself in a feminine manner; new dialogue is used in its place, while the subtitled version provides a brief explanation of the original joke.
  • Truck Driver's Gear Change: "Nandemonaiya" increases in pitch slightly from the closing title switches up during its climax.
  • Two Girls and a Guy: Mitsuha, along with her two friends, Tessie and Sayaka.
  • Vehicle Vanish: The opposite occurs when Taki is waiting for Miki to show up for their date; she appears seemingly out of nowhere behind him where some people were passing.
  • Welcome to the Big City: Mitsuha is awestruck by her first view of Tokyo, but while working Taki's shift at the restaurant later that day, she gets him into trouble with an uncouth customer.
  • Wham Shot: Taki is shocked to learn that Itomori was destroyed by an impact event three years previously, and that Mitsuha was among the casualties.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Mitsuha's grandmother and father are not present after the evacuation of Itomori, with the latter only showing briefly in a news article.
  • What If?: The official MV for Sparkle suggests a different ending to the film, one in which Taki and Mitsuha reunite three years into her future and thus present day for Taki, rather than the eight in the film.
  • What Is This Feeling?: After their memories of one another begin fading, Mitsuha and Taki experience a continuous sense of yearning for something that they cannot quite place their finger on.
  • "Where Are They Now?" Epilogue: Towards the end of the film, moments involving the minor characters, including Itomori's residents and Taki's friends, are depicted.
  • Where the Hell Is Springfield?: Itomori is a fictional town in Gifu Prefecture, drawing elements from Hida as well as from Suwa Lake in the Nagano Prefecture.
  • You Have to Believe Me: Mitsuha's efforts to convince her fellow citizens to evacuate the Itomori falls upon deaf ears.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Anime/YourName